WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric composition change

  1. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems–Atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, Kim; Sutton, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    in the size range 1 nm–10 μm including organic and inorganic chemical species. The main focus of the review is on the exchange between terrestrial ecosystems, both managed and natural and the atmosphere, although some new developments in ocean–atmosphere exchange are included. The material presented is biased...... and techniques in micrometeorology. For some of the compounds there have been paradigm shifts in approach and application of both techniques and assessment. These include flux measurements over marine surfaces and urban areas using micrometeorological methods and the up-scaling of flux measurements using...... aircraft and satellite remote sensing. The application of a flux-based approach in assessment of O3 effects on vegetation at regional scales is an important policy linked development secured through improved quantification of fluxes. The coupling of monitoring, modelling and intensive flux measurement...

  2. Atmospheric Composition Change: Climate-Chemistry Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, I.S.A.; Granier, C.; Myhre, G.; Bernsten, T. K.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Gauss, S.; Klimont, Z.; Benestad, R.; Bousquet, P.; Collins, W.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Chemically active climate compounds are either primary compounds such as methane (CH4), removed by oxidation in the atmosphere, or secondary compounds such as ozone (O3), sulfate and organic aerosols, formed and removed in the atmosphere. Man-induced climate-chemistry interaction is a two-way process: Emissions of pollutants change the atmospheric composition contributing to climate change through the aforementioned climate components, and climate change, through changes in temperature, dynamics, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric stability, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions, affects the atmospheric composition and oxidation processes in the troposphere. Here we present progress in our understanding of processes of importance for climate-chemistry interactions, and their contributions to changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. A key factor is the oxidation potential involving compounds such as O3 and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Reported studies represent both current and future changes. Reported results include new estimates of radiative forcing based on extensive model studies of chemically active climate compounds such as O3, and of particles inducing both direct and indirect effects. Through EU projects such as ACCENT, QUANTIFY, and the AEROCOM project, extensive studies on regional and sector-wise differences in the impact on atmospheric distribution are performed. Studies have shown that land-based emissions have a different effect on climate than ship and aircraft emissions, and different measures are needed to reduce the climate impact. Several areas where climate change can affect the tropospheric oxidation process and the chemical composition are identified. This can take place through enhanced stratospheric-tropospheric exchange of ozone, more frequent periods with stable conditions favouring pollution build up over industrial areas, enhanced temperature-induced biogenic emissions, methane releases from permafrost thawing, and enhanced

  3. Sharing is Winning: Cooperative Learning about Atmospheric Composition Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach, E.

    2010-09-01

    This contribution presents evolving good practice in disseminating the body of know-how, skills and competencies within the networked community of atmospheric scientists as established in ACCENT. The promotion of early-career scientists, and encouraging the next generation to move into the field were among the key issues addressed by the "Training and Education" programme in the European Network of Excellence in Atmospheric Composition Change (ACCENT). Dissemination avenues include a virtual knowledge train carrying the wealth of high-quality scientific learning material developed with experts involved in the ACCENT network. Learning opportunities on current research in atmospheric composition change in Europe were also created during face-to-face training workshops. Real-life examples of pressing air quality issues were addressed in meetings with stakeholder groups that offered opportunities for mutual learning in inspiring partnerships. In order to increase the expertise in atmospheric composition change across Europe, activities were organized with the general public (e.g., Café Scientifique), where the participating early-career scientists were confronted with questions from lay people. For interested teachers, didactic translations of compact overviews on air quality science topics developed in ACCENT offer links with the typical European science curriculum and go beyond school book content. Some of the educational events, methods and tools are described in a booklet published in 2009 ("We Care for Clean Air!", ISBN 978-88-95665-01-6). The electronic version and all training material can be downloaded from www.accent-network.org/portal/education - a valuable resource for teachers and learners around the globe.

  4. Future changes of the atmospheric composition and the impact of climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grewe, V.; Dameris, M.; Hein, R.; Sausen, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Steil, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany). Abt. Chemie der Atmosphaere

    1999-05-01

    The development of the future atmospheric chemical composition, with respect of NO{sub y} and O{sub 3} is investigated by means of the off-line coupled dynamic-chemical general circulation model ECHAM3/CHEM. Two time slice experiments have been performed for the years 1992 and 2015, which include changes in sea surface temperatures, greenhouse gas concentrations, emissions of CFCs, NO{sub x} and other species, i.e., the 2015 simulation accounts for changes in chemically relevant emissions and for a climate change and its impact on air chemistry. The 2015 simulation clearly shows a global increase in ozone except for large areas of the lower stratosphere, where no significant changes or even decreases in the ozone concentration are found. For a better understanding of the importance of (A) emissions like NO{sub x} and CFCs, (B) future changes of air temperature and water vapour concentration, and (C) other dynamic parameters, like precipitation and changes in the circulation, i.e. wind speed, diabatic circulation, stratosphere-troposphere-exchange, the simulation of the future atmosphere has been performed stepwise. This method requires a climate-chemistry model without interactive coupling of chemical species. Model results show that the direct effect of emissions (A) plays a major role for the composition of the future atmosphere, but they also clearly show that climate change has a significant impact and strongly reduces the NO{sub y} and ozone concentration in the lower stratosphere. (orig.)

  5. Changes in atmospheric composition during 2014 APEC conference in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Five sites were selected to investigate the impact of regional-scale air pollutant control strategies during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference (November 1-12, 2014) in and around Beijing. Concentrations of most of the air pollutants in the APEC period were significantly lower than those in the adjacent time period, especially when the enhanced reduction measures were implemented. Compared with the same time period in the previous five years (PM2.5 was compared with the last year), average concentrations of SO2, NO2, PM10, and PM2.5 in the five sites during the APEC period decreased by 62%, 41%, 36% and 47% respectively, whereas average concentration of O3 increased by 102%. A possible cause of the increase of O3 concentrations is the stricter reduction measure on NOx compared to that applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Compared with the non-APEC period in autumn 2014, concentrations of most of the chemical compositions of PM2.5 decreased significantly in the APEC period, especially SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+(Sulfate, nitrate and ammonium, SNA). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the columnar NO2 in the area of 39.5°-40.5°N, 116°-117°E showed a changing pattern similar to the typical gas pattern. The net effectiveness of the emission reduction measures was calculated through a comparison of concentrations of air pollutants under similar meteorological conditions. Through the reduction measures imposed during the APEC period, concentrations of CO, SO2, NO, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5, decreased by 54%, 74%, 64%, 48%, 67%, and 65%, respectively, whereas concentrations of O3 increased by 189%.

  6. Mirador - Atmospheric Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Atmospheric Composition is focused on the composition of Earth's atmosphere in relation to climate prediction, solar effects,...

  7. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  8. Compositional Changes In Atmospheric Dust In Western United States During The Past 150 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H.; Ketterer, M.; Moser, K.; Neff, J.; Reheis, M. C.; Rosenbaum, J. G.

    2009-12-01

    Dust emission in dryland regions is strongly influenced by human activity and landscape disturbance. The magnitude of such influence can be estimated by comparing dated geologic records that span times before and after human settlement. Chemical, magnetic, and textural studies of eolian dust, deposited in lakes or captured in natural subaerial traps, yield information about the influences of human activities on recent and contemporary dust composition compared to dust composition before settlement in mostly dryland western United States. Lake sediments in the Uinta Mountains (Utah), San Juan Mountains (Colorado), and Yellowstone National Park (Crevice Lake, Montana) have large shifts in chemistry within the top 15 cm that include the past ca. 150 years, from Pb-210 dating or varve chronology. Increased dust flux over this period is demonstrated by mass accumulation rates (San Juan Mountains) or implied by sedimentation rates (Uinta Mountains). In one lake, about 90 km east of Salt Lake City, many elements increase greatly above nearly constant background values that represent deposition over a few centuries prior to about AD 1850: Ag, by 4.0x; As, 4.2x; Cd, 5.3x; Co, 1.6x; Cu, 2.2x; Fe, 2.3x; Mo, 2.5x; Pb, 11.0x; Sb, 4.9x; Sn, 2.8x; W, 1.6x; Te, 5.3x; and Zn, 1.7x. Fly ash from coal combustion occurs in the upper 10 cm where S increases by 2.4x. In the other lakes, similar enrichments are evident over the past ca. 125-150 years for Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Te. Stable isotopes of lead reveal widespread effects of anthropogenic sources. Increases in P in the Uinta and San Juan settings (4x and 8x, respectively) may be related to increases in eolian P deposition. Changes in dust composition also appear in fine-grained sediments on isolated bedrock surfaces that represent natural dust collectors, along a 700-km-long transect from the Mojave Desert to the Colorado Plateau. Sediment trapped in the upper 1-2 cm that likely represents dust from the past century, on the

  9. Photochemistry of planetary atmospheres. [Mars atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The atmospheric composition of Mars is presented, and the applicability of laboratory data on CO2 absorption cross sections and quantum yields of dissociation is discussed. A summary and critical evaluation are presented on the various mechanisms proposed for converting the photodissociation products CO and O2 back to CO2.

  10. Our Changing Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearing, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes what is known about two major variables involved in certain types of chemical pollution that seem to be changing the structure of the Earth's atmosphere. Discusses the greenhouse effect and the ozone layer. (TW)

  11. Changes in atmospheric composition during the 2014 APEC conference in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanshan; Li, Yunting; Chen, Tian; Li, Lingjun; Liu, Baoxian; Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Feng; Wei, Qiang; Jiang, Lei; Pan, Libo

    2015-12-01

    Five sites were selected to investigate the impact of regional-scale air pollutant control strategies during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference (1-12 November 2014) in and around Beijing. Concentrations of most of the air pollutants in the APEC period were significantly lower than those in the adjacent time period, especially when the enhanced reduction measures were implemented. Compared with the same time period in the previous 5 years (PM2.5 was compared with the last year), average concentrations of SO2, NO2, PM10, and PM2.5 in the five sites during the APEC period decreased by 62%, 41%, 36%, and 47% respectively, whereas average concentration of O3 increased by 102%. A possible cause of the increase of O3 concentrations is the stricter reduction measure on NOx compared to that applied to volatile organic compounds. Compared with the non-APEC period in autumn 2014, concentrations of most of the chemical compositions of PM2.5 decreased significantly in the APEC period, especially SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium). The aerosol optical depth and the columnar NO2 in the area of 39.5°-40.5°N, 116°-117°E showed a changing pattern similar to the typical gas pattern. The net effectiveness of the emission reduction measures was calculated through a comparison of concentrations of air pollutants under similar meteorological conditions. Through the reduction measures imposed during the APEC period, concentrations of CO, SO2, NO, NO2, PM10, and PM2.5 decreased by 54%, 74%, 64%, 48%, 67%, and 65%, respectively, whereas concentrations of O3 increased by 189%.

  12. A study of the impact of land-use change in Borneo on atmospheric composition using a global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, N. J.; Archibald, A. T.; Ashworth, K.; Dorsey, J.; Edwards, P. M.; Heard, D. E.; Langford, B.; Lee, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Whalley, J. L. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we use a high resolution version of the Cambridge p-TOMCAT model, along with data collected during the 2008 NERC-funded Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) project, to examine the potential impact of the expansion of oil palm in Borneo on air quality and atmospheric composition. Several model emission scenarios are run for the OP3 measurement period, incorporating emissions from both global datasets and local flux measurements. Isoprene fluxes observed at a forest site during OP3 were considerably less than fluxes calculated using the MEGAN model. Incorporating the observed isoprene fluxes into p-TOMCAT substantially improved the comparison between modelled and observed isoprene surface mixing ratios and OH concentrations relative to using the MEGAN emissions. If both observed isoprene fluxes and HOx recycling chemistry were included, the ability of the model to capture diurnal variations in isoprene and OH was further improved. However, a similar improvement was also achieved using a~standard chemical mechanism without HOx recycling, by fixing boundary layer isoprene concentrations over Borneo to follow the OP3 observations. Further model simulations, considering an extreme scenario with all of Borneo converted to oil palm plantation, were run to determine the maximum atmospheric impact of land use change in Borneo. In these simulations, the level of nitrogen oxides was found to be critical. If only isoprene emissions from oil palm are considered, then large scale conversion to oil palm produced a decrease in monthly mean surface ozone of up to ~20%. However, if related changes in NOx emissions from fertilisation, industrial processing and transport are also included then ozone increases of up to ~70% were calculated. Although the largest changes occurred locally, the model also calculated significant regional changes of O3, OH and other species downwind of Borneo and in the free troposphere.

  13. Atmospheric Composition Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-26

    9fI urpAt .~~~ — 7. A THOR(a) 9. CON I RACT OR GRANT HUM BER(.) ! ~~~~~~~~ /otis 7 ~~ ~~F 1962~~~ 4~~~~~~ 1 H 9. FoRMING ORGANIZATION NAN NO...objective of the Upper Atmosphere Re- search Program is the acquisition of 1- nowledge of the ohysica] and chemica ) properties and phenomena of the vitally

  14. Changes in fungal community composition in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization varies with soil horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F Weber

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 and rates of nitrogen (N-deposition to forest ecosystems are predicted to alter the structure and function of soil fungal communities, but the spatially heterogeneous distribution of soil fungi has hampered investigations aimed at understanding such impacts. We hypothesized that soil physical and chemical properties and fungal community composition would be differentially impacted by elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2 and N-fertilization in spatially separated field samples, in the forest floor, 0-2 cm, 2-5 cm and 5-10 cm depth intervals in a loblolly pine Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE experiment. In all soils, quantitative PCR-based estimates of fungal biomass were highest in the forest floor. Fungal richness, based on pyrosequencing of the fungal ribosomal large subunit gene, increased in response to N-fertilization in 0-2 cm and forest floor intervals. Composition shifted in forest floor, 0-2 cm and 2-5 cm intervals in response to N-fertilization, but the shift was most distinct in the 0-2 cm interval, in which the largest number of statistically significant changes in soil chemical parameters (i.e phosphorus, organic matter, calcium, pH was also observed. In the 0-2 cm interval, increased recovery of sequences from the Thelephoraceae, Tricholomataceae, Hypocreaceae, Clavicipitaceae, and Herpotrichiellaceae families and decreased recovery of sequences from the Amanitaceae correlated with N-fertilization. In this same depth interval, Amanitaceae, Tricholomataceae and Herpotriciellaceae sequences were recovered less frequently from soils exposed to eCO2 relative to ambient conditions. These results demonstrated that vertical stratification should be taken into consideration in future efforts to elucidate environmental impacts on fungal communities and their feedbacks on ecosystem processes.

  15. Ozone, Climate, and Global Atmospheric Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    The delicate balance of the gases that make up our atmosphere allows life to exist on Earth. Ozone depletion and global warming are related to changes in the concentrations of these gases. To solve global atmospheric problems, we need to understand the composition and chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere and the impact of human activities on them.

  16. Atmospheric Change on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We propose to use SOFIA with HIPO and FLITECAM (FLIPO) to measure the parameters of Pluto's atmosphere (temperature, pressure, possible particulate haze) by observing a stellar occultation by Pluto on 15 November 2014. Due to its highly elliptical orbit and seasonally variable obliquity, Pluto's atmosphere is predicted to condense onto its surface within the next ~10 years and possibly within the next few years and thus frequent observations are critical. Detection of the occultation central flash will allow measurement of the structure of Pluto's lower atmosphere and atmospheric oblateness. We will use FLIPO to measure the refracted starlight contemporaneously at visible and infrared wavelengths; this approach is needed to differentiate between two competing explanations for the deficiency in the observed light refracted from Pluto's lower atmosphere (strong thermal gradients versus variable particulate extinction). Only an airborne platform such as SOFIA has the flexibility to place a large telescope in the center of the shadow path of this brief event while at the same time nearly eliminating the possibility of missing time-critical observations due to unfortunate weather systems. Occultation predictions will be updated throughout the period preceding the observations with the goal of achieving sufficient prediction accuracy at the event time to place SOFIA directly in the path of Pluto's central flash. This SOFIA observation will be combined with our ongoing ground-based observing program whose goal is to measure the temporal variability of Pluto's atmosphere in response to its changing seasonal obliquity (and resulting ice migration) and recession from the sun. For the NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt, this Pluto occultation event represents the last chance, prior to the spacecraft closest approach to the Pluto/Charon system (July 2015), to provide input to the mission for encounter planning, as well as context and supporting atmospheric

  17. Finding Atmospheric Composition (AC) Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, Richard F..; Falke, Stefan; Fiakowski, Ed; Kempler, Steve; Lynnes, Chris; Goussev, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP) is an aggregator and curator of information related to remotely sensed atmospheric composition data and analysis. It uses existing tools and technologies and, where needed, enhances those capabilities to provide interoperable access, tools, and contextual guidance for scientists and value-adding organizations using remotely sensed atmospheric composition data. The initial focus is on Essential Climate Variables identified by the Global Climate Observing System CH4, CO, CO2, NO2, O3, SO2 and aerosols. This poster addresses our efforts in building the ACP Data Table, an interface to help discover and understand remotely sensed data that are related to atmospheric composition science and applications. We harvested GCMD, CWIC, GEOSS metadata catalogs using machine to machine technologies - OpenSearch, Web Services. We also manually investigated the plethora of CEOS data providers portals and other catalogs where that data might be aggregated. This poster is our experience of the excellence, variety, and challenges we encountered.Conclusions:1.The significant benefits that the major catalogs provide are their machine to machine tools like OpenSearch and Web Services rather than any GUI usability improvements due to the large amount of data in their catalog.2.There is a trend at the large catalogs towards simulating small data provider portals through advanced services. 3.Populating metadata catalogs using ISO19115 is too complex for users to do in a consistent way, difficult to parse visually or with XML libraries, and too complex for Java XML binders like CASTOR.4.The ability to search for Ids first and then for data (GCMD and ECHO) is better for machine to machine operations rather than the timeouts experienced when returning the entire metadata entry at once. 5.Metadata harvest and export activities between the major catalogs has led to a significant amount of duplication. (This is currently being addressed) 6.Most (if not all

  18. Introduction to the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP and observed atmospheric composition change during 1972–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Yttri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available European scale harmonized monitoring of atmospheric composition was initiated in the early 1970s, and the activity has generated a comprehensive dataset (available at http://www.emep.int which allows the evaluation of regional and spatial trends of air pollution during a period of nearly 40 yr. Results from the monitoring made within EMEP, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, show large reductions in ambient concentrations and deposition of sulphur species during the last decades. Reductions are in the order of 70–90% since the year 1980, and correspond well with reported emission changes. Also reduction in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx are reflected in the measurements, with an average decrease of nitrogen dioxide and nitrate in precipitation by about 23% and 25% respectively since 1990. Only minor reductions are however seen since the late 1990s. The concentrations of total nitrate in air have decreased on average only by 8% since 1990, and fewer sites show a significant trend. A majority of the EMEP sites show a decreasing trend in reduced nitrogen both in air and precipitation on the order of 25% since 1990. Deposition of base cations has decreased during the past 30 yr, and the pH in precipitation has increased across Europe. Large inter annual variations in the particulate matter mass concentrations reflect meteorological variability, but still there is a relatively clear overall decrease at several sites during the last decade. With few observations going back to the 1990s, the observed chemical composition is applied to document a change in particulate matter (PM mass even since 1980. These data indicate an overall reduction of about 5 μg m−3 from sulphate alone. Despite the significant reductions in sulphur emissions, sulphate still remains one of the single most important compounds contributing to regional scale aerosol mass concentration. Long-term ozone trends at EMEP sites show a mixed pattern. The year

  19. Predicting response of fuel load to future changes in climate and atmospheric composition in the Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi Zhang; Hanqin Tian; Yuhang Wang; Tao Zeng; Yongqiang Liu

    2010-01-01

    The model projected ecosystem carbon dynamics were incorporated into the default (contemporary) fuel load map developed by FCCS (Fuel Characteristic Classification System) to estimate the dynamics of fuel load in the Southern United States in response to projected changes in climate and atmosphere (CO2 and nitrogen deposition) from 2002 to 2050. The study results...

  20. The PHOCUS Project: Atmospheric Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, into strong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. Here we will describe the optical measurements of the atmospheric composition and present first results including comparison to the other simultaneous measurements. The atmospheric composition was probed by a set of optical instruments from Stockholm University. The idea behind the instrument setup was to combine the advantages of the sensitive resonance fluorescence with well-calibrated airglow photometry. The set of instruments consisted of two resonance fluorescence probes (each containing a lamp and a detector), one for atomic oxygen and one for atomic hydrogen, and two IR photometers for O2 and OH dayglow emissions in the near IR. The O2 IR Atmospheric system at 1.27 μm is related to the photolysis of O3, which during the day is in steady state with O and a retrieval of O is possible. The OH Meinel emission is produced by the reaction between mesospheric O3 and H, and H concentrations can be deduced by combining information from both photometers. Unfortunately, some of these measurements were corrupted by instrument problems or payload glow. O3 and O profiles will be presented and compared to the simultaneous measurements of ice and meteoric smoke particles, water vapour and the state of the background neutral and charged atmosphere.

  1. Global atmospheric changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Piver, W T

    1991-01-01

    Increasing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere can be directly related to global warming. In terms of human health, because a major cause of increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 is the increased combustion of fossil fuels, global warming also may result in increases in air pollutants, acid deposition, and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To understand better the impacts of global warming phenomena on human health, this review emphasizes the proces...

  2. Detection of Atmospheric Composition Based on Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinye; Tong Yala; Yang Xiaoling; Gong Jiaoli [School of science, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China); Gong Wei, E-mail: yezi.zh@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A summary overview about the types of lidar and their own applications on atmosphere detection is presented. Measurement of atmospheric aerosols by Mie lidar and Raman lidar is focused. The vertical profiles of aerosols in the atmosphere are retrieved. And at the same time, through analyzing aerosol vertical content distribution, the atmosphere boundary layer and the cloud are also observed. All the results show that the lidar has good performance on detecting the atmospheric composition.

  3. Composition Changes After the "Halloween" Solar Proton Event: The High-Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA) Model Versus MIPAS Data Intercomparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, B.; Baumgaertner, A.; Calisto, M.; Egorova, T.; Jackman, C. H.; Kieser, J.; Krivolutsky, A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Marsh. D. R.; Reddmann, T.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have compared composition changes of NO, NO2, H2O2,O3, N2O, HNO3 , N2O5, HNO4, ClO, HOCl, and ClONO2 as observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat in the aftermath of the "Halloween" solar proton event (SPE) in October/November 2003 at 25-0.01 hPa in the Northern hemisphere (40-90 N) and simulations performed by the following atmospheric models: the Bremen 2D model (B2dM) and Bremen 3D Chemical Transport Model (B3dCTM), the Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) model, FinROSE, the Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA), the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA), the ECHAM5/MESSY Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, the modeling tool for SO1ar Climate Ozone Links studies (SOCOL and SOCOLi), and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). The large number of participating models allowed for an evaluation of the overall ability of atmospheric models to reproduce observed atmospheric perturbations generated by SPEs, particularly with respect to NOS, and ozone changes. We have further assessed the meteorological conditions and their implications on the chemical response to the SPE in both the models and observations by comparing temperature and tracer (CH4 and CO) fields. Simulated SPE-induced ozone losses agree on average within 5% with the observations. Simulated NO(y) enhancements around 1 hPa, however, are typically 30% higher than indicated by the observations which can be partly attributed to an overestimation of simulated electron-induced ionization. The analysis of the observed and modeled NO(y) partitioning in the aftermath of the SPE has demonstrated the need to implement additional ion chemistry (HNO3 formation via ion-ion recombination and water cluster ions) into the chemical schemes. An overestimation of observed H2O2 enhancements by all models hints at an underestimation of the OH/HO2 ratio in the upper polar stratosphere during the SPE. The

  4. Impacts of Ozone-vegetation Interactions and Biogeochemical Feedbacks on Atmospheric Composition and Air Quality Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeke, M.; Tai, A. P. K.; Lombardozzi, D.; Val Martin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface ozone pollution is one of the major environmental concerns due to its damaging effects on human and vegetation. One of the largest uncertainties of future surface ozone prediction comes from its interaction with vegetation under a changing climate. Ozone can be modulated by vegetation through, e.g., biogenic emissions, dry deposition and transpiration. These processes are in turn affected by chronic exposure to ozone via lowered photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance. Both ozone and vegetation growth are expected to be altered by climate change. To better understand these climate-ozone-vegetation interactions and possible feedbacks on ozone itself via vegetation, we implement an online ozone-vegetation scheme [Lombardozzi et al., 2015] into the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with active atmospheric chemistry, climate and land surface components. Previous overestimation of surface ozone in eastern US, Canada and Europe is shown to be reduced by >8 ppb, reflecting improved model-observation comparison. Simulated surface ozone is lower by 3.7 ppb on average globally. Such reductions (and improvements) in simulated ozone are caused mainly by lower isoprene emission arising from reduced leaf area index in response to chronic ozone exposure. Effects via transpiration are also potentially significant but require better characterization. Such findings suggest that ozone-vegetation interaction may substantially alter future ozone simulations, especially under changing climate and ambient CO2 levels, which would further modulate ozone-vegetation interactions. Inclusion of such interactions in Earth system models is thus necessary to give more realistic estimation and prediction of surface ozone. This is crucial for better policy formulation regarding air quality, land use and climate change mitigation. Reference list: Lombardozzi, D., et al. "The Influence of Chronic Ozone Exposure on Global Carbon and Water Cycles." Journal of Climate 28.1 (2015): 292-305.

  5. Multiphase composition changes and reactive oxygen species formation during limonene oxidation in the new Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Mahon, Brendan M.; Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Giorio, Chiara; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols influences their impacts on human health and the climate system. Aerosol formation from gas-to-particle conversion and in-particle reaction was studied for the oxidation of limonene in a new facility, the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). Health-relevant oxidising organic species produced during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation were quantified in real time using an Online Particle-bound Reactive Oxygen Species Instrument (OPROSI). Two categories of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified based on time series analysis: a short-lived component produced during precursor ozonolysis with a lifetime of the order of minutes, and a stable component that was long-lived on the experiment timescale (˜ 4 h). Individual organic species were monitored continuously over this time using Extractive Electrospray Ionisation (EESI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) for the particle phase and Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) MS for the gas phase. Many first-generation oxidation products are unsaturated, and we observed multiphase aging via further ozonolysis reactions. Volatile products such as C9H14O (limonaketone) and C10H16O2 (limonaldehyde) were observed in the gas phase early in the experiment, before reacting again with ozone. Loss of C10H16O4 (7-hydroxy limononic acid) from the particle phase was surprisingly slow. A combination of reduced C = C reactivity and viscous particle formation (relative to other SOA systems) may explain this, and both scenarios were tested in the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). A range of characterisation measurements were also carried out to benchmark the chamber against existing facilities. This work demonstrates the utility of CASC, particularly for understanding the reactivity and health-relevant properties of organic aerosols using novel, highly time-resolved techniques.

  6. Composition changes after the "Halloween" solar proton event: the High Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA model versus MIPAS data intercomparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Funke

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have compared composition changes of NO, NO2, H2O2, O3, N2O, HNO3, N2O5, HNO4, ClO, HOCl, and ClONO2 as observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat in the aftermath of the "Halloween" solar proton event (SPE in late October 2003 at 25–0.01 hPa in the Northern Hemisphere (40–90° N and simulations performed by the following atmospheric models: the Bremen 2-D model (B2dM and Bremen 3-D Chemical Transport Model (B3dCTM, the Central Aerological Observatory (CAO model, FinROSE, the Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA, the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA, the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model, the modeling tool for SOlar Climate Ozone Links studies (SOCOL and SOCOLi, and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4. The large number of participating models allowed for an evaluation of the overall ability of atmospheric models to reproduce observed atmospheric perturbations generated by SPEs, particularly with respect to NOy and ozone changes. We have further assessed the meteorological conditions and their implications for the chemical response to the SPE in both the models and observations by comparing temperature and tracer (CH4 and CO fields.

    Simulated SPE-induced ozone losses agree on average within 5 % with the observations. Simulated NOy enhancements around 1 hPa, however, are typically 30 % higher than indicated by the observations which are likely to be related to deficiencies in the used ionization rates, though other error sources related to the models' atmospheric background state and/or transport schemes cannot be excluded. The analysis of the observed and modeled NOy partitioning in the aftermath of the SPE has demonstrated the need to implement

  7. Changes in concentration, composition and source contribution of atmospheric organic aerosols by shifting coal to natural gas in Urumqi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Gehui; Wu, Can; Wang, Jiayuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Lu; Han, Yanni; Liu, Lang; Cao, Cong; Cao, Junji; He, Qing; Liu, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Size-segregated aerosols were collected in Urumqi, a megacity in northwest China, during two heating seasons, i.e., before (heating season І: January-March 2012) and after (heating season II: January-March 2014) the project "shifting coal to natural gas", and determined for n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs to investigate the impact of replacement of coal by natural gas on organic aerosols in the urban atmosphere. Our results showed that compared to those in heating season I concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs decreased by 74%, 74% and 82% in heating season II, respectively. Source apportionment analysis suggested that coal combustion, traffic emission and biomass burning are the major sources of the determined organics during the heating seasons in Urumqi. Traffic emission is the main source for n-alkanes in the city. Coal combustion is the dominant source of PAHs and OPAHs in heating season І, but traffic emission becomes their major source in heating season ІI. Relative contributions of coal combustion to n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs in Urumqi decreased from 21 to 75% in heating season I to 4.0-21% in heating season II due to the replacement of coal with natural gas for house heating. Health risk assessment further indicated that compared with that in heating season I the number of lung cancer related to PAHs exposure in Urumqi decreased by 73% during heating season II due to the project implementation. Our results suggest that replacing coal by clean energy sources for house heating will significantly mitigate air pollution and improve human health in China.

  8. Atmospheric nitrogen compounds: Occurrence, composition and deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Pilegaard, K.; Egeløv, A.H.

    1996-01-01

    Traffic in cities and on highways is an important contributor to NOy atmospheric pollution in open areas. In this situation both the concentration and composition of NOy compounds show a wide variation and are dependent on meteorological and atmospheric chemical conditions. The proportion of NOz...... compounds (HNO3+nitrate+PAN+ PPN+N2O5+organic nitrates) increases while that of NOx decreases with increasing ozone concentrations. The dry deposition velocity of NO2 was determined to be 0.2 cm s(-1) above vegetation. The dry deposition contribution of the different NOy compounds was evaluated....... The possibility that a significant contribution is caused by a group of unidentified NOy compounds cannot be excluded. Therefore, future investigations of atmospheric pollution of sensitive ecosystems, at conditions with a relatively high atmospheric content of NOy compared to that of NH3, ought to take...

  9. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Theresa Jean [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  10. Measurement of Atmospheric Composition from Geostationary Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Kawa, S. R.; Janz, S.; Herman, J. R.; Gleason, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Satellite instruments flown since 1970 have had great success in elucidating the processes that control stratospheric ozone. In contrast, space-based data for tropospheric constituents that affect air quality and climate have only recently become available. While these datasets highlight the rapidly advancing capabilities of spacebased tropospheric sensors, they are also pointing to the limitations of sun-synchronous, low-earth orbiting (SSO/LEO) satellite platforms for making such measurements. In our talk we will highlight the science requirements for new missions and the technological and algorithmic approaches that we are developing to meet these requirements. From these studies a clear need for advanced atmospheric composition sensors has emerged that can be put on geostationary (GEO) platforms to provide 5 km horizontal resolution with 15-60 minutes repeat cycle. Such measurements have been high priority in the recently released Decadal Survey report by the US National Research Council. The need for GEO is driven not only by the science requirements to track rapidly changing pollution events but also by the need to provide altitude-resolved information about tropospheric constituents. Currently, with the exception of aerosols, it is not possible to derive profile information about lower tropospheric constituents from satellite measurements. New algorithmic approaches are being developed to obtain this information by combining UV and IR data, by monitoring the spatial and temporal structures of the constituents, and by using low-level clouds to separate boundary layer constituents from free troposphere. All these approaches require better spatial and temporal resolution than that provided by LEO sensors.

  11. Extending Atmospheric Composition Processing to the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P.; Tilmes, C.; Balsano, R.; Martin, A.; Soika, V.; Inskeep, E.

    2007-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument Science Investigator-led Processing System (OMI SIPS) has been the central data processing system for OMI since its launch on NASA's Aura spacecraft in July, 2004. As part of NASA's evolution from mission based processing to measurement based processing, we are evolving the system into a community oriented Atmospheric Composition Processing System (ACPS). This involves changing focus from the mission (OMI) to the measurement (total column ozone), and a widening of our focus from the mission science teams to the overall scientific community. The current system dispatches and executes software developed by scientists on a computer cluster; archiving the results and distributing the data to numerous parties. Although this works well for the production environment, access to centralized systems has been naturally limited. Ideally, scientists should be able to easily get the data, run their software, make changes and repeat the process until they are happy with the solution to the problems they are trying to solve. In addition it should be simple to migrate research improvements from the community back into the formal production system. Through NASA's "Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth-Sun System Science," we have extended publicly accessible interfaces into the production system. The system provides an open API via a set of SOAP/XML and REST based web services, enabling scientists, researchers and operators to interact directly with the data and services offered by the central system. The system includes metadata, archive, and planner subsystems. The metadata server stores metadata about the data products and provides the ability for processing software to evaluate production rules to determine the appropriate input data files for a given data processing job. The archive server stores the data files themselves and makes then available for clients to retrieve the files as needed. The planner plans out the set of jobs to be run

  12. First intercalibration of column-averaged methane from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, F.; Sussmann, R.; Rettinger, M.; Deutscher, N. M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Jones, N.; Patra, P. K.

    2012-02-01

    We present the intercalibration of dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of methane (XCH4) retrieved from solar FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) in the mid-infrared (MIR) versus near-infrared (NIR) soundings from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). The study uses multi-annual quasi-coincident MIR and NIR measurements from the stations Garmisch, Germany (47.48° N, 11.06° E, 743 m a.s.l.) and Wollongong, Australia (34.41° S, 150.88° E, 30 m a.s.l.). Direct comparison of the retrieved MIR and NIR time series shows a phase shift in XCH4 seasonality, i.e. a significant time-dependent bias leading to a standard deviation (stdv) of the difference time series (NIR-MIR) of 8.4 ppb. After eliminating differences in a prioris by using ACTM-simulated profiles as a common prior, the seasonalities of the (corrected) MIR and NIR time series agree within the noise (stdv = 5.2 ppb for the difference time series). The difference time series (NIR-MIR) do not show a significant trend. Therefore it is possible to use a simple scaling factor for the intercalibration without a time-dependent linear or seasonal component. Using the Garmisch and Wollongong data together, we obtain an overall calibration factor MIR/NIR = 0.9926(18). The individual calibration factors per station are 0.9940(14) for Garmisch and 0.9893(40) for Wollongong. They agree within their error bars with the overall calibration factor which can therefore be used for both stations. Our results suggest that after applying the proposed intercalibration concept to all stations performing both NIR and MIR measurements, it should be possible to obtain one refined overall intercalibration factor for the two networks. This would allow to set up a harmonized NDACC and TCCON XCH4 data set which can be exploited for joint trend studies, satellite validation, or the inverse modeling of sources and sinks.

  13. First intercalibration of column-averaged methane from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network and the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the first intercalibration of dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of methane (XCH4 retrieved from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR measurements of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC in the mid-infrared (MIR versus near-infrared (NIR soundings from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. The study uses multi-annual quasi-coincident MIR and NIR measurements from the stations Garmisch, Germany (47.48° N, 11.06° E, 743 m a.s.l., and Wollongong, Australia (34.41° S, 150.88° E, 30 m a.s.l..

    Direct comparison of the retrieved MIR and NIR XCH4 time series for Garmisch shows a quasi-periodic seasonal bias leading to a standard deviation (stdv of the difference time series (NIR–MIR of 7.2 ppb. After reducing time-dependent a priori impact by using realistic site- and time-dependent ACTM-simulated profiles as a common prior, the seasonal bias is reduced (stdv = 5.2 ppb. A linear fit to the MIR/NIR scatter plot of monthly means based on same-day coincidences does not show a y-intercept that is statistically different from zero, and the MIR/NIR intercalibration factor is found to be close to ideal within 2-σ uncertainty, i.e. 0.9996(8. The difference time series (NIR–MIR do not show a significant trend. The same basic findings hold for Wollongong. In particular an overall MIR/NIR intercalibration factor close to the ideal 1 is found within 2-σ uncertainty. At Wollongong the seasonal cycle of methane is less pronounced and corresponding smoothing errors are not as significant, enabling standard MIR and NIR retrievals to be used directly, without correction to a common a priori.

    Our results suggest that it is possible to set up a harmonized NDACC and TCCON XCH4 data set which can be exploited for joint trend studies, satellite validation, or the inverse modeling of sources and sinks.

  14. Seasonal changes in Titan's middle-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Nixon, C. A.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Flasar, F. M.

    2013-09-01

    Titan is the largest satellite of Saturn and is the only moon in our solar system with a significant atmo- sphere. Titan's middle-atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) circulation usually comprises a single hemisphere to hemisphere meridional circulation cell, with upwelling air in the summer hemisphere and sub- siding air at the winter pole with an associated winter polar vortex. Titan has an axial tilt (obliquity) of 26.7°, so during its 29.5 Earth year annual cycle pronounced seasonal effects are encountered as the relative solar insolation in each hemisphere changes. The most dramatic of these changes is the reversal in global meridional circulation as the peak solar heating switches hemispheres after an equinox. Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009, and since then many middle-atmosphere changes have been observed by Cassini that were previously impossible to study (1,2,3,4). Here we present a detailed analysis of the post equinox changes in middle-atmosphere temperature and composition measured with Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS), use these to infer changes in atmospheric circulation, and explore implications for atmospheric photochemical and dynamical processes. Our results show that the meridional circulation has now reversed (1).

  15. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  16. The Wmo Global Atmosphere Watch Programme: Global Framework for Atmospheric Composition Observations and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, O. A.; Jalkanen, L.

    2010-12-01

    The WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme is the only existing long-term international global programme providing an international coordinated framework for observations and analysis of the chemical composition of the atmosphere. GAW is a partnership involving contributors from about 80 countries. It includes a coordinated global network of observing stations along with supporting facilities (Central Facilities) and expert groups (Scientific Advisory Groups, SAGs and Expert Teams, ETs). Currently GAW coordinates activities and data from 27 Global Stations and a substantial number of Regional and Contributing Stations. Station information is available through the GAW Station Information System GAWSIS (http://gaw.empa.ch/gawsis/). There are six key groups of variables which are addressed by the GAW Programme, namely: ozone, reactive gases, greenhouse gases, aerosols, UV radiation and precipitation chemistry. GAW works to implement integrated observations unifying measurements from different platforms (ground based in situ and remote, balloons, aircraft and satellite) supported by modeling activities. GAW provides data for ozone assessments, Greenhouse Gas Bulletins, Ozone Bulletins and precipitation chemistry assessments published on a regular basis and for early warnings of changes in the chemical composition and related physical characteristics of the atmosphere. To ensure that observations can be used for global assessments, the GAW Programme has developed a Quality Assurance system. Five types of Central Facilities dedicated to the six groups of measurement variables are operated by WMO Members and form the basis of quality assurance and data archiving for the GAW global monitoring network. They include Central Calibration Laboratories (CCLs) that host primary standards (PS), Quality Assurance/Science Activity Centres (QA/SACs), World Calibration Centers (WCCs), Regional Calibration Centers (RCCs), and World Data Centers (WDCs) with responsibility for

  17. Challenges in Discerning Atmospheric Composition in Directly Imaged Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the justifications motivating efforts to detect and characterize young extrasolar giant planets has been to measure atmospheric composition for comparison with that of the primary star. If the enhancement of heavy elements in the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets, like it is for their solar system analogs, is inversely proportional to mass, then it is likely that these worlds formed by core accretion. However in practice it has been very difficult to constrain metallicity because of the complex effect of clouds. Cloud opacity varies both vertically and, in some cases, horizontally through the atmosphere. Particle size and composition, both of which impact opacity, are difficult challenges both for forward modeling and retrieval studies. In my presentation I will discuss systematic efforts to improve cloud studies to enable more reliable determinations of atmospheric composition. These efforts are relevant both to discerning composition of directly imaged young planets from ground based telescopes and future space based missions, such as WFIRST and LUVOIR.

  18. Change in global aerosol composition since preindustrial times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Krol, M.C.; Dentener, F.; Balkanski, Y.; Lathiere, J.; Metzger, S.; Hauglustaine, D.; Kanakidou, M.

    2006-01-01

    To elucidate human induced changes of aerosol load and composition in the atmosphere, a coupled aerosol and gas-phase chemistry transport model of the troposphere and lower stratosphere has been used. The present 3-D modeling study focuses on aerosol chemical composition change since preindustrial

  19. Multi-scale atmospheric composition modelling for the Balkan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganev, Kostadin; Syrakov, Dimiter; Todorova, Angelina; Prodanova, Maria; Atanasov, Emanouil; Gurov, Todor; Karaivanova, Aneta; Miloshev, Nikolai; Gadzhev, Georgi; Jordanov, Georgi

    2010-05-01

    emissions by using the SMOKE abilities is developed; Model validation tests for episodes of very high PM10 concentrations over Germany in February and March of 2003. 3.) Extensive numerical simulations on regional (Balkan Peninsula) and local (Bulgaria) scales are performed aiming at: - better understanding and quantifying of the role of different processes and scales - evaluation of different sources (countries and/or SNAP categories) contribution to air pollution formation on local to regional scales Conclusions and Future Work: The present work is an attempt to development of an integrated view of the atmospheric composition formation at different spatial and temporal scales. It is also envisaged some studies to be carried out aiming at assessment of climate change impact on air pollution levels in Bulgaria. A natural sequel of the present work will be the creation of Bulgarian national chemical weather forecasting and information system.

  20. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging and addition of calcium hypochlorite on the atmosphere composition, colour and microbial quality of mushrooms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kuyper, L

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of modified atmosphere packaging in combination with the addition of calcium hypochlorite on the atmosphere composition, colour and microbial quality of mushrooms was investigated. A modified atmosphere which slowed down discolouration...

  1. Tropospheric Composition Change observed from Space (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Hilboll, A.; Leitao, J.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The composition of the troposphere is largely influenced by surface emissions of both natural and anthropogenic origins. These emissions change over time as result of human activities and natural variability, leading to varying atmospheric levels of primary and secondary pollutants. Satellite observations of sun light scattered back by the surface and the atmosphere can be used to retrieve information on atmospheric trace gases by application of optical absorption spectroscopy. In the UV and visible part of the spectrum, these measurements have good sensitivity to the lower troposphere providing information on relevant species such as O3, NO2, SO2, HCHO or glyoxal. Here, we report on recent results on tropospheric composition changes obtained from the GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 instruments which have a combined data record of nearly 15 years. The focus is on NO2 which shows an increasing trend over Asia and many large cities in countries with growing economies. At the same time, significant reductions are observed over the US and Europe, probably as result of changes in environmental legislation. SO2 signals have been decreasing over the US since 1996 while a strong upward trend was evident over China until recently when desulphurisation of power plant emissions came into effect. There also is evidence for increases in VOC levels over China which could be either of anthropogenic origin or from biogenic emissions.

  2. Interpretation of Titan's atmospheric composition measured by Cassini-Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, G.; Gautier, D.; Hersant, F.; Lunine, J. I.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT The GCMS instrument aboard the Huygens probe has measured the composition of Titan's atmosphere [1] and detected for the first time 36Ar and 40Ar, but no Xe and Kr. Assuming that planetesimals which formed the satellite originated from the cold solar nebula around 10 AU, we predict, on the basis of our interpretation of the CNS enrichments in Saturn [2], that they must have contained silicates, H2O ice, CO2, CH4, H2S, NH3 and some amount of noble gases. Using the evolution model of Tobie et al. [3], we have determined the fate of the different volatile species present in Titan's interior and in the atmosphere from the accretion to present time. At the end of accretion, most of the region outward of this proto-corewas warmliquid water (T > 300K), in which gas compound has very low solubility, and so potentially very large amounts of volatiles, notably methane, ended up in the primitive atmosphere and on the surface. During that early epoch, the composition of the hot-proto atmosphere should have reflected the composition of the planetesimals. The atmosphere at that time was probablymainly composed of H2O, NH3, CO2, CH4, H2S, which strongly contrasts with the nitrogen dominating atmosphere we have on Titan today. Early escape, photolysis, impact-driven chemistry and progressive condensation to the surface of the different species initially present in the primitive atmosphere gradually change the composition of the atmosphere, so that most of the primordial gas compound disappeared fromthe atmosphere. After that catastrophic early epoch, only the inner undifferentiated portion of Titans interior was able to hold primordial volatiles. These volatile species were released fromthe deep interior when internal differentiation occured, roughly 0.5 Gyr after accretion. Depending on their ability to interact with water molecules, each species follow a different evolutionnary pathway. For pressure conditions occurringwithin Titan, we show thatmost of the volatile

  3. ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION AND COMPOSITION OF GJ1214b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The exoplanet GJ1214b presents an interesting example of compositional degeneracy for low-mass planets. Its atmosphere may be composed of water, super-solar or solar metallicity material. We present atmospheric circulation models of GJ1214b for these three compositions, with explicit gray radiative transfer and an optional treatment of MHD bottom drag. All models develop strong, superrotating zonal winds ({approx}1-2 km s{sup -1}). The degree of eastward heat advection, which can be inferred from secondary eclipse and thermal phase curve measurements, varies greatly between the models. These differences are understood as resulting from variations in the radiative times at the thermal photosphere, caused by separate molecular weight and opacity effects. Our GJ1214b models illustrate how atmospheric circulation can be used as a probe of composition for similar tidally locked exoplanets in the mini-Neptune/waterworld class.

  4. Changes in the Martian atmosphere induced by auroral electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Gérard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.

    2017-09-01

    Typical auroral events in the Martian atmosphere, such as discrete and diffuse auroral emissions detected by UV spectrometers onboard ESA Mars Express and NASA MAVEN, are investigated. Auroral electron kinetic energy distribution functions and energy spectra of the upward and downward electron fluxes are obtained by electron transport calculations using the kinetic Monte Carlo model. These characteristics of auroral electron fluxes make it possible to calculate both the precipitation-induced changes in the atmosphere and the observed manifestations of auroral events on Mars. In particular, intensities of discrete and diffuse auroral emissions in the UV and visible wavelength ranges (Soret et al., 2016; Bisikalo et al., 2017; Gérard et al., 2017). For these conditions of auroral events, the analysis is carried out, and the contribution of the fluxes of precipitating electrons to the heating and ionization of the Martian atmosphere is estimated. Numerical calculations show that in the case of discrete auroral events the effect of the residual crustal magnetic field leads to a significant increase in the upward fluxes of electrons, which causes a decrease in the rates of heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas in comparison with the calculations without taking into account the residual magnetic field. It is shown that all the above-mentioned impact factors of auroral electron precipitation processes should be taken into account both in the photochemical models of the Martian atmosphere and in the interpretation of observations of the chemical composition and its variations using the ACS instrument onboard ExoMars.

  5. Changes in Pluto's Atmosphere Revealed by Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, Bruno; Widemann, Thomas; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Veillet, Christian; Colas, Francois; Roques, Francoise; Beisker, Wolfgang; Kretlow, Mike; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Hainaut, Olivier

    After the discovery and study of Pluto's tenuous atmosphere in 1985 and 1988 with stellar occultations 14 years were necessary before two other occultations by the planet could be observed on 20 July 2002 and 21 August 2002 from Northern Chile with a portable telescope and from CFHT in Hawaii respectively. These occultations reveal drastric changes in Pluto's nitrogen atmosphere whose pressure increased by a factor two or more since 1988. In spite of an increasing distance to the Sun (and a correlated decrease of solar energy input at Pluto) this increase can be explained by the fact that Pluto's south pole went from permanent darkness to permanent illumination between 1988 and 2002. This might cause the sublimation of the south polar cap and the increase of pressure which could go on till 2015 according to current nitrogen cycle models. Furthermore we detect temperature contrasts between the polar and the equatorial regions probed on Pluto possibly caused by different diurnally averaged insolations at those locations. Finally spikes observed in the light curves reveal a dynamical activity in Pluto's atmosphere.

  6. Smoke Composition to Disseminate Capsaicinoids in Atmosphere as Sensory Irritant

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, M. P.; U. G. Phapale; N. G. Swarge; M. R. Somayajulu

    2006-01-01

    Dissemination of sensory irritants in the atmosphere with the help of an evaporating mixtureis adopted. Experiments were carried out to find an alternative sensory irritant which is moreirritating and less toxic than the existing sensory irritating agents and originating from a naturalsource. Extract of red pepper, the oleoresin, is less toxic than the existing sensory irritants andis analysed for its constituents. Thermal studies of capsaicin and the composition indicate thatthe composition ...

  7. Atmospheric composition affects heat- and mass-transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    For environmental control system functions sensitive to atmospheric composition, components are test-operated in helium-oxygen and nitrogen-oxygen mixtures, pure oxygen, and air. Transient heat- and mass-transfer tests are conducted for carbon dioxide adsorption on molecular sieve and for water vapor adsorption on silica gel.

  8. Automated Atmospheric Composition Dataset Level Metadata Discovery. Difficulties and Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, R. F.; Falke, S. R.; Kempler, S.; Fialkowski, E.; Goussev, O.; Lynnes, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP) is an aggregator and curator of information related to remotely sensed atmospheric composition data and analysis. It uses existing tools and technologies and, where needed, enhances those capabilities to provide interoperable access, tools, and contextual guidance for scientists and value-adding organizations using remotely sensed atmospheric composition data. The initial focus is on Essential Climate Variables identified by the Global Climate Observing System - CH4, CO, CO2, NO2, O3, SO2 and aerosols. This poster addresses our efforts in building the ACP Data Table, an interface to help discover and understand remotely sensed data that are related to atmospheric composition science and applications. We harvested GCMD, CWIC, GEOSS metadata catalogs using machine to machine technologies - OpenSearch, Web Services. We also manually investigated the plethora of CEOS data providers portals and other catalogs where that data might be aggregated. This poster is our experience of the excellence, variety, and challenges we encountered.Conclusions:1.The significant benefits that the major catalogs provide are their machine to machine tools like OpenSearch and Web Services rather than any GUI usability improvements due to the large amount of data in their catalog.2.There is a trend at the large catalogs towards simulating small data provider portals through advanced services. 3.Populating metadata catalogs using ISO19115 is too complex for users to do in a consistent way, difficult to parse visually or with XML libraries, and too complex for Java XML binders like CASTOR.4.The ability to search for Ids first and then for data (GCMD and ECHO) is better for machine to machine operations rather than the timeouts experienced when returning the entire metadata entry at once. 5.Metadata harvest and export activities between the major catalogs has led to a significant amount of duplication. (This is currently being addressed) 6.Most (if not

  9. Light changes the atmospheric reactivity of soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Monge, Maria-Eugenia; George, Christian; Ammann, Markus; Donaldson, D. Jamie

    2010-05-01

    conversion of NO2 to HONO leads to persistent reactivity over long times (7 hours). Uptake coefficients increased linearly with the irradiation intensity indicating that the number of reactive sites at the soot surface is proportional to the number of photoactivated species. We suggest that nitrogen-containing organic compounds are also produced on the soot surface as a consequence of the heterogeneous reaction with NO2 under irradiation. These compounds can then be photolyzed and release NO and HONO in a NOx-free atmosphere. An estimation of the HONO production rate indicates that heterogeneous soot photochemistry may contribute to the daytime HONO concentration (1). When soot particles are exposed to high concentrations of O3 under irradiation there is an increase in hydrophobicity as it was previously observed for organic surface films(2). (1)ME Monge, B D'Anna, L Mazri, A Giroir-Fendler, M Ammann, D. J. Donaldson, and C George. Light changes the atmospheric reactivity of soot. PNAS, 2010, doi:10.1073/ pnas.0908341107 In press (2)L Nieto-Gligorovski, S Net, S Gligorovski, C Zetzsch, A Jammoul, B D'Anna, C George. Interactions of ozone with organic surface films in the presence of simulated sunlight: impact on wettability of aerosols. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 10, 2008, 2964-2971.

  10. Changes in atmospheric composition over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golitsyn, Georgy; Wang, Pucai; Rakitin, Vadim; Skorokhod, Andrey; Wang, Gengchen; Grechko, Evgeny; Pankratova, , Natalia; Stabkin, Yury

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of long-term spectroscopic IAP CAS and OIAP RAS CO and aerosol data sets in Beijing before and after 2007 is presented. We have find total decrease in CO total column (TC), in BC surface concentration, in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and stability of PM1 in 1992-2016 time-periods. After 2007 value of negative trends in gaseous and aerosol pollution of Beijing increased significantly. Also with using satellites data of CO TC (AIRS v6), satellite data of AOD (MODIS) and ground-based AOD data (AERONET network) we obtained a significant decrease all of these pollution characteristics in different regions of China and total their decrease for all territory of China, for different seasons especially after 2007. Season variations and weekly cycles of CO, aerosols and meteorological parameters for few Chinese sites are analyzed. The particular parameters of transition relations between satellite products MOPITTv6 Joint, AIRSv6 and MODIS were received for the period of 2010-2015. It was shown that AIRSv6 data underestimates the actual value of CO TC for Beijing by the factor of 1.5. Both CO orbital sensors have relatively low correlation (R2 0.3-0.4) with diurnal ground-based data. Significant correlation (R2≥0.7) between satellite (MODIS) and ground-based (AERONET) data of AOD for three Beijing stations and Xianghe station. This work was supported by the Russian Scientific Foundation under grant №14-47-00049.

  11. Paleosols and their relevance to Precambrian atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, J A; Phillips, G N; McCarthy, T S

    1989-01-01

    Various paleosols have been reported from within the Witwatersrand and Ventersdorp Supergroups, South Africa. They were studied in an attempt to constrain the amount of oxygen available in the atmosphere during deposition of the gold- and uranium-bearing Witwatersrand conglomerates. The majority of these horizons do not have any physical characteristics of paleosols, and none of them have a chemistry consistent with weathering, suggesting they have been subjected to modification by later alteration processes. A similar chemistry, indicating overprinting of any original soil chemistry, has been reported from paleosols elsewhere (Elliot Lake region, Canada; Hekpoort basalt, South Africa), but it does not appear that significant cognizance has been taken of this fact when using these paleosols to determine the composition of the Precambrian atmosphere. It is concluded here that characteristics previously attributed to Precambrian weathering in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere are better explained by post-burial, hydrothermal alteration along lithological contacts.

  12. Fire Influences on Atmospheric Composition, Air Quality, and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Field, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Fires impact atmospheric composition through their emissions, which range from long-lived gases to short-lived gases and aerosols. Effects are typically larger in the tropics and boreal regions but can also be substantial in highly populated areas in the northern mid-latitudes. In all regions, fire can impact air quality and health. Similarly, its effect on large-scale atmospheric processes, including regional and global atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing, can be substantial, but this remains largely unexplored. The impacts are primarily realised in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere but can also be noticeable in upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, for the most intense fires. In this review, we summarise the recent literature on findings related to fire impact on atmospheric composition, air quality and climate. We explore both observational and modelling approaches and present information on key regions and on the globe as a whole. We also discuss the current and future directions in this area of research, focusing on the major advances in emission estimates, the emerging efforts to include fire as a component in Earth system modelling and the use of modelling to assess health impacts of fire emissions.

  13. The composition of the atmosphere at the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.; Biller, J. E.; Lafleur, A. L.; Rushneck, D. R.; Howarth, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The current status is summarized of investigations of the composition of the Martian atmosphere, in which use was made of the mass spectrometers that function as the analytical component of the molecular analysis experiments on the two Viking landers. The following points seem well established: N2, Ar-40, Ne, Kr, Xe, and the primordial isotope of Ar are present. The present atmosphere of Mars represents only a small fraction of the total amount of volatiles outgassed by the planet, so that high surface pressure and abundant water may have been present. The noble gases in the Martian atmosphere exhibit a relative abundance pattern similar to that in the earth's atmosphere and (except for Xe) to that in the primordial component of meteorites. The existence of a 'planetary component' is thus proven, supporting the arguments of those who favor a fractionation of noble gases prior to the formation of the planets. In spite of these similarities, the isotopic ratios of nitrogen, argon, and xenon indicate that the histories of the Martian and the earth's atmospheres have been very different.

  14. Temporal Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Community Composition in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, J. B.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Fierer, N.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for significant microbial influences on atmospheric chemistry, cloud condensation, and ice nuclei concentrations, with known health impacts, yet we have a limited understanding of the types, abundances, and spatiotemporal dynamics of bacteria and fungi in the atmosphere. Here we use culture-independent molecular approaches, including targeted gene sequencing and quantitative PCR, to characterize bacterial and fungal community composition and abundance in the atmospheric boundary layer. We present results from 32 air samples, collected via vacuum filtration at 10 m and 250 m on the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower (Erie, CO) between November 2013 and April 2014. Samples were collected at night, and each sample was integrated over consecutive nights for approximately two weeks. Significant temporal shifts in bacterial and fungal community composition were observed over the course of the study, corresponding to changing bacterial and fungal concentrations. Within the same sampling time periods, bacterial and fungal communities from the near-surface atmosphere (10 m) were generally similar to those aloft (250 m), although coupled temporal and altitudinal effects were observed in some cases, particularly for fungi. Overall, our results indicate that bacterial and fungal communities exhibit minimal vertical stratification throughout the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer but show a high degree of variability on two-week timescales. This study paves the way for further research into the connections between boundary layer microbiology, atmospheric dynamics, emissions, and local meteorology.

  15. An Integrated Global Atmospheric Composition Observing System: Progress and Impediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    In 2003-2005, a vision of an integrated global observing system for atmospheric composition and air quality emerged through several international forums (IGACO, 2004; GEO, 2005). In the decade since, the potential benefits of such a system for improving our understanding and mitigation of health and climate impacts of air pollution have become clearer and the needs more urgent. Some progress has been made towards the goal: technology has developed, capabilities have been demonstrated, and lessons have been learned. In Europe, the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service has blazed a trail for other regions to follow. Powerful new components of the emerging global system (e.g. a constellation of geostationary instruments) are expected to come on-line in the near term. But there are important gaps in the emerging system that are likely to keep us from achieving for some time the full benefits that were envisioned more than a decade ago. This presentation will explore the components and benefits of an integrated global observing system for atmospheric composition and air quality, some of the gaps and obstacles that exist in our current capabilities and institutions, and efforts that may be needed to achieve the envisioned system.

  16. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment on interfacial properties of PBO fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengshuang; Li, Cuiyun; Wang, Baiya; Wang, Bin; Cui, Hong

    2013-07-01

    Poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fiber was modified by atmospheric air plasma treatment. The effects of plasma treatment power and speed on both surface properties of PBO fibers and interfacial properties of PBO/epoxy composites were investigated. Surface chemical composition of PBO fibers were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface morphologies of the fibers and interface structures of the composites were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Interfacial adhesion property of the composites was evaluated by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). Mechanical properties of PBO multifilament were measured by universal testing machine. The results indicate that atmospheric air plasma treatment introduced some polar or oxygen-containing groups to PBO fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of PBO fibers by plasma etching and oxidative reactions. The plasma treatment also improved interfacial adhesion of PBO/epoxy composites but has little effect on tensile properties of PBO multifilament. The ILSS of PBO/epoxy composites increased to 40.0 MPa after atmospheric air plasma treatment with plasma treatment power of 300 W and treatment speed of 6 m/min.

  17. Education in Changing Communication in Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach, E.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2009-12-01

    The “Training and Education” Programme in the European Network of Excellence in Atmospheric Composition Change ACCENT (www.accent-network.org, 2004-09) has aimed to introduce a shift in the mindset and approach to science communication among early career scientists and a wider audience. Training workshops in science communication organized across Europe and the Far East past the last five years dealt with the question where traditional lines of communication fail and how this can be remedied. In inspiring partnerships with stakeholder groups, opportunities were created for mutual learning and gaining experience in the process of translating air quality and climate change science to non-scientists. The core message is that the next generation of leaders in the field should make sure that the translation is scientifically acceptable, and should stay in control of the translation process. Evolving good practice in science communication education for future leaders in the field of atmospheric sciences in Europe and the Far East is illustrated based on ACCENT experiences.

  18. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    when explicitly simulated. The inaccurate surface emissions, likely underestimated over East Asia, are responsible for roughly half of the discrepancies between the simulated and observed {sup 13}CO in the northern hemisphere (NH), whereas the remote southern hemisphere (SH) compositions suggest an underestimated fractionation during the oxidation of CO by the hydroxyl radical (OH). A reanalysis of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in this reaction contrasts the conventional assumption of a mere pressure dependence, and instead suggests an additional temperature dependence of the {sup 13}C KIE, which is driven by changes in the partitioning of the reaction exit channels. This result is yet to be confirmed in the laboratory. Apart from {sup 13}CO, for the first time the atmospheric distribution of the oxygen mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in CO, Δ{sup 17}O, has been consistently simulated on the global scale with EMAC. The applicability of Δ{sup 17}O(CO) observations to unravelling changes in the tropospheric CH{sub 4}-CO-OH system has been scrutinised, as well as the implications of the ozone (O{sub 3}) input to the CO isotope oxygen budget. The Δ{sup 17}O(CO) is confirmed to be the principal signal for the CO photochemical age, thus providing a measure for the OH chiefly involved in the sink of CO. The highly mass-independently fractionated O{sub 3} oxygen is estimated to comprise around 2% of the overall tropospheric CO source, which has implications for the δ{sup 18}O, but less likely for the Δ{sup 17}O CO budgets. Finally, additional sensitivity simulations with EMAC corroborate the nearly equal net effects of the present-day CH{sub 4} and CO burdens in removing tropospheric OH, as well as the large turnover and stability of the abundance of the latter. The simulated CO isotopologues nonetheless hint at a likely insufficient OH regeneration in the NH high latitudes and the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere (UTLS).

  19. Giant Planets of Our Solar System Atmospheres, Composition, and Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G. J

    2009-01-01

    This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined. This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.

  20. Towards an exploitation of IAGOS atmospheric composition measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julia; Gerbig, Christoph; Petzold, Andreas; Zahn, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    IAGOS, In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System, has installed instrumentation on a growing fleet of commercial airliners in order to continuously monitor atmospheric composition around the globe. IAGOS is providing accurate in situ observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), reactive gases, aerosols, and cloud particles at high spatial resolution in the free atmosphere, thereby covering the essential climate variables (ECVs) for atmospheric composition as designated by the GCOS programme (Implementation Plan for the Global Observing System for Climate in Support of the UNFCCC, 2010). The greenhouse gas measurements made by IAGOS will be submitted to the WMO/GAW World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). Within the EU FP7 project IGAS (IAGOS for the GMES Atmospheric Service), the links between this new data stream and scientific users, including the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service, are being improved. This includes the provision of measurements in both near-real-time and delayed mode, and improved accessibility to the data through linkages to the databases of both the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) flight campaign archive and the Copernicus data archive. Work has been undertaken to investigate the use of the near-real-time profile measurements in order to correct bias in satellite measurements assimilated by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service. Documentation of the QA/QC procedures and measurement techniques for each instrument have been formalized and reviewed by external experts, to provide users with a measurement traceable to WMO standards. The representativeness of the measurements has been assessed, to better interpret results in polluted regions and near the tropopause. The potential impact of the GHG measurements on regional scale flux inversions has been quantified, which is relevant for ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observing System). Finally, tools have been developed to use the measurements for validation of satellite column

  1. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1991-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  2. Extracting Compositional Variation from THEMIS Data for Features with Large Topography on Mars Via Atmospheric Equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F. S.; Drake, J. S.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a means of equalizing the atmospheric signature in Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) infrared data over regions with large topography such as the Valles Marineris (VM). This equalization allows for the analysis of compositional variations in regions that previously have been difficult to study because of the large differences in atmospheric path length that result from large changes in surface elevation. Specifically, our motivation for this study is to examine deposits that are small at the scales observable by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) onboard Mars Global Surveyor, but which are more readily resolved with THEMIS.

  3. Saturn's Atmospheric Composition from Observations by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Young, M.; LeClair, A. C.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal emission infrared observation of Saturn s atmosphere are being made by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) aboard the Cassini spacecraft since its insertion in Saturn s orbit on July 2nd, 2004. The measurements made in both limb and nadir modes of observations consist of infrared spectra in the 10-1400/cm region with a variable spectral resolution of 0.53/cm and 2.8/cm, and exhibit rotational and vibrational spectral features that may be analyzed for retrieval of the thermal structure and constituent distribution of Saturn s atmosphere. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of the CIRS infrared observed spectra for retrieval of Saturn s atmospheric composition focusing on the distributions of some selected hydrocarbons, phosphine, ammonia, and possible determination of the isotopic ratios of some species with sufficiently strong isolated spectral features. A comparison of the retrieved constituent distributions with the available data in the literature will be made.

  4. Composition and Chemistry of the Neutral Atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcq, Emmanuel; Mills, Franklin P.; Parkinson, Christopher D.; Vandaele, Ann Carine

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with the composition and chemical processes occurring in the neutral atmosphere of Venus. Since the last synthesis, observers as well as modellers have emphasised the spatial and temporal variability of minor species, going beyond a static and uniform picture that may have prevailed in the past. The outline of this paper acknowledges this situation and follows closely the different dimensions along which variability in composition can be observed: vertical, latitudinal, longitudinal, temporal. The strong differences between the atmosphere below and above the cloud layers also dictate the structure of this paper. Observational constraints, obtained from both Earth and Venus Express, as well as 1D, 2D and 3D models results obtained since 1997 are also extensively referred and commented by the authors. An non-exhaustive list of topics included follows: modelled and observed latitudinal and vertical profiles of CO and OCS below the clouds of Venus; vertical profiles of CO and SO2 above the clouds as observed by solar occultation and modelled; temporal and spatial variability of sulphur oxides above the clouds. As a conclusion, open questions and topics of interest for further studies are discussed.

  5. Computer simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Syrkov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Georgiev, G.

    2015-07-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The simulations were carried out for years 2000-2007. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The Models-3 “Integrated Process Rate Analysis” option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment – calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble. (Author)

  6. Computer simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Georgiev, G.

    2015-07-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The simulations were carried out for years 2000-2007. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The Models-3 Integrated Process Rate Analysis option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble. (Author)

  7. Mission Objectives Of The Atmospheric Composition Related Sentinels S5p, S4, And S5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingmann, Paul; Veihelmann, Ben; Langen, Jorg; Meijer, Yasjka

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric chemistry observations from space have been made for over 30 years, in the beginning mainly by US missions. These missions have always been motivated by the concern about a number of environmental issues. At present European instruments like GOME-2 on MetOp/EPS-A and -B and OMI on NASA's Aura are in space and, despite being designed for research purposes, perform routine observations. The space instruments have helped improving our understanding of processes that govern stratospheric ozone depletion, climate change and the transport of pollutants. However, long-term continuous time series of atmospheric trace gas data have been limited to stratospheric ozone and a few related species. According to current planning, meteorological satellites will maintain these observations over the next decade. They will also add some measurements of tropospheric trace gases critical for climate forcing. However, as their measurements have been motivated by meteorology, vertical sensitivities and accuracies are marginal for atmospheric chemistry applications. With the exception of stratospheric ozone, reliable long-term space-based monitoring of atmospheric constituents with quality attributes sufficient to serve atmospheric chemistry applications still need to be established. The need for a GMES atmospheric service (GAS), its scope and high level requirements were laid down in an orientation papers organised by the European Commission and then updated by an Implementation Group (IG) [1], backed by four working groups, advising the Commission on scope, architecture, in situ and space requirements. The goal of GAS is to provide coherent information on atmospheric variables in support of European policies and for the benefit of European citizens. Services cover air quality, climate change/forcing, stratospheric ozone and solar radiation. To meet the needs of the user community atmospheric composition mission concepts for GEO and LEO have been defined usually referred to

  8. Effect of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration on the protein composition of cereal grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Hüther, Liane; Manderscheid, Remy; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Wätzig, Hermann; Dänicke, Sven

    2014-07-16

    The present study investigates effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration on protein composition of maize, wheat, and barley grain, especially on the fractions prolamins and glutelins. Cereals were grown at different atmospheric CO2 concentrations to simulate future climate conditions. Influences of two nitrogen fertilization levels were studied for wheat and barley. Enriched CO2 caused an increase of globulin and B-hordein of barley. In maize, the content of globulin, α-zein, and LMW polymers decreased, whereas total glutelin, zein, δ-zein, and HMW polymers rose. Different N supplies resulted in variations of barley subfractions and wheat globulin. Other environmental influences showed effects on the content of nearly all fractions and subfractions. Variations in starch-protein bodies caused by different CO2 treatments could be visualized by scanning electron microscopy. In conclusion, climate change would have impacts on structural composition of proteins and, consequently, on the nutritional value of cereals.

  9. Composition and oxidation state of sulfur in atmospheric particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Longo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and physical speciation of atmospheric sulfur was investigated in ambient aerosol samples using a combination of sulfur near-edge x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (S-NEXFS and X-ray fluorescence (XRF microscopy. These techniques were used to determine the composition and oxidation state of sulfur in common primary emission sources and ambient particulate matter collected from the greater Atlanta area. Ambient particulate matter samples contained two oxidation states: S0 and S+VI. Ninety-five percent of the individual aerosol particles (> 1 µm analyzed contain S0. Linear combination fitting revealed that S+VI in ambient aerosol was dominated by ammonium sulfate as well as metal sulfates. The finding of metal sulfates provides further evidence for acidic reactions that solubilize metals, such as iron, during atmospheric transport. Emission sources, including biomass burning, coal fly ash, gasoline, diesel, volcanic ash, and aerosolized Atlanta soil, and the commercially available bacterium Bacillus subtilis, contained only S+VI. A commercially available Azotobacter vinelandii sample contained approximately equal proportions of S0 and S+VI. S0 in individual aerosol particles most likely originates from primary emission sources, such as aerosolized bacteria or incomplete combustion.

  10. Composition and oxidation state of sulfur in atmospheric particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Amelia F.; Vine, David J.; King, Laura E.; Oakes, Michelle; Weber, Rodney J.; Huey, Lewis Gregory; Russell, Armistead G.; Ingall, Ellery D.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical and physical speciation of atmospheric sulfur was investigated in ambient aerosol samples using a combination of sulfur near-edge x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (S-NEXFS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy. These techniques were used to determine the composition and oxidation state of sulfur in common primary emission sources and ambient particulate matter collected from the greater Atlanta area. Ambient particulate matter samples contained two oxidation states: S0 and S+VI. Ninety-five percent of the individual aerosol particles (> 1 µm) analyzed contain S0. Linear combination fitting revealed that S+VI in ambient aerosol was dominated by ammonium sulfate as well as metal sulfates. The finding of metal sulfates provides further evidence for acidic reactions that solubilize metals, such as iron, during atmospheric transport. Emission sources, including biomass burning, coal fly ash, gasoline, diesel, volcanic ash, and aerosolized Atlanta soil, and the commercially available bacterium Bacillus subtilis, contained only S+VI. A commercially available Azotobacter vinelandii sample contained approximately equal proportions of S0 and S+VI. S0 in individual aerosol particles most likely originates from primary emission sources, such as aerosolized bacteria or incomplete combustion.

  11. Change in global aerosol composition since preindustrial times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tsigaridis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate human induced changes of aerosol load and composition in the atmosphere, a coupled aerosol and gas-phase chemistry transport model of the troposphere and lower stratosphere has been used. The present 3-D modeling study focuses on aerosol chemical composition change since preindustrial times considering the secondary organic aerosol formation together with all other main aerosol components including nitrate. In particular, we evaluate non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4=, ammonium (NH4+, nitrate (NO3−, black carbon (BC, sea-salt, dust, primary and secondary organics (POA and SOA with a focus on the importance of secondary organic aerosols. Our calculations show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD has increased by about 21% since preindustrial times. This enhancement of AOD is attributed to a rise in the atmospheric load of BC, nss-SO4=, NO3, POA and SOA by factors of 3.3, 2.6, 2.7, 2.3 and 1.2, respectively, whereas we assumed that the natural dust and sea-salt sources remained constant. The nowadays increase in carbonaceous aerosol loading is dampened by a 34–42% faster conversion of hydrophobic to hydrophilic carbonaceous aerosol leading to higher removal rates. These changes between the various aerosol components resulted in significant modifications of the aerosol chemical composition. The relative importance of the various aerosol components is critical for the aerosol climatic effect, since atmospheric aerosols behave differently when their chemical composition changes. According to this study, the aerosol composition changed significantly over the different continents and with height since preindustrial times. The presence of anthropogenically emitted primary particles in the atmosphere facilitates the condensation of the semi-volatile species that form SOA onto the aerosol phase, particularly in the boundary layer. The SOA burden that is dominated by the natural component has increased by 24% while its contribution to the AOD

  12. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols resolved via positive matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Heikkinen, Liine; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is a complex mixture of various chemical species such as organic compounds, sulfates, nitrates, ammonia, chlorides, black carbon and sea salt. As aerosol chemical composition strongly influences aerosol climate effects (via cloud condensation nucleus activation, hygroscopic properties, aerosol optics, volatility and condensation) as well as health effects (toxicity, carcinogenicity, particle morphology), detailed understanding of atmospheric fine particle composition is widely beneficial for understanding these interactions. Unfortunately the comprehensive, detailed measurement of aerosol chemistry remains difficult due to the wide range of compounds present in the atmosphere as well as for the miniscule mass of the particles themselves compared to their carrier gas. Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Canagaratna et al., 2007) is an instrument often used for characterization of non-refractive aerosol types: the near-universal vaporization and ionisation technique allows for measurement of most atmospheric-relevant compounds (with the notable exception of refractory matter such as sea salt, black carbon, metals and crustal matter). The downside of the hard ionisation applied is extensive fragmentation of sample molecules. However, the apparent loss of information in fragmentation can be partly offset by applying advanced statistical methods to extract information from the fragmentation patterns. In aerosol mass spectrometry statistical analysis methods, such as positive matrix factorization (PMF; Paatero, 1999) are usually applied for aerosol organic component only, to keep the number of factors to be resolved manageable, to retain the inorganic components for solution validation via correlation analysis, and to avoid inorganic species dominating the factor model. However, this practice smears out the interactions between organic and inorganic chemical components, and hinders the understanding of the connections between primary and

  13. Monitoring of atmospheric composition using the thermal infrared IASI/MetOp sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric remote sounding from satellites is an essential component of the observational strategy deployed to monitor atmospheric pollution and changing composition. The IASI nadir looking thermal infrared sounder onboard MetOp will provide 15 years of global scale observations for a series of key atmospheric species, with unprecedented spatial sampling and coverage. This paper gives an overview of the instrument's capability for measuring atmospheric composition in the perspective of chemistry and air quality. The assessment is made in terms of species, accuracy and vertical information. Global distributions are presented for CO, CH4, O3 (total and tropospheric, HNO3, NH3, and volcanic SO2. Local distributions of organic species measured during fire events, such as C2H4, CH3OH, HCOOH, and PAN are also shown. For each species or process, the link is made to specialized papers in this issue.

  14. Static stability and thermal wind in an atmosphere of variable composition Applications to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    Radiometric measurements of the temperature of the south polar cap of Mars in winter have yielded values significantly below the expected 148 K. One proposed explanation for this result is a substantial reduction in the CO2 content of the atmosphere and a lowering of the mean molecule weight near the surface. The meteorological consequences of this explanation are explored by deriving a criterion for vertical static stability and a thermal wind law for an atmosphere of variable composition. The atmosphere proves to be statically unstable unless the anomaly in the CO2 mixing ratio extends to heights of tens of kilometers. The effect of varying molecular weight exceeds the effect of temperature gradient, producing shears with height of reversed sign. The shears are baroclinically unstable, and this instability would eradicate the latitudinal gradient of molecular weight. This inconsistency can be resolved by invoking a reasonable elevation of the central polar cap and by imposing an adequate zonal wind. It is concluded that if the explanation requiring a change in atmospheric composition is correct, it must be accompanied by other special circumstances to make it meteorologically consistent.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry and physics from air pollution to climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Seinfeld, John H

    2016-01-01

    Expanded and updated with new findings and new features Since the second edition of Seinfeld and Pandis’ classic textbook, significant progress has taken place in the field of atmospheric chemistry and physics, particularly in the areas of tropospheric chemistry, aerosols, and the science of climate change. A new edition of this comprehensive work has been developed by the renowned author team. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 3rd Edition, as the previous two editions have done, provides a rigorous and comprehensive treatment of the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere – including the chemistry of the stratosphere and troposphere, aerosol physics and chemistry, atmospheric new particle formation, physical meteorology, cloud physics, global climate, statistical analysis of data, and mathematical chemical/transport models of the atmosphere. Each of these topics is covered in detail and in each area the central results are developed from first principles. In this way the reader gains a significant un...

  16. Early Action on HFCs Mitigates Future Atmospheric Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret; Fleming, Eric; Newman, Paul; Li, Feng; Liang, Qing

    2017-04-01

    As countries take action to mitigate global warming, both by ratifying the UNFCCC Paris Agreement and enacting the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol to manage hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), it is important to consider the relative importance of the pertinent greenhouse gases (GHGs), the distinct structure of their atmospheric impacts, and how the timing of potential GHG regulations would affect future changes in atmospheric temperature and ozone. Chemistry-climate model simulations demonstrate that HFCs could contribute substantially to anthropogenic climate change by the mid-21st century, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere i.e., global average warming up to 0.19K at 80hPa. Three HFC mitigation scenarios demonstrate the benefits of taking early action in avoiding future atmospheric change: more than 90% of the climate change impacts of HFCs can be avoided if emissions stop by 2030.

  17. Atmospheric aerosol over Vermont: chemical composition and sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polissar, A.V.; Hopke, P.K. [Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-12-01

    Aerosol chemical composition data for PM{sub 2.5} samples collected during the period from 1988 to 1995 at Underhill, VT were analyzed. The six sources representing wood burning, coal and oil combustion, coal combustion emissions plus photochemical sulfate production, metal production plus municipal wastes incineration, and emissions from motor vehicles were identified. Emissions from smelting of nonferrous metal ores, arsenic smelting, and soil particles and particles with high concentrations of Na were also identified by PMF. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis for the black carbon factor shows high probabilities in the area surrounding the sampling wood combustion in northern New England and southwestern Quebec. Similar large potential source areas in the midwestern United States were identified for the coal combustion factors. The oil combustion factor was associated with the east coast of the United States. canadian Ni smelters are the main sources for the As factor, although there is some contribution from coal-fired power plants to the south and west of Underhill, VT. It is concluded that the combination of the two receptor modeling methods, PMF and PSCF, provides an effective way in identifying atmospheric aerosol sources and their likely locations. Emissions from different anthropogenic activities as well as secondary aerosol production are the main sources of aerosol measured in Vermont. Fuel combustion, local wood smoke, municipal waste incineration and the secondary sulfate production collectively accounted for about 87% of the fine mass concentrations measured in Vermont. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Multielemental composition of atmospheric aerosol in the South of West Siberia

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsenogii, K P; Smirnova, A I; Makarov, V I; Kirov, E I

    2000-01-01

    The data on the multielemental composition of atmospheric aerosols for the typical landscapes of Novosibirsk region have been obtained using SR XRF. The peculiarities of seasonal variations in the multielemental composition of atmospheric aerosols in the South of West Siberia have been analyzed.

  19. Surface Composition of Mars: Results from a New Atmospheric Compensation Technique Applied to TES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.; Ward, J.; Keim, E. R.; Hackwell, J. H.; McAfee, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Before TES (Thermal Emission Spectrometry) spectra can be used to model surface compositions, they must have a strong atmospheric compensation applied. We explore a very different atmospheric retrieval process, and compare results and implications for the derived surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Aging and changes in body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van D.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    As we grow older changes in body composition occur. These changes include a loss of lean body mass (LBM), bone mass, body water, and a relative increase of fat mass. In view of these changes and acknowledging demographic trends, elder people are facing a growing burden of health-compromising levels

  1. A lower limit of atmospheric pressure on early Mars inferred from nitrogen and argon isotopic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Usui, Tomohiro

    2018-01-01

    We examine the history of the loss and replenishment of the Martian atmosphere using elemental and isotopic compositions of nitrogen and noble gases. The evolution of the atmosphere is calculated by taking into consideration various processes: impact erosion and replenishment by asteroids and comets, atmospheric escape induced by solar radiation and wind, volcanic degassing, and gas deposition by interplanetary dust particles. Our model reproduces the elemental and isotopic compositions of N and noble gases (except for Xe) in the Martian atmosphere, as inferred from exploration missions and analyses of Martian meteorites. Other processes such as ionization-induced fractionation, which are not included in our model, are likely to make a large contribution in producing the current Xe isotope composition. Since intense impacts during the heavy bombardment period greatly affect the atmospheric mass, the atmospheric pressure evolves stochastically. Whereas a dense atmosphere preserves primitive isotopic compositions, a thin atmosphere on early Mars is severely influenced by stochastic impact events and following escape-induced fractionation. The onset of fractionation following the decrease in atmospheric pressure is explained by shorter timescales of isotopic fractionation under a lower atmospheric pressure. The comparison of our numerical results with the less fractionated N (15N/14N) and Ar (38Ar/36Ar) isotope compositions of the ancient atmosphere recorded in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 provides a lower limit of the atmospheric pressure in 4 Ga to preserve the primitive isotopic compositions. We conclude that the atmospheric pressure was higher than approximately 0.5 bar at 4 Ga.

  2. Climate change and CO2 removal from the atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed in recent years to counteract climate change and ocean acidification by removing CO2 from the atmosphere (Carbon Dioxide Removal). The most versatile and widely applicable of these methods is enhanced weathering of olivine, which is capable of removing billions of

  3. Divergent pheromone-mediated insect behaviour under global atmospheric change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward B. Mondor; Michelle N. Tremblay; Caroline S. Awmack; Richard L. Lindroth

    2004-01-01

    While the effects of global atmospheric changes on vegetation and resulting insect populations('bottom-up interactions') are being increasingly studied, how these gases modify interactions among insects and their natural enemies ('top-down interactions') is less clear. As natural enemy efficacy is governed largely by behavioural mechanisms, altered...

  4. Carbon Observations from Geostationary Earth Orbit as Part of an Integrated Observing System for Atmospheric Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from the CHRONOS mission. The primary goal of this experiment is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. CHRONOS observations would provide measurements not currently available or planned as part of a surface, suborbital and satellite integrated observing system for atmospheric composition over North America. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution, and CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth

  5. Drastic changes in Pluto atmosphere revealed by stellar occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicardy, B.; Widemann, T.; Lellouch, T.; Colas, F.; Roques, F.; Veillet, C.; Cuillandre, J.-C.

    Pluto's tenuous nitrogen atmosphere was first detected by stellar occultations from Israel in 1985, and more extensively studied during a second event from Australia in June 1988. This atmosphere is poorly known, however, due to the rarity of these events. We report here the first Pluto occultation observations in 2002 (July 20 and august 21), after a lapse of fourteen years. The July data were gathered from northern Chile with a portable telescope, in the frame of a large campaign in South America, while the August event was observed from Hawaii (CFHT). Results of our analysis reveal drastic changes undergone by the atmosphere since 1988, namely a two-fold pressure increase, revealing the effect of seasonal changes on Pluto over this fourteen year interval. This provides insights into surface-atmosphere interactions and temporal variability on distant icy bodies of the solar system. Spikes observed in the CFHT lightcurve betrays the presence of a dynamical activity, either associated with shear instabilities caused by strong winds, or with a hypothetical troposphere near the surface of the planet.

  6. The CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation: Enhancing the Value of Space-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Richard; Zehner, Claus; Al-Saadi, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth. Participating agencies strive to enhance international coordination and data exchange and to optimize societal benefit. In recent years, CEOS has collaborated closely with the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in implementing the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) space-based objectives. The goal of the CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) is to collect and deliver data to improve monitoring, assessment and predictive capabilities for changes in the ozone layer, air quality and climate forcing associated with changes in the environment through coordination of existing and future international space assets. A project to coordinate and enhance the science value of a future constellation of geostationary sensors measuring parameters relevant to air quality supports the forthcoming European Sentinel-4, Korean GEMS, and US TEMPO missions. Recommendations have been developed for harmonization to mutually improve data quality and facilitate widespread use of the data products.

  7. Novel atmospheric plasma enhanced chitosan nanofiber/gauze composite wound dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrospun chitosan nanofibers were deposited onto atmospheric plasma treated cotton gauze to create a novel composite bandage with higher adhesion, better handling properties, enhanced bioactivity, and moisture management. Plasma treatment of the gauze substrate was performed to improve the durabi...

  8. Atmospheric changes observed during April 2015 Nepal earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Nandita D.

    2016-03-01

    A massive earthquake shook Nepal on 25 April 2015, with a moment magnitude of 7.9 Mw, its hypocenter at a depth of 10 km. Atmospheric changes that precede an earthquake might offer the hope of early warning and evacuation. Although the existence of such precursory signals is highly controversial, an attempt has been made to investigate the atmospheric changes from two months prior, to five months following this deadly earthquake. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar ozone were found to be higher by 40% and 6% respectively prior to the occurrence of the earthquake. The UV aerosol index (UVI), AOD and columnar NO2 increased, while columnar ozone and sea level pressure dropped following the earthquake.

  9. Atmospheric aerosol over Vermont: chemical composition and sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, A V; Hopke, P K; Poirot, R L

    2001-12-01

    Aerosol chemical composition data for PM2.5 samples collected during the period from 1988 to 1995 at Underhill, VT, were analyzed. Sulfur and black carbon mass concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.5 microg m(-3) and from 0.05 to 2.2 microg m(-3), respectively, while the total fine aerosol mass concentration ranged from 0.2 to 51.1 microg m(-3). Seasonal variations with maxima during the summer and minima in winter/spring were observed for sulfur and the fine mass concentrations. No annual pattern was observed for black carbon. Seasonal variations for most of the other anthropogenic species had maxima in winter and spring and minima in the summer. A factor analysis method, positive matrix factorization (PMF), utilizing error estimates of the data to provide optimum data point scaling was used to obtain information about possible sources of the aerosol. An 11-factor solution was obtained. The six sources representing wood burning, coal and oil combustion, coal combustion emissions plus photochemical sulfate production, metal production plus municipal waste incineration, and emissions from motor vehicles were identified. Emissions from smelting of nonferrous metal ores, arsenic smelting, and soil particles and particles with high concentrations of Na were also identified by PMF. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis combines the aerosol data with the air parcel backward trajectories. PSCF was applied to identify possible source areas and pathways that give rise to the observed high particulate mass concentrations from these 11 sources. The CAPITA Monte Carlo trajectory model was used to obtain 10 sets of 5-day air parcel back trajectories arriving every 2 h for the 7-yr period from 1988 to 1995. The PSCF plot for the black carbon factor shows high probabilities in the area surrounding the sampling site, indicating a strong local influence from residential wood combustion in northern New England and southwestern Quebec. Similar large potential source

  10. Oceans-land-atmosphere interactions and global change

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    envelope has been retaining more heat from the incident solar radiation in late 1990s. Higher heat retention capacity of air in recent times has been attributed to increased levels of CO2 and other greenhouse gases released from industries. The present... al., 2004). The geological climate changes have been a part of the natural cycles, probably related to obliquity and solar insolation. However, the human interfered rate of increase in atmospheric CO2 in the recent past has been much greater than...

  11. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheric branch of the water cycle, although containing just a tiny fraction of the Earth's total water reserves, presents a crucial interface between the physical climate (such as large-scale rainfall patterns) and the ecosystems upon which human societies ultimately depend. Because of the central importance of water in the Earth system, the question of how the water cycle is changing, and how it may alter in future as a result of anthropogenic changes, present one of the greatest challenges of this century. The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Climate Change and Water (Bates et al 2008) highlighted the increasingly strong evidence of change in the global water cycle and associated environmental consequences. It is of critical importance to climate prediction and adaptation strategies that key processes in the atmospheric water cycle are precisely understood and determined, from evaporation at the surface of the ocean, transport by the atmosphere, condensation as cloud and eventual precipitation, and run-off through rivers following interaction with the land surface, sub-surface, ice, snow and vegetation. The purpose of this special focus issue of Environmental Research Letters on anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle is to consolidate the recent substantial advances in understanding past, present and future changes in the global water cycle through evidence built upon theoretical understanding, backed up by observations and borne out by climate model simulations. Thermodynamic rises in water vapour provide a central constraint, as discussed in a guest editorial by Bengtsson (2010). Theoretical implications of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation are presented by O'Gorman and Muller (2010) and with reference to a simple model (Sherwood 2010) while observed humidity changes confirm these anticipated responses at the land and ocean surface (Willett et al 2008). Rises in low-level moisture are thought to fuel an

  12. Changes in calcification of coccoliths under stable atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, C.; Meier, K. J. S.; Kinkel, H.

    2014-01-01

    The response of coccolithophore calcification to ocean acidification has been studied in culture experiments as well as in present and past oceans. The response, however, is different between species and strains, and for the relatively small carbonate chemistry changes observed in natural...... North Atlantic Ocean. The pre-industrial Holocene, with its predominantly stable atmospheric CO2, provides the conditions for such a comprehensive analysis. For an analysis on changes in major components of Holocene coccolithophores under natural conditions, the family Noelaerhabdaceae was selected...

  13. 20 Elemental Composition and Sources of Atmospheric Particulate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    the most environmental concerns in urban areas, especially in view of the adverse health effects associated with ambient atmospheric particles (Pope, 2000). In the urban environment, particulate matter may be generated among others by automotive vehicles (road dust), manufacturing processes, fossil fuel combustion ...

  14. Seasonal Variation of Atmospheric Composition of Water-Soluble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    dust dispersion and biomass burning made a significant contribution to the atmospheric particulate pollution in. Morogoro. Keywords: Ion chromatography; Aerosol Characterization; coarse, fine and PM10 fractions; Meteorology. Introduction here is an increasing awareness of the influence of ambient particulate matter (PM) ...

  15. Impacts of near-future cultivation of biofuel feedstocks on atmospheric composition and local air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ashworth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale production of feedstock crops for biofuels will lead to land use changes. We quantify the effects of realistic land use change scenarios for biofuel feedstock production on isoprene emissions and hence atmospheric composition and chemistry using the HadGEM2 model. Two feedstocks are considered: oil palm for biodiesel in the tropics and short rotation coppice (SRC in the mid-latitudes. In total, 69 Mha of oil palm and 9 Mha of SRC are planted, each sufficient to replace just over 1% of projected global fossil fuel demand in 2020. Both planting scenarios result in increases in total global annual isoprene emissions of about 1%. In each case, changes in surface concentrations of ozone and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (bSOA are substantial at the regional scale, with implications for air quality standards. However, the changes in tropospheric burden of ozone and the OH radical, and hence effects on global climate, are negligible. Over SE Asia, one region of oil palm planting, increases in annual mean surface ozone and bSOA concentrations reach over 3 ppbv (+11% and 0.4 μg m−3 (+10% respectively for parts of Borneo, with monthly mean increases of up to 6.5 ppbv (+25% and 0.5 μg m−3 (+12%. Under the SRC scenario, Europe experiences monthly mean changes of over 0.6 ppbv (+1% and 0.1 μg m−3 (+5% in June and July, with peak increases of over 2 ppbv (+3% and 0.5 μg m−3 (+8 %. That appreciable regional atmospheric impacts result from low level planting scenarios demonstrates the need to include changes in emissions of reactive trace gases such as isoprene in life cycle assessments performed on potential biofuel feedstocks.

  16. Impacts of near-future cultivation of biofuel feedstocks on atmospheric composition and local air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, K.; Folberth, G.; Hewitt, C. N.; Wild, O.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale production of feedstock crops for biofuels will lead to land use changes. We quantify the effects of realistic land use change scenarios for biofuel feedstock production on isoprene emissions and hence atmospheric composition and chemistry using the HadGEM2 model. Two feedstocks are considered: oil palm for biodiesel in the tropics and short rotation coppice (SRC) in the mid-latitudes. In total, 69 Mha of oil palm and 9 Mha of SRC are planted, each sufficient to replace just over 1% of projected global fossil fuel demand in 2020. Both planting scenarios result in increases in total global annual isoprene emissions of about 1%. In each case, changes in surface concentrations of ozone and biogenic secondary organic aerosol (bSOA) are substantial at the regional scale, with implications for air quality standards. However, the changes in tropospheric burden of ozone and the OH radical, and hence effects on global climate, are negligible. Over SE Asia, one region of oil palm planting, increases in annual mean surface ozone and bSOA concentrations reach over 3 ppbv (+11%) and 0.4 μg m-3 (+10%) respectively for parts of Borneo, with monthly mean increases of up to 6.5 ppbv (+25%) and 0.5 μg m-3 (+12%). Under the SRC scenario, Europe experiences monthly mean changes of over 0.6 ppbv (+1%) and 0.1 μg m-3 (+5%) in June and July, with peak increases of over 2 ppbv (+3%) and 0.5 μg m-3 (+8 %). That appreciable regional atmospheric impacts result from low level planting scenarios demonstrates the need to include changes in emissions of reactive trace gases such as isoprene in life cycle assessments performed on potential biofuel feedstocks.

  17. Composition and structure of Mars' upper atmosphere - Results from the neutral mass spectrometers on Viking 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    The upper atmospheric mass spectrometers flown on Viking 1 and 2 are described, and results obtained for the composition and structure of Mars' upper atmosphere are summarized. Carbon dioxide is the major constituent of the atmosphere at all heights below 180 km. The thermal structure of the upper atmosphere is complex and variable with average temperatures below 200 K for both Viking 1 and 2. The atmosphere is mixed to heights in excess of 120 km. The isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in the Martian atmosphere is similar to that in the terrestrial atmosphere: N-15 is enriched in Mars' atmosphere by a factor of 1.62 + or - 0.16.

  18. Changing Atmospheric Acidity and the Oceanic Solubility of Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Alex; Sarin, Manmohan; Duce, Robert; Jickells, Tim; Kanakidou, Maria; Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Ito, Akinori; Turner, David; Mahowald, Natalie; Middag, Rob; Guieu, Cecile; Gao, Yuan; Croot, Peter; Shelley, Rachel; Perron, Morgane

    2017-04-01

    The atmospheric deposition of nutrients to the ocean is known to play a significant role in the marine carbon cycle. The impact of such deposition is dependent on the identity of the nutrient in question (e.g., N, P, Fe, Co, Zn, Ni, Cd), the location of the deposition, and the bioavailability of the deposited nutrient. Bioavailability is largely governed by the chemical speciation of a nutrient and, in general, insoluble species are not bioavailable. For Fe and P (and perhaps the other nutrient trace metals) solubility increases during transport through the atmosphere. The causes of this increase are complex, but interactions of aerosol particles with acids appears to play a significant role. Emissions of acidic (SO2 and NOx) and alkaline (NH3) gases have increased significantly since the Industrial Revolution, with a net increase in atmospheric acidity. This implies that Fe and P solubility may also have increased over this time period, potentially resulting in increased marine productivity. More recently, pollution controls have decreased emissions of SO2 from some regions and further reductions in SO2 and NOx are likely in the future. Emissions of NH3 are much more difficult to control however, and are projected to stabilise or increase slightly to the end of this century. Future anthropogenic emissions are thus likely to change the acidity of the atmosphere downwind of major urban / industrial centres, with potential consequences for the supply of soluble nutrients to the ocean. To address these issues UN/GESAMP Working Group 38, The Atmospheric Input of Chemicals to the Ocean, is convening a workshop on this topic at the University of East Anglia in February, 2017. The goals of this workshop are to review and synthesize the current scientific information on the solubility of aerosol-associated key biogeochemical elements, the biogeochemical controls on aerosol solubility, and the pH sensitivity of those controls; to consider the likely changes in solubility of

  19. Atmospheric Ozone and Methane in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar S. A. Isaksen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and methane are chemically active climate-forcing agents affected by climate–chemistry interactions in the atmosphere. Key chemical reactions and processes affecting ozone and methane are presented. It is shown that climate-chemistry interactions have a significant impact on the two compounds. Ozone, which is a secondary compound in the atmosphere, produced and broken down mainly in the troposphere and stratosphre through chemical reactions involving atomic oxygen (O, NOx compounds (NO, NO2, CO, hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2, volatile organic compounds (VOC and chlorine (Cl, ClO and bromine (Br, BrO. Ozone is broken down through changes in the atmospheric distribution of the afore mentioned compounds. Methane is a primary compound emitted from different sources (wetlands, rice production, livestock, mining, oil and gas production and landfills.Methane is broken down by the hydroxyl radical (OH. OH is significantly affected by methane emissions, defined by the feedback factor, currently estimated to be in the range 1.3 to 1.5, and increasing with increasing methane emission. Ozone and methane changes are affected by NOx emissions. While ozone in general increase with increases in NOx emission, methane is reduced, due to increases in OH. Several processes where current and future changes have implications for climate-chemistry interactions are identified. It is also shown that climatic changes through dynamic processes could have significant impact on the atmospheric chemical distribution of ozone and methane, as we can see through the impact of Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO. Modeling studies indicate that increases in ozone could be more pronounced toward the end of this century. Thawing permafrost could lead to important positive feedbacks in the climate system. Large amounts of organic material are stored in the upper layers of the permafrost in the yedoma deposits in Siberia, where 2 to 5% of the deposits could be organic material

  20. Multi-scale Model of Residual Strength of 2D Plain Weave C/SiC Composites in Oxidation Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2017-02-01

    Multi-scale models play an important role in capturing the nonlinear response of woven carbon fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In plain weave carbon fiber/silicon carbon (C/SiC) composites, the carbon fibers and interphases will be oxidized at elevated temperature and the strength of the composite will be degraded when oxygen enters micro-cracks formed in the as-produced parts due to the mismatch in thermal properties between constituents. As a result of the oxidation on fiber surface, fiber shows a notch-like morphology. In this paper, the change rule of fiber notch depth is fitted by circular function. And a multi-scale model based upon the change rule of fiber notch depth is developed to simulate the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. The multi-scale model is able to accurately predict the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of 2D plain weave C/SiC composites in oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the oxidation time and temperature of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of plain weave C/SiC composites.

  1. COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF HOT NEPTUNES, WITH APPLICATION TO GJ 436b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, J. I. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Line, M. R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Visscher, C. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Richardson, M. R. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005-1892 (United States); Nettelmann, N.; Fortney, J. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Barman, T. S. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Stevenson, K. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Madhusudhan, N., E-mail: jmoses@spacescience.org [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Neptune-sized extrasolar planets that orbit relatively close to their host stars—often called {sup h}ot Neptunes{sup —}are common within the known population of exoplanets and planetary candidates. Similar to our own Uranus and Neptune, inefficient accretion of nebular gas is expected produce hot Neptunes whose masses are dominated by elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. At high atmospheric metallicities of 10-10,000 times solar, hot Neptunes will exhibit an interesting continuum of atmospheric compositions, ranging from more Neptune-like, H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres to more Venus-like, CO{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. We explore the predicted equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry of generic hot Neptunes and find that the atmospheric composition varies strongly as a function of temperature and bulk atmospheric properties such as metallicity and the C/O ratio. Relatively exotic H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, and even O{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres are possible for hot Neptunes. We apply our models to the case of GJ 436b, where we find that a CO-rich, CH{sub 4}-poor atmosphere can be a natural consequence of a very high atmospheric metallicity. From comparisons of our results with Spitzer eclipse data for GJ 436b, we conclude that although the spectral fit from the high-metallicity forward models is not quite as good as the best fit obtained from pure retrieval methods, the atmospheric composition predicted by these forward models is more physically and chemically plausible in terms of the relative abundance of major constituents. High-metallicity atmospheres (orders of magnitude in excess of solar) should therefore be considered as a possibility for GJ 436b and other hot Neptunes.

  2. The increased atmospheric greenhouse effect and regional climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenaas, S. [Bergen Univ. (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. The main information for predicting future climate changes comes from integrating coupled climate models of the atmosphere, ocean and cryosphere. Regional climate change may be studied from the global integrations, however, resolution is coarse because of insufficient computer power. Attempts are being made to get more regional details out of the global integrations by ``downscaling`` the latter. This can be done in two ways. Firstly, limited area models with high resolution are applied, driven by the global results as boundary values. Secondly, statistical relationships have been found between observed meteorological parameters, like temperature and precipitation, and analyzed large scale gridded fields. The derived relations are then used on similar data from climate runs to give local interpretations. A review is given of literature on recent observations of climate variations and on predicted regional climate change. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Tissue composition changes and secondary lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylke, E S; Ward, L C; Meerkin, J D; Nery, L; Kilbreath, S L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of dominance and severity on tissue composition changes with lymphedema using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine the relationships between the DXA-determined tissue volumes and the clinical outcomes determined by perometry and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Fifty-six women with secondary lymphedema and 44 women without a history of breast cancer or lymphedema underwent measurement of their upper limbs with DXA, perometry, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Whether the affected side was the dominant or nondominant arm influenced inter-limb tissue volumes differences (F=16.31 to 35.14; all pPerometry-measured volumes and BIS ratios were moderately to highly correlated with inter-limb fat, volume, and total tissue differences found by DXA (r=0.39 to 0.86). The direction and magnitude of limb composition changes in those with lymphedema are impacted by whether the affected side is the dominant or nondominant limb, as well as the severity of the condition. The stage of tissue composition change may impact on the diagnosis and monitoring as well as treatment of secondary lymphedema.

  4. Isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric air; use of a diffusion model at the water/atmosphere interface in Velenje Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Kanduč

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available CO2 concentrations (partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and isotope compositions of carbon dioxide in air (δ13CCO2, temperature (T and relative humidity (H have been measured in the atmosphere in the Velenje Basin. Samples were collected monthly in the calendar year 2011 from 9 locations in the area where the largest thermal power plant in Slovenia with the greatest emission of CO2 to the atmosphere (around 4M t/year is located. Values of pCO2 ranged from 239 to 460 ppm with an average value of 294 ppm, which is below the average atmospheric CO2 pressure (360 ppm. δ13CCO2 ranged from -18.0 to -6.4 ‰, with an average value of -11.7 ‰. These values are similar to those measured in Wroclaw, Poland. We performed the comparison of δ13CCO2 values in atmospheric air with Wroclaw since researchers used similar approach to trace δ13CCO2 around anthropogenic sources. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC in rivers and lakes from the Velenje basin changes seasonally from -13.5 to -7.1‰. The values of δ13CDIC indicate the occurrence of biogeochemical processes in the surface waters, with dissolution of carbonates and degradation of organic matter being the most important. A concentration and diffusion model was used to calculate the time of equilibration between dissolved inorganic carbon in natural sources (rivers and atmospheric CO2.

  5. Corrosive effect of environmental change on selected properties of polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovičová, L.; Zatkalíková, V.

    2017-11-01

    The development of composite materials and the related design and manufacturing technologies is one of the most important advances in the history of materials. Composites are multifunctional materials having unprecedented mechanical and physical properties that can be tailored to meet the requirements of a particular application. Ageing is also important and it is defined as the process of deterioration of engineering materials resulting from the combined effects of atmospheric radiation, heat, oxygen, water, micro-organisms and other atmospheric factors. The present article deals with monitoring the changes in the mechanical properties of composites with polymer matrix. The composite was formed from the PA matrix and glass fibers (GF). The composite contains 10, 20 and 30 % of glass fibers. The mechanical properties were evaluated on samples of the composite before and after UV radiation on the sample. Light microscopy was evaluated distribution of glass fibers in the polymer matrix and the presence of cracks caused by UV radiation.

  6. South East Pacific atmospheric composition and variability sampled along 20° S during VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Allen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx was conducted from 15 October to 15 November 2008 in the South East Pacific (SEP region to investigate interactions between land, sea and atmosphere in this unique tropical eastern ocean environment and to improve the skill of global and regional models in representing the region. This study synthesises selected aircraft, ship and surface site observations from VOCALS-REx to statistically summarise and characterise the atmospheric composition and variability of the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL and Free Troposphere (FT along the 20° S parallel between 70° W and 85° W. Significant zonal gradients in mean MBL sub-micron aerosol particle size and composition, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide and ozone were seen over the campaign, with a generally more variable and polluted coastal environment and a less variable, more pristine remote maritime regime. Gradients in aerosol and trace gas concentrations were observed to be associated with strong gradients in cloud droplet number. The FT was often more polluted in terms of trace gases than the MBL in the mean; however increased variability in the FT composition suggests an episodic nature to elevated concentrations. This is consistent with a complex vertical interleaving of airmasses with diverse sources and hence pollutant concentrations as seen by generalised back trajectory analysis, which suggests contributions from both local and long-range sources. Furthermore, back trajectory analysis demonstrates that the observed zonal gradients both in the boundary layer and the free troposphere are characteristic of marked changes in airmass history with distance offshore – coastal boundary layer airmasses having been in recent contact with the local land surface and remote maritime airmasses having resided over ocean for in excess of ten days. Boundary layer composition to the east of 75° W was observed to be dominated by coastal

  7. Chemistry Simulations using the MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations using reanalysis meteorological fields have long been used to understand the causes of atmospheric composition change in the recent past. Using the new MERRA-2 reanalysis, we are conducting chemistry simulations to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model in Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 reanalysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 deg x 1.25 deg simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 grid of approximately 1/2 deg horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and its variability in the recent past.

  8. Understanding the formation and composition of hazes in planetary atmospheres that contain carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, S. M.; Yoon, Y. H.; Hicks, R. K.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) have revealed the presence of molecules in Titan's ionosphere with masses in excess of hundreds of amu. Negative ions with mass/charge (m/z) up to 10,000 amu/q [1] and positive ions with m/z up to 400 amu/q [2] have been detected. CAPS has also observed O+ flowing into Titan's upper atmosphere [3], which appears to originate from Enceladus and is likely the source of oxygen bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere [4]. The observed O+ is deposited in the region now known to contain large organic molecules. A recent Titan atmosphere simulation experiment has shown that incorporation of oxygen into Titan aerosol analogues results in the formation of all five nucleotide bases and the two smallest amino acids, glycine and alanine [5]. Similar chemical processes may have occurred in the atmosphere of the early Earth, or in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets; atmospheric aerosols may be an important source of the building blocks of life. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in determining the radiation budget of an atmosphere and can also provide a wealth of organic material to the surface. The presence of atmospheric aerosols has been invoked to explain the relatively featureless spectrum of HD 189773b, including the lack of predicted atmospheric Na and K spectral lines [9]. The majority of the O+ precipitating into Titan's atmosphere forms CO (O(3P)+CH3 -> CO+H2+H) [4]. CO has also been detected in the atmospheres of a number of exoplanets including HD 189733b, HD 209458b, and WASP-12b [6-8]. It is therefore important to understand the role CO plays in the formation and composition of hazes in planetary atmospheres. Using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) (see e.g. [10]) we have obtained in situ composition measurements of aerosol particles (so-called "tholins") produced in N2/CH4/CO gas mixtures subjected to either FUV radiation (deuterium lamp, 115-400 nm) or a

  9. Hanford Site Composite Analysis Technical Approach Description: Atmospheric Transport Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Lehman, L. L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in DOE O 435.1 Chg. 1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires the preparation and maintenance of a composite analysis (CA). The primary purpose of the CA is to provide a reasonable expectation that the primary public dose limit is not likely to be exceeded by multiple source terms that may significantly interact with plumes originating at a low-level waste disposal facility. The CA is used to facilitate planning and land use decisions that help assure disposal facility authorization will not result in long-term compliance problems; or, to determine management alternatives, corrective actions or assessment needs, if potential problems are identified.

  10. Composition of the atmosphere at the surface of Mars - Detection of argon-36 and preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.

    1976-01-01

    The composition of the Martian atmosphere was determined by the mass spectrometer in the molecular analysis experiment. The presence of argon and nitrogen was confirmed and a value of 1 to 2750 plus or minus 500 for the ratio of argon-36 to argon-40 was established. A preliminary interpretation of these results suggests that Mars had a slightly more massive atmosphere in the past, but that much less total outgassing has occurred on Mars than on earth.

  11. Responses of northern forest plants to atmospheric changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, K.; Huttunen, S.; Kauppi, M.; Ohtonen, R.; Laehdesmaeki, P. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    This research programme has been under way since 1990 to study the long-term synergistic effects of air pollutants and changing climatic conditions on the northern forest ecosystem and to increase the knowledge of climatic change and its consequences for the fragile northern nature. Ecological, physiological, morphological and biochemical methods have been used to study the responses of forest trees, dwarf shrubs, lichens and soil biology to environmental changes. The research programme is divided into four subprojects concentrating on different ecosystem levels. The subprojects are: (1) life, growth and survival strategies of northern dwarf shrubs under the pressure of a changing environment, (2) forest trees under the impact of air pollutants, increasing CO{sub 2} and UV-B, (3) susceptibility of lichens to air pollution and climatic change and (4) impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} on soil biology with special reference to carbon allocation and N fixation in symbiotic systems. This report summarizes the results of short-term experiments which showed many ecological and physiological changes in almost all elements of the northern boreal forests. These species-level measurements focused on the key species of the northern boreal forest, which have been thought to be useful in large-scale ecosystem experiments and modelling. The results will also facilitate the further studies on the patterns of plant species distribution and northern ecosystem function with respect to the environmental parameters that are expected to change along with global change (e.g. temperature, airchemistry, UV-B, snow condition)

  12. Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular Composition of Laboratory Proxies of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Aiona, Paige K.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2014-09-02

    Sources, optical properties, and chemical composition of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) aerosol are uncertain, making it challenging to estimate its contribution to radiative forcing. Furthermore, optical properties of BrC may change significantly during its atmospheric aging. We examined the effect of solar photolysis on the molecular composition, mass absorption coefficient, and fluorescence of secondary organic aerosol prepared by high-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene (NAP SOA). The aqueous solutions of NAP SOA was observed to photobleach with an effective half-time of ~15 hours (with sun in its zenith) for the loss of the near-UV (300 -400 nm) absorbance. The molecular composition of NAP SOA was significantly modified by photolysis, with the average SOA formula changing from C14.1H14.5O5.1N0.08 to C11.8H14.9O4.5N0.02 after 4 hours of irradiation. The average O/C ratio did not change significantly, however, suggesting that it is not a good metric for assessing the extent of photolysis-driven aging in NAP SOA (and in BrC in general). In contrast to NAP SOA, the photolysis of BrC material produced by aqueous reaction of limonene+O3 SOA (LIM/O3 SOA) with ammonium sulfate was much faster, but it did not result in a significant change in the molecular level composition. The characteristic absorbance of the aged LIM/O3 SOA in the 450-600 nm range decayed with an effective half-time of <0.5 hour. This result emphasizes the highly variable and dynamic nature of different types of atmospheric BrC.

  13. Effect of solar radiation on the optical properties and molecular composition of laboratory proxies of atmospheric brown carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Aiona, Paige Kuuipo; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2014-09-02

    Sources, optical properties, and chemical composition of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) aerosol are uncertain, making it challenging to estimate its contribution to radiative forcing. Furthermore, optical properties of BrC may change significantly during its atmospheric aging. We examined the effect of photolysis on the molecular composition, mass absorption coefficient, and fluorescence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) prepared by high-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene (NAP SOA). Our experiments were designed to model photolysis processes of NAP SOA compounds dissolved in cloud or fog droplets. Aqueous solutions of NAP SOA were observed to photobleach (i.e., lose their ability to absorb visible radiation) with an effective half-life of ∼15 h (with sun in its zenith) for the loss of near-UV (300-400 nm) absorbance. The molecular composition of NAP SOA was significantly modified by photolysis, with the average SOA formula changing from C14.1H14.5O5.1N0.085 to C11.8H14.9O4.5N0.023 after 4 h of irradiation. However, the average O/C ratio did not change significantly, suggesting that it is not a good metric for assessing the extent of photolysis-driven aging in NAP SOA (and in BrC in general). In contrast to NAP SOA, the photobleaching of BrC material produced by the reaction of limonene + ozone SOA with ammonia vapor (aged LIM/O3 SOA) was much faster, but it did not result in a significant change in average molecular composition. The characteristic absorbance of the aged LIM/O3 SOA in the 450-600 nm range decayed with an effective half-life of atmospheric BrC.

  14. Atmospheric Plasma Treatment of Nylon 6,6 for Improved Interfacial Adhesion in Thermoplastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujanda, A. A.; Wu, C.; Demaree, J. D.; Robinette, E. J.; Weerasooriya, A.; Flanagan, D.

    The physio-chemical modifications of polyamide (Nylon 6,6) obtained from exposure to an atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge were examined. Specifically, the surface energy, surface chemical composition, and interfacial adhesive strength were studied using water contact angle goniometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and single joint lap shear testing. Nylon substrates were plasma treated with both O2 and water vapor (H2O) in He for 30, 60, and 180 seconds, resulting in the functionalization of the surface via the addition of reactive chemical groups such as -OH that change the energy, composition, and reactivity of the surface. The studies revealed that He/H2O plasma treatments were more effective at functionalizing the surface than He/O2 plasma treatments, resulting in a more than 40% decrease in the water contact angle. XPS results show a significant increase in the amount of surface oxygen after treatment, and lap shear experiments show an almost ˜300% increase in interfacial adhesive strength.

  15. Earth's changing global atmospheric energy cycle in response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yefeng; Li, Liming; Jiang, Xun; Li, Gan; Zhang, Wentao; Wang, Xinyue; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The Lorenz energy cycle is widely used to investigate atmospheres and climates on planets. However, the long-term temporal variations of such an energy cycle have not yet been explored. Here we use three independent meteorological data sets from the modern satellite era, to examine the temporal characteristics of the Lorenz energy cycle of Earth's global atmosphere in response to climate change. The total mechanical energy of the global atmosphere basically remains constant with time, but the global-average eddy energies show significant positive trends. The spatial investigations suggest that these positive trends are concentrated in the Southern Hemisphere. Significant positive trends are also found in the conversion, generation and dissipation rates of energies. The positive trends in the dissipation rates of kinetic energies suggest that the efficiency of the global atmosphere as a heat engine increased during the modern satellite era.

  16. The composition of fine fragrances is changing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2003-01-01

    High frequencies of contact allergy to fragrance ingredients have been reported in recent years. Developments in analytical chemistry have made it possible to measure exposure to well-known fragrance contact allergens. It has been shown that exposure is widespread in different types of products. ...... products on the market, have a different composition from the new perfumes. This may be due to change in fashion or to an effort by the fragrance industry to focus on fragrance contact allergy, especially that to the FM ingredients....

  17. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  18. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, G.; Godowitch, J.; Henderson, B. H.; Fahey, K.; Pouliot, G.; Hutzell, W. T.; Mathur, R.; Kang, D.; Goliff, W. S.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-10-01

    We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU). Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  19. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  20. Martian Chronology and Atmospheric Composition: In Situ Measurements versus Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Donald D.

    2008-01-01

    I examine two significant issues of martian science from the point of view of in situ measurements by robotic spacecraft versus sample return and analysis in terrestrial labs. (1) To define martian history, ages of geological processes and surface features are required. Estimated ages from surface crater densities have limitations, and the ages measured for martian meteorites cannot be associated with specific martian locales. Whereas returned martian rocks could be accurately dated, some have suggested sending a robotic spacecraft to Mars to measure rock ages using the classical K- Ar-40 technique, considered the easiest to implement. (2) To understand the evolution of the martian atmosphere and its interactions with the surface, requires precise measurements of atmospheric composition. A significant amount of information has derived from measurements by Viking and of martian meteorites. Instrumentation on the Mars Science Lander (MSL) spacecraft to be launched in the near future promises to determine atmospheric composition even more precisely. If MSL is successful, which questions about atmospheric composition will remain and thus will require atmospheric sample return to answer?

  1. The composition of fine fragrances is changing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2003-01-01

    High frequencies of contact allergy to fragrance ingredients have been reported in recent years. Developments in analytical chemistry have made it possible to measure exposure to well-known fragrance contact allergens. It has been shown that exposure is widespread in different types of products. ...... products on the market, have a different composition from the new perfumes. This may be due to change in fashion or to an effort by the fragrance industry to focus on fragrance contact allergy, especially that to the FM ingredients....... of 5 of the 7 target allergens of the FM, while the new perfumes contained a mean of 2.8 of the allergens. The mean concentrations of the target allergens were 2.6 times higher in the old perfumes than in the new perfumes, range 2.2-337. It is concluded that the old perfumes, which are still popular...

  2. Chemical composition of aerosol in the atmospheric surface layer of the East Antarctica coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Golobokova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of aerosol in the ground layer of the coastal zone in East Antarctica is analyzed in the article. The aerosol samples were taken in 2006–2015 during seasonal works of the Russian Antarctic Expeditions (RAE, namely, these were 52nd–53rd, 55th, and 58th–60th expeditions. Samples were taken in the 200‑km band of the sea-shore zone along routes of the research vessels (REV «Akademik Fedorov» and «Akademik Treshnikov» as well as on territories of the Russian stations Molodezhnaya and Mirny. Although the results obtained did show the wide range of the aerosol concentrations and a certain variability of their chemical composition, some common features of the variability were revealed. Thus, during the period from 2006 to 2014 a decrease of average values of the sums were noted. Spatially, a tendency of decreasing of the ion concentrations was found in the direction from the station Novolazarevskaya to the Molodezhnaya one, but the concentrations increased from the Molodezhnaya to the station Mirny. The sum of ions of the aerosol in the above mentioned coastal zone was, on the average, equal to 2.44 μg/m3, and it was larger than that on the territory of the Antarctic stations Molodezhnaya (0,29 μg/m3 and Mirny (0,50 ág / m3. The main part to the sum of the aerosol ions on the Antarctic stations was contributed by Na+, Ca2+, Cl−, SO4 2−. The main ions in aerosol composition in the coastal zone are ions Na+ and Cl−. The dominant contribution of the sea salt and SO4 2− can be traced in not only the composition of atmospheric aerosols, but also in the chemical composition of the fresh snow in the coastal areas of East Antarctica: at the Indian station Maitri, on the Larsemann Hills, and in a boring located in 55.3 km from the station Progress (K = 1.4÷6.1. It was noted that values of the coefficient of enrichment K of these ions decreases as someone moves from a shore to inland. Estimation of

  3. Method for preparing polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1990-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein. The composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  4. Atmospheric composition change research: Time to go post-normal?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes Pereira, Angela; Raes, Frank; De Sousa Pedrosa, Tiago

    2009-01-01

    that interactionswith spheres other than the scientific are needed. While such interactions give personal insight and satisfaction, they seem to have little impact on the goals and the practice of the scientific work itself. Extended frameworks of science production that go beyond the disciplinarymode seemto emerge...

  5. 12 CFR 5.53 - Change in asset composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Change in asset composition. 5.53 Section 5.53... composition. (a) Authority. 12 U.S.C. 93a, 1818. (b) Scope. This section requires a national bank to obtain the approval of the OCC before changing the composition of all, or substantially all, of its assets...

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION ON THE STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. H. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China); Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi, E-mail: guojh@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2016-02-20

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of an escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets: HD 189733b, HD 209458b, GJ 436b, and Kepler-11b. We find that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter (λ), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400–900 Å), which pushes the transition of H/H{sup +} to low altitudes. In contrast, the transition of H/H{sup +} moves to higher altitudes when most photons are concentrated in the high-energy spectral region (50–400 Å). For exoplanets with a low λ, the lower temperatures of the atmosphere make many chemical reactions so important that photoionization alone can no longer determine the composition of the escaping atmosphere. For HD 189733b, it is possible to explain the time variability of Lyα between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K-type star, yet invoking only thermal H i in the atmosphere.

  7. Interdecadal changes in atmospheric connectivity using complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizmendi, F.; Barreiro, M.; Marti, A.

    2013-05-01

    Improving our understanding of the Earth complex climate phenomena, such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation, has a huge economic and social impact for present and future generations, and can underpin advances in areas as diverse as energy, environment, agricultural and marine sciences. To contribute in this direction we have analyzed the teleconnection patterns from a complex network perspective, using both linear and nonlinear time series symbolic analysis techniques. Specifically, we construct global climate networks by studying the monthly average eddy geopotential height anomalies at 200 mb since 1900 (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and NOAA 20th Century Reanalysis) and calculate the fraction of the Earth that each geographical point is connected to (area weighted connectivity function). Mutual information with the ordinal patterns and the classical probability density function methodologies, and linear correlation are used to measure the interconnection degree between nodes. The threshold, to avoid randomness, is varied to establish the strength of the links. The map of area weighted connectivity shows larger connectivity in the tropics with every methodology which agrees with our current understanding of tropical dynamics. Likewise with lower thresholds there are some extratropical regions that stand out for their number of connections, such as the south and north Pacific, which reflect the teleconnection patterns in both hemispheres through the propagation of Rossby waves. Moreover the results also show some differences between linear and nonlinear methodologies, specifically in the central tropical Pacific, where the nonlinear methods using ordinal patterns shows significantly fewer connections than with the others methods. Further analysis of the dynamics of the connectivities in strategic locations shows clear interdecadal changes in the area weighted connectivity function, which suggests changes in the dynamics of the atmospheric teleconnection processes in

  8. Changes in stable isotope composition in Lake Michigan trout ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have frequently sought to use environmental archives of sediment, peat and glacial ice to try and assess historical trends in atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition to aquatic ecosystems. While this information is valuable in the context of identifying temporal source trends, these types of assessments cannot account for likely changes in bioavailability of Hg sources that are tied to the formation of methylmercury (MeHg) and accumulation in fish tissues. For this study we propose the use of long-term fish archives and Hg stable isotope determination as an improved means to relate temporal changes in fish Hg levels to varying Hg sources in the Great Lakes. For this study we acquired 180 archived fish composites from Lake Michigan over a 40-year time period (1975 to 2014) from the Great Lakes Fish Monitoring and Surveillance Program, which were analyzed for their total Hg content and Hg isotope abundances. The results reveal that Hg sources to Lake Michigan trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have encountered considerable changes as well as a large shift in the food web trophic position as a result of the introduction of several invasive species, especially the recent invasion of dreissenid mussels. Total Hg concentrations span a large range (1,600 to 150 ng g-1) and exhibit large variations from 1975 to 1985. Ä199Hg signatures similarly exhibit large variation (3.2 to 6.9‰) until 1985, followed by less variation through the end of the data record in 2014.

  9. Changes in DOC treatability: Indications of compositional changes in DOC trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Burt, T. P.

    2009-03-01

    SummaryThis study considers long-term records of the nature of water colour and coincident water quality and quantity in order to test hypotheses about increases in release of dissolved organic carbon from peat soils across the northern hemisphere. The study focuses upon the treatment ratio, i.e. the ratio of the amount of coagulant dose required to the water colour of the incoming water, and compares this ratio to possible explanatory variables: pH, conductivity, water temperature, river flow and alkalinity. The study shows that: The annual average increase in treatment ratio is just less than 6.5% over a six year period. There is a long-term increase in the treatment ratio that is independent of changes in riverflow, pH, conductivity, water temperature and alkalinity and so a real change in DOC composition is occurring. There is a seasonal cycle in treatment ratio that is also independent of the available water and climate variables. The upward trend in treatment ratio is declining with time over the study period. The observed trends in DOC composition are consistent with an explanation of increasing DOC concentration and flux based upon changes in flow and temperature but is not consistent with present explanations based upon changes in atmospheric deposition or upon drought unless the effect of the drought are short-lived (1-2 years).

  10. Land-Atmosphere Interactions in Cold Environments (LATICE): The role of Atmosphere - Biosphere - Cryosphere - Hydrosphere interactions in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, J. F.; Tallaksen, L. M.; Stordal, F.; Berntsen, T.; Westermann, S.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Etzelmuller, B.; Hagen, J. O.; Schuler, T.; Hamran, S. E.; Lande, T. S.; Bryn, A.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is impacting the high latitudes more rapidly and significantly than any other region of the Earth because of feedback processes between the atmosphere and the underlying surface. A warmer climate has already led to thawing of permafrost, reducing snow cover and a longer growing season; changes, which in turn influence the atmospheric circulation and the hydrological cycle. Still, many studies rely on one-way coupling between the atmosphere and the land surface, thereby neglecting important interactions and feedbacks. The observation, understanding and prediction of such processes from local to regional and global scales, represent a major scientific challenge that requires multidisciplinary scientific effort. The successful integration of earth observations (remote and in-situ data) and model development requires a harmonized research effort between earth system scientists, modelers and the developers of technologies and sensors. LATICE, which is recognized as a priority research area by the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences at the University of Oslo, aims to advance the knowledge base concerning land atmosphere interactions and their role in controlling climate variability and climate change at high northern latitudes. The consortium consists of an interdisciplinary team of experts from the atmospheric and terrestrial (hydrosphere, cryosphere and biosphere) research groups, together with key expertise on earth observations and novel sensor technologies. LATICE addresses critical knowledge gaps in the current climate assessment capacity through: Improving parameterizations of processes in earth system models controlling the interactions and feedbacks between the land (snow, ice, permafrost, soil and vegetation) and the atmosphere at high latitudes, including the boreal, alpine and artic zone. Assessing the influence of climate and land cover changes on water and energy fluxes. Integrating remote earth observations with in-situ data and

  11. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, C-13/C-12, O-18/O-16, O-17 / O-16, and C-13 O-18 / C-12 O-16 in carbon dioxide, and Ar-38 / Ar-36, Kr-x / Kr-84, and N-15 / N-14 made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established approximately 4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing.

  12. Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere: First Results from the Mars Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Franz, Heather; Wong, Michael; Conrad, Pamela G.; Harpold, Dan; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie, A.; Manning, Heidi; hide

    2013-01-01

    Repeated measurements of the composition of the Mars atmosphere from Curiosity Rover yield a (40)Ar/N2 ratio 1.7 times greater and the (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratio 1.6 times smaller than the Viking Lander values in 1976. The unexpected change in (40)Ar/N2 ratio probably results from different instrument characteristics although we cannot yet rule out some unknown atmospheric process. The new (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratio is more aligned with Martian meteoritic values. Besides Ar and N2 the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on the Curiosity Rover has measured the other principal components of the atmosphere and the isotopes. The resulting volume mixing ratios are: CO2 0.960(+/- 0.007); (40)Ar 0.0193(+/- 0.0001); N2 0.0189(+/- 0.0003); O2 1.45(+/- 0.09) x 10(exp -3); and CO 5.45(+/- 3.62) x 10(exp 4); and the isotopes (40)Ar/(36)Ar 1.9(+/- 0.3) x 10(exp 3), and delta (13)C and delta (18)O from CO2 that are both several tens of per mil more positive than the terrestrial averages. Heavy isotope enrichments support the hypothesis of large atmospheric loss. Moreover, the data are consistent with values measured in Martian meteorites, providing additional strong support for a Martian origin for these rocks.

  13. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V; Torokova, L; Krcma, F; Mason, N J; Matejcik, S

    2016-11-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  14. Yield, chemical composition and nutritional quality responses of carrot, radish and turnip to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Andaleeb; Khan, Ikhtiar; Mahmood, Abid; Hameed, Abdul

    2013-10-01

    Future concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is very important due to its apparent economic and environmental impact in terms of climate change. However, a compressive assessment of its effect on the nutritional and chemical characteristics of food crops has yet to be established. In the present study the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the yield, chemical composition and nutritional quality of three root vegetables, carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. T-1-111), radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Mino) and turnip (Brassica rapa L. cv. Grabe) has been investigated. The yield of carrot, radish and turnip increased by 69, 139 and 72%, respectively, when grown under elevated CO2 conditions. Among the proximate composition, protein, vitamin C and fat contents decreased significantly for all the vegetables while sugar and fibre contents were increased. Response of the vegetables to elevated CO2 , in terms of elemental composition, was different with a significant decrease in many important minerals. Elevated CO2 decreased the amount of majority of the fatty acids and amino acids in these vegetables. It was observed that elevated CO2 increased the yield of root vegetables but many important nutritional parameters including protein, vitamin C, minerals, essential fatty acids and amino acids were decreased. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Atmospheric Ozone and Methane in a Changing Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Isaksen, Ivar S.A.; Berntsen, Terje K.; Dalsøren, Stig B.; Kostas Eleftheratos; Yvan Orsolini; Bjørg Rognerud; Frode Stordal; Ole Amund Søvde; Christos Zerefos; Holmes, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    Ozone and methane are chemically active climate-forcing agents affected by climate–chemistry interactions in the atmosphere. Key chemical reactions and processes affecting ozone and methane are presented. It is shown that climate-chemistry interactions have a significant impact on the two compounds. Ozone, which is a secondary compound in the atmosphere, produced and broken down mainly in the troposphere and stratosphre through chemical reactions involving atomic oxygen (O), NOx compounds (NO...

  16. Chemistry Simulations Using MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations using reanalyzed meteorological conditions have been long used to understand causes of atmospheric composition change over the recent past. Using the new Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2) meteorology, chemistry simulations are being conducted to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model developed Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 analysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 x 1.25 simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 approximately horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. The Replay simulations is driven by the online use of key MERRA-2 meteorological variables (i.e. U, V, T, and surface pressure) with all other variables calculated in response to those variables. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and changes over the recent past.

  17. Earth Rotation and Coupling to Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research supported under the contract dealt primarily with: (a) the mechanisms responsible for the exchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and atmosphere; (b) the quality of the data sets used to estimate atmospheric angular momentum; and (c) the ability of these data and of global climate models to detect low-frequency signals in the momentum and, hence, circulation of the atmosphere. Three scientific papers reporting on the results of this research were produced during the course of the contract. These papers identified the particular torques responsible for the peak in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day during the 1982-93 El Nino event, and, more generally, the relative roles of torques over land and ocean in explaining the broad spectrum of variability in the length-of-day. In addition, a tendency for interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum to increase during the last several decades of the 20th century was found in both observations and a global climate model experiment.

  18. Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qianlai; Chen, Min; Xu, Kai; Tang, Jinyun; Saikawa, Eri; Lu, Yanyu; Melillo, Jerry M.; Prinn, Ronald G.; McGuire, A. David

    2013-01-01

    Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21st centuries. We estimated that global soils consumed 32–36 Tg CH4 yr−1 during the 1990s. Natural ecosystems accounted for 84% of the total consumption, and agricultural ecosystems only consumed 5 Tg CH4 yr−1 in our estimations. During the twentieth century, the consumption rates increased at 0.03–0.20 Tg CH4 yr−2 with seasonal amplitudes increasing from 1.44 to 3.13 Tg CH4 month−1. Deserts, shrublands, and xeric woodlands were the largest sinks. Atmospheric CH4 concentrations and soil moisture exerted significant effects on the soil consumption while nitrogen deposition had a moderate effect. During the 21st century, the consumption is predicted to increase at 0.05-1.0 Tg CH4 yr−2, and total consumption will reach 45–140 Tg CH4 yr−1 at the end of the 2090s, varying under different future climate scenarios. Dry areas will persist as sinks, boreal ecosystems will become stronger sinks, mainly due to increasing soil temperatures. Nitrogen deposition will modestly reduce the future sink strength at the global scale. When we incorporated the estimated global soil consumption into our chemical transport model simulations, we found that nitrogen deposition suppressed the total methane sink by 26 Tg during the period 1998–2004, resulting in 6.6 ppb higher atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios compared to without considering nitrogen deposition effects. On average, a cumulative increase of every 1 Tg soil CH4 consumption decreased atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios by 0.26 ppb during the period 1998–2004.

  19. Elucidative analysis and sequencing of two respiratory health monitoring methods to study the impact of varying atmospheric composition on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Amit; Hothi, Navjot; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, Nirankar; Chakraborty, Monojit; Bansal, Sangeeta

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric composition of ambient air consists of different gases in definite proportion that affect the earth's climate and its ecological system. Due to varied anthropogenic reasons, this composition is changed, which ultimately have an impact on the health of living beings. For survival, the human respiratory system is one of the sensitive systems, which is easily and closely affected by the change in atmospheric composition of an external environment. Many studies have been conducted to quantify the effects of atmospheric pollution on human health by using different approaches. This article presents different scenario of studies conducted to evaluate the effects on different human groups. Differences between the studies conducted using spirometry and survey methods are presented in this article to extract a better sequence between these two methodologies. Many studies have been conducted to measure the respiratory status by evaluating the respiratory symptoms and hospital admissions. Limited numbers of studies are found with repeated spirometry on the same subjects for long duration to nullify the error arising due to decrease in efforts by the same subjects during manoeuvre of pulmonary function tests. Present study reveals the importance of methodological sequencing in order to obtain more authentic and reliable results. This study suggests that impacts of deteriorating atmospheric composition on human health can be more significantly studied if spirometry is done after survey analysis. The article also proposes that efficiency and authenticity of surveys involving health impacts will increase, if medical data information of patients is saved in hospitals in a proper format.

  20. Chiral Chemicals as Tracers of Atmospheric Sources and Fate Processes in a World of Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Bidleman, Terry; M. Jantunen, Liisa; Binnur Kurt-Karakus, Perihan; Wong, Fiona; Hung, Hayley; Ma, Jianmin; Stern, Gary; Rosenberg, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Elimination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under national and international regulations reduces “primary” emissions, but “secondary” emissions continue from residues deposited in soil, water, ice and vegetation during former years of usage. In a future, secondary source controlled world, POPs will follow the carbon cycle and biogeochemical processes will determine their transport, accumulation and fate. Climate change is likely to affect mobilisation of POPs through e.g., increased temperature, altered precipitation and wind patterns, flooding, loss of ice cover in polar regions, melting glaciers, and changes in soil and water microbiology which affect degradation and transformation. Chiral compounds offer advantages for following transport and fate pathways because of their ability to distinguish racemic (newly released or protected from microbial attack) and nonracemic (microbially degraded) sources. This paper discusses the rationale for this approach and suggests applications where chiral POPs could aid investigation of climate-mediated exchange and degradation processes. Multiyear measurements of two chiral POPs, trans-chlordane and α-HCH, at a Canadian Arctic air monitoring station show enantiomer compositions which cycle seasonally, suggesting varying source contributions which may be under climatic control. Large-scale shifts in the enantioselective metabolism of chiral POPs in soil and water might influence the enantiomer composition of atmospheric residues, and it would be advantageous to include enantiospecific analysis in POPs monitoring programs. PMID:24349938

  1. Constraining the atmospheric composition of the day-night terminators of HD 189733b: Atmospheric retrieval with aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Min [Institute for Computational Science, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Barstow, Joanna K. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU Oxford (United Kingdom); Heng, Kevin, E-mail: lee@physik.uzh.ch [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    A number of observations have shown that Rayleigh scattering by aerosols dominates the transmission spectrum of HD 189733b at wavelengths shortward of 1 μm. In this study, we retrieve a range of aerosol distributions consistent with transmission spectroscopy between 0.3-24 μm that were recently re-analyzed by Pont et al. To constrain the particle size and the optical depth of the aerosol layer, we investigate the degeneracies between aerosol composition, temperature, planetary radius, and molecular abundances that prevent unique solutions for transit spectroscopy. Assuming that the aerosol is composed of MgSiO{sub 3}, we suggest that a vertically uniform aerosol layer over all pressures with a monodisperse particle size smaller than about 0.1 μm and an optical depth in the range 0.002-0.02 at 1 μm provides statistically meaningful solutions for the day/night terminator regions of HD 189733b. Generally, we find that a uniform aerosol layer provide adequate fits to the data if the optical depth is less than 0.1 and the particle size is smaller than 0.1 μm, irrespective of the atmospheric temperature, planetary radius, aerosol composition, and gaseous molecules. Strong constraints on the aerosol properties are provided by spectra at wavelengths shortward of 1 μm as well as longward of 8 μm, if the aerosol material has absorption features in this region. We show that these are the optimal wavelengths for quantifying the effects of aerosols, which may guide the design of future space observations. The present investigation indicates that the current data offer sufficient information to constrain some of the aerosol properties of HD189733b, but the chemistry in the terminator regions remains uncertain.

  2. A high-resolution mass spectrometer to measure atmospheric ion composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Junninen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present recent achievements on developing and testing a tool to detect the composition of ambient ions in the mass/charge range up to 2000 Th. The instrument is an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (APi-TOF, Tofwerk AG. Its mass accuracy is better than 0.002%, and the mass resolving power is 3000 Th/Th. In the data analysis, a new efficient Matlab based set of programs (tofTools were developed, tested and used. The APi-TOF was tested both in laboratory conditions and applied to outdoor air sampling in Helsinki at the SMEAR III station. Transmission efficiency calibrations showed a throughput of 0.1–0.5% in the range 100–1300 Th for positive ions, and linearity over 3 orders of magnitude in concentration was determined. In the laboratory tests the APi-TOF detected sulphuric acid-ammonia clusters in high concentration from a nebulised sample illustrating the potential of the instrument in revealing the role of sulphuric acid clusters in atmospheric new particle formation. The APi-TOF features a high enough accuracy, resolution and sensitivity for the determination of the composition of atmospheric small ions although the total concentration of those ions is typically only 400–2000 cm−3. The atmospheric ions were identified based on their exact masses, utilizing Kendrick analysis and correlograms as well as narrowing down the potential candidates based on their proton affinities as well isotopic patterns. In Helsinki during day-time the main negative ambient small ions were inorganic acids and their clusters. The positive ions were more complex, the main compounds were (polyalkyl pyridines and – amines. The APi-TOF provides a near universal interface for atmospheric pressure sampling, and this key feature will be utilized in future laboratory and field studies.

  3. Achilles tendinosis - Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mos, Marieke; van El, Benno; DeGroot, Jeroen; Jahr, Holger; van Schie, Hans T. M.; van Arkel, Ewoud R.; Tol, Hans; Heijboer, Rien; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  4. Achilles tendinosis: Changes in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, M. de; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Jahr, H.; Schie, H.T.M. van; Arkel, E.R. van; Tol, H.; Heijboer, R.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Verhaar, J.A.N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Understanding biochemical and structural changes of the extracellular matrix in Achilles tendinosis might be important for developing mechanism-based therapies. Hypothesis: In Achilles tendinosis, changes occur in biochemical composition and collagen turnover rate. Study Design:

  5. The response of atmospheric CO sub 2 to changes in land use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.W.; Emanuel, W.R.; Post, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    The burning of biomass that often accompanies deforestation and other changes in land use is believed to be a major contributor to documented increases in the concentration of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Using three models of carbon turnover in the atmosphere and ocean, we simulate changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2} that result from the addition of CO{sub 2} from industrial sources and terrestrial ecosystems disturbed by changes in land use. We simulate atmospheric response to different histories of terrestrial biospheric CO{sub 2} release, and we compare these simulations with the history of atmospheric CO{sub 2} obtained from ice core measurements and atmospheric monitoring stations. 63 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Chemistry of atmospheric nucleation: on the recent advances on precursor characterization and atmospheric cluster composition in connection with atmospheric new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Ehn, M; Thornton, J; Sipilä, M; Worsnop, D R; Kerminen, V-M

    2014-01-01

    The recent development in measurement techniques and theoretical understanding has enabled us to study atmospheric vapor, cluster and nanoparticle concentrations, dynamics, and their connection to atmospheric nucleation. Here we present a summary of the chemistry of atmospheric clustering, growing nanoparticles, and their precursors. In this work, we focus particularly on atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion and recent progress in its understanding.

  7. Nano composite phase change materials microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingwen

    MicroPCMs with nano composite structures (NC-MicroPCMs) have been systematically studied. NC-MicroPCMs were fabricated by the in situ polymerization and addition of silver NPs into core-shell structures. A full factorial experiment was designed, including three factors of core/shell, molar ratio of formaldehyde/melamine and NPs addition. 12 MicroPCMs samples were prepared. The encapsulated efficiency is approximately 80% to 90%. The structural/morphological features of the NC-MicroPCMs were evaluated. The size was in a range of 3.4 mu m to 4.0 mu m. The coarse appearance is attributed to NPs and NPs are distributed on the surface, within the shell and core. The NC-MicroPCMs contain new chemical components and molecular groups, due to the formation of chemical bonds after the pretreatment of NPs. Extra X-ray diffraction peaks of silver were found indicating silver nano-particles were formed into an integral structure with the core/shell structure by means of chemical bonds and physical linkages. Extra functionalities were found, including: (1) enhancement of IR radiation properties; (2) depression of super-cooling, and (3) increase of thermal stabilities. The effects of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) arising from the silver nano-particles were observed. The Raman scattering intensity was magnified more than 100 times. These effects were also exhibited in macroscopic level in the fabric coatings as enhanced IR radiation properties were detected by the "Fabric Infrared Radiation Management Tester" (FRMT). "Degree of Crystallinity" (DOC) was measured and found the three factors have a strong influence on it. DOC is closely related to thermal stability and MicroPCMs with a higher DOC show better temperature resistance. The thermal regulating effects of the MicroPCMs coatings were studied. A "plateau regions" was detected around the temperature of phase change, showing the function of PCMs. Addition of silver nano-particles to the MicroPCMs has a positive

  8. Simulated atmospheric N deposition alters fungal community composition and suppresses ligninolytic gene expression in a northern hardwood forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan P Edwards

    Full Text Available High levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition may result in greater terrestrial carbon (C storage. In a northern hardwood ecosystem, exposure to over a decade of simulated N deposition increased C storage in soil by slowing litter decay rates, rather than increasing detrital inputs. To understand the mechanisms underlying this response, we focused on the saprotrophic fungal community residing in the forest floor and employed molecular genetic approaches to determine if the slower decomposition rates resulted from down-regulation of the transcription of key lignocellulolytic genes, by a change in fungal community composition, or by a combination of the two mechanisms. Our results indicate that across four Acer-dominated forest stands spanning a 500-km transect, community-scale expression of the cellulolytic gene cbhI under elevated N deposition did not differ significantly from that under ambient levels of N deposition. In contrast, expression of the ligninolytic gene lcc was significantly down-regulated by a factor of 2-4 fold relative to its expression under ambient N deposition. Fungal community composition was examined at the most southerly of the four sites, in which consistently lower levels of cbhI and lcc gene expression were observed over a two-year period. We recovered 19 basidiomycete and 28 ascomycete rDNA 28S operational taxonomic units; Athelia, Sistotrema, Ceratobasidium and Ceratosebacina taxa dominated the basidiomycete assemblage, and Leotiomycetes dominated the ascomycetes. Simulated N deposition increased the proportion of basidiomycete sequences recovered from forest floor, whereas the proportion of ascomycetes in the community was significantly lower under elevated N deposition. Our results suggest that chronic atmospheric N deposition may lower decomposition rates through a combination of reduced expression of ligninolytic genes such as lcc, and compositional changes in the fungal community.

  9. Aerosol composition and microstructure in the smoky atmosphere of Moscow during the August 2010 extreme wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovicheva, O. B.; Kistler, M.; Kireeva, E. D.; Persiantseva, N. M.; Timofeev, M. A.; Shoniya, N. K.; Kopeikin, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the physicochemical characterization of multicomponent aerosols in the smoky atmosphere of Moscow during the extreme wildfires of August 2010 and against the background atmosphere of August 2011. Thermal-optical analysis, liquid and ion chromatography, IR spectroscopy, and electron microscopy were used to determine the organic content (OC) and elemental content (EC) of carbon, organic/inorganic and ionic compounds, and biomass burning markers (anhydrosaccharides and the potassium ion) and study the morphology and elemental composition of individual particles. It has been shown that the fires are characterized by an increased OC/EC ratio and high concentrations of ammonium, potassium, and sulfate ions in correlation with an increased content of levoglucosan as a marker of biomass burning. The organic compounds containing carbonyl groups point to the process of photochemical aging and the formation of secondary organic aerosols in the urban atmosphere when aerosols are emitted from forest fires. A cluster analysis of individual particles has indicated that when the smokiest atmosphere is characterized by prevailing soot/tar ball particles, which are smoke-emission micromarkers.

  10. The role of planetary formation and evolution in shaping the composition of exoplanetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, D.; Nelson, R. P.; Barbieri, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last twenty years, the search for extrasolar planets has revealed the rich diversity of outcomes from the formation and evolution of planetary systems. In order to fully understand how these extrasolar planets came to be, however, the orbital and physical data we possess are not enough, and they need to be complemented with information about the composition of the exoplanets. Ground-based and space-based observations provided the first data on the atmospheric composition of a few extrasolar planets, but a larger and more detailed sample is required before we can fully take advantage of it. The primary goal of a dedicated space mission like the Exoplanet Characterization Observatory (EChO) proposal is to fill this gap and to expand the limited data we possess by performing a systematic survey of extrasolar planets. The full exploitation of the data that space-based and ground-based facilities will provide in the near future, however, requires knowledge about the sources and sinks of the chemical species and molecules that will be observed. Luckily, the study of the past history of the Solar System provides several indications about the effects of processes like migration, late accretion and secular impacts, and on the time they occur in the life of planetary systems. In this work we will review what is already known about the factors influencing the composition of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the case of gaseous giant planets, and what instead still need to be investigated.

  11. The modern atmospheric background dust load: Recognition in Central Asian snowpack, and compositional constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, T.; Pertsiger, F.; Zavjalova, L.

    1997-01-01

    Dusts in strata of snowpack in the Alai-Pamir range, Kirghizstan, Central Asia, have chemical compositions that are in the same restricted range as those of the dusts found in snowpacks at three other locations: central south Greenland, the St. Elias range (Alaska), and coastal Antarctica, where special-type local dust sources certainly cannot dominate. This similarity at the four widely separated sites appears to indicate that there is a modern atmospheric background dust that is the same on a regional, hemispheric, or global scale. The common compositional range is that of average crustal rock, or of moderately ferromagnesian volcanic rock. It is not that of carbonate, nor highly siliciceous rocks. Previously, the existence of an atmospheric background dust has been postulated only on the basis of its particle size distribution, and only from observations in polar regions. The present study partially determines the chemical composition of the background dust, and confirms its existence in snowpack at four localities worldwide, including the center of the earth's largest continent where dusts of local source have considerable influence. U.S. copyright. Published in 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Plasma penetration depth and mechanical properties of atmospheric plasma-treated 3D aramid woven composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Yao, L.; Xue, J.; Zhao, D.; Lan, Y.; Qian, X.; Wang, C. X.; Qiu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Three-dimensional aramid woven fabrics were treated with atmospheric pressure plasmas, on one side or both sides to determine the plasma penetration depth in the 3D fabrics and the influences on final composite mechanical properties. The properties of the fibers from different layers of the single side treated fabrics, including surface morphology, chemical composition, wettability and adhesion properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement and microbond tests. Meanwhile, flexural properties of the composites reinforced with the fabrics untreated and treated on both sides were compared using three-point bending tests. The results showed that the fibers from the outer most surface layer of the fabric had a significant improvement in their surface roughness, chemical bonding, wettability and adhesion properties after plasma treatment; the treatment effect gradually diminished for the fibers in the inner layers. In the third layer, the fiber properties remained approximately the same to those of the control. In addition, three-point bending tests indicated that the 3D aramid composite had an increase of 11% in flexural strength and 12% in flexural modulus after the plasma treatment. These results indicate that composite mechanical properties can be improved by the direct fabric treatment instead of fiber treatment with plasmas if the fabric is less than four layers thick.

  13. Plasma penetration depth and mechanical properties of atmospheric plasma-treated 3D aramid woven composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.; Yao, L.; Xue, J.; Zhao, D.; Lan, Y.; Qian, X. [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Textile Materials Science and Product Design, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, C.X. [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Textile Materials Science and Product Design, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224003 (China); Qiu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Textile Materials Science and Product Design, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)], E-mail: ypqiu@dhu.edu.cn

    2008-12-30

    Three-dimensional aramid woven fabrics were treated with atmospheric pressure plasmas, on one side or both sides to determine the plasma penetration depth in the 3D fabrics and the influences on final composite mechanical properties. The properties of the fibers from different layers of the single side treated fabrics, including surface morphology, chemical composition, wettability and adhesion properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurement and microbond tests. Meanwhile, flexural properties of the composites reinforced with the fabrics untreated and treated on both sides were compared using three-point bending tests. The results showed that the fibers from the outer most surface layer of the fabric had a significant improvement in their surface roughness, chemical bonding, wettability and adhesion properties after plasma treatment; the treatment effect gradually diminished for the fibers in the inner layers. In the third layer, the fiber properties remained approximately the same to those of the control. In addition, three-point bending tests indicated that the 3D aramid composite had an increase of 11% in flexural strength and 12% in flexural modulus after the plasma treatment. These results indicate that composite mechanical properties can be improved by the direct fabric treatment instead of fiber treatment with plasmas if the fabric is less than four layers thick.

  14. Changes to the chemical state of the Northern Hemisphere atmosphere during the second half of the twentieth century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Mike J.; Martinerie, Patricia; Witrant, Emmanuel; Helmig, Detlev; Worton, David R.; Hogan, Chris; Sturges, William T.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2017-07-01

    The NOx (NO and NO2) and HOx (OH and HO2) budgets of the atmosphere exert a major influence on atmospheric composition, controlling removal of primary pollutants and formation of a wide range of secondary products, including ozone, that can influence human health and climate. However, there remain large uncertainties in the changes to these budgets over recent decades. Due to their short atmospheric lifetimes, NOx and HOx are highly variable in space and time, and so the measurements of these species are of limited value for examining long-term, large-scale changes to their budgets. Here, we take an alternative approach by examining long-term atmospheric trends of alkyl nitrates, the production efficiency of which is dependent on the atmospheric [NO] / [HO2] ratio. We derive long-term trends in the alkyl nitrates from measurements in firn air from the NEEM site, Greenland. Their mixing ratios increased by a factor of 3-5 between the 1970s and 1990s. This was followed by a steep decline to the sampling date of 2008. Moreover, we examine how the trends in the alkyl nitrates compare to similarly derived trends in their parent alkanes (i.e. the alkanes which, when oxidised in the presence of NOx, lead to the formation of the alkyl nitrates). The ratios of the alkyl nitrates to their parent alkanes increased from around 1970 to the late 1990s. This is consistent with large changes to the [NO] / [HO2] ratio in the Northern Hemisphere atmosphere during this period. Alternatively, they could represent changes to concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, OH, or to the transport time of the air masses from source regions to the Arctic.

  15. A Phase-Change Composite for Use in Building Envelopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Ron S. [LMES/ORNL; Stovall, T. K. [LMES/ORNL; Weaver, K. E. [LMES/ORNL; Wilkes, K. E. [LMES/ORNL; Roy, S. [PhD Research Group, Inc.

    1992-06-15

    The objective of this project is to develop composite thermal insulations containing phase-change materials for use in the building envelope. The use of a phase-change insulation composite in the building envelope could result in a significant increase in energy efficiency. PhD Research provided candidate phase-change composites, and ORNL performed analytical and experimental evaluations of their thermal performance. The thermal resistance of the prototype panels was somewhat less than that of commercial products, although their thermal capacity was greater. Using these results, PhD Research has been working to modify the design and to produce practical building elements that incorporate phase-change material.

  16. Tight coupling of particle size, number and composition in atmospheric cloud droplet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substantial uncertainty in the indirect effect of aerosol particles on radiative forcing in large part arises from the influences of atmospheric aerosol particles on (i the brightness of clouds, exerting significant shortwave cooling with no appreciable compensation in the long wave, and on (ii their ability to precipitate, with implications for cloud cover and lifetime.

    Predicting the ambient conditions at which aerosol particles may become cloud droplets is largely reliant on an equilibrium relationship derived by Köhler (1936. However, the theoretical basis of the relationship restricts its application to particles solely comprising involatile compounds and water, whereas a substantial fraction of particles in the real atmosphere will contain potentially thousands of semi-volatile organic compounds in addition to containing semi-volatile inorganic components such as ammonium nitrate.

    We show that equilibration of atmospherically reasonable concentrations of organic compounds with a growing particle as the ambient humidity increases has potentially larger implications on cloud droplet formation than any other equilibrium compositional dependence, owing to inextricable linkage between the aerosol composition, a particles size and concentration under ambient conditions.

    Whilst previous attempts to account for co-condensation of gases other than water vapour have been restricted to one inorganic condensate, our method demonstrates that accounting for the co-condensation of any number of organic compounds substantially decreases the saturation ratio of water vapour required for droplet activation. This effect is far greater than any other compositional dependence; more so even than the unphysical effect of surface tension reduction in aqueous organic mixtures, ignoring differences in bulk and surface surfactant concentrations.

  17. Decomposing demographic change into direct vs. compositional components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    We present and prove a formula for decomposing change in a population average into two components. One component captures the effect of direct change in the characteristic of interest, and the other captures the effect of compositional change. The decomposition is applied to time derivatives of a...... is also presented. Other examples concern global life expectancy and the growth rate of the population of the world.......We present and prove a formula for decomposing change in a population average into two components. One component captures the effect of direct change in the characteristic of interest, and the other captures the effect of compositional change. The decomposition is applied to time derivatives...

  18. Aerosol size and chemical composition measurements at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Lab (PEARL) in Eureka, Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, P. L.; Tremblay, S.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Leaitch, R.; Kolonjari, F.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; AboEl Fetouh, Y.; Fogal, P.; Drummond, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    This study presents observations of aerosol chemical composition and particle number size distribution at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) in the Canadian High Arctic (80N, 86W). The current aerosol measurement program at PEARL has been ongoing for more than a year providing long-term observations of Arctic aerosol size distributions for both coarse and fine modes. Particle nucleation events were frequently observed during the summers of 2015 and 2016. The size distribution data are also compared against similar measurements taken at the Alert Global Atmospheric Watch Observatory (82N, 62W) for July and August 2015. The nucleation events are correlated at the two sites, despite a distance of approximately 500 km, suggesting regional conditions favorable for particle nucleation and growth during this period. Size resolved chemical composition measurements were also carried out using an aerosol mass spectrometer. The smallest measured particles between 40 and 60 nm are almost entirely organic aerosol (OA) indicating that the condensation of organic vapors is responsible for particle growth events and possibly particle nucleation. This conclusion is further supported by the relatively high oxygen content of the OA, which is consistent with secondary formation of OA via atmospheric oxidation.Lastly, surface measurements of the aerosol scattering coefficient are compared against the coefficient values calculated using Mie theory and the measured aerosol size distribution. Both the actual and the calculated scattering coefficients are then compared to sun photometer measurements to understand the relationship between surface and columnar aerosol optical properties. The measurements at PEARL provide a unique combination of surface and columnar data sets on aerosols in the High Arctic, a region where such measurements are scarce despite the important impact of aerosols on Arctic climate.PEARL research is supported by the Natural Sciences and

  19. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glass fibre composite for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, H.; Stenum, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    treated for more than 30 s. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis showed that the contents of aluminium and oxygen on the surface increased with the plasma treatment. The adhesion strength of the 2-s treated surface was comparable to or higher than that achieved by conventional mechanical surface......Glass-fibre-reinforced polyester composite plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge. Synthetic air was used as the treatment gas. The water contact angle dropped markedly from 84 to 22° after a 2-s treatment, and decreased to 0° when the composite plates were...... roughening. It decreased when the surfaces were treated for 5 and 15 s, but recovered for 30-s treatment....

  20. Changing Amazon biomass and the role of atmospheric CO2 concentration, climate, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Castanho, Andrea D.; Galbraith, David; Zhang, Ke; Coe, Michael T.; Costa, Marcos H.; Moorcroft, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon tropical evergreen forest is an important component of the global carbon budget. Its forest floristic composition, structure, and function are sensitive to changes in climate, atmospheric composition, and land use. In this study biomass and productivity simulated by three dynamic global vegetation models (Integrated Biosphere Simulator, Ecosystem Demography Biosphere Model, and Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) for the period 1970-2008 are compared with observations from forest plots (Rede Amazónica de Inventarios Forestales). The spatial variability in biomass and productivity simulated by the DGVMs is low in comparison to the field observations in part because of poor representation of the heterogeneity of vegetation traits within the models. We find that over the last four decades the CO2 fertilization effect dominates a long-term increase in simulated biomass in undisturbed Amazonian forests, while land use change in the south and southeastern Amazonia dominates a reduction in Amazon aboveground biomass, of similar magnitude to the CO2 biomass gain. Climate extremes exert a strong effect on the observed biomass on short time scales, but the models are incapable of reproducing the observed impacts of extreme drought on forest biomass. We find that future improvements in the accuracy of DGVM predictions will require improved representation of four key elements: (1) spatially variable plant traits, (2) soil and nutrients mediated processes, (3) extreme event mortality, and (4) sensitivity to climatic variability. Finally, continued long-term observations and ecosystem-scale experiments (e.g. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiments) are essential for a better understanding of the changing dynamics of tropical forests.

  1. Emerging pattern of global change in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Laštovička

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In the upper atmosphere, greenhouse gases produce a cooling effect, instead of a warming effect. Increases in greenhouse gas concentrations are expected to induce substantial changes in the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere, including a thermal contraction of these layers. In this article we construct for the first time a pattern of the observed long-term global change in the upper atmosphere, based on trend studies of various parameters. The picture we obtain is qualitative, and contains several gaps and a few discrepancies, but the overall pattern of observed long-term changes throughout the upper atmosphere is consistent with model predictions of the effect of greenhouse gas increases. Together with the large body of lower atmospheric trend research, our synthesis indicates that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are affecting the atmosphere at nearly all altitudes between ground and space.

  2. The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Jr., Francis Perry [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the Ox, HOx, NOx, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

  3. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Franz, H.; Trainer, M. G.; Wong, M. H.; Mischna, M. A.; Flesch, G.; Farley, K. A.; Owen, T. C.; Niles, P. B.; Jones, J. H.; Christensen, L. E.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, 13C/12C, 18O/16O, 17O/16O, and 13C18O/12C16O in carbon dioxide, 38Ar/36Ar, xKr/84Kr, and 15N/14N made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established ~4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing. References:[1] Mahaffy P. R. et al., Science, 341, 263-266, 2013, doi:10.1126/science.1237966. [2] Webster C. R. et al. (2013), Science, 341, 260-263, doi:10.1126/science.1237961. [3] Wong, M. H. et al. (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2013GL057840. [4] Atreya S. K. et al (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 1-5, doi:10.1002/2013GL057763. The research described here was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  4. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research: Outcomes of EPA’s STAR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri ...

  5. Comparison of ZrB2-MoSi2 Composite Coatings Fabricated by Atmospheric and Vacuum Plasma Spray Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaran; Wang, Zhong; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi; Ding, Chuanxian

    2017-01-01

    In this work, ZrB2-20 vol.% MoSi2 (denoted as ZM) composite coatings were fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) techniques, respectively. Phase composition and microstructure of the composite coatings were characterized. Their oxidation behaviors and microstructure changes at 1500 °C were comparatively investigated. The results showed that VPS-ZM coating was composed of hexagonal ZrB2, tetragonal and hexagonal MoSi2, while certain amount of ZrO2 existed in APS-ZM coating. The oxide content, surface roughness and porosity of VPS-ZM coating were apparently lower than those of APS-ZM coating. The mass gain of APS-ZM coating was maximum at the beginning (1500 °C, 0 h) and then decreased with the oxidation time extending, while the mass of VPS-ZM coating gradually increased with increasing the oxidation time. The possible reasons for the different oxidation behaviors of the two kinds of coatings were analyzed.

  6. Sensitivity of Oxygen Isotopes of Sulfate in Ice Cores to Past Changes in Atmospheric Oxidant Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Alexander, B.; Kunasek, S. A.; Mickley, L.; Murray, L. T.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2009-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate from ice cores allows for a quantitative assessment of the past oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, which has implications for the lifetime of pollutants (e.g. CO) and greenhouse gases (e.g. CH4), and changes in the sulfur budget on various timescales. Using Δ17O of sulfate measurements from the WAIS-Divide, Antarctica and Site-A, Greenland ice cores as constraints, we use the GEOS-Chem global three-dimensional chemical transport model to study changes in the concentrations of OH, O3, and H2O2 and their impact on sulfate Δ17O between the preindustrial and present-day. The Greenland ice core sulfate oxygen isotope observations are insensitive to changes in oxidant concentrations on the preindustrial-industrial timescale due to the rising importance of metal catalyzed S(IV) oxidation in mid- to high-northern latitudes resulting from anthropogenic metal emissions. The small change in Antarctic ice core sulfate Δ17O observations on this timescale is consistent with simultaneous increases in boundary layer O3 (32%) and H2O2 (49%) concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere, which have opposing effects on the sulfate O-isotope anomaly. Sulfate Δ17O is insensitive to the relatively small (-12%) decrease in Southern Hemisphere OH concentrations on this timescale due to the dominance of in-cloud versus gas-phase formation of sulfate in the mid-to-high southern latitudes. We find that the fraction of sulfate formed globally through gas-phase oxidation has not changed substantially between preindustrial and present times, however the total amount of sulfate formed in the gas-phase has nearly quadrupled due to rising anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide. Measurements over a glacial-interglacial cycle from the Vostok core indicate dramatic changes in the Δ17O of sulfate on this timescale, which provide a strong constraint for glacial-era atmospheric chemistry modeling efforts. We will present preliminary results of

  7. Significant Atmospheric Boundary Layer Change Observed above an Agulhas Current Warm Cored Eddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Messager

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air-sea impact of a warm cored eddy ejected from the Agulhas Retroflection region south of Africa was assessed through both ocean and atmospheric profiling measurements during the austral summer. The presence of the eddy causes dramatic atmospheric boundary layer deepening, exceeding what was measured previously over such a feature in the region. This deepening seems mainly due to the turbulent heat flux anomaly above the warm eddy inducing extensive deep and persistent changes in the atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics. The loss of heat by turbulent processes suggests that this kind of oceanic feature is an important and persistent source of heat for the atmosphere.

  8. Changes in the composition of South African red meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicolette Gibson

    2014-02-15

    Feb 15, 2014 ... plan. Yet, red meat is non-homogenous, unique to each country, and continually changing in composition. It is observed that the amount of fat on carcasses has reduced over time, simultaneously ... processes, as well as legislation and marketing strategies, continued research on composition needs to be.

  9. Mixing ratio and carbon isotopic composition investigation of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J.; Wen, X.; Sun, X.

    2016-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 can be used as a tracer in the study of urban carbon cycles, which are affected by anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 components. Continuous measurements of the mixing ratio and δ13C of atmospheric CO2 were conducted in Beijing from Nov. 15, 2012 to Mar. 8, 2014 including two heating seasons and a vegetative season. Both δ13C and the isotopic composition of source CO2 (δ13CS) were depleted in the heating seasons and enriched in the vegetative season. The diurnal variations in the CO2 mixing ratio and δ13C contained two peaks in the heating season, which are due to the effects of morning rush hour traffic. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of the CO2 mixing ratio and δ13C were affected by anthropogenic emissions and biogenic activity. Assuming that the primary CO2 sources at night (22:00-04:00) were coal and natural gas combustion during heating seasons I and II, an isotopic mass balance analysis indicated that coal combustion had average contributions of 83.83 ± 14.11% and 86.84 ± 12.27% and that natural gas had average contributions of 16.17 ± 14.11% and 13.16 ± 12.27%, respectively. The δ13C of background CO2 in air was the main error source in the isotopic mass balance model. Both the mixing ratio and δ13C of atmospheric CO2 had significant linear relationships with the air quality index (AQI) and can be used to indicate local air pollution conditions. Energy structure optimization, for example, reducing coal consumption, will improve the local air conditions in Beijing.

  10. Mixing ratio and carbon isotopic composition investigation of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jiaping; Wen, Xuefa; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 can be used as a tracer in the study of urban carbon cycles, which are affected by anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 components. Continuous measurements of the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 were conducted in Beijing from Nov. 15, 2012 to Mar. 8, 2014 including two heating seasons and a vegetative season. Both δ(13)C and the isotopic composition of source CO2 (δ(13)CS) were depleted in the heating seasons and enriched in the vegetative season. The diurnal variations in the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C contained two peaks in the heating season, which are due to the effects of morning rush hour traffic. Seasonal and diurnal patterns of the CO2 mixing ratio and δ(13)C were affected by anthropogenic emissions and biogenic activity. Assuming that the primary CO2 sources at night (22:00-04:00) were coal and natural gas combustion during heating seasons I and II, an isotopic mass balance analysis indicated that coal combustion had average contributions of 83.83±14.11% and 86.84±12.27% and that natural gas had average contributions of 16.17±14.11% and 13.16±12.27%, respectively. The δ(13)C of background CO2 in air was the main error source in the isotopic mass balance model. Both the mixing ratio and δ(13)C of atmospheric CO2 had significant linear relationships with the air quality index (AQI) and can be used to indicate local air pollution conditions. Energy structure optimization, for example, reducing coal consumption, will improve the local air conditions in Beijing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in local oceanographic and atmospheric conditions shortly after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhongzhen; Sui, Yi; Sheng, Jinyu; Tang, Danling; Lin, I.-I.

    2015-06-01

    This study examines changes in the local oceanographic and atmospheric conditions over the southern Bay of Bengal and adjacent Indian Ocean waters after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami based on satellite remote sensing data and atmospheric reanalysis fields. After the tsunami that occurred on 26 December 2004, the accumulated rainfall had a notably increase (600 mm per month) in January of 2005 over deep waters to the southeast of Sri Lanka. This rainfall increase after the tsunami was accompanied with cooling in the sea surface temperature (SST) (up to -2 °C). Four-day averaged SST anomalies had a noticeable increase (1-4 °C) after the tsunami over the deep waters to the southwest of the epicenter. Series of ocean atmospheric and biological variables changed successively after the change of SST. The chain of causality between the tsunami and the changes in the local atmospheric conditions is suggested.

  12. From closing the atmospheric ozone hole to reducing climate change. Lessons learned

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ewart, Gary W; Rom, William N; Braman, Sidney S; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2015-01-01

    ... the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The process that led to global agreement on reducing depletion of the ozone layer holds valuable lessons, and some ironies, for scientists and policy makers seeking now to address global climate change...

  13. BOREAS (Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study): Global change and biosphere-atmosphere interactions in the boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers J.

    1991-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystems Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) is a cooperative field and analysis project involving elements of land surface climatology, tropospheric chemistry, and terrestrial ecology. The goal of the study is to understand the interactions between the boreal forest biome and the atmosphere in order to clarify their roles in global change. The study will be centered on two 20 by 20 km sites within the North American boreal forest region, located near the northern and southern limits of the biome. Studies based at these sites will be used to explore the roles of various environmental factors in controlling the extent and character of the biome. The sites will be the subject of surface, airborne, and satellite based observations which aim to improve understanding of the biological and physical processes and states which govern the exchanges of energy, water, carbon, and trace gases between boreal forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. Particular reference will be made to those processes and states that may be sensitive to global change. The study also aims to develop the use of remote sensing techniques to transfer understanding of the above process from local scales out to regional scales. The BOREAS project is being planned for 1992-1996, with a major field effort in 1994.

  14. Particle sizes and composition of Mars atmospheric dust based upon Viking and Mariner 9 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Mars atmospheric dust can play an important role in the thermal structure of the Mars atmosphere during periods of high dust loading. However, the radiative properties of Mars atmospheric dust remain uncertain due to uncertain definitions of the dust composition and size distribution. The analysis by Toon et al., of Mariner 9 IRIS spectra during the 1971-1972 global dust storm indicated a reasonable match between the modeled 9-micron absorption of montmorillinite and the observed 9-micron absorption. Toon et al. also determined that an effective (cross-section weighted) mean radius of 2.5 microns (R(sub mode) = 0.4 microns) provided a consistent fit of montmorillinite to the IRIS dust spectra at 9 microns. Pollack et al. analyzed Viking lander observations of atmospheric extinction and scattering at visible-near IR wavelengths (0.5-1.0 microns), and obtained consistency with the Toon et al. dust size distribution when the effects of nonspherical particle shapes were included. An additional, minor (1 percent) component of visible-ultraviolet absorbing material was required to model the derived visible (0.86) and ultraviolet (0.4-0.6) single-scattering albedos of the dust, since montmorillinite does not absorb sufficiently in this wavelength region. A combined analysis of the Viking IRTM and Mariner 9 observations was conducted to reassess the model of Mars atmospheric ultraviolet-to-infrared measurements of dust absorption and scattering. The optical constants for palagonite are incorporated in a doubling-adding radiative transfer model of the Mars atmosphere to simulate Mariner 9 IRIS spectra as well as the Viking IRTM IR band observations. Visible and ultraviolet single-scattering albedos based on the Hansen and Travis Mie scattering code were also derived. A tentative conclusion is that smaller dust particles (R(sub mode) = 0.15 microns, cross-section weighted mean R = 1.2 microns) composed of palagonite provide a much improved fit to the Mariner 9 IRIS spectra

  15. The influence of leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange on the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants and the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Berry, Joseph A

    2013-10-01

    The distribution of nitrogen isotopes in the biosphere has the potential to offer insights into the past, present and future of the nitrogen cycle, but it is challenging to unravel the processes controlling patterns of mixing and fractionation. We present a mathematical model describing a previously overlooked process: nitrogen isotope fractionation during leaf-atmosphere NH3(g ) exchange. The model predicts that when leaf-atmosphere exchange of NH3(g ) occurs in a closed system, the atmospheric reservoir of NH3(g ) equilibrates at a concentration equal to the ammonia compensation point and an isotopic composition 8.1‰ lighter than nitrogen in protein. In an open system, when atmospheric concentrations of NH3(g ) fall below or rise above the compensation point, protein can be isotopically enriched by net efflux of NH3(g ) or depleted by net uptake. Comparison of model output with existing measurements in the literature suggests that this process contributes to variation in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in plants as well as NH3(g ) in the atmosphere, and should be considered in future analyses of nitrogen isotope circulation. The matrix-based modelling approach that is introduced may be useful for quantifying isotope dynamics in other complex systems that can be described by first-order kinetics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. JADDS - towards a tailored global atmospheric composition data service for CAMS forecasts and reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Olaf; Schultz, Martin G.; Rambadt, Michael; Saini, Rajveer; Hoffmann, Lars; Mallmann, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Global model data of atmospheric composition produced by the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service (CAMS) is collected since 2010 at FZ Jülich and serves as boundary condition for use by Regional Air Quality (RAQ) modellers world-wide. RAQ models need time-resolved meteorological as well as chemical lateral boundary conditions for their individual model domains. While the meteorological data usually come from well-established global forecast systems, the chemical boundary conditions are not always well defined. In the past, many models used 'climatic' boundary conditions for the tracer concentrations, which can lead to significant concentration biases, particularly for tracers with longer lifetimes which can be transported over long distances (e.g. over the whole northern hemisphere) with the mean wind. The Copernicus approach utilizes extensive near-realtime data assimilation of atmospheric composition data observed from space which gives additional reliability to the global modelling data and is well received by the RAQ communities. An existing Web Coverage Service (WCS) for sharing these individually tailored model results is currently being re-engineered to make use of a modern, scalable database technology in order to improve performance, enhance flexibility, and allow the operation of catalogue services. The new Jülich Atmospheric Data Distributions Server (JADDS) adheres to the Web Coverage Service WCS2.0 standard as defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium OGC. This enables the user groups to flexibly define datasets they need by selecting a subset of chemical species or restricting geographical boundaries or the length of the time series. The data is made available in the form of different catalogues stored locally on our server. In addition, the Jülich OWS Interface (JOIN) provides interoperable web services allowing for easy download and visualization of datasets delivered from WCS servers via the internet. We will present the prototype JADDS

  17. Water security, global change and land-atmosphere feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadson, Simon; Acreman, Michael; Harding, Richard

    2013-11-13

    Understanding the competing pressures on water resources requires a detailed knowledge of the future water balance under uncertain environmental change. The need for a robust, scientifically rigorous evidence base for effective policy planning and practice has never been greater. Environmental change includes, but is not limited to, climate change; it also includes land-use and land-cover change, including deforestation for agriculture, and occurs alongside changes in anthropogenic interventions that are used in natural resource management such as the regulation of river flows using dams, which can have impacts that frequently exceed those arising in the natural system. In this paper, we examine the role that land surface models can play in providing a robust scientific basis for making resource management decisions against a background of environmental change. We provide some perspectives on recent developments in modelling in land surface hydrology. Among the range of current land surface and hydrology models, there is a large range of variability, which indicates that the specification and parametrization of several basic processes in the models can be improved. Key areas that require improvement in order to address hydrological applications include (i) the representation of groundwater in models, particularly at the scales relevant to land surface modelling, (ii) the representation of human interventions such as dams and irrigation in the hydrological system, (iii) the quantification and communication of uncertainty, and (iv) improved understanding of the impact on water resources availability of multiple use through treatment, recycling and return flows (and the balance of consumptive and conservative uses). Through a series of examples, we demonstrate that changes in water use could have important reciprocal impacts on climate over a wide area. The effects of water management decisions on climate feedbacks are only beginning to be investigated-they are

  18. Towards a new proxy of continental atmospheric humidity: the triple oxygen isotopic composition of plant biosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A. E.; Pauchet, S.; Landais, A.; Piel, C.; Devidal, S.; Roy, J.; Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Sonzogni, C.; Pasturel, M.; Cornuault, P.; Xin, J.; Mazur, J. C.; Prie, F.; Bentaleb, I.

    2016-12-01

    There is a serious lack of proxy suitable for reconstructing, in a quantitative way, past changes of continental atmospheric humidity. This reduces the possibility to make model-data comparisons necessary for the implementation of climate models. Over the past 10 years, analytical developments have enabled a few laboratories to reach sufficient precision for measuring the triple oxygen isotopes, expressed by the 17O-excess, in water, water vapor, atmospheric oxygen, and minerals. The 17O-excess represents an alternative to d-excess for investigating relative humidity conditions that prevail during water evaporation. The 17O-excess of water results from the increase of kinetic isotopic fractionation at evaporative sites as a function of decreasing relative humidity. This mechanism occurs at large scales, i.e. during seawater evaporation or during plant canopies transpiration. Unlike deuterium-excess, 17O-excess is supposed to be insensitive to temperature and less sensitive than δD and δ18O to equilibrium fractionation during transport and precipitation. Additionally, the 17O-excess is recorded in biogenic minerals less prone to weathering than organic compounds. Here, we calibrate the 17O-excess of plant biosilica as a new air humidity proxy. First, we examined the behavior of the 17O-excess in soil water, leaf water and phytoliths in growth chambers in response to changes in relative humidity. Second, we measured the 17O-excess of soil phytolith assemblages from inter-tropical savannas and forests distributed along humidity transects. Both approaches show similar dependency of phytolith 17O-excess to relative humidity. The results allow to discuss future calibration directions aimed at estimating the precision of the obtained relationship and at quantifying the successive isotopic fractionations in play at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface, to provide a strong proxy of past atmospheric relative humidity.

  19. Changes in tropospheric composition and air quality due to stratospheric ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Keith R; Tang, Xiaoyan; Wilson, Stephen R; Zanis, Prodromos; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2003-01-01

    Increased UV-B through stratospheric ozone depletion leads to an increased chemical activity in the lower atmosphere (the troposphere). The effect of stratospheric ozone depletion on tropospheric ozone is small (though significant) compared to the ozone generated anthropogenically in areas already experiencing air pollution. Modeling and experimental studies suggest that the impacts of stratospheric ozone depletion on tropospheric ozone are different at different altitudes and for different chemical regimes. As a result the increase in ozone due to stratospheric ozone depletion may be greater in polluted regions. Attributable effects on concentrations are expected only in regions where local emissions make minor contributions. The vertical distribution of NOx (NO + NO2), the emission of volatile organic compounds and the abundance of water vapor, are important influencing factors. The long-term nature of stratospheric ozone depletion means that even a small increase in tropospheric ozone concentration can have a significant impact on human health and the environment. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA) are produced by the atmospheric degradation of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). TFA has been measured in rain, rivers, lakes, and oceans, the ultimate sink for these and related compounds. Significant anthropogenic sources of TFA other than degradation HCFCs and HFCs have been identified. Toxicity tests under field conditions indicate that the concentrations of TFA and CDFA currently produced by the atmospheric degradation of HFCs and HCFCs do not present a risk to human health and the environment. The impact of the interaction between ozone depletion and future climate change is complex and a significant area of current research. For air quality and tropospheric composition, a range of physical parameters such as temperature, cloudiness and atmospheric transport will modify the impact of UV-B. Changes in the

  20. Impact of sea ice cover changes on the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric winter circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Handorf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of the Arctic atmosphere to low and high sea ice concentration phases based on European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF Re-Analysis Interim (ERA-Interim atmospheric data and Hadley Centre's sea ice dataset (HadISST1 from 1989 until 2010 has been studied. Time slices of winter atmospheric circulation with high (1990–2000 and low (2001–2010 sea ice concentration in the preceding August/September have been analysed with respect to tropospheric interactions between planetary and baroclinic waves. It is shown that a changed sea ice concentration over the Arctic Ocean impacts differently the development of synoptic and planetary atmospheric circulation systems. During the low ice phase, stronger heat release to the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean reduces the atmospheric vertical static stability. This leads to an earlier onset of baroclinic instability that further modulates the non-linear interactions between baroclinic wave energy fluxes on time scales of 2.5–6 d and planetary scales of 10–90 d. Our analysis suggests that Arctic sea ice concentration changes exert a remote impact on the large-scale atmospheric circulation during winter, exhibiting a barotropic structure with similar patterns of pressure anomalies at the surface and in the mid-troposphere. These are connected to pronounced planetary wave train changes notably over the North Pacific.

  1. The impact of enhanced atmospheric carbon dioxide on yield, proximate composition, elemental concentration, fatty acid and vitamin C contents of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ikhtiar; Azam, Andaleeb; Mahmood, Abid

    2013-01-01

    The global average temperature has witnessed a steady increase during the second half of the twentieth century and the trend is continuing. Carbon dioxide, a major green house gas is piling up in the atmosphere and besides causing global warming, is expected to alter the physico-chemical composition of plants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the hypothesis that increased CO(2) in the air is causing undesirable changes in the nutritional composition of tomato fruits. Two varieties of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were grown in ambient (400 μmol mol(-1)) and elevated (1,000 μmol mol(-1)) concentration of CO(2) under controlled conditions. The fruits were harvested at premature and fully matured stages and analyzed for yield, proximate composition, elemental concentration, fatty acid, and vitamin C contents. The amount of carbohydrates increased significantly under the enhanced CO(2) conditions. The amount of crude protein and vitamin C, two important nutritional parameters, decreased substantially. Fatty acid content showed a mild decrease with a slight increase in crude fiber. Understandably, the effect of enhanced atmospheric CO(2) was more pronounced at the fully matured stage. Mineral contents of the fruit samples changed in an irregular fashion. Tomato fruit has been traditionally a source of vitamin C, under the experimental conditions, a negative impact of enhanced CO(2) on this source of vitamin C was observed. The nutritional quality of both varieties of tomato has altered under the CO(2) enriched atmosphere.

  2. Improving adhesion of powder coating on PEEK composite: Influence of atmospheric plasma parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Aurélie; Ho, Thu Huong; Fahs, Ahmad; Lafabrier, Aurore; Louarn, Guy; Bacharouche, Jalal; Airoudj, Aissam; Aragon, Emmanuel; Chailan, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In aeronautic industries, powder coatings are increasingly used because of environmental considerations. During the deposition of such a coating on a substrate piece, the main objective is to obtain a good coating/substrate adhesion. In this study, the targeted substrate is a Poly-(Ether EtherKetone)-(PEEK) based composite material. Due to the poor surface energy of PEEK, a surface treatment is necessary in order to enhance its adhesion with the coating. In this purpose, atmospheric plasma treatment has been chosen and the influence of plasma parameters has been studied. Four scan speed nozzles and three gases (Air, N2 and Argon) plasma has been tested. The increase of adhesion with increasing wettability, polarity and nanoroughness has been evidenced. A particular study of the type of grafted polar functionalities according to gas nature allowed to better understand the plasma mechanism and the cross-impact of polarity and nanoroughness in adhesion enhancement.

  3. Elemental composition of Tibetan Plateau top soils and its effect on evaluating atmospheric pollution transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoliu; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong

    2009-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is an ideal place for monitoring the atmospheric environment of low to mid latitudes. In total 54 soil samples from the western TP were analyzed for major and trace elements. Results indicate that concentrations of some typical "pollution" elements (such as As) are naturally high here, which may cause incorrect evaluation for the source region of these elements, especially when upper continental crust values are used to calculate enrichment factors. Because only particles elemental concentrations of this fraction of the TP soils are more reliable for the future aerosol related studies over the TP. In addition, REE compositions of the TP soils are unusual, highly characteristic and can be used as an effective index for identifying dust aerosol from the TP.

  4. Structure and composition of the neutral upper atmosphere of Mars from the MAVEN NGIMS investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P R; Benna, M; Elrod, M; Yelle, R V; Bougher, S W; Stone, S W; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-16

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) provides sensitive detections of neutral gas and ambient ion composition. NGIMS measurements of nine atomic and molecular neutral species, and their variation with altitude, latitude, and solar zenith angle are reported over several months of operation of the MAVEN mission. Sampling NGIMS signals from multiple neutral species every several seconds reveals persistent and unexpectedly large amplitude density structures. The scale height temperatures are mapped over the course of the first few months of the mission from high down to midlatitudes. NGIMS measurements near the homopause of 40Ar/N2 ratios agree with those reported by the Sample Analysis at Mars investigation and allow the altitude of the homopause for the most abundant gases to be established.

  5. The weathering of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur in Earth's crust and its importance for regulating atmospheric composition, seawater chemistry, and stable isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, C. T.; Planavsky, N.; Bolton, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's crust stores extremely large reservoirs of organic carbon and pyrite sulfur, and transient or secular changes in the sizes of these reservoirs have the capacity to dramatically alter atmospheric composition, climate, seawater acid-base chemistry, and the propagation of isotopic signals into the geologic record. This talk will present and discuss new quantitative approaches toward better understanding the factors that control organic carbon and pyrite sulfur weathering under a wide range of Earth surface conditions, as well as their downstream effects on seawater chemistry, stability of atmospheric pO2, and conventional interpretations of stable carbon isotope mass balance during pivotal events in Earth's biogeochemical evolution. In particular, we will focus on (1) development of a weathering-driven scaling between atmospheric pO2 and geologic carbon isotope signals that explains the relative stability of marine δ13C through time and provides a mechanism for protracted negative δ13C excursions during transient increases in atmospheric pO2; (2) experimental and theoretical approaches aimed at better understanding the role of pyrite sulfur weathering in stabilizing atmospheric pO2; and (3) the importance of redox balance in the sedimentary rock cycle for controlling the marine carbonate system and atmospheric pCO2.

  6. Body composition changes in pregnancy: measurement, predictors and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widen, EM; Gallagher, D

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of overweight and obesity has risen in the United States over the past few decades. Concurrent with this rise in obesity has been an increase in pregravid body mass index and gestational weight gain affecting maternal body composition changes in pregnancy. During pregnancy, many of the assumptions inherent in body composition estimation are violated, particularly the hydration of fat-free mass, and available methods are unable to disentangle maternal composition from fetus and supporting tissues; therefore, estimates of maternal body composition during pregnancy are prone to error. Here we review commonly used and available methods for assessing body composition changes in pregnancy, including: (1) anthropometry, (2) total body water, (3) densitometry, (4) imaging, (5) dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, (6) bioelectrical impedance and (7) ultrasound. Several of these methods can measure regional changes in adipose tissue; however, most of these methods provide only whole-body estimates of fat and fat-free mass. Consideration is given to factors that may influence changes in maternal body composition, as well as long-term maternal and offspring outcomes. Finally, we provide recommendations for future research in this area. PMID:24667754

  7. Microbiome of the upper troposphere: Species composition and prevalence, effects of tropical storms, and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon-Rodriguez, Natasha; Lathem, Terry L.; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Barazesh, James M.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Bergin, Michael; Nenes, Athanasios; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2013-01-01

    The composition and prevalence of microorganisms in the middle-to-upper troposphere (8–15 km altitude) and their role in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions represent important, unresolved questions for biological and atmospheric science. In particular, airborne microorganisms above the oceans remain essentially uncharacterized, as most work to date is restricted to samples taken near the Earth’s surface. Here we report on the microbiome of low- and high-altitude air masses sampled onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration DC-8 platform during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes campaign in the Caribbean Sea. The samples were collected in cloudy and cloud-free air masses before, during, and after two major tropical hurricanes, Earl and Karl. Quantitative PCR and microscopy revealed that viable bacterial cells represented on average around 20% of the total particles in the 0.25- to 1-μm diameter range and were at least an order of magnitude more abundant than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria represent an important and underestimated fraction of micrometer-sized atmospheric aerosols. The samples from the two hurricanes were characterized by significantly different bacterial communities, revealing that hurricanes aerosolize a large amount of new cells. Nonetheless, 17 bacterial taxa, including taxa that are known to use C1–C4 carbon compounds present in the atmosphere, were found in all samples, indicating that these organisms possess traits that allow survival in the troposphere. The findings presented here suggest that the microbiome is a dynamic and underappreciated aspect of the upper troposphere with potentially important impacts on the hydrological cycle, clouds, and climate. PMID:23359712

  8. Microbiology of atmospheric trace gases. Sources, sinks and global change processes. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murrell, J.C. [ed.] [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Kelly, D.P. [ed.] [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Inst. of Education

    1996-10-01

    It was a purpose in this ARW to bring together experts in the microbiology and biogeochemistry of the fundamentally important gases (methane, halomethanes, carbon monoxide, organosulfur compounds, nitrogen oxides) in order to quantify as far as possible the biological driving forces and regulatory processes (sources, sinks, and turnover dynamics) leading to the observed atmospheric composition, and to identify the biological and chemical networks linking the various trace gases in their production and turnover in the terrestrial and marine environments, which are the ultimate sources and sinks for the atmospheric phases of these compounds. (orig./SR)

  9. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, Ivana; Cigasova, Julia; Stevulova, Nadezda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution) and physically (by ultrasonic procedure) treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  10. Observed near-surface atmospheric moisture content changes affected by irrigation development in Xinjiang, Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songjun; Tang, Qiuhong; Xu, Di; Wang, Shaoli; Yang, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    The effects of irrigation development on observed near-surface atmospheric moisture changes remain unclear in arid Xinjiang. In this study, cultivated land fractions (CFs) within a 4-km radius of 90 meteorological stations over Xinjiang, which are inferred from the 2000 land use map, are used as a quantitative indicator of irrigation intensity. Trends of observed water vapor pressure and relative humidity during the growing season (May to September) from 1959 to 2006 are significantly positively correlated with CFs of the meteorological stations. Stations with larger CFs experience a more rapid increase in near-surface atmospheric moisture than stations with small CFs. Results indicate that growing season near-surface atmospheric moisture wetting is enhanced by irrigation development for stations with high levels of cultivated land uses. The land use around stations should be considered when analyzing the observed near-surface atmospheric moisture changes in Xinjiang.

  11. Projected land photosynthesis constrained by changes in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Wenzel, Sabrina; Cox, Peter M.; Eyring, Veronika; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainties in the response of vegetation to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations1,2 contribute to the large spread in projections of future climate change3,4. Climate–carbon cycle models generally agree that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will enhance terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP). However, the magnitude of this CO2 fertilization effect varies from a 20 per cent to a 60 per cent increase in GPP for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations in model studies5–7...

  12. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  13. The impact of Future Land Use and Land Cover Changes on Atmospheric Chemistry-Climate Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Bouwman, L.

    2010-01-01

    To demonstrate potential future consequences of land cover and land use changes beyond those for physical climate and the carbon cycle, we present an analysis of large-scale impacts of land cover and land use changes on atmospheric chemistry using the chemistry-climate model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy

  14. Future changes in biogenic isoprene emissions: how might they affect regional and global atmospheric chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Wiedinmyer; Xuexi Tie; Alex Guenther; Ron Neilson; Claire. Granier

    2006-01-01

    Isoprene is emitted from vegetation to the atmosphere in significant quantities, and it plays an important role in the reactions that control tropospheric oxidant concentrations. As future climatic and land-cover changes occur, the spatial and temporal variations, as well as the magnitude of these biogenic isoprene emissions, are expected to change. This paper presents...

  15. Planetary fertility during the past 400 ka based on the triple isotope composition of atmospheric oxygen in trapped gases from the Vostok ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunier, T.; Bender, M. L.; Barnett, B.; von Fisher, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The productivity of the biosphere leaves its imprint on the isotopic composition of atmospheric oxygen. Ultimately atmospheric oxygen, through photosynthesis, originates from seawater. Fractionations during the passage from seawater to atmospheric O2 and during respiration are mass dependent, affecting δ17O about half as much as δ18O. An "anomalous" (also termed mass independent) fractionation process changes δ17O about 1.7 times as much as δ18O during isotope exchange between O2 and CO2 in the stratosphere. The relative rates of biological O2 production and stratospheric processing determine the relationship between δ17O and δ18O of O2 in the atmosphere. Variations of this relationship thus allow us to estimate changes in the rate of mass dependent O2 production by photosynthesis versus the rate of mass independent O2-CO2 exchange in the stratosphere. However, the analysis of the 17O anomaly is complicated because each hydrological and biological process influencing δ17O and δ18O fractionates 17O and 18O in slightly different proportions. In this study we present oxygen data covering the last 400 kyr from the Vostok ice core. We reconstruct oxygen productivities from the triple isotope composition of atmospheric oxygen with a box model. Our steady state model for the oxygen cycle takes into account fractionation during photosynthesis and respiration of the land and ocean biosphere as well as fractionation when oxygen passes through the stratosphere. We consider changes of fractionation factors linked to climate variations taking into account the span of estimates of the main factors affecting our calculations. We find that ocean oxygen productivity was likely elevated relative to modern during glacials. However, this increase probably did not fully compensate for a reduction in land ocean productivity resulting in a slight reduction in total oxygen production during glacials.

  16. Building oceanographic and atmospheric observation networks by composition: unmanned vehicles, communication networks, and planning and execution control frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, J. T.; Pinto, J.; Martins, R.; Costa, M.; Ferreira, F.; Gomes, R.

    2014-12-01

    The problem of developing mobile oceanographic and atmospheric observation networks (MOAO) with coordinated air and ocean vehicles is discussed in the framework of the communications and control software tool chain developed at Underwater Systems and Technologies Laboratory (LSTS) from Porto University. This is done with reference to field experiments to illustrate key capabilities and to assess future MOAO operations. First, the motivation for building MOAO by "composition" of air and ocean vehicles, communication networks, and planning and execution control frameworks is discussed - in networked vehicle systems information and commands are exchanged among multiple vehicles and operators, and the roles, relative positions, and dependencies of these vehicles and operators change during operations. Second, the planning and execution control framework developed at LSTS for multi-vehicle systems is discussed with reference to key concepts such as autonomy, mixed-initiative interactions, and layered organization. Third, the LSTS tool software tool chain is presented to show how to develop MOAO by composition. The tool chain comprises the Neptus command and control framework for mixed initiative interactions, the underlying IMC messaging protocol, and the DUNE on-board software. Fourth, selected LSTS operational deployments illustrate MOAO capability building. In 2012 we demonstrated the use of UAS to "ferry" data from UUVs located beyond line of sight (BLOS). In 2013 we demonstrated coordinated observations of coastal fronts with small UAS and UUVs, "bent" BLOS through the use of UAS as communication relays, and UAS tracking of juvenile hammer-head sharks. In 2014 we demonstrated UUV adaptive sampling with the closed loop controller of the UUV residing on a UAS; this was done with the help of a Wave Glider ASV with a communications gateway. The results from these experiments provide a background for assessing potential future UAS operations in a compositional MOAO.

  17. Stable carbon isotopes of C3 plant resins and ambers record changes in atmospheric oxygen since the Triassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappert, Ralf; McKellar, Ryan C.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Tappert, Michelle C.; Ortega-Blanco, Jaime; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2013-11-01

    Estimating the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (pO2) in the geological past has been challenging because of the lack of reliable proxies. Here we develop a technique to estimate paleo-pO2 using the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of plant resins-including amber, copal, and resinite-from a wide range of localities and ages (Triassic to modern). Plant resins are particularly suitable as proxies because their highly cross-linked terpenoid structures allow the preservation of pristine δ13C signatures over geological timescales. The distribution of δ13C values of modern resins (n = 126) indicates that (a) resin-producing plant families generally have a similar fractionation behavior during resin biosynthesis, and (b) the fractionation observed in resins is similar to that of bulk plant matter. Resins exhibit a natural variability in δ13C of around 8‰ (δ13C range: -31‰ to -23‰, mean: -27‰), which is caused by local environmental and ecological factors (e.g., water availability, water composition, light exposure, temperature, nutrient availability). To minimize the effects of local conditions and to determine long-term changes in the δ13C of resins, we used mean δ13C values (δ13Cmeanresin) for each geological resin deposit. Fossil resins (n = 412) are generally enriched in 13C compared to their modern counterparts, with shifts in δ13Cmeanresin of up to 6‰. These isotopic shifts follow distinctive trends through time, which are unrelated to post-depositional processes including polymerization and diagenesis. The most enriched fossil resin samples, with a δ13Cmeanresin between -22‰ and -21‰, formed during the Triassic, the mid-Cretaceous, and the early Eocene. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations suggest that neither change in pCO2 nor in the δ13C of atmospheric CO2 can account for the observed shifts in δ13Cmeanresin. The fractionation of 13C in resin-producing plants (Δ13C), instead, is primarily influenced by

  18. Microstructure evolutions of graded high-vanadium tool steel composite coating in-situ fabricated via atmospheric plasma beam alloying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Huatang; Dong, XuanPu; Chen, Shuqun; Dutka, Mikhail; Pei, Yutao

    2017-01-01

    A novel high-vanadium based hard composite coating was synthesized from premixed powders (V, Cr, Mo, Ti, Nb) on ductile iron (DI) substrate via atmospheric plasma beam surface alloying process. The graded coating can be divided into three distinct zones: upper alloyed zone (AZ) rich with spherical

  19. Harvard Forest regional-scale air mass composition by Patterns in Atmospheric Transport History (PATH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J. L.; Munger, J. W.; Goldstein, A. H.; Jacob, D. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    1998-06-01

    We calculated 4 years (1990-1993) of back trajectories arriving at Harvard Forest and used them to define patterns in atmospheric transport history. This information was used to assess the degree to which regional-scale transport modulates the chemical composition of air masses sampled at Harvard Forest. Different seasonal signals in trace-gas concentration are derived for different flow patterns. Throughout the year, high-speed transport of cool, dry, cloud-free air from the north and northwest represents background conditions for the Harvard Forest site. These synoptic conditions describe the atmosphere after passage of a cold front. The most polluted conditions in each season occurred under SW flow, with warmer temperatures, higher water vapor mixing ratios, low mixed-layer depths at the site, and a higher frequency of cloudy conditions. These regional-scale air mass characteristics describe synoptic conditions of warm sector transport. In addition to average air mass characteristics, we have analyzed the covariation of species (e.g., O3 versus NOy-NOx; O3 versus CO) to address chemical processes based on transport history. For summer daytime measurements, we show that relatively fresh pollutants arrive in SW flow while the most aged air masses with higher O3 to NOz slopes arrive with W flow, suggesting a Midwestern contribution to regional high-oxidant episodes. These observations of patterns in chemical characteristics related to patterns in transport are corroborated with probability maps indicating the likelihood of transport from upwind regions using trajectories selected for chemical distribution end-members (10th and 90th percentiles).

  20. Optical properties, morphology and elemental composition of atmospheric particles at T1 supersite on MILAGRO campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Carabali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particles were sampled at T1 supersite during MILAGRO campaign, in March 2006. T1 was located at the north of Mexico City (MC. Aerosol sampling was done by placing copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM on the last five of an 8-stage MOUDI cascade impactor. Samples were obtained at different periods to observe possible variations on morphology. Absorption and scattering coefficients, as well as particle concentrations (0.01–3 μm aerodynamic diameter were measured simultaneously using a PSAP absorption photometer, a portable integrating nephelometer, and a CPC particle counter. Particle images were acquired at different magnifications using a CM 200 Phillips TEM-EDAX system, and then calculated the border-based fractal dimension. Also, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS was used to determine the elemental composition of particles. The morphology of atmospheric particles for two aerodynamic diameters (0.18 and 1.8 μm was compared using border-based fractal dimension to relate it to the other particle properties, because T1-generated particles have optical, morphological and chemical properties different from those transported by the MC plume.

    Particles sampled under MC pollution influence showed not much variability, suggesting that more spherical particles (border-based fractal dimension close to 1.0 are more common in larger sizes (d50 = 1.8 μm, which may be attributed to aerosol aging and secondary aerosol formation. Between 06:00 and 09:00 a.m., smaller particles (d50 = 0.18 μm had more irregular shapes resulting in higher border-based fractal dimensions (1.2–1.3 for samples with more local influence. EDS analysis in d50 = 0.18 μm particles showed high contents of carbonaceous material, Si, Fe, K, and Co. Perhaps, this indicates an impact from industrial and vehicle emissions on atmospheric particles at T1.

  1. Laboratory Studies of Planetary Hazes: composition of cool exoplanet atmospheric aerosols with very high resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Sarah E.; Horst, Sarah; He, Chao; Flandinet, Laurene; Moses, Julianne I.; Orthous-Daunay, Francois-Regis; Vuitton, Veronique; Wolters, Cedric; Lewis, Nikole

    2017-10-01

    We present first results of the composition of laboratory-produced exoplanet haze analogues. With the Planetary HAZE Research (PHAZER) Laboratory, we simulated nine exoplanet atmospheres of varying initial gas phase compositions representing increasing metallicities (100x, 1000x, and 10000x solar) and exposed them to three different temperature regimes (600, 400, and 300 K) with two different “instellation” sources (a plasma source and a UV lamp). The PHAZER exoplanet experiments simulate a temperature and atmospheric composition phase space relevant to the expected planetary yield of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission as well as recently discovered potentially habitable zone exoplanets in the TRAPPIST-1, LHS-1140, and Proxima Centauri systems. Upon exposure to the energy sources, all of these experiments produced aerosol particles, which were collected in a dry nitrogen glove box and then analyzed with an LTQ Orbitrap XL™ Hybrid Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer utilizing m/z ranging from 50 to 1000. The collected aerosol samples were found to contain complex organics. Constraining the composition of these aerosols allows us to better understand the photochemical and dynamical processes ongoing in exoplanet atmospheres. Moreover, these data can inform our telescope observations of exoplanets, which is of critical importance as we enter a new era of exoplanet atmosphere observation science with the upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope. The molecular makeup of these haze particles provides key information for understanding exoplanet atmospheric spectra, and constraining the structure and behavior of clouds, hazes, and other aerosols is at the forefront of exoplanet atmosphere science.

  2. Atmospheric aerosols in Amazonia and land use change: from natural biogenic to biomass burning conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Rizzo, Luciana V; Brito, Joel F; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Arana, Andrea; Sena, Elisa T; Cirino, Glauber G; Bastos, Wanderlei; Martin, Scot T; Andreae, Meinrat O

    2013-01-01

    In the wet season, a large portion of the Amazon region constitutes one of the most pristine continental areas, with very low concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosol particles. However, land use change modifies the biosphere-atmosphere interactions in such a way that key processes that maintain the functioning of Amazonia are substantially altered. This study presents a comparison between aerosol properties observed at a preserved forest site in Central Amazonia (TT34 North of Manaus) and at a heavily biomass burning impacted site in south-western Amazonia (PVH, close to Porto Velho). Amazonian aerosols were characterized in detail, including aerosol size distributions, aerosol light absorption and scattering, optical depth and aerosol inorganic and organic composition, among other properties. The central Amazonia site (TT34) showed low aerosol concentrations (PM2.5 of 1.3 +/- 0.7 microg m(-3) and 3.4 +/- 2.0 microg m(-3) in the wet and dry seasons, respectively), with a median particle number concentration of 220 cm(-3) in the wet season and 2200 cm(-3) in the dry season. At the impacted site (PVH), aerosol loadings were one order of magnitude higher (PM2.5 of 10.2 +/- 9.0 microg m(-3) and 33.0 +/- 36.0 microg m(-3) in the wet and dry seasons, respectively). The aerosol number concentration at the impacted site ranged from 680 cm(-3) in the wet season up to 20 000 cm(-3) in the dry season. An aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) was deployed in 2013 at both sites, and it shows that organic aerosol account to 81% to the non-refractory PM1 aerosol loading at TT34, while biomass burning aerosols at PVH shows a 93% content of organic particles. Three years of filter-based elemental composition measurements shows that sulphate at the impacted site decreases, on average, from 12% of PM2.5 mass during the wet season to 5% in the dry season. This result corroborates the ACSM finding that the biomass burning contributed overwhelmingly to the organic

  3. Medium-term changes in grass composition and diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A limited amount of compositional change took place except on a property stocked 1.5 times as heavily as the others, but no species were lost. ... a similar response for the Decreaser Themeda triandra and the Increaser 2 Diheteropogon filifolius, indicating review of this classification is warranted for the Highland Sourveld.

  4. Changes in body composition and other anthropometric measures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. An understanding of the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on various aspects of health, including nutritional status, is needed to ensure that population-specific guidelines can be developed for South Africa. This study aimed to investigate the changes in body composition and ...

  5. Compositional changes of Pd-Au bimetallic nanoclusters upon hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Vece, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/248753355; Bals, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Lievens, P.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the size distribution and composition of bimetallic Pd-Au nanoclusters have been observed after hydrogen exposure. This effect is caused by hydrogen-induced Ostwald ripening whereby the hydrogen reduces the binding energy of the cluster atoms leading to their detachment from the cluster.

  6. Chemical composition changes of post-harvest coconut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coconut inflorescence sap (CIS) is sweet, oyster-white and translucent and was reported to be highly nutritive and a good digestive agent. The chemical composition changes including total sugar, reducing sugar, ethanol, total acidity, volatile acid, amino acid, vitamin C and total phenolic contents of postharvest coconut ...

  7. Changes in chemical composition and bioassay assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-03-20

    Mar 20, 2005 ... Changes in chemical composition upon processing and bioassay assessment of nutritional potentials of almond fruit waste as an alternative feedstuff were conducted using day-old- cockerels. Proximate analyses revealed that AFW contained valuable nutrients, carbohydrate/dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ...

  8. Body composition and power changes in elite judo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A M; Fields, D A; Heymsfield, S B; Sardinha, L B

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the association between body composition changes, from a weight stable period to prior competition, on upper-body power in judo athletes. 27 top-level male athletes were evaluated at baseline (weight stable period) and 1-3 days before competition, with a time difference of approximately 1 month. Total body and extracellular water were estimated by dilution techniques (deuterium and bromide, respectively) and intracellular water was calculated as the difference. Body composition was assessed by DXA. A power-load spectrum was used to assess upper-body power output in a bench-press position. Comparison of means, bivariate, and partial correlations were used. Results indicate that though no significant mean changes were found in body composition and upper-body power, individual variability was large. Among all body composition changes, only total-body water (r=0.672; pbody power variation. These associations remained significant after controlling for weight and arm lean-soft tissue changes (r=0.594, p=0.002 for total-body water; r=0.524, p=0.007 for intracellular water). These findings highlight the need for tracking total-body water, specifically the intracellular compartment in elite judo athletes in order to avoid reductions in upper-body power when a target body weight is desired prior to competition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Assessing the Impacts of Atmospheric Conditions under Climate Change on Air Quality Profile over Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei Tong, Cheuk

    2017-04-01

    Small particulates can cause long term impairment to human health as they can penetrate deep and deposit on the wall of the respiratory system. Under the projected climate change as reported by literature, atmospheric stability, which has strong effects on vertical mixing of air pollutants and thus air quality Hong Kong, is also varying from near to far future. In addition to domestic emission, Hong Kong receives also significant concentration of cross-boundary particulates that their natures and movements are correlated with atmospheric condition. This study aims to study the relation of atmospheric conditions with air quality over Hong Kong. Past meteorological data is based on Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data. Radiosonde data provided from HKO are also adopted in testing and validating the data. Future meteorological data is simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), which dynamically downscaled the past and future climate under the A1B scenario simulated by ECHAM5/MPIOM. Air quality data is collected on one hand from the ground station data provided by Environment Protection Department, with selected stations revealing local emission and trans-boundary emission respectively. On the other hand, an Atmospheric Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which operates using the radar principle to detect Rayleigh and Mie scattering from atmospheric gas and aerosols, has also been adopted to measure vertical aerosol profile, which has been observed tightly related to the high level meteorology. Data from scattered signals are collected, averaged or some episode selected for characteristic comparison with the atmospheric stability indices and other meteorological factors. The relation between atmospheric conditions and air quality is observed by statistical analysis, and statistical models are built based on the stability indices to project the changes in sulphur dioxide, ozone and particulate

  10. Contribution of changes in atmospheric circulation patterns to extreme temperature trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Daniel E; Johnson, Nathaniel C; Singh, Deepti; Swain, Daniel L; Rajaratnam, Bala; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2015-06-25

    Surface weather conditions are closely governed by the large-scale circulation of the Earth's atmosphere. Recent increases in the occurrence of some extreme weather phenomena have led to multiple mechanistic hypotheses linking changes in atmospheric circulation to increasing probability of extreme events. However, observed evidence of long-term change in atmospheric circulation remains inconclusive. Here we identify statistically significant trends in the occurrence of atmospheric circulation patterns, which partially explain observed trends in surface temperature extremes over seven mid-latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Using self-organizing map cluster analysis, we detect robust circulation pattern trends in a subset of these regions during both the satellite observation era (1979-2013) and the recent period of rapid Arctic sea-ice decline (1990-2013). Particularly substantial influences include the contribution of increasing trends in anticyclonic circulations to summer and autumn hot extremes over portions of Eurasia and North America, and the contribution of increasing trends in northerly flow to winter cold extremes over central Asia. Our results indicate that although a substantial portion of the observed change in extreme temperature occurrence has resulted from regional- and global-scale thermodynamic changes, the risk of extreme temperatures over some regions has also been altered by recent changes in the frequency, persistence and maximum duration of regional circulation patterns.

  11. The role of atmospheric circulation in the Mediterranean precipitation response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Giuseppe; Hoskins, Brian; Shepherd, Ted

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean region has been identified as a climate change hot-spot, due to a projected reduction in precipitation which could have large socio—economic impacts by affecting fresh water availability for agricultural and societal needs. However, the mechanisms that control such precipitation change are not well understood and there is large uncertainty in the amplitude of the projected precipitation change. We here show that more than 80% of the variance in the wintertime precipitation change in the CMIP5 models projections is linked to uncertainty in the atmospheric circulation response to climate change. This is demonstrated by introducing a simple index of atmospheric circulation based on the intensity of the westerly flow in North Africa. It is shown that the relationship between precipitation and circulation under climate change is consistent to what is found in the year to year variability. However, many CMIP5 climate models have biases in their ability of capturing the observed relationship between circulation and precipitation. This suggests that climate models may tend to underestimate the realised precipitation change for any given change in the atmospheric circulation.

  12. Effect of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment condition on adhesion of ramie fibers to polypropylene for composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [College of Material and Textile Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314033 (China); Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Manolache, Sorin [Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); US Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Qiu, Yiping, E-mail: ypqiu@dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Sarmadi, Majid, E-mail: majidsar@wisc.edu [Center for Plasma-Aided Manufacturing, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The continuous ethanol flow technique can successfully modify ramie fiber surface with an increase in IFSS value up to 50%. • Response surface methodology was applied to design the plasma treatment parameters for ramie fiber modification. • The ethanol flow rate was the most influential treatment parameter in plasma modification process. - Abstract: In order to improve the interfacial adhesion between hydrophilic ramie fibers and hydrophobic polypropylene (PP) matrices, ramie fibers are modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with our continuous ethanol flow technique in helium environment. A central composite design of experiments with different plasma processing parameter combinations (treatment current, treatment time and ethanol flow rate) is applied to find the most influential parameter and to obtain the best modification effect. Field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) shows the roughened surfaces of ramie fibers from the treated groups due to plasma etching effect. Dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) demonstrates that the wettability of the treated fibers drastically decreases. Microbond pullout test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between treated ramie fibers and PP matrices increases significantly. Residual gas analysis (RGA) confirms the creation of ethyl groups during plasma treatment. This study shows that our continuous ethanol flow technique is effective in the plasma modification process, during which the ethanol flow rate is the most influential parameter but all parameters have simultaneous influence on plasma modification effect of ramie fibers.

  13. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 1: Tropospheric composition and air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles burning fossil fuel emit a number of substances that change the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere, and contribute to global air and water pollution and climate change. For example, nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted as byproducts of fossil fuel combustion are key precursors to ground-level ozone and aerosol formation. In addition, on-road vehicles are major CO2 emitters. In order to tackle these problems, molecular hydrogen (H2 has been proposed as an energy carrier to substitute for fossil fuels in the future. However, before implementing any such strategy it is crucial to evaluate its potential impacts on air quality and climate. Here, we evaluate the impact of a future (2050 H2-based road transportation sector on tropospheric chemistry and air quality for several possible growth and technology adoption scenarios. The growth scenarios are based on the high and low emissions Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, A1FI and B1, respectively. The technological adoption scenarios include H2 fuel cell and H2 internal combustion engine options. The impacts are evaluated with the Community Atmospheric Model Chemistry global chemistry transport model (CAM-Chem. Higher resolution simulations focusing on the contiguous United States are also carried out with the Community Multiscale Air Quality Modeling System (CMAQ regional chemistry transport model. For all scenarios future air quality improves with the adoption of a H2-based road transportation sector; however, the magnitude and type of improvement depend on the scenario. Model results show that the adoption of H2 fuel cells would decrease tropospheric burdens of ozone (7%, CO (14%, NOx (16%, soot (17%, sulfate aerosol (4%, and ammonium nitrate aerosol (12% in the A1FI scenario, and would decrease those of ozone (5%, CO (4%, NOx (11%, soot (7%, sulfate aerosol (4%, and ammonium nitrate aerosol (9% in the B1 scenario

  14. Impacts of Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling on Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Newman, Paul; Pawson, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Climate in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) has undergone significant changes in recent decades. These changes are closely linked to the shift of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) towards its positive polarity, which is driven primarily by Antarctic ozone depletion. There is growing evidence that Antarctic ozone depletion has significant impacts on Southern Ocean circulation change. However, it is poorly understood whether and how ocean feedback might impact the SAM and climate change in the SH atmosphere. This outstanding science question is investigated using the Goddard Earth Observing System Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Chemistry Climate Model(GEOS-AOCCM).We perform ensemble simulations of the recent past (1960-2010) with and without the interactive ocean. For simulations without the interactive ocean, we use sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations produced by the interactive ocean simulations. The differences between these two ensemble simulations quantify the effects of atmosphere-ocean coupling. We will investigate the impacts of atmosphere-ocean coupling on stratospheric processes such as Antarctic ozone depletion and Antarctic polar vortex breakup. We will address whether ocean feedback affects Rossby wave generation in the troposphere and wave propagation into the stratosphere. Another focuson this study is to assess how ocean feedback might affect the tropospheric SAM response to Antarctic ozone depletion

  15. Meteorite Atmospheric Entry Reproduced in Plasmatron II: Iron Oxidation State Change Probed by Xanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuli, G.; Lepore, G. O.; Pittarello, L.; McKibbin, S.; Goderis, S.; Soens, B.; Bariselli, F.; Barros Dias, B. R.; Zavalan, F. L.; Magin, T.; Helber, B.; Claeys, P.

    2017-09-01

    Heating experiments are one of the approaches used to investigate those changes experienced by meteoroids during their atmospheric entry. In this work, we are going to present the preliminary results from scanning electron microscopy and X-ray Adsorption Spectroscopy, in order to quantify the oxidation state of Fe produced in the VKI Plasmatron.

  16. TENDL nuclear data library for calculation of fuel composition change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramovich, S.N.; Gorelov, V.P.; Gorshikhin, A.A.; Grebennikov, A.N.; Farafontov, G.G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center - VNIIEF, Arzamas (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    There is description TENDL1 first version of evaluated nuclear data for calculation of fuel composition change in transmutation design. TENDL1 contain data for actinides and fission fragments. Selection of data for TENDL1 was made from ENDL-82, JENDL-3, ENDF/B-6 and BROND-2. TEND1 could be recommended for the usage in the equations of fuel composition kinetics in the course of multigroup neutron constants preparation. TENDL development was preceded by the analytical work. Its results are also discussed in the present paper. 25 refs., 8 tabs.

  17. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  18. Surface chemical changes of atmospheric pressure plasma treated rabbit fibres important for felting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štěpánová, Vlasta, E-mail: vstepanova@mail.muni.cz [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Slavíček, Pavel; Stupavská, Monika; Jurmanová, Jana [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Rabbit fibres plasma treatment is an effective method for fibres modification. • Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment is able to affect fibres properties. • Surface changes on fibres after plasma treatment were analysed via SEM, ATR-FTIR, XPS. • Significant increase of fibres wettability after plasma treatment was observed. • Plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure can replace the chemical treatment of fibres. - Abstract: We introduce the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment as a suitable procedure for in-line industrial application of rabbit fibres pre-treatment. Changes of rabbit fibre properties due to the plasma treatment were studied in order to develop new technology of plasma-based treatment before felting. Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used for plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy was used for determination of the fibres morphology before and after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used for evaluation of reactive groups. The concentration of carbon decreased and conversely the concentration of nitrogen and oxygen increased after plasma treatment. Aging effect of plasma treated fibres was also investigated. Using Washburn method the significant increase of fibres wettability was observed after plasma treatment. New approach of pre-treatment of fibres before felting using plasma was developed. Plasma treatment of fibres at atmospheric pressure can replace the chemical method which consists of application of strong acids on fibres.

  19. Dynamical and thermodynamical modulations of future changes in landfalling atmospheric rivers over North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yang; Lu, Jian; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Qing; Hagos, Samson M.; Qian, Yun

    2015-09-12

    This study examines the changes of landfalling atmospheric rivers (ARs) over the west coast of North America in response to future warming using model outputs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The result reveals a strikingly large magnitude of increase of AR days by the end of the 21st century in the RCP8.5 climate change scenario, with fractional increases ranging between ~50% and 600%, depending on the seasons and the landfall locations. These increases are predominantly controlled by the super-Clausius-Clapeyron rate of increase of atmospheric water vapor with warming, while changes of winds that transport moisture in the ARs, or dynamical effect, mostly counter the thermodynamical effect of increasing water vapor, limiting the increase of AR events in the future. The consistent negative effect of wind changes on AR days during spring and fall can be further linked to the robust poleward shift of the subtropical jet in the North Pacific basin.

  20. Weight change and body composition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, P L; Palarino, M Y; Michalek, D; Busenbark, K; Koller, W C

    1995-09-01

    To compare reports of weight loss and actual measures of body composition to predict nutritional risk in patients with Parkinson's disease and matched control subjects. Patients and control subjects were asked to record prior changes in weight and activity. Body composition was then compared in both groups using percentage ideal body weight (IBW), body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold (TSF) thickness, midarm muscle circumference, and percentage body fat (BF) as determined by bioelectrical impedance. Fifty-one free-living patients with Parkinson's disease and 49 matched control subjects were recruited from the neurology clinic and the surrounding area. We anticipated that reported weight loss would be greater and actual measures of body composition would show greater nutritional risk in the patients with Parkinson's disease. chi 2 Analysis was used to determine differences in the ratio of patients and control subjects who lost weight. Paired t tests were used to compare amount of weight change and measures of body composition. Correlations were performed among measures of weight change, body composition, and associated disease factors. Patients with Parkinson's disease were four times more likely to report weight loss greater than 10 lb than the matched control subjects (odds ratio > 4.2). Patients reported a mean (+/- standard deviation) weight loss of 7.2 +/- 2.9 lb and control subjects reported a mean weight gain of 2.1 +/- 1.6 lb (P weight change and percentage IBW, BMI, TSF, percentage BF, and stage of the disease. CONCLUSIONS/APPLICATION: Patients with Parkinson's disease appear to be at greater nutritional risk than a matched population. Simple screening and assessment tools can be used to detect nutritional risk.

  1. Street lighting changes the composition of invertebrate communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Thomas W; Bennie, Jonathan; Gaston, Kevin J

    2012-10-23

    Artificial lighting has been used to illuminate the nocturnal environment for centuries and continues to expand with urbanization and economic development. Yet, the potential ecological impact of the resultant light pollution has only recently emerged as a major cause for concern. While investigations have demonstrated that artificial lighting can influence organism behaviour, reproductive success and survivorship, none have addressed whether it is altering the composition of communities. We show, for the first time, that invertebrate community composition is affected by proximity to street lighting independently of the time of day. Five major invertebrate groups contributed to compositional differences, resulting in an increase in the number of predatory and scavenging individuals in brightly lit communities. Our results indicate that street lighting changes the environment at higher levels of biological organization than previously recognized, raising the potential that it can alter the structure and function of ecosystems.

  2. Resilience vs. decline: Precipitation and atmospheric change drive contrasting responses in invertebrate communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facey, Sarah L.

    Invertebrates form the foundation of terrestrial ecosystems, far outnumbering their vertebrate counterparts in terms of abundance, biomass and diversity. As such, arthropod communities play vitally important roles in ecosystem processes ranging from pollination to soil fertility. Given the importance of invertebrates in ecosystems, predicting their responses - and those of the communities they form - to global change is one of the great challenges facing contemporary ecology. Our climate is changing as a result of the anthropogenic release of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide (CO2), produced from burning fossil fuels and land use change. The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere now exceeds the range the Earth has seen in the last 800,000 years. Through the effect of such gases on radiative forcing, sustained greenhouse gas emissions will continue to drive increases in global average temperatures. Additionally, precipitation patterns are likely to change across the world, with increases in the occurrence of extreme weather events, such as droughts, as well as alterations in the magnitude and frequency of rainfall events. Climate change is already causing measurable changes in the Earth's biotic environment. Past work has been heavily focused on the responses of plants to various climate change parameters, with most studies including invertebrates limited to highly controlled studies of pair-wise interactions between one arthropod species and its host plant. Relatively little work to date, however, has looked at the potential impacts of climatic and atmospheric change for invertebrate communities as a whole. The overarching goal of this project was to help remedy this research gap, specifically by investigating the effects of precipitation and atmospheric change on invertebrate communities in grassland and woodland habitat, respectively. Chapters 2 and 4 synthesised recent work on climate change-driven alterations in precipitation and atmospheric change

  3. Effects of atmospheric and climate change at the timberline of the Central European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Gerhard; Matyssek, Rainer; Luzian, Roland; Zwerger, Peter; Pindur, Peter; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This review considers potential effects of atmospheric change and climate warming within the timberline ecotone of the Central European Alps. After focusing on the impacts of ozone (O3) and rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, effects of climate warming on the carbon and water balance of timberline trees and forests will be outlined towards conclusions about changes in tree growth and treeline dynamics. Presently, ambient ground-level O3 concentrations do not exert crucial stress on adult conifers at the timberline of the Central European Alps. In response to elevated atmospheric CO2 Larix decidua showed growth increase, whereas no such response was found in Pinus uncinata. Overall climate warming appears as the factor responsible for the observed growth stimulation of timberline trees. Increased seedling re-establishment in the Central European Alps however, resulted from invasion into potential habitats rather than upward migration due to climate change, although seedlings will only reach tree size upon successful coupling with the atmosphere and thus loosing the beneficial microclimate of low stature vegetation. In conclusion, future climate extremes are more likely than the gradual temperature increase to control treeline dynamics in the Central European Alps. PMID:21379395

  4. Using nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in lichens to spatially assess the relative contribution of atmospheric nitrogen sources in complex landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, P; Barros, C; Augusto, S; Pereira, M J; Máguas, C; Branquinho, C

    2017-11-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is an important driver of global change, causing alterations in ecosystem biodiversity and functionality. Environmental assessments require monitoring the emission and deposition of both the amount and types of Nr. This is especially important in heterogeneous landscapes, as different land-cover types emit particular forms of Nr to the atmosphere, which can impact ecosystems distinctively. Such assessments require high spatial resolution maps that also integrate temporal variations, and can only be feasibly achieved by using ecological indicators. Our aim was to rank land-cover types according to the amount and form of emitted atmospheric Nr in a complex landscape with multiple sources of N. To do so, we measured and mapped nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in lichen thalli, which we then related to land-cover data. Results suggested that, at the landscape scale, intensive agriculture and urban areas were the most important sources of Nr to the atmosphere. Additionally, the ocean greatly influences Nr in land, by providing air with low Nr concentration and a unique isotopic composition. These results have important consequences for managing air pollution at the regional level, as they provide critical information for modeling Nr emission and deposition across regional as well as continental scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzova Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution and physically (by ultrasonic procedure treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  6. Impact of atmospheric convection on south Tibet summer precipitation isotopologue composition using a combination of in situ measurements, satellite data, and atmospheric general circulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, You; Risi, Camille; Gao, Jing; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Yao, Tandong; Lai, Chun-Ta; Ding, Yongjian; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Chepfer, Helene; Cesana, Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Precipitation isotopologues recorded in natural archives from the southern Tibetan Plateau may document past variations of Indian monsoon intensity. The exact processes controlling the variability of precipitation isotopologue composition must therefore first be deciphered and understood. This study investigates how atmospheric convection affects the summer variability of δ18O in precipitation (δ18Op) and δD in water vapor (δDv) at the daily scale. This is achieved using isotopic data from precipitation samples at Lhasa, isotopic measurements of water vapor retrieved from satellites (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), GOSAT) and atmospheric general circulation modeling. We reveal that both δ18Op and δDv at Lhasa are well correlated with upstream convective activity, especially above northern India. First, during days of strong convection, northern India surface air contains large amounts of vapor with relatively low δDv. Second, when this low-δDv moisture is uplifted toward southern Tibet, this initial depletion in HDO is further amplified by Rayleigh distillation as the vapor moves over the Himalayan. The intraseasonal variability of the isotopologue composition of vapor and precipitation over the southern Tibetan Plateau results from these processes occurring during air mass transportation.

  7. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H.; Edgar, Kirsty M.; Foster, Gavin L.; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N.; Pancost, Richard D.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pearson, Paul N.

    2016-05-01

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ11B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  8. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H; Edgar, Kirsty M; Foster, Gavin L; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N; Pancost, Richard D; Lunt, Daniel J; Pearson, Paul N

    2016-05-19

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ(11)B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  9. Boron and calcium isotope composition in Neoproterozoic carbonate rocks from Namibia: evidence for extreme environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Hawkesworth, Chris J.; Prave, Anthony R.; Fallick, Anthony E.; Pearson, Paul N.

    2005-02-01

    The level and evolution of atmospheric carbon dioxide throughout Earth's history are key issues for palaeoclimate reconstructions, especially during times of extreme climate change such as those that marked the Neoproterozoic. The carbon isotope ratios of marine carbonates are crucial in the correlation and identification of Neoproterozoic glacial deposits, and they are also used as a record for biogeochemical cycling and potential proxy for atmospheric pCO 2. Likewise, the boron and calcium isotope compositions of marine carbonates are potential proxies for palaeo-seawater pH and the ratio of calcium fluxes into and out of seawater, respectively, and together they may be used to estimate atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here we use B and Ca isotopes to estimate palaeoenvironmental conditions in the aftermath of a major Neoproterozoic glaciation in Namibia. The validity of the B and Ca isotope variation in the ancient marine carbonates is evaluated using the oxygen isotope composition of the carbonates and its correlation to the carbon isotope variation. A negative (2.7 to -6.2‰) δ 11B excursion occurs in the postglacial carbonates and is interpreted to reflect a temporary decrease in seawater pH. Associated variations in δ 44Ca values (ranging between 0.35 and 1.14‰) are linearly coupled with the carbon isotope ratios and imply enhanced postglacial weathering rates. The reconstructed seawater pH and weathering profiles indicates that high atmospheric CO 2 concentrations were likely during the melt back of Neoproterozoic glaciations and precipitation of cap carbonates. However, the B isotope trend suggests that these concentrations rapidly ameliorated and they do not co-vary with δ 13C. Thus models attempting to link long-lived negative δ 13C excursions to elevated pCO 2 need to be reconsidered.

  10. Change of the Serum Composition in Irradiated Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seong Kwan [Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    This study is aimed to investigate the change of serum compositions of mice caused by the irradiation. The 3 Gy radiation with 10 MeV Linac was once irradiated to whole body of mice and their serum was collected to conduct 14 biochemical analyses. With the collected data, t-test was performed. As the result, the significant change was confirmed in the following 3 compositions. First, the glucose level of the normal control group was 185.43{+-}14.93, but the irradiation group was found to be 220.00{+-}17.58, which shows significant difference(p<0.001). Second, the BUN(blood urea nitrogen) measurement showed lower value(15.70{+-}1.48) in the irradiation group than the normal control group(19.61{+-}1.65), which indicates the significant difference in mean value (p<0.01). Third, the measurement of albumin resulted in lower value of 2.89{+-}0.25 in irradiation group than 3.19{+-}0.25 of the normal control group, which shows the significant difference in mean value(p<0.05). In consequence, the serum of the mice irradiated with 3 Gy radiation caused significant change in 3 compositions; glucose, Blood urea nitrogen(BUN) and albumin.

  11. Changes in atmospheric circulation between solar maximum and minimum conditions in winter and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Nyung

    2008-10-01

    Statistically significant climate responses to the solar variability are found in Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and in the tropical circulation. This study is based on the statistical analysis of numerical simulations with ModelE version of the chemistry coupled Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. The low frequency large scale variability of the winter and summer circulation is described by the NAM, the leading Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) of geopotential heights. The newly defined seasonal annular modes and its dynamical significance in the stratosphere and troposphere in the GISS ModelE is shown and compared with those in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In the stratosphere, the summer NAM obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis as well as from the ModelE simulations has the same sign throughout the northern hemisphere, but shows greater variability at low latitudes. The patterns in both analyses are consistent with the interpretation that low NAM conditions represent an enhancement of the seasonal difference between the summer and the annual averages of geopotential height, temperature and velocity distributions, while the reverse holds for high NAM conditions. Composite analysis of high and low NAM cases in both the model and observation suggests that the summer stratosphere is more "summer-like" when the solar activity is near a maximum. This means that the zonal easterly wind flow is stronger and the temperature is higher than normal. Thus increased irradiance favors a low summer NAM. A quantitative comparison of the anti-correlation between the NAM and the solar forcing is presented in the model and in the observation, both of which show lower/higher NAM index in solar maximum/minimum conditions. The summer NAM in the troposphere obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis has a dipolar zonal structure with maximum

  12. Variations in atmospheric N2O concentration during abrupt climatic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluckiger; Dallenbach; Blunier; Stauffer; Stocker; Raynaud; Barnola

    1999-07-09

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas that is presently increasing at a rate of 0.25 percent per year. Records measured along two ice cores from Summit in Central Greenland provide information about variations in atmospheric N2O concentration in the past. The record covering the past millennium reduces the uncertainty regarding the preindustrial concentration. Records covering the last glacial-interglacial transition and a fast climatic change during the last ice age show that the N2O concentration changed in parallel with fast temperature variations in the Northern Hemisphere. This provides important information about the response of the environment to global climatic changes.

  13. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt E. Williamson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond, RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities.

  14. Stormwater runoff drives viral community composition changes in inland freshwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kurt E.; Harris, Jamie V.; Green, Jasmin C.; Rahman, Faraz; Chambers, Randolph M.

    2014-01-01

    Storm events impact freshwater microbial communities by transporting terrestrial viruses and other microbes to freshwater systems, and by potentially resuspending microbes from bottom sediments. The magnitude of these impacts on freshwater ecosystems is unknown and largely unexplored. Field studies carried out at two discrete sites in coastal Virginia (USA) were used to characterize the viral load carried by runoff and to test the hypothesis that terrestrial viruses introduced through stormwater runoff change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Field data gathered from an agricultural watershed indicated that primary runoff can contain viral densities approximating those of receiving waters. Furthermore, viruses attached to suspended colloids made up a large fraction of the total load, particularly in early stages of the storm. At a second field site (stormwater retention pond), RAPD-PCR profiling showed that the viral community of the pond changed dramatically over the course of two intense storms while relatively little change was observed over similar time scales in the absence of disturbance. Comparisons of planktonic and particle-associated viral communities revealed two completely distinct communities, suggesting that particle-associated viruses represent a potentially large and overlooked portion of aquatic viral abundance and diversity. Our findings show that stormwater runoff can quickly change the composition of freshwater microbial communities. Based on these findings, increased storms in the coastal mid-Atlantic region predicted by most climate change models will likely have important impacts on the structure and function of local freshwater microbial communities. PMID:24672520

  15. Land-atmosphere interactions due to anthropogenic and natural changes in the land surface: A numerical modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao

    Alterations to the land surface can be attributed to both human activity and natural variability. Human activities, such as urbanization and irrigation, can change the conditions of the land surface by altering albedo, soil moisture, aerodynamic roughness length, the partitioning of net radiation into sensible and latent heat, and other surface characteristics. On the other hand, natural variability, manifested through changes in atmospheric circulation, can also induce land surface changes. These regional scale land surface changes, induced either by humans or natural variability, can effectively modify atmospheric conditions through land-atmosphere interactions. However, only in recent decades have numerical models begun to include representations of the critical processes driving changes at the land surface, and their associated effects on the overlying atmosphere. In this work we explore three mechanisms by which changes to the land surface - both anthropogenic and naturally induced - impact the overlying atmosphere and affect regional hydroclimate. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  16. Cognitive-based approach in teaching 1st year Physics for Life Sciences, including Atmospheric Physics and Climate Change components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelina, S. V.

    2009-12-01

    Most 1st year students who take the service course in Physics - Physics for Life Sciences - in Australia encounter numerous problems caused by such factors as no previous experience with this subject; general perception that Physics is hard and only very gifted people are able to understand it; lack of knowledge of elementary mathematics; difficulties encountered by lecturers in teaching university level Physics to a class of nearly 200 students with no prior experience, diverse and sometime disadvantageous backgrounds, different majoring areas, and different learning abilities. As a result, many students either drop, or fail the subject. In addition, many of those who pass develop a huge dislike towards Physics, consider the whole experience as time wasted, and spread this opinion among their peers and friends. The above issues were addressed by introducing numerous changes to the curriculum and modifying strategies and approaches in teaching Physics for Life Sciences. Instead of a conventional approach - teaching Physics from simple to complicated, topic after topic, the students were placed in the world of Physics in the same way as a newborn child is introduced to this world - everything is seen all the time and everywhere. That created a unique environment where a bigger picture and all details were always present and interrelated. Numerous concepts of classical and modern physics were discussed, compared, and interconnected all the time with “Light” being a key component. Our primary field of research is Atmospheric Physics, in particular studying the atmospheric composition and structure using various satellite and ground-based data. With this expertise and also inspired by an increasing importance of training a scientifically educated generation who understands the challenges of the modern society and responsibilities that come with wealth, a new section on environmental physics has been developed. It included atmospheric processes and the greenhouse

  17. Ethanolic fermentation of Bartlett pears as influenced by ripening stage and atmospheric composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, D.; Yahia, E.; Mateos, M.; Kader, A.A. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Pomology)

    1994-09-01

    Changes in fermentation volatiles and enzymes were studied in preclimacteric and postclimacteric Bartlett pears (Pyrus communis L.) kept in air, 0.25% O[sub 2], 20% O[sub 2] + 80% CO[sub 2], or 0.25% O[sub 2] + 80% CO[sub 2] at 20 C for 1, 2, or 3 days. All three atmospheres resulted in accumulation of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and ethyl acetate. The postclimacteric pears had higher activity of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and higher concentrations of fermentation volatiles than those of the preclimacteric fruit. For the preclimacteric pears, the 0.25% O[sub 2] treatment dramatically increased alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity, which was largely due to the enhancement of one ADH isozyme. Exposure to 20% O[sub 2] + 80% CO[sub 2] slightly increased ADH activity, but the combination of 0.25% O[sub 2] + 80% CO[sub 2] resulted in lower ADH activity than 0.25% O[sub 2] alone. Ethanolic fermentation in Bartlett pears could be induced by low O[sub 2] and/or high CO[sub 2] via (1) increased amounts of PDC and ADH; (2) PDC and ADH activation caused by decreased cytoplasmic pH; or (3) PDC and ADH activation or more rapid fermentation due to increased concentrations of their substrates (pyruvate, acetaldehyde, or NADH).

  18. Regional Climate Change in East Asia Simulated by an Interactive Atmosphere Soil Vegetation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Pollard, David; Barron, Eric J.

    2004-02-01

    A regional coupled soil vegetation atmosphere model is used to study changes and interactions between climate and the ecosystem in East Asia due to increased atmospheric CO2. The largest simulated climate changes are due to the radiative influence of CO2, modified slightly by vegetation feedbacks. Annual precipitation increases by about 20% in coastal areas of northern China and in central China, but only by 8% in southern China. The strongest warming of up to 4°C occurs in summer in northern China. Generally, the climate tends to be warmer and wetter under doubled CO2 except for inland areas of northern China, where it becomes warmer and drier. Most of the changes discussed in this paper are associated with changes in the East Asian monsoon, which is intensified under doubled CO2.The largest changes and feedbacks between vegetation and climate occur in northern China. In some coastal and central areas around 40°N, temperate deciduous forests expand northward, replacing grassland due to warmer and wetter climate. Evergreen taiga retreats in the coastal northeast, causing extra cooling feedback due to less snow masking. The largest changes occur in extensive inland regions northward of 40°N, where deserts and shrub land expand due to warmer and drier conditions, and water supply is a critical factor for vegetation. These northern inland ecosystems experience considerable degradation and desertification, indicating a marked sensitivity and vulnerability to climatic change.

  19. Towards a quasi-complete reconstruction of past atmospheric aerosol load and composition (organic and inorganic over Europe since 1920 inferred from Alpine ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Preunkert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seasonally resolved chemical ice core records available from the Col du Dôme glacier (4250 m elevation, French Alps, are here used to reconstruct past aerosol load and composition of the free European troposphere from before World War II to present. Available ice core records include inorganic (Na+, Ca2+, NH4+, Cl−, NO3−, and SO42− and organic (carboxylates, HCHO, humic-like substances, dissolved organic carbon, water-insoluble organic carbon, and black carbon compounds and fractions that permit reconstructing the key aerosol components and their changes over the past. It is shown that the atmospheric load of submicron aerosol has been increased by a factor of 3 from the 1921–1951 to 1971–1988 years, mainly as a result of a large increase of sulfate (a factor of 5, ammonium and water-soluble organic aerosol (a factor of 3. Thus, not only growing anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide and ammonia have caused the enhancement of the atmospheric aerosol load but also biogenic emissions producing water-soluble organic aerosol. This unexpected change of biospheric source of organic aerosol after 1950 needs to be considered and further investigated in scenarios dealing with climate forcing by atmospheric aerosol.

  20. The impact on atmospheric CO2 of iron fertilization induced changes in the ocean's biological pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. McWilliams

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Using numerical simulations, we quantify the impact of changes in the ocean's biological pump on the air-sea balance of CO2 by fertilizing a small surface patch in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the eastern tropical Pacific with iron. Decade-long fertilization experiments are conducted in a basin-scale, eddy-permitting coupled physical/biogeochemical/ecological model. In contrast to previous studies, we find that most of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC removed from the euphotic zone by the enhanced biological export is replaced by uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. Atmospheric uptake efficiencies, the ratio of the perturbation in air-sea CO2 flux to the perturbation in export flux across 100 m, integrated over 10 years, are 0.75 to 0.93 in our patch size-scale experiments. The atmospheric uptake efficiency is insensitive to the duration of the experiment. The primary factor controlling the atmospheric uptake efficiency is the vertical distribution of the enhanced biological production and export. Iron fertilization at the surface tends to induce production anomalies primarily near the surface, leading to high efficiencies. In contrast, mechanisms that induce deep production anomalies (e.g. altered light availability tend to have a low uptake efficiency, since most of the removed DIC is replaced by lateral and vertical transport and mixing. Despite high atmospheric uptake efficiencies, patch-scale iron fertilization of the ocean's biological pump tends to remove little CO2 from the atmosphere over the decadal timescale considered here.

  1. Lowering of glacial atmospheric CO2 in response to changes in oceanic circulation and marine biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkin, Victor; Ganopolski, Andrey; Archer, David; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    We use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, to investigate what recent improvements in the representation of the physics and biology of the glacial ocean imply for the atmospheric concentration. The coupled atmosphere-ocean model under the glacial boundary conditions is able to reproduce the deep, salty, stagnant water mass inferred from Antarctic deep pore water data and the changing temperature of the entire deep ocean. When carbonate compensation is included in the model, we find a CO2 drawdown of 43 ppmv associated mainly with the shoaling of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and an increased fraction of water masses of southern origin in the deep Atlantic. Fertilizing the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean north of the polar front leads to a further drawdown of 37 ppmv. Other changes to the glacial carbon cycle include a decrease in the amount of carbon stored in the terrestrial biosphere (540 Pg C), which increases atmospheric CO2 by 15 ppmv, and a change in ocean salinity resulting from a drop in sea level, which elevates CO2 by another 12 ppmv. A decrease in shallow water CaCO3 deposition draws down CO2 by 12 ppmv. In total, the model is able to explain more than two thirds (65 ppmv) of the glacial to interglacial CO2 change, based only on mechanisms that are clearly documented in the proxy data. A good match between simulated and reconstructed distribution of δ13C changes in the deep Atlantic suggests that the model captures the mechanisms of reorganization of biogeochemistry in the Atlantic Ocean reasonably well. Additional, poorly constrained mechanisms to explain the rest of the observed drawdown include changes in the organic carbon:CaCO3 ratio of sediment rain reaching the seafloor, iron fertilization in the subantarctic Pacific Ocean, and changes in terrestrial weathering.

  2. Autonomic function responses to training: Correlation with body composition changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Huang, Chuanye; He, Zihong; Hong, Ping; Zhao, Jiexiu

    2015-11-01

    The causal relation between autonomic function and adiposity is an unresolved issue. Thus, we studied whether resting heart rate variability (HRV) changes could be used to predict changes in body composition after 16 weeks of individualized exercise training. A total of 117 sedentary overweight/obese adults volunteered to join an intervention group (IN, n=82) or a control group (CON, n=35). The intervention group trained for 30-40 min three times a week with an intensity of 85-100% of individual ventilatory threshold (Thvent). At baseline and after a 16-week training period, resting HRV variables, body composition and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) were assessed. Compared with CON, exercise training significantly improved HRV and body composition and increased VO2peak (Ptraining were observed for those with greater total and central fat loss. Individual aerobic-based exercise training was for improving autonomic function and resting HRV responses to aerobic training is a potential indicator for adaptations to exercise training. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in the Atmosphere of Underground Environments as Tracers of Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonia, P.; di Pietro, R.; Francofonte, V.

    2004-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is often observed in concentrations much higher than in external atmosphere inside underground environments, both of natural (caves) and artificial (galleries) origin. With the aim of evaluating the possible use as a tracer of climatic changes, CO2 static concentrations have been discontinuously monitored since the year 2000 in the atmosphere of the Carburangeli and Santa Ninfa Caves, located in a limestone karst areas near the city of Palermo and in a gypsum karst area in the Belice Valley (Sicily, Italy) respectively. The measurements have been acquired with a portable 0-9999 ppm infrared spectrometer, together with dripping waters rate, air temperature and relative humidity (both continuous and discontinuous measures); free CO2 contents of dripping waters have been determined with titration method. Highest values were recorded in Carburangeli cave, when underground air temperature is colder than external atmosphere: in this case air circulation is blocked and carbon dioxide concentration arises. Very high concentrations of carbon dioxide were recorded also in winter, when hot winds blew from SE. The main source for carbon dioxide has been individuated in the dripping waters, which rate depends on the dynamic of rainfall events. These preliminary data suggests that carbon dioxide concentrations in the underground atmosphere of Carburangeli cave strongly depend on the delicate equilibria between internal and external air temperatures and dripping waters rate, being all these parameters affected by possible climate changes. Atmospheric warming and intensification of rainfalls rate might be traced by variations in the space-time dynamic of carbon dioxide inside the cave.

  4. Pyrosequencing reveals the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the composition of archaeal communities in the rhizosphere of C3 and C4 crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. M.; Cann, I. K.; Mackie, R. I.

    2008-12-01

    The projected increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations throughout the 21st century is likely to increase aboveground and belowground plant productivity and cause changes in the quantity and quality of plant root exudates, although plants using C4 photosynthesis are likely to be only affected during times of drought (Leakey et al., 2006, Plant Physiology, 140, 779). Evidence is emerging from molecular tools that these changes may influence the abundance and composition of soil microbial communities that regulate key soil processes, such as nitrogen cycling (Lesaulnier et al., 2008, Environmental Microbiology, 10, 926). However, most molecular tools are not well-suited for comparing multiple samples at great sequencing depth, which is critical when considering soil microbial communities of high diversity. To overcome these limitations we used pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of two genes (the V3 region of 16S rDNA and the amoA gene) to examine intra- and inter-treatment variability in the abundance and composition of microbial communities in the rhizosphere of soybean (C3) and maize (C4) grown in field conditions under ambient (~380 ppm) and elevated (~550 ppm) CO2 using FACE (free-air concentration enrichment) technology during the 2006 growing season in central Illinois. We specifically focused on archaeal communities because of their key role in nitrification (Leininger et al., 2006, Nature, 442, 806). The majority (>97%) of recovered sequences were from members of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Principle component analysis of sequence results from the V3 and amoA genes indicated significant (p<0.05) differences in the composition of rhizosphere archaeal communities between ambient and elevated CO2 beneath soybean, but not maize. qPCR suggested no significant difference in the abundance of archaea between treatments for soybean and maize. The lack of response of archaeal community composition beneath maize to elevated CO2 is consistent with relatively high

  5. Impact of near-surface atmospheric composition on ozone formation in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina, Elena; Moiseenko, Konstantin; Skorokhod, Andrey; Belikov, Igor; Pankratova, Natalia; Elansky, Nikolai

    2017-04-01

    natural and anthropogenic sources of VOCs. The quantitative contribution of aromatic VOCs to ozone formation in urban areas and in Russian regions along the railway is estimated. The greatest impact of aromatic VOCs to ozone formation (up to 7.5 ppb of O3) is obtained in the large cities along the Trans-Siberian Railway, with the highest concentrations of aromatic VOCs (1-1.7 ppb) and nitrogen oxides (> 20 ppb) being observed. The results show a significant contribution of anthropogenic emissions of VOCs to the photochemical ozone generation (30-50%) in the large cities along the Trans-Siberian railway in hot and dry weather conditions against natural isoprene emissions determining the regional balance of ground-level ozone in summer. This study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-47-00049) and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant no. 16-35-00158). References: 1. Xie, X., Shao, M., Liu, Y., Lu, S., Chang, C. C., and Chen, Z. M. // Atmos. Environ., 2008, 42, pp. 6000-6010. 2. Guenther, A., Geron, C., Pierce, T., Lamb, B., Harley, P., Fall, R. // Atmospheric Environment, 2000, 34, pp. 2205-2230. 3. Dreyfus, G. B., Schade G. W., Goldstein A. H. // J. Geophys. Res., 2002, 107(D19): 4365, doi:10.1029/2001JD001490.

  6. Jaipur Indian Oil Fire of 29 September 2009 and Associated Atmospheric and Meteorological Changes Using Multi Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Akshansha; Sharma, Manish; Mehdi, Waseem; Singh, Rachita; Mishra, Sunil K.; Singh, Ramesh

    An intense fire occurred at Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) located at Sitapur near Jaipur city on 29 October 2009 around 6.00 pm. High flames up to 70 ft were seen and emission of black plumes were observed over few days. The huge fire killed few and injured a dozen of people. Soon after this huge fire, people living in the adjoining areas escaped and a spurt of patients complaining respiratory problems were reported and taken to the nearest hospital for medical care. The people living in the surrounding villages suffered eye irritation, rashes and were also rushed to the nearest hospital for emergency care. Huge amount of carbon soot was seen in the atmosphere which was deposited in the field and houses. Huge emission of toxic gases like CO, CO2, SO2, NOx were due to burning of oil, although the routine observed data by the Central Pollution Control Board was not made available so it was difficult to comment on the exact amount of these toxic gases. These gases modify the atmospheric composition initially over the IOC region and with time dispersed in the direction of wind towards south-eastern parts affecting major cities Kota, Gwalior, etc. Soon after the fire, cloudy conditions were observed over Delhi which is north-east of IOC, with a thick smog which interrupted road and air traffic for a couple of days. An analysis of multi satellite sensor data (MODIS, AIRS, OMI AURA, AMSER) were carried out. Terra MODIS Image (1 km and 250 m resolution) clearly shows the dispersion of plume. The plume shows south-east direction due to dominance of north-westerly wind in the region. Numerous atmospheric (aerosol optical depth, angstrom coefficient, water vapor and CO mixing ratio, total ozone column) and meteorological parameters (air temperature, relative humidity) are found change. AIRS data show the enhancement of carbon monoxide and changes in atmospheric parameters at around 500 hPa pressure level in the nearby cities due to dispersion in the direction of wind towards

  7. Diurnal changes of remote sensing reflectance over Chesapeake Bay: Observations from the Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minwei; Hu, Chuanmin; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Kowalewski, Matthew G.; Janz, Scott J.

    2018-01-01

    Using hyperspectral data collected by the Airborne Compact Atmospheric Mapper (ACAM) and a shipborne radiometer in Chesapeake Bay in July-August 2011, this study investigates diurnal changes of surface remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). Atmospheric correction of ACAM data is performed using the traditional "black pixel" approach through radiative transfer based look-up-tables (LUTs) with non-zero Rrs in the near-infrared (NIR) accounted for by iterations. The ACAM-derived Rrs was firstly evaluated through comparison with Rrs derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite measurements, and then validated against in situ Rrs using a time window of ±1 h or ±3 h. Results suggest that the uncertainties in ACAM-derived Rrs are generally comparable to those from MODIS satellite measurements over coastal waters, and therefore may be used to assess whether Rrs diurnal changes observed by ACAM are realistic (i.e., with changes > 2 × uncertainties). Diurnal changes observed by repeated ACAM measurements reaches up to 66.8% depending on wavelength and location and are consistent with those from the repeated in situ Rrs measurements. These findings suggest that once airborne data are processed using proper algorithms and validated using in situ data, they are suitable for assessing diurnal changes in moderately turbid estuaries such as Chesapeake Bay. The findings also support future geostationary satellite missions that are particularly useful to assess short-term changes.

  8. Modelling change in color and firmness of baby banana (Musa acuminata AA in modified atmosphere packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellanos Espinosa Diego

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    To determine the change in the ripening stage and quality through associated variables such as firmness and peel color is a useful tool for predicting the behavior and involvement of the product stored at different changing conditions. The change in O2 and CO2 concentration, pulp firmness and peel color were measured in a test of modified atmosphere packaging for baby banana to develop a mathematical model to represent the change in firmness and color as a function of temperature, mixture of gas and time. The fruits were packaged at three temperatures (11, 13 and 17°C and a range of combinations of steady state concentrations of modified atmospheres (5.3 to 15.7 kPa O2 and 0 to 11.0 kPa for CO2, local atmospheric pressure of 74.9 kPa (0.74 atm and 80 % relative humidity constant in polyethylene bags (HDPE micro-perforated for a period of 30 days. The model considers the product respiration rate by an Michaelis-Menten equation of noncompetitive inhibition, and takes into account the transfer of gases through packaging film and through micro-perforations of this; the change of firmness is considered through a first-order model, and depending on the concentration of both O2 and CO2 by Michaelis-Menten equations; color change (in Hunter Lab coordinates was considered separately for each color coordinate, representing the coordinate L* using an increase-logistic model, a* by a zero-order model and b* by first-order model, all temperaturedependent by Arrhenius functions. The predictive capability of the developed model is appropriate, explaining 97.0% of the modified atmosphere effect on the loss of firmness, 90.6% of the change in the coordinate L*, 88.9% of the change in a* and

  9. Australian atmospheric lead deposition reconstructed using lead concentrations and isotopic compositions of archival lichen and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqin; Taylor, Mark Patrick; Handley, Heather K; Wu, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lead concentrations and their isotopic compositions were measured in lichen genera Cladonia and Usnea and fungi genus Trametes from the Greater Sydney region (New South Wales, Australia) that had been collected and archived over the past 120 years. The median lead contents were elevated in lichens and fungi prior to the introduction of leaded petrol (Cladonia 12.5 mg/kg; Usnea 15.6 mg/kg; Trametes 1.85 mg/kg) corresponding to early industrial development. During the use of leaded petrol for automobiles in Australia from 1932 to 2002, total median lead concentrations rose: Cladonia 18.8 mg/kg; Usnea 21.5 mg/kg; Trametes 4.3 mg/kg. Following the cessation of leaded petrol use, median total lead concentrations decreased sharply in the 2000s: Cladonia 4.8 mg/kg; Usnea 1.7 mg/kg. The lichen and fungi isotopic compositions reveal a significant decrease in (206)Pb/(207)Pb values from the end of 19th century to the 1970s. The following decades were characterised by lower allowable levels of lead additive in fuel and the introduction of unleaded petrol in 1985. The environmental response to these regulatory changes was that lichen and fungi (206)Pb/(207)Pb values increased, particularly from 1995 onwards. Although the lead isotope ratios of lichens continued to increase in the 2000s they do not return to pre-leaded petrol values. This demonstrates that historic leaded petrol emissions, inter alia other sources, remain a persistent source of anthropogenic contamination in the Greater Sydney region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stable hydrogen isotope composition of n-alkanes in urban atmospheric aerosols in Taiyuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Huiling; Li, Yinghui; Peng, Lin; Liu, Xiangkai; Liu, Xiaofeng; Song, Chongfang; Mu, Ling

    2017-03-01

    The hydrogen isotope compositions (δD) of n-alkanes associated with particulate matter with a diameter of ≤10 μm from Taiyuan, China, during heating and non-heating periods were measured via gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry to reveal the spatial and temporal characteristics of five functional zones and to provide another constraint on atmospheric pollutants. The δD values of n-C16 to n-C31 during the heating and non-heating periods ranged from -235.9‰ to -119.8‰ and from -231.3‰ to -129.2‰, respectively, but these similar spans had different distribution features. During the heating period, the δD distributions between non-central heating and commercial districts were consistent, as were those between residential and industrial districts; the n-alkanes came from two or more types of emission sources. Coal soot might be the primary local emission source, but not the only source. During the non-heating period, the n-alkanes of n-C16 to n-C20 were more depleted in D with the increasing carbon number in all functional zones, but there was no rule for n-C21 to n-C31. Specifically, coal soot and vehicle exhaust might be the primary sources of n-alkanes for non-central heating districts in the heating and non-heating periods, respectively, according to the δD distribution of n-C18 to n-C22; gasoline vehicle exhaust might be an n-alkane source, and the hydrogen isotope fractionation effect during the condensation process should be a pollution mechanism for the commercial district during the heating period; the δD distribution difference of n-C16 to n-C18 between the two periods in the residential and industrial districts was consistent, which indicates a similar source of fossil fuel combustion and a similar isotope fractionation effect during the non-heating period.

  11. Fog composition at Baengnyeong Island in the eastern Yellow Sea: detecting markers of aqueous atmospheric oxidations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, A. J.; Lee, T.; Park, T.; Choi, J.; Seo, S. J.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of fog water were collected at Baengnyeong Island (BYI) in the Yellow Sea during the summer of 2014. The most abundant chemical species in the fog water were NH4+ (mean of 2220 µM), NO3- (1260 µM), SO4-2 (730 µM), and Na+ (551 µM), with substantial contributions from other species consistent with marine and biomass burning influence on some dates. The pH of the samples ranged between 3.48 and 5.00, with a mean of 3.94, intermediate within pH values of fog/cloud water reported previously in Southeast Asia. Back trajectories (72 h) showed that high relative humidity ( > 80 %) was encountered upwind of the sampling site by all but one of the sampled air masses, and that the fog composition at BYI can be impacted by several different source regions, including the Sea of Japan, southeastern China, northeastern China, and the East China Sea. Sulfur in the collected fog was highly oxidized: low S(IV) concentrations were measured (mean of 2.36 µM) in contrast to SO4-2 and in contrast to fog/cloud S(IV) concentrations from pollutant source regions; organosulfate species were also observed and were most likely formed through aging of mainly biogenic volatile organic compounds. Low-molecular-mass organic acids were major contributors to total organic carbon (TOC; 36-69 %), comprising a fraction of TOC at the upper end of that seen in fogs and clouds in other polluted environments. Large contributions were observed from not only acetic and formic acids but also oxalic, succinic, maleic, and other organic acids that can be produced in aqueous atmospheric organic processing (AAOP) reactions. These samples of East Asian fog water containing highly oxidized components represent fog downwind of pollutant sources and can provide new insight into the fate of regional emissions. In particular, these samples demonstrate the result of extensive photochemical aging during multiday transport, including oxidation within wet aerosols and fogs.

  12. Fog composition at Baengnyeong Island in the eastern Yellow Sea: detecting markers of aqueous atmospheric oxidations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Boris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of fog water were collected at Baengnyeong Island (BYI in the Yellow Sea during the summer of 2014. The most abundant chemical species in the fog water were NH4+ (mean of 2220 µM, NO3− (1260 µM, SO4−2 (730 µM, and Na+ (551 µM, with substantial contributions from other species consistent with marine and biomass burning influence on some dates. The pH of the samples ranged between 3.48 and 5.00, with a mean of 3.94, intermediate within pH values of fog/cloud water reported previously in Southeast Asia. Back trajectories (72 h showed that high relative humidity ( >  80 % was encountered upwind of the sampling site by all but one of the sampled air masses, and that the fog composition at BYI can be impacted by several different source regions, including the Sea of Japan, southeastern China, northeastern China, and the East China Sea. Sulfur in the collected fog was highly oxidized: low S(IV concentrations were measured (mean of 2.36 µM in contrast to SO4−2 and in contrast to fog/cloud S(IV concentrations from pollutant source regions; organosulfate species were also observed and were most likely formed through aging of mainly biogenic volatile organic compounds. Low-molecular-mass organic acids were major contributors to total organic carbon (TOC; 36–69 %, comprising a fraction of TOC at the upper end of that seen in fogs and clouds in other polluted environments. Large contributions were observed from not only acetic and formic acids but also oxalic, succinic, maleic, and other organic acids that can be produced in aqueous atmospheric organic processing (AAOP reactions. These samples of East Asian fog water containing highly oxidized components represent fog downwind of pollutant sources and can provide new insight into the fate of regional emissions. In particular, these samples demonstrate the result of extensive photochemical aging during multiday transport, including oxidation within wet aerosols and

  13. μ-Scale Variations Of Elemental Composition In Individual Atmospheric Particles By Means Of Synchrotron Radiation Based μ-XRF Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, N.; Kramar, U.; Norra, S.; Dietze, V.; Kaminski, U.; Cen, K.; Yu, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric pollution poses a huge challenge especially for densely populated urban areas. Although a tremendous knowledge already exists on atmospheric particulate pollution, only very limited knowledge is available on mineral and chemical composition of single atmospheric particles because most studies on air pollution focus on total mass concentrations or bulk elemental analysis. However, it is of particular importance to investigate the properties of single particles since according to their individually composition they differ in their specific impact on climate change, negative environment and health effects, as well as accelerating the weathering of stone buildings in urban areas. Particles with sulfate and nitrate coatings together with sufficient moisture increase metal solubility and possibly catalyze further surface reactions on stone facades of buildings. From the viewpoint of health effects of aerosols it is important to consider agglomerations processes of fine anthropogenic and highly toxic particles with coarse geogenic and less toxic particles. With respect to fundamental research in mineralogy, processes forming composed coarse particles consisting of geogenic and anthropogenic substances are valuable to study since a new type of particle is produced. In this context, the important and still in detail unknown role of geogenic particles as catchers for anthropogenic aerosols can be investigated more closely. Coarse particles can provide a possible sink for fine particles. Moreover, the intermixture of particles from geogenic and anthropogenic sources and the spatial and temporal variations of contributions from different sources, which plays a decisive role in the study area of Beijing, can be clarified with this approach. For this study, particles were collected with the passive sampling device Sigma-2 and analyzed for particles from 3 to 96 μm. The analyzed particles showed a very inhomogeneous distribution in their elemental composition. For

  14. RGB-NDVI colour composites for visualizing forest change dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, S. A.; Winne, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The study presents a simple and logical technique to display and quantify forest change using three dates of satellite imagery. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was computed for each date of imagery to define high and low vegetation biomass. Color composites were generated by combining each date of NDVI with either the red, green, or blue (RGB) image planes in an image display monitor. Harvest and regeneration areas were quantified by applying a modified parallelepiped classification creating an RGB-NDVI image with 27 classes that were grouped into nine major forest change categories. Aerial photographs and stand history maps are compared with the forest changes indicated by the RGB-NDVI image. The utility of the RGB-NDVI technique for supporting forest inventories and updating forest resource information systems are presented and discussed.

  15. Weather forecasting by insects: modified sexual behaviour in response to atmospheric pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Ana Cristina; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Nardi, Cristiane; Bezner-Kerr, Wayne; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Bento, José Maurício Simões; McNeil, Jeremy N

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing abiotic conditions may positively or negatively impact insects at both the individual and population levels. For example while moderate rainfall and wind velocity may provide conditions that favour development, as well as movement within and between habitats, high winds and heavy rains can significantly decrease life expectancy. There is some evidence that insects adjust their behaviours associated with flight, mating and foraging in response to changes in barometric pressure. We studied changes in different mating behaviours of three taxonomically unrelated insects, the curcurbit beetle, Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera), the true armyworm moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera) and the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera), when subjected to natural or experimentally manipulated changes in atmospheric pressure. In response to decreasing barometric pressure, male beetles exhibited decreased locomotory activity in a Y-tube olfactometer with female pheromone extracts. However, when placed in close proximity to females, they exhibited reduced courtship sequences and the precopulatory period. Under the same situations, females of the true armyworm and the potato aphid exhibited significantly reduced calling behaviour. Neither the movement of male beetles nor the calling of armyworm females differed between stable and increasing atmospheric pressure conditions. However, in the case of the armyworm there was a significant decrease in the incidence of mating under rising atmospheric conditions, suggesting an effect on male behaviour. When atmospheric pressure rose, very few M. euphorbiae oviparae called. This was similar to the situation observed under decreasing conditions, and consequently very little mating was observed in this species except under stable conditions. All species exhibited behavioural modifications, but there were interspecific differences related to size-related flight ability and the diel periodicity of mating activity. We

  16. Weather forecasting by insects: modified sexual behaviour in response to atmospheric pressure changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Pellegrino

    Full Text Available Prevailing abiotic conditions may positively or negatively impact insects at both the individual and population levels. For example while moderate rainfall and wind velocity may provide conditions that favour development, as well as movement within and between habitats, high winds and heavy rains can significantly decrease life expectancy. There is some evidence that insects adjust their behaviours associated with flight, mating and foraging in response to changes in barometric pressure. We studied changes in different mating behaviours of three taxonomically unrelated insects, the curcurbit beetle, Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera, the true armyworm moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera and the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera, when subjected to natural or experimentally manipulated changes in atmospheric pressure. In response to decreasing barometric pressure, male beetles exhibited decreased locomotory activity in a Y-tube olfactometer with female pheromone extracts. However, when placed in close proximity to females, they exhibited reduced courtship sequences and the precopulatory period. Under the same situations, females of the true armyworm and the potato aphid exhibited significantly reduced calling behaviour. Neither the movement of male beetles nor the calling of armyworm females differed between stable and increasing atmospheric pressure conditions. However, in the case of the armyworm there was a significant decrease in the incidence of mating under rising atmospheric conditions, suggesting an effect on male behaviour. When atmospheric pressure rose, very few M. euphorbiae oviparae called. This was similar to the situation observed under decreasing conditions, and consequently very little mating was observed in this species except under stable conditions. All species exhibited behavioural modifications, but there were interspecific differences related to size-related flight ability and the diel periodicity of mating

  17. The influence of land warming on precipitation and atmospheric circulation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Robin; Ackerley, Duncan; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2017-04-01

    One robust aspect of climate change is that the land surface warms more than the ocean surface, and this is expected to influence precipitation and the atmospheric circulation. A new set of experiments are described, where the effect of land surface temperature change on precipitation and circulation change is isolated, and compared with the effects of sea-surface temperature (SST) change, direct CO2 radiative forcing, and the plant physiological effect. Land warming generally leads to enhanced low-level convergence and precipitation over land, while SST warming leads to reduced precipitation over land and increases over the oceans. However the combination of the two effects is strongly nonlinear. Direct radiative forcing drives precipitation change both through heating of the atmosphere, and through land warming, and this is particularly important in some monsoon regions. The plant physiological effect directly drives large reductions in transpiration and precipitation over tropical forest regions, as stomata close in response to elevated CO2 concentrations. However the plant effect also produces significant land warming, which leads to increased convergence and precipitation in some tropical forest regions. Therefore the overall result of the plant effect in each region depends on the balance between these two mechanisms.

  18. Decadal changes in North Atlantic atmospheric circulation patterns recorded by sand spits since 1800 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Clément; Tessier, Bernadette; Chaumillon, Éric; Bertin, Xavier; Fruergaard, Mikkel; Mouazé, Dominique; Noël, Suzanne; Weill, Pierre; Wöppelmann, Guy

    2017-03-01

    Present-day coastal barriers represent around 15% of the world's oceanic shorelines, and play an important role as early warning indicators of environmental change. Among them, wave-dominated barriers are dynamic landforms that tend to migrate landward in response to storms and sea-level change. High rates of sediment supply can locally offset the global retrogradation trend, providing valuable records of past environmental change occurring on transgressive coasts. However, geochronological control limits the temporal resolution of such records to millennial or centennial timescales, and the decadal or even faster response of wave-built barriers to historical climate changes is therefore poorly understood. In this study, we show that shoreline dynamics of sand spits reconstructed from old cartographic documents has been synchronous on both margins of the North Atlantic Ocean since about 1800 CE. Spit growth accelerated drastically during three periods lasting about 15 years, characterised by positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and negative East Atlantic-West Russia (EA-WR) atmospheric circulation patterns. These changes are in phase with periods of increased volcanic activity. We use a high-resolution wave hindcast (1948-2014 CE) in a reference area to confirm the association between NAO and EA-WR as a proxy for offshore and nearshore wave height and for associated longshore sediment transport (LST) involved in spit growth. A 24-month lagged correlation between sediment transport and volcanic aerosol optical thickness (concentration of ashes in the atmosphere) is observed, suggesting that spit shoreline dynamics at the decadal timescale is partially forced by external climate drivers via cascading effects on atmospheric circulation patterns and wave climate. Our results imply that NAO variability alone is not sufficient to understand the evolution of wave-built coastal environments. The associated sediment record can be used to reconstruct multi

  19. Projects To Probe Titan's Surface Composition and Development of Atmospheric Removal Models for Cassini VIMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, K. M.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; West, R. A.; Wolff, M. J.; Brown, R. H.

    2007-05-01

    In this work, we will describe recent projects performed by our group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology involving I/F data of Titan's surface acquired by Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), including the next stage of development of methods to de-gas and de-fog VIMS images. VIMS I/F spectra include contributions from both surface and atmospheric signal; therefore, current spectral data analysis necessarily focuses on portions of VIMS I/F spectra where atmospheric methane and scattering by haze is at a minimum. However, atmospheric opacity clears enough between wavelengths of 1 and 2 microns to provide strong potential to view complex landforms if a proper atmospheric correction can be applied. Plane- parallel radiative transfer (RT) correction methods have been used successfully in surface-atmospheric separation retrievals for Mars and offer some utility for VIMS observations of Titan that are away from the limb. In a previous work (Pitman et al. 2007, LPSC XXXVIII, p. 1164), we determined which inputs to radiative transfer models must be updated, given results from recent meetings and literature, and evaluated two plane-parallel RT models (adding-doubling, discrete ordinates) to determine which is more easily customized for surface- atmospheric separation of Titan. In this work, we report our progress on replacing Voyager with Cassini-Huygens inputs and how these models currently compare. Work performed under contract to NASA and by appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (ORAU).

  20. Changes in household composition as determinant of changes in functional ability among old men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Due, Pernille; Holstein, Bjorn E

    2002-01-01

    in functional ability are described as 1) sustained good, 2) decreased, 3) improved, and 4) sustained poor, and changes in household composition as 1) sustained living alone, 2) from living with others to living alone, and 3) sustained living with others. Number of chronic diseases and home help were included......The aims of this article were 1) to describe changes in functional ability from ages 75 to 80 among men and women in three Nordic localities, and 2) to analyze whether these changes are determined by changes in household composition from ages 70 to 75. The present analyses include the persons who...... as covariates in the multivariate analyses. A large proportion of men and women had sustained good functional ability from age 75 to 80, but we observed both improvement and deterioration over time. For example, with regard to need for help in PADL: 64/59% of the mer/women had sustained good function, 19...

  1. Long-term change of the atmospheric energy cycles and weather disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, WonMoo; Choi, Yong-Sang

    2017-11-01

    Weather disturbances are the manifestation of mean atmospheric energy cascading into eddies, thus identifying atmospheric energy structure is of fundamental importance to understand the weather variability in a changing climate. The question is whether our observational data can lead to a consistent diagnosis on the energy conversion characteristics. Here we investigate the atmospheric energy cascades by a simple framework of Lorenz energy cycle, and analyze the energy distribution in mean and eddy fields as forms of potential and kinetic energy. It is found that even the widely utilized independent reanalysis datasets, NCEP-DOE AMIP-II Reanalysis (NCEP2) and ERA-Interim (ERA-INT), draw different conclusions on the change of weather variability measured by eddy-related kinetic energy. NCEP2 shows an increased mean-to-eddy energy conversion and enhanced eddy activity due to efficient baroclinic energy cascade, but ERA-INT shows relatively constant energy cascading structure between the 1980s and the 2000s. The source of discrepancy mainly originates from the uncertainties in hydrological variables in the mid-troposphere. Therefore, much efforts should be made to improve mid-tropospheric observations for more reliable diagnosis of the weather disturbances as a consequence of man-made greenhouse effect.

  2. Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unger, N.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D. M.

    2009-02-02

    The development of effective emissions control policies that are beneficial to both climate and air quality requires a detailed understanding of all the feedbacks in the atmospheric composition and climate system. We perform sensitivity studies with a global atmospheric composition-climate model to assess the impact of aerosols on tropospheric chemistry through their modification on clouds, aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). The model includes coupling between both tropospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry and aerosols and liquid-phase clouds. We investigate past impacts from preindustrial (PI) to present day (PD) and future impacts from PD to 2050 (for the moderate IPCC A1B scenario) that embrace a wide spectrum of precursor emission changes and consequential ACI. The aerosol indirect effect (AIE) is estimated to be -2.0 Wm{sup -2} for PD-PI and -0.6 Wm{sup -2} for 2050-PD, at the high end of current estimates. Inclusion of ACI substantially impacts changes in global mean methane lifetime across both time periods, enhancing the past and future increases by 10% and 30%, respectively. In regions where pollution emissions increase, inclusion of ACI leads to 20% enhancements in in-cloud sulfate production and {approx}10% enhancements in sulfate wet deposition that is displaced away from the immediate source regions. The enhanced in-cloud sulfate formation leads to larger increases in surface sulfate across polluted regions ({approx}10-30%). Nitric acid wet deposition is dampened by 15-20% across the industrialized regions due to ACI allowing additional re-release of reactive nitrogen that contributes to 1-2 ppbv increases in surface ozone in outflow regions. Our model findings indicate that ACI must be considered in studies of methane trends and projections of future changes to particulate matter air quality.

  3. Determinations Of The Radii, Redshifts, And Atmospheric Compositions Of Neutron Stars From Modeling Their Chandra X-ray Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Stage, M D

    2003-01-01

    Fitting the X-ray spectra of thermal radiation from neutron stars with realistic atmosphere models provides a way to place constraints on their radii, surface gravities and compositions, and to test general relativity in the strong field limit. Such determinations allow us to constrain the equation of state of nuclear matter. I present fits which constrain the radii and surface compositions of two neutron stars, using high quality Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the point source in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant (Cas A XPS), and the isolated neutron star RX J1856.5-3754. I apply models calculated with advanced versions of the ATM model atmosphere code developed by Madej and Joss for neutron- star atmospheres composed of hydrogen, hydrogen-helium, iron, or a silicon to iron mixture. The results, taken assuming a typical value of 1.4 solar masses, show that the X-ray emission is generated from hot spot regions of scale size ∼3–4 km, on stars of intrinsic radius 9 and 12.5 km. Thi...

  4. Microbiological and biochemical aspects of Camembert-type cheeses depend on atmospheric composition in the ripening chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Picque, D; Riahi, H; Corrieu, G

    2006-08-01

    Camembert-type cheeses were prepared from pasteurized milk seeded with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. Microorganism growth and biochemical dynamics were studied in relation to ripening chamber CO(2) atmospheric composition using 31 descriptors based on kinetic data. The chamber ripening was carried out under 5 different controlled atmospheres: continuously renewed atmosphere, periodically renewed atmosphere, no renewed atmosphere, and 2 for which CO(2) was either 2% or 6%. All microorganism dynamics depended on CO(2) level. Kluyveromyces lactis was not sensitive to CO(2) during its growth phases, but its death did depend on it. An increase of CO(2) led to a significant improvement in G. candidum. Penicillium camemberti mycelium development was enhanced by 2% CO(2). The equilibrium between P. camemberti and G. candidum populations was disrupted in favor of the yeast when CO(2) was higher than 4%. Growth of B. aurantiacum depended more on O(2) than on CO(2). Two ripening progressions were observed in relation to the presence of CO(2) at the beginning of ripening: in the presence of CO(2), the ripening was fast-slow, and in the absence of CO(2), it was slow-fast. The underrind was too runny if CO(2) was equal to or higher than 6%. The nitrogen substrate progressions were slightly related to ripening chamber CO(2) and O(2) levels. During chamber ripening, the best atmospheric condition to produce an optimum between microorganism growth, biochemical dynamics, and cheese appearance was a constant CO(2) level close to 2%.

  5. Large-scale changes in community composition: Determining land use and climate change signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampichler, C.; Van Turnhout, C.A.M.; Devictor, V.; Van der Jeugd, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Human land use and climate change are regarded as the main driving forces of present-day and future species extinction. They may potentially lead to a profound reorganisation of the composition and structure of natural communities throughout the world. However, studies that explicitly investigate

  6. Atmospheric Correction Performance of Hyperspectral Airborne Imagery over a Small Eutrophic Lake under Changing Cloud Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Markelin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric correction of remotely sensed imagery of inland water bodies is essential to interpret water-leaving radiance signals and for the accurate retrieval of water quality variables. Atmospheric correction is particularly challenging over inhomogeneous water bodies surrounded by comparatively bright land surface. We present results of AisaFENIX airborne hyperspectral imagery collected over a small inland water body under changing cloud cover, presenting challenging but common conditions for atmospheric correction. This is the first evaluation of the performance of the FENIX sensor over water bodies. ATCOR4, which is not specifically designed for atmospheric correction over water and does not make any assumptions on water type, was used to obtain atmospherically corrected reflectance values, which were compared to in situ water-leaving reflectance collected at six stations. Three different atmospheric correction strategies in ATCOR4 was tested. The strategy using fully image-derived and spatially varying atmospheric parameters produced a reflectance accuracy of ±0.002, i.e., a difference of less than 15% compared to the in situ reference reflectance. Amplitude and shape of the remotely sensed reflectance spectra were in general accordance with the in situ data. The spectral angle was better than 4.1° for the best cases, in the spectral range of 450–750 nm. The retrieval of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a concentration using a popular semi-analytical band ratio algorithm for turbid inland waters gave an accuracy of ~16% or 4.4 mg/m3 compared to retrieval of Chl-a from reflectance measured in situ. Using fixed ATCOR4 processing parameters for whole images improved Chl-a retrieval results from ~6 mg/m3 difference to reference to approximately 2 mg/m3. We conclude that the AisaFENIX sensor, in combination with ATCOR4 in image-driven parametrization, can be successfully used for inland water quality observations. This implies that the need for in situ

  7. Our contaminated atmosphere: The danger of climate change, phases 1 and 2. [effect of atmospheric particulate matter on surface temperature and earth's radiation budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimorelli, A. J.; House, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter on average surface temperature and on the components of the earth's radiation budget are studied. An atmospheric model which couples particulate loading to surface temperature and to changes in the earth's radiation budget was used. A determination of the feasibility of using satellites to monitor the effect of increased atmospheric particulate concentrations is performed. It was found that: (1) a change in man-made particulate loading of a factor of 4 is sufficient to initiate an ice age; (2) variations in the global and hemispheric weighted averages of surface temperature, reflected radiant fluz and emitted radiant flux are nonlinear functions of particulate loading; and (3) a black satellite sphere meets the requirement of night time measurement sensitivity, but not the required day time sensitivity. A nonblack, spherical radiometer whose external optical properties are sensitive to either the reflected radiant fluz or the emitted radiant flux meets the observational sensitivity requirements.

  8. A change in nuclear pore complex composition regulates cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Gomez-Cavazos, J Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2012-02-14

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ∼30 different proteins called nucleoporins or Nups. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ESCs into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Ralph F

    2012-01-03

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  10. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  11. Multiple sulfur isotope geochemistry of Dharwar Supergroup, Southern India: Late Archean record of changing atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kaoru; Yamazaki, Rie; Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan; Ueno, Yuichiro; Hokada, Tomokazu; Toyoshima, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Earth's tectonic and climatic systems may have changed fundamentally before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at about 2.3 Ga. Sulfur Mass Independent Fractionation (S-MIF) has demonstrated that Earth's atmosphere was virtually oxygen-free before the GOE. During 3.0 to 2.4 Ga, the change in Δ33S and Δ36S signals may reflect the perturbation of atmospheric chemistry, though the mechanisms of the change are uncertain. Here, we reported multiple sulfur isotopic studies of Archean volcano-sedimentary sequences of the Dharwar Supergroup, distributed in the Chitradurga Schist Belt (CSB), Southern India. New field mapping and zircon U-Pb dating allows us to reconstruct detailed lithostratigraphy of the Dharwar Supergroup. The lower unit consists of post-3.0 Ga conglomerate, stromatolitic carbonate, siliciclastics with diamictite, chert/BIF and pillowed basalt in ascending order, all of which are older than the 2676 Ma dacite dyke that had intruded into the lower unit. The upper unit unconformably overlies the pillow basalts at the top of the lower unit, and consists of conglomerate/sandstone with ∼2600 Ma detrital zircons, komatiitic basalt, BIF and siliciclastic sequence with mafic volcanics. Sulfur isotope analysis of extracted sulfides shows MIF signals (Δ33S > + 1 ‰) with clear Δ33S- Δ36S correlations. The lower group of the Dharwar Supergroup shows a Δ36S / Δ33S slope of -1.48, the middle group shows -1.16 and -1.07, and the upper group shows -0.94. Reassessment of all the Archean S-MIF records from sedimentary rocks indicates that the Δ36S / Δ33S slope systematically changed during the Archean period. The observed trend in the Indian section is similar to those of its Pilbara-Kaapvaal equivalents, thus it could reflect a global atmospheric signature. Moreover, the isotopic trend seems to correlate with mid-Archean glaciation. Thus, the Δ36S / Δ33S slope could be a useful tracer for atmospheric chemistry and its link with climate change before the GOE.

  12. Effect of Pollution Controls on Atmospheric PM2.5 Composition during Universiade in Shenzhen, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitika Dewan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The 16th Universiade, an international multi-sport event, was hosted in Shenzhen, China from 12 to 23 August 2011. During this time, officials instituted the Pearl River Delta action plan in order to enhance the air quality of Shenzhen. To determine the effect of these controls, the current study examined the trace elements, water-soluble ions, and stable lead isotopic ratios in atmospheric particulate matter (PM collected during the controlled (when the restrictions were in place and uncontrolled periods. Fine particles (PM2.5 were collected at two sampling sites in Shenzhen: “LG”—a residential building in the Longgang District, with significant point sources around it and “PU”—Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School in the Nanshan District, with no significant point sources. Results from this study showed a significant increase in the concentrations of elements during the uncontrolled periods. For instance, samples at the LG site showed (controlled to uncontrolled periods concentrations (in ng·m−3 of: Fe (152 to 290, As (3.65 to 8.38, Pb (9.52 to 70.8, and Zn (98.6 to 286. Similarly, samples at the PU site showed elemental concentrations (in ng·m−3 of: Fe (114 to 301, As (0.634 to 8.36, Pb (4.86 to 58.1, and Zn (29.5 to 259. Soluble Fe ranged from 7%–15% for the total measured Fe, indicating an urban source of Fe. Ambient PM2.5 collected at the PU site has an average 206Pb/204Pb ratio of 18.257 and 18.260 during controlled and uncontrolled periods, respectively. The LG site has an average 206Pb/204Pb ratio of 18.183 and 18.030 during controlled and uncontrolled periods, respectively. The 206Pb/204Pb ratios at the PU and the LG sites during the controlled and uncontrolled periods were similar, indicating a common Pb source. To characterize the sources of trace elements, principal component analysis was applied to the elements and ions. Although the relative importance of each component varied, the major sources for both

  13. Isotopic composition of nitrogen - Implications for the past history of Mars' atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.; Nier, A. O.

    1976-01-01

    Models are presented for the past history of nitrogen on Mars, based on Viking measurements showing that the atmosphere is enriched in N-15. The enrichment is attributed to selective escape, with fast atoms formed in the exosphere by electron impact dissociation of N2 and by dissociative recombination of N2(+). The initial partial pressure of N2 should have been at least as large as several millibars and could have been as large as 30 millibars if surface processes were to represent an important sink for atmospheric HNO2 and HNO3.

  14. Heavy metals and trace elements in atmospheric fall-out: Their relationship with topsoil and wheat element composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M.A., E-mail: gbermudez@com.uncor.edu [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Vegetal (IMBIV), CONICET (Argentina); Catedra de Quimica General, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Avda. Velez Sarsfield 1611, Ciudad Universitaria (X5016 GCA), Cordoba (Argentina); Jasan, Raquel; Pla, Rita [Tecnicas Analiticas Nucleares, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CAE), Presbitero Gonzalez y Aragon N Degree-Sign 15 (B1802AYA), Ezeiza (Argentina); Pignata, Maria L. [Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biologia Vegetal (IMBIV), CONICET (Argentina); Catedra de Quimica General, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Avda. Velez Sarsfield 1611, Ciudad Universitaria (X5016 GCA), Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal and trace element deposition rates and concentrations in bulk samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anthropogenic vs. natural sources were identified using enrichment factors and PCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, U, Zn and lanthanides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main sources were a cement plant, chemical-mechanical industries, cities and mining. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metals in wheat grain were predicted by soil and bulk deposition composition. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to determine the average concentrations and deposition rates of 28 elements in atmospheric bulk deposition and to elucidate associations among topsoil, bulk deposition and wheat element composition. The fluxes of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) deposition in Cordoba were higher than in other agro-ecosystems, which reflects both natural (geochemistry and topsoil removal) and anthropogenic sources. High lanthanide, uranium (U) and thorium (Th) concentrations revealed the impact of an open cast uranium mine. The highest enrichment factors (EF) were those of Cu, Pb, Zn and nickel (Ni), with calcium (Ca) being the most prominent in the surroundings of a cement plant. Industries and the transport of airborne urban pollutants were the main anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and antimony (Sb). The concentrations of metals in wheat grain were predicted using the topsoil and atmospheric fall-out composition with R{sup 2} = 0.90, with the latter being the best explanatory variable. The present study highlights the potential health hazards of wheat consumption (Environmental Protection Agency) by the assessment of heavy metals in bulk atmospheric deposition.

  15. Effect of cold atmospheric pressure He-plasma jet on DNA change and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaopromsiri, C.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Thopan, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (CAPPJ) effect on DNA change was studied for assessment of its safety. The experiment utilized a home-developed CAPPJ using 100% helium to directly treat naked DNA plasmid pGFP (plasmid green fluorescent protein). A traversal electric field was applied to separate the plasma components and both dry and wet sample conditions were adopted to investigate various factor roles in changing DNA. Plasma species were measured by using optical emission spectroscopy. DNA topological form change was analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The plasma jet treated DNA was transferred into bacterial Escherichia coli cells for observing mutation. The results show that the He-CAPPJ could break DNA strands due to actions from charge, radicals and neutrals and potentially cause genetic modification of living cells.

  16. Effect of cold atmospheric pressure He-plasma jet on DNA change and mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Sarapirom, S. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Bang Khen, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Boonyawan, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-12-15

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (CAPPJ) effect on DNA change was studied for assessment of its safety. The experiment utilized a home-developed CAPPJ using 100% helium to directly treat naked DNA plasmid pGFP (plasmid green fluorescent protein). A traversal electric field was applied to separate the plasma components and both dry and wet sample conditions were adopted to investigate various factor roles in changing DNA. Plasma species were measured by using optical emission spectroscopy. DNA topological form change was analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The plasma jet treated DNA was transferred into bacterial Escherichia coli cells for observing mutation. The results show that the He-CAPPJ could break DNA strands due to actions from charge, radicals and neutrals and potentially cause genetic modification of living cells.

  17. Atmospheric changes caused by galactic cosmic rays over the period 1960–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Jackman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (GSFC 2-D models are used to investigate the effect of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs on the atmosphere over the 1960–2010 time period. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS computation of the GCR-caused ionization rates are used in these simulations. GCR-caused maximum NOx increases of 4–15 % are computed in the Southern polar troposphere with associated ozone increases of 1–2 %. NOx increases of  ∼ 1–6 % are calculated for the lower stratosphere with associated ozone decreases of 0.2–1 %. The primary impact of GCRs on ozone was due to their production of NOx. The impact of GCRs varies with the atmospheric chlorine loading, sulfate aerosol loading, and solar cycle variation. Because of the interference between the NOx and ClOx ozone loss cycles (e.g., the ClO + NO2+ M  →  ClONO2+ M reaction and the change in the importance of ClOx in the ozone budget, GCRs cause larger atmospheric impacts with less chlorine loading. GCRs also cause larger atmospheric impacts with less sulfate aerosol loading and for years closer to solar minimum. GCR-caused decreases of annual average global total ozone (AAGTO were computed to be 0.2 % or less with GCR-caused column ozone increases between 1000 and 100 hPa of 0.08 % or less and GCR-caused column ozone decreases between 100 and 1 hPa of 0.23 % or less. Although these computed ozone impacts are small, GCRs provide a natural influence on ozone and need to be quantified over long time periods. This result serves as a lower limit because of the use of the ionization model NAIRAS/HZETRN which underestimates the ion production by neglecting electromagnetic and muon branches of the cosmic ray induced cascade. This will be corrected in future works.

  18. Learning from the interplay between discharge and water temperature for signals of hydrologic and atmospheric change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefli, Bettina; Larsen, Joshua

    2017-04-01

    The interplay between river discharge and water temperature regimes determines the habitat quality of river ecosystems, and understanding their interplay is thus critical to assess future ecosystem health in the context of climate change and anthropogenic impacts. Beyond the evident practical importance for ecosystem management, understanding this water temperature-discharge interplay also has great potential to gain new insights into the dominant hydro-climatological processes occurring at the catchment scale. Central to this is the analysis of bivariate distributions between discharge and water temperature, in combination with simple thermal models, at different temporal scales and across many catchments. Potential insights to be gained include: i) the relative roles of rain, glacier, snow, and groundwater inputs, ii) the influence of atmospheric forcings, and iii) the mixing of the stream network. Using detailed records from Swiss catchments, we show the relative importance of these drivers, how they vary between catchments, as well as their susceptibility to change over time. This work provides a data-based, yet physical basis for understanding how the thermal regime of rivers is regulated by hydrologic and atmospheric processes, and thus provides a template to understand the thermal range of aquatic ecosystems. Such a physical understanding is critical in order to better interpret changing stream temperatures, and the thermal flux they provide to downstream lake and ocean environments.

  19. Glacial-interglacial water cycle, global monsoon and atmospheric methane changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhengtang; Wu, Haibin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cenozoic Geology and Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cenozoic Geology and Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, School of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Polar Environment, Hefei (China)

    2012-09-15

    The causes of atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) changes are still a major contention, in particular with regards to the relative contributions of glacial-interglacial cycles, monsoons in both hemispheres and the late Holocene human intervention. Here, we explore the CH{sub 4} signals in the Antarctic EPICA Dome C and Vostok ice records using the methods of timeseries analyses and correlate them with insolation and geological records to address these issues. The results parse out three distinct groups of CH{sub 4} signals attributable to different drivers. The first group ({proportional_to}80% variance), well tracking the marine {delta}{sup 18}O record, is attributable to glacial-interglacial modulation on the global water cycle with the effects shared by wetlands at all latitudes, from monsoonal and non-monsoonal regions in both hemispheres. The second group ({proportional_to}15% variance), centered at the {proportional_to}10-kyr semi-precession frequency, is linkable with insolation-driven tropical monsoon changes in both hemispheres. The third group ({proportional_to}5% variance), marked by millennial frequencies, is seemingly related with the combined effect of ice-volume and bi-hemispheric insolation changes at the precession bands. These results indicate that bi-hemispheric monsoon changes have been a constant driver of atmospheric CH{sub 4}. This mechanism also partially explains the Holocene CH{sub 4} reversal since {proportional_to}5 kyr BP besides the human intervention. In the light of these results, we propose that global monsoon can be regarded as a system consisting of two main integrated components, one primarily driven by the oscillations of Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in response to the low-latitude summer insolation changes, anti-phase between the two hemispheres (i.e. the ITCZ monsoon component); and another modulated by the glacial-interglacial cycles, mostly synchronous at the global scale (i.e. the glacial-interglacial monsoon

  20. Changes in precipitation extremes projected by a 20-km mesh global atmospheric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kitoh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution modeling is necessary to project weather and climate extremes and their future changes under global warming. A global high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model with grid size about 20 km is able to reproduce climate fields as well as regional-scale phenomena such as monsoonal rainfall, tropical and extratropical cyclones, and heavy precipitation. This 20-km mesh model is applied to project future changes in weather and climate extremes at the end of the 21st century with four different spatial patterns in sea surface temperature (SST changes: one with the mean SST changes by the 28 models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP-8.5 scenario, and the other three obtained from a cluster analysis, in which tropical SST anomalies derived from the 28 CMIP5 models were grouped. Here we focus on future changes in regional precipitation and its extremes. Various precipitation indices averaged over the Twenty-two regional land domains are calculated. Heavy precipitation indices (maximum 5-day precipitation total and maximum 1-day precipitation total increase in all regional domains, even where mean precipitation decrease (Southern Africa, South Europe/Mediterranean, Central America. South Asia is the domain of the largest extreme precipitation increase. In some domains, different SST patterns result in large precipitation changes, possibly related to changes in large-scale circulations in the tropical Pacific.

  1. Atmospheric circulation remote response during two types of El Niño in changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznova, Irina

    2017-04-01

    The ENSO is the general mode of interannual climate variability. Studies of the last decade revealed that there are two different types of El Niño (Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific), and the effect of these two phenomena on atmospheric circulation differs significantly [Ashok et al., 2007; Weng et al., 2009; Zheleznova and Gushchina, 2015; Zheleznova and Gushchina, 2016]. This study investigates the changes in characteristics of the remote response on two types of El Niño in the context of climate warming in the 21st century, using CMIP5 climate models data. The ability of CMIP5 coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (CGCMs) to simulate two flavors of El Niño was estimated in preliminary researches [Matveeva and Gushchina, 2015; Zheleznova et al., 2015]. It was shown that only 14 of the 20 CGCMs realistically reproduce SST anomalies distinctive for two types of El Nino. Further research carried out among these models have shown that only three CGCMs are capable to reproduce features of the response of the global, regional and vertical atmospheric circulation on the two flavours of El Niño. These CGCMs are MIROC 5, GFDL-ESM2M and CESM1-CAM5. Changing remote response features under climate change (based on the RCP group of experiments) was assessed on the basis of the data of these CGCMs. It was noted a general weakening of the remote response intensity, reducing its duration, as well as explore its change depending on the "rigidity" of the experiment. The study was supported by the Russian foundation for basic research (project № 16-35-00394 mol_a). References: 1. Ashok K., Behera S. K., Rao S. A., Weng H., Yamagata, T. El Nino Modoki and its possible teleconnection. J. Geophys. Res. 2007, 112, C11007, doi:10.1029/2006JC003798. 2. Matveeva T., Gushchina D. The role of intraseasonal atmosphere variability in enso generation in future climate // European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. — Vol. 18 of Geophysical Research Abstracts.

  2. Pleistocene atmospheric CO2 change linked to Southern Ocean nutrient utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, M.; Diz, P.; Hall, I. R.; Zahn, R.

    2011-12-01

    Biological uptake of CO2 by the ocean and its subsequent storage in the abyss is intimately linked with the global carbon cycle and constitutes a significant climatic force1. The Southern Ocean is a particularly important region because its wind-driven upwelling regime brings CO2 laden abyssal waters to the surface that exchange CO2 with the atmosphere. The Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) is a CO2 sink and also drives global primary productivity as unutilized nutrients, advected with surface waters from the south, are exported via Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) as preformed nutrients to the low latitudes where they fuel the biological pump in upwelling areas. Recent model estimates suggest that up to 40 ppm of the total 100 ppm atmospheric pCO2 reduction during the last ice age were driven by increased nutrient utilization in the SAZ and associated feedbacks on the deep ocean alkalinity. Micro-nutrient fertilization by iron (Fe), contained in the airborne dust flux to the SAZ, is considered to be the prime factor that stimulated this elevated photosynthetic activity thus enhancing nutrient utilization. We present a millennial-scale record of the vertical stable carbon isotope gradient between subsurface and deep water (Δδ13C) in the SAZ spanning the past 350,000 years. The Δδ13C gradient, derived from planktonic and benthic foraminifera, reflects the efficiency of biological pump and is highly correlated (rxy = -0.67 with 95% confidence interval [0.63; 0.71], n=874) with the record of dust flux preserved in Antarctic ice cores6. This strongly suggests that nutrient utilization in the SAZ was dynamically coupled to dust-induced Fe fertilization across both glacial-interglacial and faster millennial timescales. In concert with ventilation changes of the deep Southern Ocean this drove ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange and, ultimately, atmospheric pCO2 variability during the late Pleistocene.

  3. Projected changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire disturbance and the snow season in the western Arctic, 2003–2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, E.S.; McGuire, A. David; Rupp, T.S.; Chapin, F. S.; Walsh, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In high latitudes, changes in climate impact fire regimes and snow cover duration, altering the surface albedo and the heating of the regional atmosphere. In the western Arctic, under four scenarios of future climate change and future fire regimes (2003–2100), we examined changes in surface albedo and the related changes in regional atmospheric heating due to: (1) vegetation changes following a changing fire regime, and (2) changes in snow cover duration. We used a spatially explicit dynamic vegetation model (Alaskan Frame-based Ecosystem Code) to simulate changes in successional dynamics associated with fire under the future climate scenarios, and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model to simulate changes in snow cover. Changes in summer heating due to the changes in the forest stand age distributions under future fire regimes showed a slight cooling effect due to increases in summer albedo (mean across climates of −0.9 W m−2 decade−1). Over this same time period, decreases in snow cover (mean reduction in the snow season of 4.5 d decade−1) caused a reduction in albedo, and a heating effect (mean across climates of 4.3 W m−2 decade−1). Adding both the summer negative change in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire regimes to the positive changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in the length of the snow season resulted in a 3.4 W m−2 decade−1 increase in atmospheric heating. These findings highlight the importance of gaining a better understanding of the influences of changes in surface albedo on atmospheric heating due to both changes in the fire regime and changes in snow cover duration.

  4. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using a 14.3-m3 Teflon-lined smog chamber with 120 UV bulbs to simulate solar radiation, we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with differ...

  5. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using EPA’s Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC), we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with different concentrations of these criteria pol...

  6. Global scale observations of atmospheric molecular hydrogen and its stable isotopic composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313960453

    2012-01-01

    With average mixing ratios (χ) around 550 ppb (nmole/mole), molecular hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant reduced gas in our atmosphere after methane (CH4), but considerably less studied. H2 is also a promising energy carrier that might replace fossil fuels in vehicles with great sustainability

  7. ISOTOPIC (14C) AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ATMOSPHERIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FRACTIONS - PRECURSORS TO OZONE FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important factor in the production of ozone near ground level [3]. Many hydrocarbons originate from auto exhaust. However, a number of VOCs, e.g., isoprene, are known to be natural in origin. To develop reliable models for un...

  8. The impact of climate and composition on playa surface roughness: Investigation of atmospheric mineral dust emission mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    there were no active processes during the summers that changed surface roughness. Images from NASA's MODIS instrument (1640 nm, band 6) delineate winter flooding on the playa. Areas of water in the winter tend to be smoother in the summer. In particular, a smooth area of the play in summer 2010 aligns very closely with ponded water in February 2010. This indicates that standing water disrupts the playa surface, reducing roughness. We also compared the distribution of surface roughness across the playa to playa composition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of samples from the Black Rock Desert demonstrates that the playa surface is composed of approximately 30% quartz, 45% clays, 10% calcite, and 5% halite. Calcite and halite concentrations vary significantly between samples. We produced a map of calcite concentration in the Black Rock Desert based on hyperspectral data from NASA's EO-1 Hyperion instrument. We find that calcite concentrations are higher in smooth areas that have been inundated by water. Without an understanding of the surface processes associated with dust emission, it is difficult to model atmospheric dust, especially in the past or future when there is much less data for an empirical dust model.

  9. Precambrian supercontinents, glaciations, atmospheric oxygenation, metazoan evolution and an impact that may have changed the second half of Earth history

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grant M. Young

    2013-01-01

    ... homePage:www.eflsevie r.com/Iocate/gsf ■Review Precambrian superc0ntinents,glaciations,atmospheric oxygenation,metazoan evolution and an impact that may have changed the second...

  10. Menstrual Changes in Body Composition of Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachoń, Aleksandra Jadwiga

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the tendencies and scope of changes in body mass, body composition and body girths across the menstrual cycle were similar or different in women of different body build. Anthropometric examinations were carried out in a group of 40 naturally regularly menstruated females practicing team sports (aged 19-21, B-v 169.3+/-6.4 cm, body mass 59.6+/-7.0 kg), in the follicular, periovulatory and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The phases were determined on the basis of data from two consecutive menstrual cycles taking into account the cycle’s length. To establish the type of body build, Body Mass Index, hydration status and skinfold thickness were measured. For a statistical analysis, a multiple comparisons with multiple confidence intervals were applied. The increase in body mass between the follicular and the luteal phases was observed in all groups of women, the biggest gain was recorded in slim women, who in the luteal phase weighted 0.8 kg more. The amount of fat mass increased significantly across the menstrual cycle only in more hydrated (by about 0.66 kg) and slim women (by about 0.54 kg). Significant changes between consecutive phases of the menstrual cycle in waist and hip girths, and suprailiac skinfold thickness in some groups of women also indicate influence of fatness and hydration status and slenderness. In view of the presented results, the body build seems important for an analysis of the pattern of each component’s changes across the menstrual cycle, especially for female athletes. Certain changes can be seen only in some groups of women, therefore somatic features can be considered as a predictor of the intensity of changes.

  11. Changes in the Composition of Aromatherapeutic Citrus Oils during Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of some commercial Citrus oils, lemon, sweet orange, and tangerine, designated for aromatherapy, was examined before and after partial evaporation in a stream of nitrogen. The intact oils contained the expected mixtures of mono- and sesquiterpenes, with hydrocarbons dominating and lesser amounts of oxygenated analogues making up the remainder. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to follow alterations in the relative amounts of the various components present as evaporation proceeded. Changes were marked, and in particular more volatile components present in the intact oils rapidly disappeared. Thus the balance of content was shifted away from monoterpene hydrocarbons towards the analogous alcohols and carbonyl compounds. The results of this differential evaporation are discussed and possible consequences for aromatherapy use are noted. The case of lemon oil was especially interesting as the relative amount of citral, a known sensitizer, remaining as time elapsed represented an increasing percentage of the total oil.

  12. High-resolution measurements of atmospheric molecular hydrogen and its isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Walter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2 to the atmosphere, where nitrogen (N2 fixation is assumed to be the main biological production pathway followed by photochemical production from organic material. The sources can be distinguished using isotope measurements because of clearly differing isotopic signatures of the produced hydrogen. Here we present the first ship-borne measurements of atmospheric molecular H2 mixing ratio and isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania (16–25° W, 17–24° N. This area is one of the biologically most active regions of the world's oceans with seasonal upwelling events and characterized by strongly differing hydrographical/biological properties and phytoplankton community structures. The aim of this study was to identify areas of H2 production and distinguish H2 sources by isotopic signatures of atmospheric H2. For this more than 100 air samples were taken during two cruises in February 2007 and 2008. During both cruises a transect from the Cape Verde Islands towards the Mauritanian Coast was sampled to cover differing oceanic regions such as upwelling and oligotrophic regimes. In 2007, additionally, four days were sampled at high resolution of one sample per hour to investigate a possible diurnal cycle of atmospheric H2. Our results indicate the influence of local sources and suggest the Banc d'Arguin as a pool for precursors for photochemical H2 production, whereas oceanic N2 fixation could not be identified as a source for atmospheric H2 during these two cruises. The variability in diurnal cycles is probably influenced by released precursors for photochemical H2 production and also affected by a varying origin of air masses. This means for future investigations that only measuring the mixing ratio of H2 is insufficient to explain the variability of an atmospheric diurnal cycle and support is needed, e.g. by isotopic measurements. Nevertheless, measurements of atmospheric H2

  13. Climate-change signals in national atmospheric deposition program precipitation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Mast, M. Alisa

    2016-01-01

    National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP)/National Trends Network precipitation type, snow-season duration, and annual timing of selected chemical wet-deposition maxima vary with latitude and longitude within a 35-year (1979–2013) data record for the contiguous United States and Alaska. From the NADP data collected within the region bounded by 35.6645°–48.782° north latitude and 124°–68° west longitude, similarities in latitudinal and longitudinal patterns of changing snow-season duration, fraction of annual precipitation recorded as snow, and the timing of chemical wet-deposition maxima, suggest that the chemical climate of the atmosphere is linked to physical changes in climate. Total annual precipitation depth has increased 4–6 % while snow season duration has decreased from approximately 7 to 21 days across most of the USA, except in higher elevation regions where it has increased by as much as 21 days. Snow-season precipitation is increasingly comprised of snow, but annually total precipitation is increasingly comprised of liquid precipitation. Meanwhile, maximum ammonium deposition occurs as much as 27 days earlier, and the maximum nitrate: sulfate concentration ratio in wet-deposition occurs approximately 10–21 days earlier in the year. The maximum crustal (calcium + magnesium + potassium) cation deposition occurs 2–35 days earlier in the year. The data suggest that these shifts in the timing of atmospheric wet deposition are linked to a warming climate, but the ecological consequences are uncertain.

  14. Atmospheric radiative feedbacks associated with transient climate change and climate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, Robert A.; Power, Scott B. [Bureau of Meteorology, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, GPO Box 1289, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    This study examines in detail the 'atmospheric' radiative feedbacks operating in a coupled General Circulation Model (GCM). These feedbacks (defined as the change in top of atmosphere radiation per degree of global surface temperature change) are due to responses in water vapour, lapse rate, clouds and surface albedo. Two types of radiative feedback in particular are considered: those arising from century scale 'transient' warming (from a 1% per annum compounded CO{sub 2} increase), and those operating under the model's own unforced 'natural' variability. The time evolution of the transient (or 'secular') feedbacks is first examined. It is found that both the global strength and the latitudinal distributions of these feedbacks are established within the first two or three decades of warming, and thereafter change relatively little out to 100 years. They also closely approximate those found under equilibrium warming from a 'mixed layer' ocean version of the same model forced by a doubling of CO{sub 2}. These secular feedbacks are then compared with those operating under unforced (interannual) variability. For water vapour, the interannual feedback is only around two-thirds the strength of the secular feedback. The pattern reveals widespread regions of negative feedback in the interannual case, in turn resulting from patterns of circulation change and regions of decreasing as well as increasing surface temperature. Considering the vertical structure of the two, it is found that although positive net mid to upper tropospheric contributions dominate both, they are weaker (and occur lower) under interannual variability than under secular change and are more narrowly confined to the tropics. Lapse rate feedback from variability shows weak negative feedback over low latitudes combined with strong positive feedback in mid-to-high latitudes resulting in no net global feedback - in contrast to the dominant negative low

  15. Grassland/atmosphere response to changing climate: Coupling regional and local scales. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughenour, M.B.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Pielke, R.A.; Eastman, J.

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of the study were: to evaluate the response of grassland ecosystems to atmospheric change at regional and site scales, and to develop multiscaled modeling systems to relate ecological and atmospheric models with different spatial and temporal resolutions. A menu-driven shell was developed to facilitate use of models at different temporal scales and to facilitate exchange information between models at different temporal scales. A detailed ecosystem model predicted that C{sub 3} temperate grasslands wig respond more strongly to elevated CO{sub 2} than temperate C{sub 4} grasslands in the short-term while a large positive N-PP response was predicted for a C{sub 4} Kenyan grassland. Long-term climate change scenarios produced either decreases or increases in Colorado plant productivity (NPP) depending on rainfall, but uniform increases in N-PP were predicted in Kenya. Elevated CO{sub 2} is likely to have little effect on ecosystem carbon storage in Colorado while it will increase carbon storage in Kenya. A synoptic climate classification processor (SCP) was developed to evaluate results of GCM climate sensitivity experiments. Roughly 80% agreement was achieved with manual classifications. Comparison of lx and 2xCO{sub 2} GCM Simulations revealed relatively small differences.

  16. Mid-latitude summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Keckhut

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and wind data obtained with Rayleigh lidar since 1979 and Russian rockets since 1964 are analyzed to deduce the summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes. The equivalent width of the 1083 nm He I line is used as a proxy to monitor the short-term UV flux changes. Spectral analyses are performed on 108-day windows to extract the 27-day component from temperature, wind and solar data sets. Linear regressions between these spectral harmonics show some significant correlations around 45 km at mid-latitudes. For large 27-day solar cycles, amplitudes of 2 K and 6 m s-1 are calculated for temperature data series over the south of France (44°N, and on wind data series over Volgograd (49°N, respectively. Cross-spectrum analyses have indicated correlations between these atmospheric parameters and the solar proxy with a phase lag of less than 2 days. These statistically correlative results, which provide good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations, are both obtained at mid-latitude. However, the observed amplitudes are larger than expected, with numerical models suggesting that dynamical processes such as equatorial or gravity waves may be responsible.

  17. Mid-latitude summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Keckhut

    Full Text Available Temperature and wind data obtained with Rayleigh lidar since 1979 and Russian rockets since 1964 are analyzed to deduce the summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes. The equivalent width of the 1083 nm He I line is used as a proxy to monitor the short-term UV flux changes. Spectral analyses are performed on 108-day windows to extract the 27-day component from temperature, wind and solar data sets. Linear regressions between these spectral harmonics show some significant correlations around 45 km at mid-latitudes. For large 27-day solar cycles, amplitudes of 2 K and 6 m s-1 are calculated for temperature data series over the south of France (44°N, and on wind data series over Volgograd (49°N, respectively. Cross-spectrum analyses have indicated correlations between these atmospheric parameters and the solar proxy with a phase lag of less than 2 days. These statistically correlative results, which provide good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations, are both obtained at mid-latitude. However, the observed amplitudes are larger than expected, with numerical models suggesting that dynamical processes such as equatorial or gravity waves may be responsible.

  18. Mineralogical composition changes of postagrogenic soils under different plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilin, Nikita; Chizhikova, Natalia; Varlamov, Evgheni; Churilina, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Plant communities play the leading role in transformation of soil. The need of studying former arable lands increases due to large number of abandoned lands in Russia. It is necessary to study mineralogical composition of soils involved into natural processes to understand the trends of their development after agricultural activities in the past. The aim of the study is to identify changes in mineralogical composition of soils under the influence of different plant communities. Soils were sampled in the south of Arkhangelsk region, Ustyansky district, near Akichkin Pochinok village. Soils are formed on clay moraine of Moscow glaciation. Soil profiles were dug on interfluve. We selected 4 plant communities on different stages of succession: upland meadow with domination of sod grasses (Phleum pratense, Agrostis tenuis), 16-year-old birch forest where dominants are herbaceous plants such as Poa sp., Chamerion angustiflium, Agrostis tenuis, 16-year-old spruce forest with no herbaceous vegetation and 70-year-old bilberry spruce forest with domination of Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea. To separate soil fractions <1 micron, 1-5 micron and 5-10 micron samples were rubbed into a thick paste and sedimented. Oriented preparations of fractions were examined by XRD method. The results show that podzol processes lead to significant changes of mineral content. We noticed a clear differentiation of studied soils both in the content of fraction and composition of minerals. Mineralogical composition and major mineral phases correlation of profiles under 70 years and 16 years of spruce forests are different. Mineralogical content in upper part of profile under the young spruce is more differentiated than in old spruce forest: the amount of quartz and kaolinite increases in upper horizon, although in this case the overall pattern of profile formation of clay material during podzolization remains unchanged. There is more substantial desilting under the birch forest

  19. Origins and composition of fine atmospheric carbonaceous aerosol in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Worton

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report chemically resolved measurements of organic aerosol (OA and related tracers during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX at the Blodgett Forest Research Station, California from 15 August–10 October 2007. OA contributed the majority of the mass to the fine atmospheric particles and was predominately oxygenated (OOA. The highest concentrations of OA were during sporadic wildfire influence when aged plumes were impacting the site. In situ measurements of particle phase molecular markers were dominated by secondary compounds and along with gas phase compounds could be categorized into six factors or sources: (1 aged biomass burning emissions and oxidized urban emissions, (2 oxidized urban emissions (3 oxidation products of monoterpene emissions, (4 monoterpene emissions, (5 anthropogenic emissions and (6 local methyl chavicol emissions and oxidation products. There were multiple biogenic components that contributed to OA at this site whose contributions varied diurnally, seasonally and in response to changing meteorological conditions, e.g. temperature and precipitation events. Concentrations of isoprene oxidation products were larger when temperatures were higher during the first half of the campaign (15 August–12 September due to more substantial emissions of isoprene and enhanced photochemistry. The oxidation of methyl chavicol, an oxygenated terpene emitted by ponderosa pine trees, contributed similarly to OA throughout the campaign. In contrast, the abundances of monoterpene oxidation products in the particle phase were greater during the cooler conditions in the latter half of the campaign (13 September–10 October, even though emissions of the precursors were lower, although the mechanism is not known. OA was correlated with the anthropogenic tracers 2-propyl nitrate and carbon monoxide (CO, consistent with previous observations, while being comprised of mostly non-fossil carbon

  20. Changes in tropospheric composition and air quality due to stratospheric ozone depletion and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S R; Solomon, K R; Tang, X

    2007-03-01

    It is well-understood that reductions in air quality play a significant role in both environmental and human health. Interactions between ozone depletion and global climate change will significantly alter atmospheric chemistry which, in turn, will cause changes in concentrations of natural and human-made gases and aerosols. Models predict that tropospheric ozone near the surface will increase globally by up to 10 to 30 ppbv (33 to 100% increase) during the period 2000 to 2100. With the increase in the amount of the stratospheric ozone, increased transport from the stratosphere to the troposphere will result in different responses in polluted and unpolluted areas. In contrast, global changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) are not predicted to be large, except where influenced by the presence of oxidizable organic matter, such as from large-scale forest fires. Recent measurements in a relatively clean location over 5 years showed that OH concentrations can be predicted by the intensity of solar ultraviolet radiation. If this relationship is confirmed by further observations, this approach could be used to simplify assessments of air quality. Analysis of surface-level ozone observations in Antarctica suggests that there has been a significant change in the chemistry of the boundary layer of the atmosphere in this region as a result of stratospheric ozone depletion. The oxidation potential of the Antarctic boundary layer is estimated to be greater now than before the development of the ozone hole. Recent modeling studies have suggested that iodine and iodine-containing substances from natural sources, such as the ocean, may increase stratospheric ozone depletion significantly in polar regions during spring. Given the uncertainty of the fate of iodine in the stratosphere, the results may also be relevant for stratospheric ozone depletion and measurements of the influence of these substances on ozone depletion should be considered in the future. In agreement with

  1. IR and UV laser-induced morphological changes in silicon surface under oxygen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Jarquin, J.; Fernandez-Guasti, M.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Hernandez-Pozos, J.L. [Laboratorio de Optica Cuantica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, C.P. 09340, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-08-01

    We irradiated silicon (100) wafers with IR (1064 nm) and UV (355 nm) nanosecond laser pulses with energy densities within the ablation regime and used scanning electron microscopy to analyze the morphological changes induced on the Si surface. The changes in the wafer morphology depend both on the incident radiation wavelength and the environmental atmosphere. We have patterned Si surfaces with a single focused laser spot and, in doing the experiments with IR or UV this reveals significant differences in the initial surface cracking and pattern formation, however if the experiment is carried out in O{sub 2} the final result is an array of microcones. We also employed a random scanning technique to irradiate the silicon wafer over large areas, in this case the microstructure patterns consist of a ''semi-ordered'' array of micron-sized cones. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. From closing the atmospheric ozone hole to reducing climate change. Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Gary W; Rom, William N; Braman, Sidney S; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2015-02-01

    Global warming presents U.S. and transnational leaders with enormous political and policy challenges. World leadership addressed a similar worldwide environmental challenge in the 1980s and 1990s when scientists advised that accelerating emission of man-made chlorofluorocarbons was depleting the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The process that led to global agreement on reducing depletion of the ozone layer holds valuable lessons, and some ironies, for scientists and policy makers seeking now to address global climate change. By understanding the international treaty process, how science informed that process, and how the physician community played a constructive role in the transition away from commercial use of ozone-depleting gases three decades ago, environmental activists can better understand the challenges, opportunities, and potential solutions under current consideration in affecting global climate change.

  3. Organic Aerosol Volatility Parameterizations and Their Impact on Atmospheric Composition and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridis, Konsta; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance and ubiquity in the atmosphere, organic aerosols are still very poorly parameterized in global models. This can be explained by two reasons: first, a very large number of unconstrained parameters are involved in accurate parameterizations, and second, a detailed description of semi-volatile organics is computationally very expensive. Even organic aerosol properties that are known to play a major role in the atmosphere, namely volatility and aging, are poorly resolved in global models, if at all. Studies with different models and different parameterizations have not been conclusive on whether the additional complexity improves model simulations, but the added diversity of the different host models used adds an unnecessary degree of variability in the evaluation of results that obscures solid conclusions.

  4. Abundance and isotopic composition of gases in the martian atmosphere from the Curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Webster, C.R.; Atreya, S.K.; Franz, H.; Wong, M.; Conrad, P.G.; Harpold, D.; Jones, J.J.; Leshin, L.A.; Manning, H.; Owen, T.; Pepin, R.O.; Squyres, S.; Trainer, M.; MSL Science Team, the

    2013-01-01

    Volume mixing and isotope ratios secured with repeated atmospheric measurements taken with the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on the Curiosity rover are: carbon dioxide (CO2), 0.960(±0.007); argon-40 (40Ar), 0.0193(±0.0001); nitrogen (N2), 0.0189(±0.0003); oxygen, 1.45(±0.09) × 10−3;

  5. A reconstruction of atmospheric carbon dioxide and its stable carbon isotopic composition from the penultimate glacial maximum to the last glacial inception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schneider

    2013-11-01

    δ13Catm level in the Penultimate (~ 140 000 yr BP and Last Glacial Maximum (~ 22 000 yr BP, which can be explained by either (i changes in the isotopic composition or (ii intensity of the carbon input fluxes to the combined ocean/atmosphere carbon reservoir or (iii by long-term peat buildup. Our isotopic data suggest that the carbon cycle evolution along Termination II and the subsequent interglacial was controlled by essentially the same processes as during the last 24 000 yr, but with different phasing and magnitudes. Furthermore, a 5000 yr lag in the CO2 decline relative to EDC temperatures is confirmed during the glacial inception at the end of MIS5.5 (120 000 yr BP. Based on our isotopic data this lag can be explained by terrestrial carbon release and carbonate compensation.

  6. Two centuries of observed atmospheric variability and change over the North Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendel, Martin; van den Besselaar, Else; Hannachi, Abdel; Kent, Elizabeth; Lefebvre, Christiana; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schenk, Frederik; van der Schrier, Gerard; Woollings, Tim

    2016-04-01

    In the upcoming North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA), we present a synthesis of current knowledge about past, present and possible future climate change in the North Sea region. A climate change assessment from published scientific work has been conducted as a kind of regional IPCC report, and a book has been produced that will be published by Springer in 2016. In the framework of the NOSCCA project, we examine past and present studies of variability and changes in atmospheric variables within the North Sea region over the instrumental period, roughly the past 200 years, based on observations and reanalyses. The variables addressed in this presentation are large-scale circulation, pressure and wind, surface air temperature, precipitation and radiative properties (clouds, solar radiation, and sunshine duration). While air temperature over land, not unexpectedly, has increased everywhere in the North Sea region, with strongest trends in spring and in the north of the region, a precipitation increase has been observed in the north and a decrease in the south of the region. This pattern goes along with a north-eastward shift of storm tracks and is in agreement with climate model projections under enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. For other variables, it is not obvious which part of the observed changes may be due to anthropogenic activities and which is internally forced. It remains also unclear to what extent atmospheric circulation over the North Sea region is influenced by distant factors, in particular Arctic sea-ice decline in recent decades. There are indications of an increase in the number of deep cyclones (but not in the total number of cyclones), while storminess since the late 19th century shows no robust trends. The persistence of circulation types appears to have increased over the last century, and consequently, there is an indication for 'more extreme' extreme events. However, changes in extreme weather events are difficult to assess

  7. Neutral Atmospheres of the Giant Planets: An Overview of Composition Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, Thér‘Se

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of the chemical composition of the giant planets provide clues of their formation and evolution processes. According to the currently accepted nucleation model, giant planets formed from the initial accretion of an icy core and the capture of the protosolar gas, mosly composed of hydrogen and helium. In the case of Jupiter and Saturn (the gaseous giants), this gaseous component dominates the composition of the planet, while for Uranus and Neptune (the icy giants) it is only a small fraction of the total mass. The measurement of elemental and isotopic ratios in the giant planets provides key diagnostics of this model, as it implies an enrichment in heavy elements (as well as deuterium) with respect to the cosmic composition.

  8. Global and marine paleoproductivity over the last 4 glacial cycles, constrained by the triple isotope composition of atmospheric O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, M.; von Fischer, J.; Barnett, B.; Blunier, T.

    2004-12-01

    Photochemical reactions in the stratosphere impart a mass-independent fractionation to O2 in the global atmosphere that is attenuated by photosynthesis and respiration. The mass-independent fractionation is approximated by the term D17O = d17O - 0.5 d18O; d17O and d18O are the normal delta terms, with values in per mil. One can calculate rates of photosynthesis and respiration by the biosphere from measurements of the triple isotope composition of paleoatmospheric O2 (accessed from ice cores) and estimates of relative rates of stratospheric photochemical reactions through time. This approach invokes the fact that the magnitude of D17O depends on relative rates of stratospheric reactions, which produce the anomaly, and biological processes, which consume anomalous ambient O2 and replace it with photosynthetic O2, which is normally fractionated (D17O = 0). We present a record of D17O of paleoatmospheric O2 back to 400 ka based on analyses of Vostok and other deep ice cores. We estimate rates of stratospheric reactions in the past, and use these results to estimate past variations in planetary fertility. The results lead to two significant conclusions. First, gross ocean productivity, estimated after subtracting inferred terrestrial productivity from the global value, was generally higher during the ice ages than in interglacial times. Second, global productivity was not strongly forced by orbital variations, in contrast to the Dole effect (d18O of atmospheric O2 - d18O of seawater). This discordance raises the question of how the isotopic composition of O2 in the atmosphere can vary independent of variations in production.

  9. Atmospheric Environment Fabrication of Composite Films by Ethanol Catalytic Combustion and Its Use as Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Soar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite films which consist of amorphous carbon, carbon nanotube, and iron nanoparticles were prepared by ethanol catalytic combustion in atmospheric environment. The as-prepared composite films have good electrocatalytic activity and high conductivity which is due to their particular structure. The efficiency of the composite films based dye-sensitized soar cells (DSSCs is closed to that of the Pt based one. Most importantly, the DSSC employing the composite films presents a higher FF than those of Pt based solar cell. In addition, it is a simple method for mass production of composite films counter electrode (CE which is expected to reduce the cost of fabricating DSSCs.

  10. Phytochemical changes in leaves of subtropical grasses and fynbos shrubs at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattas, D.; Stock, W. D.; Mabusela, W. T.; Green, I. R.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant polyphenolic, tannin, nitrogen, phosphorus and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations were investigated in leaves of subtropical grass and fynbos shrub species. The hypothesis tested was that carbon-based secondary compounds would increase when carbon gain is in excess of growth requirements. This premise was tested in two ecosystems involving plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms and growth strategies. The first ecosystem comprised grasses from a C 4-dominated, subtropical grassland, where three plots were subjected to three different free air CO 2 enrichment treatments, i.e., elevated (600 to 800 μmol mol -1), intermediate (400 μmol mol -1) and ambient atmospheric CO 2. One of the seven grass species, Alloteropsis semialata, had a C 3 photosynthetic pathway while the other grasses were all C 4. The second ecosystem was simulated in a microcosm experiment where three fynbos species were grown in open-top chambers at ambient and 700 μmol mol -1 atmospheric CO 2 in low nutrient acid sands typical of south western coastal and mountain fynbos ecosystems. Results showed that polyphenolics and tannins did not increase in the grass species under elevated CO 2 and only in Leucadendron laureolum among the fynbos species. Similarly, foliar nitrogen content of grasses was largely unaffected by elevated CO 2, and among the fynbos species, only L. laureolum and Leucadendron xanthoconus showed changes in foliar nitrogen content under elevated CO 2, but these were of different magnitude. The overall decrease in nitrogen and phosphorus and consequent increase in C:N and C:P ratio in both ecosystems, along with the increase in polyphenolics and tannins in L. laureolum in the fynbos ecosystem, may negatively affect forage quality and decomposition rates. It is concluded that fast growing grasses do not experience sink limitation and invest extra carbon into growth rather than polyphenolics and

  11. Sensitivity of the Reaction Mechanism of the Ozone Depletion Events during the Arctic Spring on the Initial Atmospheric Composition of the Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Cao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion events (ODEs during the Arctic spring have been investigated since the 1980s. It was found that the depletion of ozone is highly associated with the release of halogens, especially bromine containing compounds. These compounds originate from various substrates such as the ice/snow-covered surfaces in Arctic. In the present study, the dependence of the mixing ratios of ozone and principal bromine species during ODEs on the initial composition of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated by using a concentration sensitivity analysis. This analysis was performed by implementing a reaction mechanism representing the ozone depletion and halogen release in the box model KINAL (KInetic aNALysis of reaction mechanics. The ratios between the relative change of the mixing ratios of particular species such as ozone and the variation in the initial concentration of each atmospheric component were calculated, which indicate the relative importance of each initial species in the chemical kinetic system. The results of the computations show that the impact of various chemical species is different for ozone and bromine containing compounds during the depletion of ozone. It was found that CH3CHO critically controls the time scale of the complete removal of ozone. However, the rate of the ozone loss and the maximum values of bromine species are only slightly influenced by the initial value of CH3CHO. In addition, according to the concentration sensitivity analysis, the reduction of initial Br2 was found to cause a significant retardant of the ODE while the initial mixing ratio of HBr exerts minor influence on both ozone and bromine species. In addition, it is also interesting to note that the increase of C2H2 would significantly raise the amount of HOBr and Br in the atmosphere while the ozone depletion is hardly changed.

  12. Measurement of body composition changes during hemodialysis by bioimpedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, A A; Costa, R A; Grilo, M G; Bezerra, M E; Vieira, M M; Alves, R F; Carmo, S C; Faintuch, J

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of fluid exchanges during hemodialysis is essential for the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Bioimpedance analysis has been used for the measurement of body compartments in many settings, but experience during hemodialysis is relatively scare. In a prospective study of 28 cases of chronic renal failure treated by long-term hemodialysis on an outpatient basis, body composition studies were done immediately before and after the dialysis session. Methods included body weight, serum albumin, hematocrit, hemoglobin, sodium and osmolality. These variables were compared with impedance (BIA) findings, namely lean body mass, body fat, total water, extra and intra-cellular water, third space, and exchangeable sodium/potassium ratio. Patients lost weight and improved hematocrit, hemoglobin, osmolality and serum sodium during the therapy, and BIA measurements were consistent with these changes. Lean body mass and body fat markedly changed along the dialysis session (respectively -24.5% and + 7.5%), and these results were out of proportion regarding known gains and losses in that period. It is concluded that BIA was useful for monitoring water fluxes during hemodialysis, but provided unreliable information about body fat and lean body mass.

  13. Recent changes in the oxidized to reduced nitrogen ratio in atmospheric precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzyca, Iwona; Frankowski, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the characteristics of precipitation in terms of various nitrogen forms (NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, Norganic, Ntotal) is presented. The samples were collected in the areas of different anthropogenic pressure (urban area vs. ecologically protected woodland area, ∼30 km distant from each other; Wielkopolska region, Poland). Based on the Nox and Nred emission profiles (Nox/Nred ratio), temporal and spatial comparison was carried out. For both sites, during a decade of observation, more than 60% of samples had higher contribution of N-NH4+ than N-NO3-, the amount of N-NO2- was negligible, and organic nitrogen amounted to 30% of total nitrogen content which varied up to 16 mg/l. The precipitation events w ith high concentration of nitrogen species were investigated in terms of possible local and remote sources of nitrogen (synoptic meteorology), to indicate the areas which can act as potential sources of N-compounds. Based on the chemometric analysis, it was found that Nred implies Nox and vice versa, due to interactions between them in the atmosphere. Taking into account the analysis of precipitation occurring simultaneously in both locations (about 50% of all rainfall episodes), it was observed that such factor as anthropogenic pressure differentiates but does not determine the chemical composition of precipitation in the investigated areas (urban vs. woodland area; distance of ∼30 km). Thermodynamics of the atmosphere had a significant impact on concentrations of N-NO3- and N-NH4+ in precipitation, as well as the circulation of air masses and remote N sources responsible for transboundary inflow of pollutants.

  14. The atmospheric composition geostationary satellite constellation for air quality and climate science: Evaluating performance with Observation System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. P.; Barre, J.; Worden, H. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Gaubert, B.; Anderson, J. L.; Mizzi, A. P.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Current satellite observations of tropospheric composition made from low Earth orbit provide at best one or two measurements each day at any given location. Coverage is global but sparse, often with large uncertainties in individual measurements that limit examination of local and regional atmospheric composition over short time periods. This has hindered the operational uptake of these data for monitoring air quality and population exposure, and for initializing and evaluating chemical weather forecasts. By the end of the current decade there are planned geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of GEO platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations of continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability on diurnal and local scales. We describe Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the contributions of these GEO missions to improve knowledge of near-surface air pollution due to intercontinental long-range transport and quantify chemical precursor emissions. We discuss the requirements on measurement simulation, chemical transport modeling, and data assimilation for a successful OSSE infrastructure. Our approach uses an efficient computational method to sample a high-resolution global GEOS-5 chemistry Nature Run over each geographical region of the GEO constellation. The demonstration carbon monoxide (CO) observation simulator, which is being expanded to other chemical pollutants, currently produces multispectral retrievals and captures realistic scene-dependent variation in measurement vertical sensitivity and cloud cover. We use the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter to assimilate the simulated observations in a CAM-Chem global chemistry-climate model Control Run. The impact of observing over each region is evaluated using data

  15. The isotopic composition of present-day Antarctic snow in a Lagrangian atmospheric simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsen, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802459; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643

    2007-01-01

    The isotopic composition of present-day Antarctic snow is simulated for the period September 1980–August 2002 using a Rayleigh-type isotope distillation model in combination with backward trajectory calculations with 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis

  16. On transient climate change at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary due to atmospheric soot injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeen, Charles G.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Toon, Owen B.; Conley, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Climate simulations that consider injection into the atmosphere of 15,000 Tg of soot, the amount estimated to be present at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, produce what might have been one of the largest episodes of transient climate change in Earth history. The observed soot is believed to originate from global wildfires ignited after the impact of a 10-km-diameter asteroid on the Yucatán Peninsula 66 million y ago. Following injection into the atmosphere, the soot is heated by sunlight and lofted to great heights, resulting in a worldwide soot aerosol layer that lasts several years. As a result, little or no sunlight reaches the surface for over a year, such that photosynthesis is impossible and continents and oceans cool by as much as 28 °C and 11 °C, respectively. The absorption of light by the soot heats the upper atmosphere by hundreds of degrees. These high temperatures, together with a massive injection of water, which is a source of odd-hydrogen radicals, destroy the stratospheric ozone layer, such that Earth’s surface receives high doses of UV radiation for about a year once the soot clears, five years after the impact. Temperatures remain above freezing in the oceans, coastal areas, and parts of the Tropics, but photosynthesis is severely inhibited for the first 1 y to 2 y, and freezing temperatures persist at middle latitudes for 3 y to 4 y. Refugia from these effects would have been very limited. The transient climate perturbation ends abruptly as the stratosphere cools and becomes supersaturated, causing rapid dehydration that removes all remaining soot via wet deposition.

  17. On transient climate change at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary due to atmospheric soot injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeen, Charles G; Garcia, Rolando R; Toon, Owen B; Conley, Andrew J

    2017-09-05

    Climate simulations that consider injection into the atmosphere of 15,000 Tg of soot, the amount estimated to be present at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, produce what might have been one of the largest episodes of transient climate change in Earth history. The observed soot is believed to originate from global wildfires ignited after the impact of a 10-km-diameter asteroid on the Yucatán Peninsula 66 million y ago. Following injection into the atmosphere, the soot is heated by sunlight and lofted to great heights, resulting in a worldwide soot aerosol layer that lasts several years. As a result, little or no sunlight reaches the surface for over a year, such that photosynthesis is impossible and continents and oceans cool by as much as 28 °C and 11 °C, respectively. The absorption of light by the soot heats the upper atmosphere by hundreds of degrees. These high temperatures, together with a massive injection of water, which is a source of odd-hydrogen radicals, destroy the stratospheric ozone layer, such that Earth's surface receives high doses of UV radiation for about a year once the soot clears, five years after the impact. Temperatures remain above freezing in the oceans, coastal areas, and parts of the Tropics, but photosynthesis is severely inhibited for the first 1 y to 2 y, and freezing temperatures persist at middle latitudes for 3 y to 4 y. Refugia from these effects would have been very limited. The transient climate perturbation ends abruptly as the stratosphere cools and becomes supersaturated, causing rapid dehydration that removes all remaining soot via wet deposition.

  18. Microstructure changes in nanoparticulate gold films under different thermal atmospheres and the effects on bondability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seonhee, E-mail: seonhee.jang@samsung.com [Electro Material and Device (eMD) Center, Central R and D Institute, Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd., 314 Maetan3-Dong, Yeongtong-Gu, Suwon, Gyunggi-Do 443-743 (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Jaewoo; Oh, Yongsoo [Electro Material and Device (eMD) Center, Central R and D Institute, Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd., 314 Maetan3-Dong, Yeongtong-Gu, Suwon, Gyunggi-Do 443-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Sintering in a furnace under different thermal atmospheres of air, nitrogen (N{sub 2}) or N{sub 2} bubbled through formic acid (FA/N{sub 2}) was carried out for a spin-coated gold nanoparticle (NP) ink. Temperatures of 200, 250 and 290 deg. C were applied for each atmosphere. The size of the NPs was measured by transmission electron microscopy and the decomposition temperatures of the solvent and the organic capping molecules of the ink were determined by thermo-gravimetric analysis. The changes in the microstructure of Au NP films after sintering were studied using the field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy and focused ion beam analysis. Organic residues remaining on the film were detected by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and sheet resistance was measured using a four point probe for the calculation of resistivity. Wire bonding tests on the Au film were performed for bondability. The Au NP films sintered under air showed neck growth as temperature increased, while the films sintered under N{sub 2} showed grain growth, except for the film sintered at 290 deg. C. Coalescence and grain growth as well as porosity were observed in the film sintered under FA/N{sub 2}. The infrared absorption peaks of stretch and deformation were found as organic residues, with C-O stretch peak only being detected in the film sintered under FA/N{sub 2}. All of the samples represented a preferred Au (1 1 1) orientation. The film sintered under N{sub 2} showed good quality compared with those sintered under air or FA/N{sub 2} and the resistivity was about twice the bulk value. Wire bonding tests were successful in all the films sintered under air, N{sub 2} or FA/N{sub 2} atmospheres.

  19. Changes occurring in vegetable oils composition due to microwave heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan El-Mallah, M.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of microwave heating on three vegetable oils having different lipid compositions was studied. Sunflower, soybean and peanut oils in comparison with oil admixture of soybean and peanut oil (1:1, w/w, were selected for this study. Each oil was heated for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 minutes in microwave oven. Peroxide value, free acidity and colour absorbance (at 420 nm were proportionally increasing with the increase of heating period. Colour absorption threw light on the formation of browning products arising from phospholipids during microwave heating. Total tocopherol contents were determined by preparative thin layer chromatography, whereas the fatty acid compositions and formed epoxy acid were analyzed by capillary gas liquid chromatography. The formed conjugated dienes and trienes were determined by UV spectrophotometry. It was found that the total tocopherols of the microwave heated oils, decreased depending on the type of the predominating tocopherols. Also a relation of peroxide formation, during microwave heating, with changes in total tocopherol composition was discussed. It was found that polyunsaturated fatty acids generally decreased by increasing the heating period. The results obtained from the heated oil admixture helped interpret the results obtained from other heated individual oils.Se estudia el efecto del calentamiento en horno de microondas sobre aceites de diferente composición en ácidos grasos. Aceites de girasol, soja, cacahuete y una mezcla de soja y cacahuete al 50%, se calentaron durante 2, 4, 6, 8 10, 12, 15 y 18 minutos. Los valores de índice de peróxidos, acidez libre y absorbancia a 420 nm fueron proporcionales al tiempo de calentamiento. Otras determinaciones incluyeron el contenido total en tocoferoles mediante cromatografía en capa fina, la composición en ácidos grasos y en epoxiácidos mediante cromatografía gas líquido, y la formación de dienos y trienos conjugados mediante

  20. Changes in proximate composition and oil characteristics during flaxseed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herchi, W.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization-Mass Spectrometry (APPI-MS and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC are the two analytical methods that were used to characterize Triacylglycerols (TAGs during flaxseed development. The HPLC method of the oils showed the presence of 15 TAG species. In contrast to the HPLC chromatograms, the APPI-MS showed 17 peaks of TAG. APPI-MS is more rapid than the HPLC method (11 min. The iodine value of the oils showed a gradual increase, while the oil stability continuously decreased. Proximate composition during flaxseed development revealed that flaxseed is potentially a good source of dietary energy and protein. At full maturity, flaxseed contained 37% oil and 24% protein on a dry-weight basis; albumin was the major storage protein (53% of total storage proteins followed by globulin (33% and glutelin fractions (11%. Prolamins had the lowest percentage with 3%. α-amylase activity was higher in the mature seeds than the young ones.Fotoionización a presión atmosférica-Espectrometría de masas (APPI-MS y cromatografía líquida de alta resolución (HPLC son dos métodos de análisis que se utilizaron para caracterizar triglicéridos (TAGs durante el desarrollo de semillas de linaza. El método HPLC mostró la presencia de 15 especies de TAG, en contraste, los cromatogramas de APPI-MS mostraron 17 picos de TAG siendo el método APPI-MS más rápido que el de HPLC (11 min. El índice de yodo de los aceites mostró un aumento gradual, mientras que la estabilidad disminuyó continuamente. El estudio de la composición proximal de la linaza durante su desarrollo, mostró que esta semilla es una fuente potencialmente buena de energía y de proteína para la dieta. Al final de la maduración, la linaza contenía 37 % de aceite y 24 % de proteína sobre peso seco; albúmina fue la principal proteína de almacenamiento (53% sobre el total de las proteínas de almacenamiento seguido de la globulina (33 % y glutelina

  1. Plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere of Central Europe: Isotopic composition and time evolution vs. circulation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kierepko, Renata, E-mail: Renata.Kierepko@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Mietelski, Jerzy W. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Ustrnul, Zbigniew [Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Institute of Meteorology and Water Management, National Research Institute, Krakow (Poland); Anczkiewicz, Robert [Institute of Geological Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Wershofen, Herbert [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Holgye, Zoltan [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Kapała, Jacek [Medical University of Bialystok (Poland); Isajenko, Krzysztof [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports evidence of Pu isotopes in the lower part of the troposphere of Central Europe. The data were obtained based on atmospheric aerosol fraction samples collected from four places in three countries (participating in the informal European network known as the Ring of Five (Ro5)) forming a cell with a surface area of about 200,000 km{sup 2}. We compared our original data sets from Krakow (Poland, 1990–2007) and Bialystok (Poland, 1991–2007) with the results from two other locations, Prague (Czech Republic; 1997–2004) and Braunschweig (Germany; 1990–2003) to find time evolution of the Pu isotopes. The levels of the activity concentration for {sup 238}Pu and for {sup (239} {sup +} {sup 240)}Pu were estimated to be a few and some tens of nBq m{sup −} {sup 3}, respectively. However, we also noted some results were much higher (even about 70 times higher) than the average concentration of {sup 238}Pu in the atmosphere. The achieved complex data sets were used to test a new approach to the problem of solving mixing isotopic traces from various sources (here up to three) in one sample. Results of our model, supported by mesoscale atmospheric circulation parameters, suggest that Pu from nuclear weapon accidents or tests and nuclear burnt-up fuel are present in the air. - Highlights: • Evidence of Pu isotopes in the lower part of the troposphere of Central Europe • The effective annual doses associated with Pu inhalation • New approach to the problem of solving mixed Pu origins in one sample (3SM) • Relationship between Pu isotopes activity concentration and circulation factors.

  2. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Chemistry and the Composition of the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    A high priority objective of the Mars Exploration Program is to Determine if life exists today (MEPAG Goal I, Objective A). The measurement of gases of biogenic origin may be an approach to detect the presence of microbial life on the surface or subsurface of Mars. Chemical thermodynamic calculations indicate that on both Earth and Mars, certain gases should exist in extremely low concentrations, if at all. Microbial metabolic activity is an important non-equilibrium chemistry process on Earth, and if microbial life exists on Mars, may be an important nonequilibrium chemistry process on Mars. The non-equilibrium chemistry of the atmosphere of Mars is discussed in this paper.

  3. Relevance of Preindustrial Land Cover Change and Emissions for Attribution of Excess Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratz, J.; Caldeira, K.

    2010-12-01

    Until the 1950s, CO2 emissions from anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC), in particular from deforestation, have been of similar magnitude as or larger than CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel burning. It has therefore been widely acknowledged that attribution of the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate change to countries has to consider not only fossil-fuel emissions, but also emissions from ALCC. Unlike fossil-fuel burning, however, ALCC caused substantial emissions in the preindustrial era: 20-40% of cumulative ALCC emissions until today have occurred before AD 1850. Here, we use simulation results from the comprehensive climate-carbon cycle model ECHAM5-JSBACH/MPIOM-HAMOCC5 and a response function approach to give improved estimates of countries’ contributions to atmospheric CO2 increase, based on a spatially explicit reconstruction of ALCC that reaches back until AD 800. We find that considering emissions from ALCC in addition to fossil-fuel burning substantially shifts the attribution of the present-day CO2 increase towards tropical regions, consistent with previous studies. So far unrecognized, however, has been the role of the large-scale preindustrial deforestation in India and China. Together, these countries contributed more than 20% to the CO2 increase well into the 20th century. As a consequence, the contribution to atmospheric CO2 increase of Europe, the Former Soviet Union, and North America combined is about 100% in 1850 and 70% today when only fossil-fuel emissions are considered, but only 30% in 1850 and 50% today when ALCC emissions are also considered. Reconstruction of the long history of ALCC allows accounting for legacy effects such as delayed emissions from soils and wood products, and for carbon sinks caused by historical land use activity. We find that the Middle East counteracts the atmospheric CO2 increase throughout the preindustrial era, as agricultural area is abandoned in late medieval and early modern times. As

  4. Responses of Metabolites in Soybean Shoot Apices to Changing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sicher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean seedlings were grown in controlled environment chambers with CO2 partial pressures of 38 (ambient and 72 (elevated Pa. Five or six shoot apices were harvested from individual 21- to 24-day-old plants. Metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography and, out of 21 compounds, only sucrose and fructose increased in response to CO2 enrichment. One unidentified metabolite, Unk-21.03 decreased up to 80% in soybean apices in response to elevated CO2. Levels of Unk-21.03 decreased progressively when atmospheric CO2 partial pressures were increased from 26 to 100 Pa. Reciprocal transfer experiments showed that Unk-21.03, and sucrose in soybean apices were altered slowly over several days to changes in atmospheric CO2 partial pressures. The mass spectrum of Unk-21.03 indicated that this compound likely contained both an amino and carboxyl group and was structurally related to serine and aspartate. Our findings suggested that CO2 enrichment altered a small number of specific metabolites in soybean apices. This could be an important step in understanding how plant growth and development are affected by carbon dioxide enrichment.

  5. Response of the North Atlantic storm track to climate change shaped by ocean-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollings, T.; Gregory, J. M.; Pinto, J. G.; Reyers, M.; Brayshaw, D. J.

    2012-05-01

    A poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm tracks in response to anthropogenic greenhouse-gas forcing has been diagnosed in climate model simulations. Explanations of this effect have focused on atmospheric dynamics. However, in contrast to storm tracks in other regions, the North Atlantic storm track responds by strengthening and extending farther east, in particular on its southern flank. These adjustments are associated with an intensification and extension of the eddy-driven jet towards western Europe and are expected to have considerable societal impacts related to a rise in storminess in Europe. Here, we apply a regression analysis to an ensemble of coupled climate model simulations to show that the coupling between ocean and atmosphere shapes the distinct storm-track response to greenhouse-gas forcing in the North Atlantic region. In the ensemble of simulations we analyse, at least half of the differences between the storm-track responses of different models are associated with uncertainties in ocean circulation changes. We compare the fully coupled simulations with both the associated slab model simulations and an ocean-forced experiment with one climate model to establish causality. We conclude that uncertainties in the response of the North Atlantic storm track to anthropogenic emissions could be reduced through tighter constraints on the future ocean circulation.

  6. A moderate change in temperature induces changes in fatty acid composition of storage and membrane lipids in a soil arthropod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooremalen, van C.; Ellers, J.

    2010-01-01

    A moderate change in ambient temperature can lead to vital physiological and biochemical adjustments in ectotherms, one of which is a change in fatty acid composition. When temperature decreases, the composition of membrane lipids (phospholipid fatty acids) is expected to become more unsaturated to

  7. A moderate change in temperature induces changes in fatty acid composition of storage and membrane lipids in a soil arthropod.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dooremalen, J.A.; Ellers, J.

    2010-01-01

    A moderate change in ambient temperature can lead to vital physiological and biochemical adjustments in ectotherms, one of which is a change in fatty acid composition. When temperature decreases, the composition of membrane lipids (phospholipid fatty acids) is expected to become more unsaturated to

  8. Land use changes and its impacts on air quality and atmospheric patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, E. D.; Mazzoli, C. R.; Martins, L. D.; Martins, J. A.; Carvalho, V.; Andrade, M.

    2013-05-01

    Possible modifications on atmospheric patterns and air quality caused by land use changes are discussed in this work. With the increasing interest in alternative energy sources, mainly due to the replacement of fossil fuels, large part of the Brazilian territory is being used for sugar cane cultivation. The resultant modifications in land use and some activities associated to this crop are studied with some detail through numerical modeling of the atmosphere. The same tool was applied to study the effect of surface type and emission sources over urban areas in the neighborhoods of the cultivated areas, in particular those located in the Metropolitan Area of Campinas, inside the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The main focus of this work was to identify some relationship between these two types of land use modification and its influence on the regional atmospheric circulation patterns and air quality over agricultural and urban areas affected by biomass burning and the traditional sources of pollutants, such as industries and vehicles. First, the effect of urban areas was analyzed and it was possible to identify typical patterns associated with urban heat islands, especially over the city of Campinas. In this region, air temperature differences up to 3 K were detected during night time. During the day, due to the atmospheric conditions of the studied period, this effect was not significant. Afterwards, the effect of sugar cane cultivated regions was discussed. The results show that the regions of sugar cane grow can significantly modify the surface energy fluxes, with direct consequences to the standards of local temperature and humidity and over nearby regions. Sensitivity tests were carried out during part of September, 2007, through the substitution of the sugar cane by a generic crop in the model, and show that during the day the cultivated areas can present temperatures up to 0,65 k higher than those in the case of the generic one. Throughout the dispersion module

  9. Accumulation of lignin and malondialdehyde in relation to quality changes of button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) stored in modified atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianjia; Jahangir, Muhammad Muzammil; Wang, Qiushuang; Ying, Tiejin

    2010-06-01

    Whole fresh button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) were stored in unsealed bags in two types of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), namely, active and passive, at 4 °C. The packaging film was 0.04 mm low-density polyethylene and the gas composition of the active MAP was 12% O(2), 2.5% CO(2) and 85.5% N(2). Firmness of Mushroom showed a positive correlation with the accumulation of lignin in the tissue. On the other hand, changes of malondialdehyde content with storage time were proportional to the evolution of browning. The button mushrooms in control treatment developed severe browning at the end of the 15-day storage, while the mushrooms of both active and passive MAP treatments browned slightly. MAP treatments could not inhibit phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity; however, it can reduce the lignification process by the inhibition of peroxidase (POD) activity and the accumulation of lignin. Correlation between the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity and lignin accumulation was not obvious. Our results suggested that an increase in the firmness of mushrooms during senescence may be a consequence of tissue lignification, a process associated with increase in POD activity. Both active and passive MAPs were useful for the conservation of tenderness and whiteness in button mushrooms.

  10. Infrared studies of temperature-dependent phase transitions in ammonium sulfate aerosol and the development of a visible light scattering technique to measure atmospheric particle compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onasch, Timothy Bruce

    1999-10-01

    Sulfate containing particles exist globally throughout the atmosphere and impact its chemistry and radiative properties. Under the low temperature conditions found in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, sulfate particles act as nuclei for cirrus clouds and facilitate heterogeneous reactions which affect ozone chemistry. Both of these processes are dependent upon the chemical composition and phase of the background aerosol, and thus the behavior of these particles at low temperatures. This thesis represents two approaches undertaken to investigate the composition and phase of atmospheric aerosols. First, a flow tube system has been developed to study the low temperature behavior of atmospherically relevant particles within a controlled laboratory environment. Second, a visible light scattering technique has been developed to characterize the physical properties of particles in situ from an aircraft platform. The relative humidities of temperature-dependent phase transitions in ammonium sulfate aerosols were measured within a flow tube system. A chilled-mirror hygrometer measured the relative humidity and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to probe the phase of the particles and to characterize their microphysical properties. The relative humidity of deliquescence changed from 80% to 82% over the temperature range from 294.8 K to 258.0 K, in agreement with thermodynamic theory. The efflorescence relative humidity of submicron ammonium sulfate particles increased slightly from 32% to 39% as the temperature decreased from 294.8 K to 234.3 K. The latter result suggests that salt particles may exist as metastable solution droplets under low relative humidity conditions for significant time periods in the upper troposphere. To measure particle refractive indices in situ, a visible light scattering technique based on NCAR's Multiangle Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (MASP) was developed. The MASP was calibrated with monodisperse particles having

  11. Are noctilucent clouds harbingers of global change in the middle atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gary E.

    Noctilucent clouds (NLC) and their space counterpart, Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) are water-ice clouds that form in the cold high-latitude mesopause region during summertime. These clouds have been suggested to be sensitive markers of long-term mesospheric change. It was previously reported that NLC numbers over northwestern Europe increased in the late 20 th century. However, when the observations are sorted properly by location, the time series of NLC observations no longer shows an upward trend. A 40-year data set from Moscow also shows no significant long-term trend in NLC numbers, but an increase in their average brightness. There is also new satellite evidence that PMCs have brightened over the past 23 years. Recent mesospheric cloud occurrences have been reported at unusually-low latitudes (40°-50°N). Together with the satellite evidence, these developments have promoted speculation that permanent atmospheric changes near the high-latitude mesopause region have occurred. Before such conclusions can be drawn, natural variations in NLC activity need to be understood. The solar cycle appears to be the dominant natural influence. The published data (both from the ground and space-based) are consistent in showing a pronounced 10-11 year period oscillation in cloud occurrence, which is approximately anti-correlated with the solar cycle. The brighter the clouds, the more their numbers change over the solar cycle. The cyclic change is likely due to small changes in mesospheric temperature and water vapor, induced by the solar cycle variation of UV irradiance. There is an unexplained several-year time lag between solar cycle minimum and the peak of cloud activity. Longer time series and more comprehensive models are needed before the link with global change can be established.

  12. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change.

  13. Lipid oxidation and color changes of goose meat stored under vacuum and modified atmosphere conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkusz, A; Haraf, G; Okruszek, A; Werenska-Sudnik, M

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the work was to investigate the color and lipid oxidation changes of goose breast meat packaged in vacuum and modified atmosphere (MA) conditions consisting of 80% O2, 20% CO2, and stored in refrigerated conditions at 4°C. Color stability was monitored by determining total heme pigments concentration; relative concentration of myoglobin, oxymyoglobin, and metmyoglobin; parameters of color L*, a*, b*, and sensory evaluation of the surface color. Lipid stability was measured by determining thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The samples were examined in 24 h after slaughter (unpacked muscles) and on d 4, 7, 9, 11 of storage (muscles packed in vacuum and in MA). Through the time of storage, samples packed in MA had higher TBARS values in comparison to the meat packed in vacuum. For samples packed in two types of atmospheres, the total pigments concentration decreased gradually within 11 d of storage. It was observed that relative metmyoglobin concentration increased whereas relative oxymyoglobin concentration decreased in total heme pigments in the MA stored muscle. The relative concentration of all three myoglobin forms sample packed in vacuum remained unchanged. The color parameters (L*, a*, b*) did not change for 11 d of storage for the vacuum packed meat. The value of the color parameter a* decreased and the value of the color parameters L* and b* increased in the samples packaged in MA. The data prove that if you store goose meat in MA (consisting of 80% O2, 20% CO2) or vacuum, the unchanged surface color is preserved for 9 and 11 day, respectively.Vacuum appears to be a better method as regards the maintaining of lipid stability in goose meat. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. Climate change scenarios of extreme temperatures and atmospheric humidity for Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejeda-Martinez, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)]. E-mail: atejeda@uv.mx; Conde-Alvarez, C. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Valencia-Treviso, L.E. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2008-10-15

    The following study explores climatic change scenarios of extreme temperature and atmospheric humidity for the 2020 and 2050 decades. They were created for Mexico through the GFDLR30, ECHAM4 and HadCM2 general circulation models. Base scenario conditions were associated with the normal climatological conditions for the period 1961-1990, with a database of 50 surface observatories. It was necessary to empirically estimate the missing data in approximately half of the pressure measurements. For the period 1961-1990, statistical models of the monthly means of maximum and minimum temperatures and atmospheric humidity (relative and specific) were obtained from the observed data of temperature, solar radiation and precipitation. Based on the simulations of the GFDLR30, ECHAM4 and HADCM2 models, a future scenario of monthly means of maximum and minimum temperatures and humidity in climatic change conditions was created. The results shown are for the representative months of winter (January) and summer (July). [Spanish] En este articulo se presentan escenarios de cambio climatico referidos a temperaturas extremas y humedad atmosferica para las decadas de 2020 y 2050. Fueron generados para Mexico a partir de los modelos de circulacion general GFDLR30, ECHAM4 y HADCM2. El escenario base corresponde a las normales climatologicas del periodo 1961-1990 para 50 observatorios de superficie. Para la mitad de ellos fue necesario estimar empiricamente la presion atmosferica a partir de la altitud y para la totalidad se obtuvieron modelos estadisticos de los promedios mensuales de temperaturas maxima y minima asi como de humedad atmosferica (relativa y especifica). Esos modelos estadisticos, combinados con las salidas de los modelos de circulacion general mencionados, produjeron escenarios futuros de medias mensuales de temperaturas extremas y de humedad bajo condiciones de cambio climatico. Se mostraran los resultados para un mes representativo del invierno (enero) y otro del verano

  15. Elemental and carbon isotope composition of total particulate matter in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland: summer-winter contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Samek, Lucyna; Morawski, Filip; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Bartyzel, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    Deterioration of air quality in urban agglomerations is a growing problem of global significance [1]. This spurs research towards better understanding of parameters controlling air quality in urban environment (sources of particulate matter and gaseous contaminants, spatial and temporal variability of air quality, impact of atmospheric dynamics on the air quality, and several others). Krakow belongs to four largest cities in Poland. With nearly one million inhabitants, rapidly growing car traffic and significant industrial activities, Krakow agglomeration represents a typical urban environment in the eastern Europe. Characteristic features of the local climate are generally weak winds (annual average around 2.7 m s-1) and frequent inversions, extending sometimes over several days, particularly during winter seasons, favor accumulation of pollutants originating from surface emissions in the atmosphere over the city. Krakow ranks among the most polluted cities in Europe. There is an ongoing discussion on the role of different sources of total suspended particulate matter (TSPM) in the city's atmosphere, such as traffic, low- and high-level emissions related to burning of coal for heating purposes, resuspension of street dust, and some others. The presented work was aimed at exploring possibilities of using carbon isotope composition of total particulate matter collected in Krakow atmosphere, for better characterization of TSPM sources in the city, with the focus on seasonal changes of the character and intensity of those sources. Archived samples of TSPM deposited on filters (sampling interval between 5 and 20 days) and spanning the period 2005 - 2010 [3] were used for this purpose. For each year one pair of filters representing summer and winter conditions was selected. The work comprised also multi-elemental analysis of available TSPM samples using EDXRF technique. The measurements of 13C and 14C content in the total elemental carbon collected on filters revealed

  16. Controllable Thermal Rectification Realized in Binary Phase Change Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-03-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management.

  17. P53 Mutations Change Phosphatidylinositol Acyl Chain Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP second messengers relay extracellular growth cues through the phosphorylation status of the inositol sugar, a signal transduction system that is deregulated in cancer. In stark contrast to PIP inositol head-group phosphorylation, changes in phosphatidylinositol (PI lipid acyl chains in cancer have remained ill-defined. Here, we apply a mass-spectrometry-based method capable of unbiased high-throughput identification and quantification of cellular PI acyl chain composition. Using this approach, we find that PI lipid chains represent a cell-specific fingerprint and are unperturbed by serum-mediated signaling in contrast to the inositol head group. We find that mutation of Trp53 results in PIs containing reduced-length fatty acid moieties. Our results suggest that the anchoring tails of lipid second messengers form an additional layer of PIP signaling in cancer that operates independently of PTEN/PI3-kinase activity but is instead linked to p53.

  18. The atmosphere during the younger dryas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayewski, P A; Meeker, L D; Whitlow, S; Twickler, M S; Morrison, M C; Alley, R B; Bloomfield, P; Taylor, K

    1993-07-09

    One of the most dramatic climate change events observed in marine and ice core records is the Younger Dryas, a return to near-glacial conditions that punctuated the last deglaciation. High-resolution, continuous glaciochemical records, newly retrieved from central Greenland, record the chemical composition of the arctic atmosphere at this time. This record shows that both the onset and the termination of the Younger Dryas occurred within 10 to 20 years and that massive, frequent, and short-term (decadal or less) changes in atmospheric composition occurred throughout this event. Changes in atmospheric composition are attributable to changes in the size of the polar atmospheric cell and resultant changes in source regions and to the growth and decay of continental biogenic source regions.

  19. MULTI-SECTORIAL IMPACTS OF ATMOSPHERIC EXTREME EVENTS AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTH-EAST HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. MIKA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to comprehend possible impacts of the atmospheric extreme events and of the expected climate change in three different spatial levels. They are first collected at the national level, i.e. all impacts are included in matrices, where the rows are the extremities in the first aspect and the regional climate change in the second aspect. The columns are the impacts on the natural resources, i.e. on hydrology & water management, on natural ecosystems and on agriculture & food supply, as well, as on the human dimensions, i.e. on urban settlements, on energy and transportation and on human health, in both aspects. The impacts most relevant in the two other levels, i.e. North-East Hungary and the Bükk-Miskolc microregion are also unequivocally indicated in the matrices. Importance of the impacts is preliminarily illustrated by quantitative information on the extremes, the changes and some impacts already happened at the selected space scales. The paper is closing by the related adaptation measures in North-East Hungary.

  20. New perspectives for studying organics and the composition of Mars’ atmosphere with ExoMars / NOMAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Thomas, Ian; Smith, Michael D.; Daerden, Frank; Ristic, Bojan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Lopez-Moreno, Jose; NOMAD Team

    2017-10-01

    The ESA/Roscosmos Exomars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) mission carries a series of instruments, whose operativity is aimed to achieve unprecedented accuracy in the detection and characterization of spatial distribution and temporal cycles of a broad set of trace species, organics and key isotopologues on Mars. Besides this, the mission is designed for some other specific objectives, such as the mapping of CH4 and D/H isotopologic ratio.In this work, we essentially focus on one of the key payloads of ExoMars, the Nadir and Occultation for Mars Discovery (NOMAD) instrument. This is a grating spectrometer whose design is based on that of the SPICAV/SOIR instrument, already flown on board of Venus Express, and can operate both at the infrared (IR) and visible/UV wavelengths. In addition, the IR channel can be operated both in Solar Occultation (SO) mode, and in Limb Nadir Occultation (LNO), enabling the possibility of a characterization of both the vertical structure of the atmosphere and the mapping of the above cited atmospheric compounds on a global scale.To be prepared to exploit the outstanding possibilities and the high feasibility of the instrument to these science objectives, we have worked on the calibration of the instrument both in SO and LNO modes. Using a large subset of the calibration measurements acquired during the Mars Capture Orbit-1 phase (MCO-1), we have reckoned both the wavenumber calibration across all the spectral interval of the instrument, and characterized the response function of the Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter (AOTF) which selects diffraction orders. The results have been also used to elaborate a model of the instrumental response, and a quantitative model of the observed signal. Based on this, we also present some actual retrieval results on SO and LNO datasets acquired in November 2016 and March 2017, which will serve as a proxy for the forthcoming science operations (starting early 2018).Acknowledgments NASA’s Mars Exploration Program

  1. Changes in the composition of South African red meat | Hall | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This reduction together with changes in carcass weight has resulted in changes in carcass composition and thus changes in nutrient density. The data attest that in order to align industry processes, as well as legislation and marketing strategies, continued research on composition needs to be performed for the baseline ...

  2. How Sensitive is the Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Partitioning to Changes in Remineralization Rates of Biogenic Material in the Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, E.; Primeau, F.

    2006-12-01

    We use a 3D ocean biogeochemistry model coupled to an atmospheric box model to study the equilibrium response of atmospheric CO_2 to changes in the remineralization rates of calcium carbonate and particulate and dissolved organic matter. Our focus is on understanding how the three dimensional redistribution of biogeochemical tracers affect the partitioning of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean. We present a sensitivity analysis that quantifies how dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity and nutrients are redistributed as a result of changes in the remineralization parameters. The resulting sensitivity patterns are further analyzed using a novel decomposition technique that allows us to quantify the impact of the parameter changes on the strength of the potential soft-tissue pump, the potential hard-tissue counter pump and the gas-exchange pump. The three dimensional view of the pump components elucidates how the changes in remineralization length scales couple with the ocean circulation to affect air-sea carbon fluxes.

  3. Changes in nutrient and antinutrient composition of Vigna racemosa flour in open and controlled fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Difo, V. H.; Onyike, E.; D.A. Ameh; Njoku, G. C.; Ndidi, U. S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of open and controlled fermentation on the proximate composition, mineral elements, antinutritional factors and flatulence-causing oligosaccharides in Vigna racemosa. The open fermentation was carried out using the microorganisms present in the atmosphere while the controlled fermentation was carried out using Aspergillus niger as a starter. The proximate composition of the Vigna racemosa, some anti-nutrients and the mineral elements were ana...

  4. Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flynn, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign, was based out of Ellington Field in Houston, Texas, during August and September 2013. The study focused on pollution emissions and the evolution of gases and aerosols in deep convective outflow, and the influences and feedbacks of aerosol particles from anthropogenic pollution and biomass burning on meteorology, clouds, and climate. The project required three aircraft to accomplish these goals. The NASA DC-8 provided observations from near the surface to 12 km, while the NASA ER-2 provided high-altitude observations reaching into the lower stratosphere as well as important remote-sensing observations connecting satellites with observations from lower-flying aircraft and surface sites. The SPEC, Inc. Learjet obtained aerosol and cloud microphysical measurement in convective clouds and convective outflow.

  5. Multiple oxygen and sulfur isotope compositions of secondary atmospheric sulfate in the city of Wuhan, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Bao, H.; Zhou, A.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary atmospheric sulfate (SAS) is the oxidation product and sink for sulfur gases of biological, volcanic, and anthropogenic origins on Earth. SAS can be produced from gas-phase OH-radical oxidation and five aqueous-phase chemical reactions including aqueous-phase S (IV) oxidation reactions by H2O2, O3, oxygen catalyzed by Fe3+ and Mn2+, and methyle hydrogen peroxide and peroxyacetic acid. The tropospheric sulfur oxidation pathway is therefore determined by cloud-water pH, dissolved [Fe2+] or [Mn2+] content, S emission rate, meteorological condition, and other factors. The S isotope composition is a good tracer for the source while the O isotopes, especially the triple O isotope compositions are a good tracer for S oxidation pathway. Jerkins and Bao (2006) provided the first set of multiple stable isotope compositions (δ34S, δ18O and Δ17O) for SAS collected from bulk atmosphere in Baton Rouge in the relatively rural southern USA. Their study revealed a long-tern average Δ17O value of ~+0.7‰ for SAS, and speculated that much of the Earth mid-latitudes may have a similar average SAS Δ17O value. Additional sampling campaign at different sites is necessarily for constructing and testing models on sulfur oxidation and transport in the troposphere. A total of 33 sulfate samples were collected from bulk atmospheric deposition over a 950-day period from May 2009 to December 2011 in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Differing from Baton Rouge, Wuhan is an industrial metropolis with a population of 9.8 million and a high particulate matter content (115 μg/m3). It also has a subtropical monsoon climate, with rainwater pH at ~5.3 year-around. The rainwater ion concentrations have seasonal variations, typically low in summer and high in winter. The anions are dominated by SO42-, at an average concentration of 8.5 mg/L. There is little sulfate contribution from sea-salt (SS) sulfate or dusts in Wuhan. The isotopic compositions for bulk atmospheric sulfate

  6. Is late Quaternary climate change governed by self-sustained oscillations in atmospheric CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    A simple earth system model is developed to simulate global carbon and phosphorus cycling over the late Quaternary. It is focused on the geological cycling of C and P via continental weathering, volcanic and metamorphic degassing, hydrothermal processes and burial at the seabed. A simple ocean model is embedded in this geological model where the global ocean is represented by surface water, thermocline and deep water boxes. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus, dissolved inorganic carbon, and total alkalinity are calculated for each box. The partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere (pCO2A) is determined by exchange processes with the surface ocean and the continents. It serves as key prognostic model variable and is assumed to govern surface temperatures and global sea-level. The model is formulated as autonomous system, in which the governing equations have no explicit time-dependence. For certain parameter values, the model does not converge towards a steady-state but develops stable self-sustained oscillations. These free oscillations feature pCO2A minima and maxima consistent with the ice-core record when vertical mixing in the ocean is allowed to vary in response to pCO2A-controlled temperature change. A stable 100-kyr cycle with a rapid transition from glacial to interglacial conditions is obtained when additional non-linear equations are applied to calculate deep ocean mixing, iron fertilization and the depth of organic matter degradation as function of pCO2A-controlled surface temperature. The δ13C value of carbon in the ocean/atmosphere system calculated in these model runs is consistent with the benthic δ13C record. However, the simulated 13C depletion in the glacial ocean is not driven by the decline in terrestrial carbon stocks but by sea-level change controlling the rates of organic carbon burial and weathering at continental margins. The pCO2A- and δ13C oscillations develop without any form of external Milankovitch forcing. They are induced and

  7. On the atmospheric dynamical responses to land-use change in East Asian monsoon region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huqiang [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); China Meteorological Administration, Institute of Arid Meteorology, Lanzhou (China); Gao, Xuejie [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing (China); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    This study aims at (1) exploring dominant atmospheric dynamical processes which are responsible for climate model-simulated land-use impacts on Asian monsoon; and (2) assessing uncertainty in such model simulations due to their skills in simulating detailed monsoon circulations in the region. Firstly, results from a series of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) global model simulations of land-use vegetation changes (LUC) in China are analysed. The model showed consistent signals of changes in atmospheric low-level vertical profile and regional circulations responding to LUC. In northern winter, the model-simulated rainfall reduction and surface cooling are associated with an enhanced southward penetration of dry and cold air mass, which impedes warm and humid air reaching the region for generating cold-front rainfall. In its summer, an enhanced cyclonic circulation responding to LUC further blocks the northeast penetration of southwesterly summer monsoon flow into the region and results in rainfall decreases and a surface warming. Secondly, we have explored uncertainties in the proposed mechanism operating in the global model. By comparing its results with a set of high-resolution regional model simulations using the same vegetation datasets, it reveals similar changes in winter rainfall but opposite features in summer rainfall responses. In the global model, there is a cyclonic low-level circulation pattern over the South China Sea and adjacent region, an unsatisfactory feature commonly seen in other global climate models. With the reduction in surface roughness following LUC, such a deficiency becomes more prominent which further results in a weakened south/southwesterly summer monsoon flow and rainfall reduction. In contrast, in the regional model, its southwesterly summer monsoon flow is further enhanced due to the same process as reduced surface roughness. The enhanced monsoon flow further pushes the East Asian monsoon rainfall belt

  8. Analysis of High Frequency Site-Specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Harris, E. J.; Olszewski, W.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) significantly impacts Earth's climate due to its dual role as an inert potent greenhouse gas in the troposphere and as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. However, there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. The marked spatial divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on climate. Source and sink processes of N2O lead to varying concentrations of N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N18O being measured) due to preferential isotopic production and elimination in different environments. Estimation of source and sink fluxes can be improved by combining isotopically resolved N2O observations with simulations using a chemical transport model with reanalysis meteorology and treatments of isotopic signatures of specific surface sources and stratospheric intrusions. We present the first few months of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the Stheno-TILDAS instrument (Harris et al, 2013) at Mace Head, Ireland and compare these to results from MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) chemical transport model runs including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and reanalysis meterological fields (NCEP/NCAR, MERRA, and GEOS-5). This study forms the basis for future inverse modeling experiments that will improve the accuracy of isotopically differentiated N2O emission and loss estimates. Ref: Harris, E., D. Nelson, W. Olszewski, M. Zahniser, K. Potter, B. McManus, A. Whitehill, R. Prinn, and S. Ono, Development of a spectroscopic technique for continuous online monitoring of oxygen and site-specific nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide, Analytical Chemistry, 2013; DOI: 10.1021/ac403606u.

  9. Multi-Scale Enviro-HIRLAM Forecasting of Weather and Atmospheric Composition over China and its Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, Alexander; Amstrup, Bjarne; Nuterman, Roman; Yang, Xiaohua; Baklanov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Air pollution is a serious problem in different regions of China and its continuously growing megacities. Information on air quality, and especially, in urbanized areas is important for decision making, emergency response and population. In particular, the metropolitan areas of Shanghai, Beijing, and Pearl River Delta are well known as main regions having serious air pollution problems. The on-line integrated meteorology-chemistry-aerosols Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model) model adapted for China and selected megacities is applied for forecasting of weather and atmospheric composition (with focus on aerosols). The model system is running in downscaling chain from regional to urban scales at subsequent horizontal resolutions of 15-5-2.5 km. The model setup includes also the urban Building Effects Parameterization module, describing different types of urban districts (industrial commercial, city center, high density and residential) with its own morphological and aerodynamical characteristics. The effects of urbanization are important for atmospheric transport, dispersion, deposition, and chemical transformations, in addition to better quality emission inventories for China and selected urban areas. The Enviro-HIRLAM system provides meteorology and air quality forecasts at regional-subregional-urban scales (China - East China - selected megacities). In particular, such forecasting is important for metropolitan areas, where formation and development of meteorological and chemical/aerosol patterns are especially complex. It also provides information for evaluation impact on selected megacities of China as well as for investigation relationship between air pollution and meteorology.

  10. Combining projected changes in species richness and composition reveals climate change impacts on coastal Mediterranean fish assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albouy, Camille; Guilhaumon, François; Bastos Araujo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Species Temporal Turnover (STT) is one of the most familiar metrics to assess changes in assemblage composition as a consequence of climate change. However, STT mixes two components in one metric, changes in assemblage composition caused by a process of species loss or gain (i.e. the nestedness......, the joint exploration of changes in species richness and composition coupled with the distinction between species replacement and nestedness bears important information for understanding the nature of climate change impacts on biodiversity. These methodological advances should help decision...... component) and changes in assemblage composition caused by a process of species replacement (i.e. the species replacement component). Drawing on previous studies investigating spatial patterns of beta diversity, we propose measures of STT that allow analysing each component (species replacement vs...

  11. Temperature induced changes in the heterocyst glycolipid composition of N

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Stal, L.J.; Grego, M.; Schwark, L.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature on the heterocyst glycolipid (HG) composition of the diazotrophic heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain CCY9613 and Nostoc sp. strain CCY9926 grown at 9, 12, 16, 20 and 24 degrees C. Both strains contained an overall similar composition of

  12. Effect of metal vaporization behavior on keyhole-mode surface morphology of selective laser melted composites using different protective atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Donghua; Gu, Dongdong

    2015-11-01

    A selective laser melting (SLM) physical model of the change from heat conduction to keyhole-mode process is proposed, providing the transformation of the thermal behavior in the SLM process. Both thermo-capillary force and recoil pressure, which are the major driving forces for the molten flow, are incorporated in the formulation. The effect of the protective atmosphere on the thermal behavior, molten pool dynamics, velocity field of the evaporation material and resultant surface morphology has been investigated. It shows that the motion direction of the evaporation material plays a crucial role in the formation of the terminally solidified surface morphology of the SLM-processed part. For the application of N2 protective atmosphere, the evaporation material has a tendency to encounter in the frontier of the laser scan direction, resulting in the stack of molten material and the attendant formation of humps in the top surface. As Ar protective atmosphere is used, the vector direction of the evaporation material is typically upwards, leading to a uniform recoil pressure forced on the free surface and the formation of fine and flat melt pool surface. The surface quality and morphology are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation.

  13. Atmospheric dynamical changes as a contributor to deglacial climate variability: results from an ensemble of transient deglacial simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Heather; Tarasov, Lev

    2017-04-01

    The atmosphere is often assumed to play a passive role in centennial- to millennial-timescale climate variations of the last deglaciation due to its short response times ( years) and the absence of abrupt changes in external climate forcings. Nevertheless, atmospheric dynamical responses to changes in ice sheet topography and albedo can affect the entire Northern Hemisphere through the altering of Rossby stationary wave patterns and changes to the North Atlantic eddy-driven jet. These responses appear sensitive to the particular configuration of Northern Hemisphere land ice, so small changes have the potential to reorganize atmospheric circulation with impacts on precipitation distributions, ocean surface currents and sea ice extent. Indirect proxy evidence, idealized theoretical studies, and "snapshot" simulations performed at different periods during the last glacial cycle indicate that between the Last Glacial Maximum and the preindustrial period the North Atlantic eddy-driven jet weakened, became less zonally-oriented, and exhibited greater variability. How the transition (or transitions) between the glacial atmospheric state and the interglacial state occurred is less clear. To address this question, we performed an ensemble of transient simulations of the last deglaciation using the Planet Simulator coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation-sea ice model (PlaSim, at an atmospheric resolution of T42) forced by variants of the GLAC1-D deglacial ice sheet chronology. We characterize simulated changes in stationary wave patterns over this period as well as changes in the strength and position of the North Atlantic eddy-driven jet. In particular, we document the range of timescales for these changes and compare the simulated climate signatures of these transitions to data archives of precipitation and sea ice extent.

  14. Saturn's Titan: Surface change, ammonia, and implications for atmospheric and tectonic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Matson, D.L.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Baines, K.H.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Jaumann, R.; Smythe, W.D.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Pearl, J.C.; Hapke, B.W.; Lunine, J.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, R.Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is known to have a young surface. Here we present evidence from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer that it is currently geologically active. We report that changes in the near-infrared reflectance of a 73,000 km2 area on Titan (latitude 26° S, longitude 78° W) occurred between July 2004 and March of 2006. The reflectance of the area increased by a factor of two between July 2004 and March–April 2005; it then returned to the July 2004 level by November 2005. By late December 2005 the reflectance had surged upward again, establishing a new maximum. Thereafter, it trended downward for the next three months. Detailed spectrophotometric analyses suggest these changes happen at or very near the surface. The spectral differences between the region and its surroundings rule out changes in the distribution of the ices of reasonably expected materials such as H2O, CO2, and CH4 as possible causes. Remarkably, the change is spectrally consistent with the deposition and removal of NH3 frost over a water ice substrate. NH3 has been proposed as a constituent of Titan's interior and has never been reported on the surface. The detection of NH3 frost on the surface might possibly be explained by episodic effusive events occur which bring juvenile ammonia from the interior to the surface. If so, its decomposition would feed nitrogen to the atmosphere now and in the future. The lateral extent of the region exceeds that of active areas on the Earth (Hawaii) or Io (Loki).

  15. Chemical Composition and Atmosphere Parameters of the Double-Mode Cepheid U Tra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, I. A.; Knyazev, A. Yu.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Kravtsov, V. V.

    Four high-resolution spectra of the doble-mode Cepheid U TrA have been obtained during its pulsational period. For the first time, we obtained accurate atmosphere parameters and the chemical abundance of a number of elements, in particular ofsodium, magnesium, and aluminium. We estimated the mean Teff = 6085±29 K, log g = 2.00±0.15, and Vt = 3.90±0.25 kms -1 . A deficit of carbon ([C=H] = -0.35±0.23 dex), overabundance of both sodium ([Na=H] = +0.15±0.25 dex) and aluminium ([Al=H]= +0.30±0.32 dex) are typical for Cepheids passing through the first dredge-up phase. The abundance of iron ([Fe=H] = +0.01±0.15 dex) is very close to the solar one. Moreover, we find that α-elements, those of Fe-group, as well as "light"- and "heavy"-, s- and rprocess elements, all of them have abundances close to solar values, too, excepting maybe several elements with slight enhance or deficit.

  16. On the Fractal Mechanism of Interrelation Between the Genesis, Size and Composition of Atmospheric Particulate Matters in Different Regions of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, Vitaliy D; Jacimovic, Radojko R; Pavlovich, Vladimir N; Bondarchuk, Yuriy A; Vaschenko, Vladimir N; Zelentsova, Tatiana N; Beglaryan, Margarita E; Linnik, Elena P; Smolyar, Vladimir P; Kosenko, Sergey I; Gudyma, Alla A

    2011-01-01

    Experimental data from the National Air Surveillance Network of Japan from 1974 to 1996 and from independent measurements performed simultaneously in the regions of Ljubljana (Slovenia), Odessa (Ukraine) and the Ukrainian "Academician Vernadsky" Antarctic station (64{\\deg}15'W; 65{\\deg}15'S), where the air elemental composition was determined by the standard method of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) collection on nucleopore filters and subsequent neutron activation analysis, were analyzed. Comparative analysis of different pairs of atmospheric PM element concentration data sets, measured in different regions of the Earth, revealed a stable linear (on a logarithmic scale) correlation, showing a power law increase of every atmospheric PM element mass and simultaneously the cause of this increase - fractal nature of atmospheric PM genesis. Within the framework of multifractal geometry we show that the mass (volume) distribution of atmospheric PM elemental components is a log normal distribution, which on a l...

  17. Future changes in atmospheric condition for the baiu under RCP scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Y.; Takemi, T.; Ishikawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on atmospheric circulation fields during the baiu in Japan with global warming projection experimental data conducted using a 20-km mesh global atmospheric model (MRI-AGCM3.2) under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) scenarios. This model also used 4 different sea surface temperature (SST) initial conditions. Support of this dataset is provided by the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI). The baiu front indicated by the north-south gradient of moist static energy moves northward in present-day climate, whereas this northward shift in future climate simulations is very slow during May and June. In future late baiu season, the baiu front stays in the northern part of Japan even in August. As a result, the rich water vapor is transported around western Japan and the daily precipitation amount will increase in August. This northward shift of baiu front is associated with the westward expansion of the enhanced the North Pacific subtropical high (NPSH) into Japan region. However, the convective activity around northwest Pacific Ocean is inactive and is unlikely to occur convective jump (CJ). These models show that the weak trough exists in upper troposphere around Japan. Therefore, the cold advection stays in the northern part of Japan during June. In July, the front due to the strengthening of the NPSH moves northward, and then it stays until August. This feature is often found between the clustered SSTs, Cluster 2 and 3. The mean field of future August also show the inflow of rich water vapor content to Japan islands. In this model, the extreme rainfall suggested tends to almost increase over the Japan islands during future summer. This work was conducted under the Program for Risk Information on Climate Change supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology-Japan (MEXT).

  18. Effect of the synthesis and annealing atmosphere composition on the fundamental absorption edge of ZnGA2O4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordun, O. M.; Kukharskyy, I. Yo.; Bihday, V. G.

    2013-01-01

    We have used optical spectroscopy to study the region of the fundamental absorption edge of ZnGa2O4 thin films obtained by high-frequency RF ion plasma sputtering. We have established that the optical bandgap width E g increases from 4.55 eV to 4.81 eV when up to 20% oxygen is added to the sputtering argon atmosphere. An even greater increase in E g is observed when the films obtained are annealed in a hydrogen reducing atmosphere. We discuss the correlation between the value of E g and the composition of the sputtering and annealing atmosphere.

  19. Positive feedback between global warming and atmospheric CO2 concentration inferred from past climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Marten; Brovkin, Victor; Cox, Peter M.

    2006-05-01

    There is good evidence that higher global temperatures will promote a rise of greenhouse gas levels, implying a positive feedback which will increase the effect of anthropogenic emissions on global temperatures. However, the magnitude of this effect predicted by the available models remains highly uncertain, due to the accumulation of uncertainties in the processes thought to be involved. Here we present an alternative way of estimating the magnitude of the feedback effect based on reconstructed past changes. Linking this information with the mid-range Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimation of the greenhouse gas effect on temperature we suggest that the feedback of global temperature on atmospheric CO2 will promote warming by an extra 15-78% on a century-scale. This estimate may be conservative as we did not account for synergistic effects of likely temperature moderated increase in other greenhouse gases. Our semi-empirical approach independently supports process based simulations suggesting that feedback may cause a considerable boost in warming.

  20. How much information do extinction and backscattering measurements contain about the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnert, Michael; Andersson, Emma

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the problem of assimilating multiwavelength lidar observations of extinction and backscattering coefficients of aerosols into a chemical transport model. More specifically, we consider the inverse problem of determining the chemical composition of aerosols from these observations. The main questions are how much information the observations contain to determine the particles' chemical composition, and how one can optimize a chemical data assimilation system to make maximum use of the available information. We first quantify the information content of the measurements by computing the singular values of the scaled observation operator. From the singular values we can compute the number of signal degrees of freedom, Ns, and the reduction in Shannon entropy, H. As expected, the information content as expressed by either Ns or H grows as one increases the number of observational parameters and/or wavelengths. However, the information content is strongly sensitive to the observation error. The larger the observation error variance, the lower the growth rate of Ns or H with increasing number of observations. The right singular vectors of the scaled observation operator can be employed to transform the model variables into a new basis in which the components of the state vector can be partitioned into signal-related and noise-related components. We incorporate these results in a chemical data assimilation algorithm by introducing weak constraints that restrict the assimilation algorithm to acting on the signal-related model variables only. This ensures that the information contained in the measurements is fully exploited, but not overused. Numerical tests show that the constrained data assimilation algorithm provides a solution to the inverse problem that is considerably less noisy than the corresponding unconstrained algorithm. This suggests that the restriction of the algorithm to the signal-related model variables suppresses

  1. Thawing Permafrost in Arctic Peatlands Leads to Changing Vegetation Composition, Decline in Plant Biodiversity, but Little Change in Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, S. R.; Hough, M.; McClure, A.; Saleska, S. R.; Rich, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    As permafrost thaws over the next century due to a rapidly changing climate, the shifting nature and amount of bioavailable soil organic matter (SOM) are causing ecosystem-level changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. These greenhouse gases could drive a positive feedback to climate change, increasing the rate of permafrost thaw. The change in SOM is due to (a) new availability of previously frozen permafrost carbon (C), and (b) shifting plant communities. Appreciable study has focused on the former; we focus here on the latter, at a `natural' permafrost thaw gradient in Arctic Abisko, Sweden. As previously frozen soil destabilizes and collapses into a waterlogged habitat, dominant vegetation type shifts from smaller, woodier plants to moss-dominated sites, then to taller, leafier sedges. This plant community succession is associated with increased CO2 uptake, which could partially offset the thaw-associated C release from soils if it resulted in greater C storage. We tested the hypothesis that C stored in plant biomass increases spatially across the thaw gradient by sampling both above and belowground biomass. We also took time points from the early and peak-growing season (early June to late July) to test if differences in plant growth seasonality impacted our biomass measures. Surprisingly, we found that total above and belowground biomass together do not significantly change from the intact to the fully-thawed habitats, despite previous research showing that productivity appears to be higher in the fully water-logged fen. However, biodiversity significantly decreased from the intact to waterlogged sites. The lack of observed biomass increase despite the increase in NPP observed in other studies from this site could be explained if the C taken up by sedges in fen sites is deposited in SOM at increased rates either through root exudates or annual litter deposition. Since the shift in plant community composition is associated with the observed

  2. Forecasting the atmospheric composition of southern West Africa with COSMO-ART during the DACCIWA measurement campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, Konrad; Vogel, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    The Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project (Knippertz et al., 2015) investigates the influence of anthropogenic and natural emissions on the atmospheric composition over Southern West Africa (SWA). Between 1 June and 31 July 2016 the DACCIWA measurement campaign took place in SWA, including ground based and airborne observations. By using the regional scale comprehensive model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009), operational numerical forecasts of the atmospheric composition including aerosols and gas phase compounds were conducted between 8 May and 31 July 2016. The forecasts cover the domain 25°W to 35°E and 20°S to 30°N with a grid mesh size of 28km and a lead time of 57h. The primary assignment of the forecasts was to support the DACCIWA aircraft campaign (27 June to 17 July 2016) in terms of the decision making of the flight routes of the research aircrafts. Visualizations of the forecast results were daily uploaded to the public available server dacciwa.sedoo.fr. Apart from the support of the DACCIWA measurement campaign, the COSMO-ART model dataset is highly valuable for identifying time periods feasible for post-campaign case study simulations, the extensive validation of COSMO-ART with observational data and the derivation of model climatologies to raise knowledge in meteorological and the atmospheric composition characteristics of SWA. The presentation will show validation results of the COSMO-ART forecasts with ground based and airborne measurements from the DACCIWA campaign as well as remote sensing observations. COSMO-ART well reproduces the diurnal cycle of the observed ozone concentration at Savé site and shows very good agreement of mineral dust AOD compared to CAMS model results whereas the anthropogenic aerosol seems to be overestimated by COSMO-ART compared to MODIS AOD and AERONET observations. We will present model climatologies of the NLLS characteristics and the spatial structure of the pollution

  3. Optimal eigenanalysis for the treatment of aerosols in the retrieval of atmospheric composition from transmission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy M; Polyakov, Alexander V; Steele, Helen M; Newchurch, Michael J

    2003-05-20

    The separation of the individual contributions of aerosol and gases to the total attenuation of radiation through the atmosphere has been the subject of much scientific investigation since remote sensing experiments first began. We describe a new scheme to account for the spectral variation of the aerosol extinction in the inversion of transmission data from occultation measurements. Because the spectral variation of the aerosol extinction is generally unknown,the inversion problem is underdetermined and cannot be solved without a reduction in the number of unknowns in the set of equations used to describe the attenuation at each wavelength. This reduction can be accomplished by a variety of methods, including use of a priori information, the parameterization of the aerosol spectral attenuation, and the specification of the form of the aerosol size distribution. We have developed and implemented a parameterization scheme based on existing empirical and modeled information about the microphysical properties of aerosols. This scheme employs the eigenvectors from an extensive set of simulations to parameterize the aerosol extinction coefficient for incorporation into the inversion algorithm. We examine the accuracy of our method using data sets containing over 24,000 extinction spectra and compare it with that of another scheme that is currently implemented in the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) satellite experiment. In simulations using 80 wavelengths in the UV-visible-near-IR spectral range of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE) instrument, we show that, for our optimal parameterization, errors below 1% are observed in 80% of cases, whereas only approximately 20% of all cases are as accurate as this in a quadratic parameterization employing the logarithm of the wavelength.

  4. Molecular composition of sugars in atmospheric particulate matter from interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md. Mozammel; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kim, Yongwon

    2015-04-01

    Sugars can account for 0.5-8% of carbon in atmospheric particulate matter, affecting the earth climate, air quality and public health. Total of 33 total suspended particle (TSP) samples were collected from Fairbanks, Alaska in June 2008 to June 2009 using a low volume air sampler. Here, we report the molecular characteristics of anhydro-sugars (levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan), primary saccharides (xylose, fructose, glucose, sucrose and trehalose) and sugar alcohols (erythritol, arabitol, mannitol and inositol). The average contribution of sugars to the organic carbon (OC) was also determined to be 0.92%. Sugar compounds were measured using solvent extraction/TMS-derivatization technique followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination. The concentrations of total quantified sugar compounds ranged from 2.3 to 453 ng m-3 (average 145 ng m-3). The highest concentration was recorded for levoglucosan in summer, with a maximum concentration of 790 ng m-3 (average 108 ng m-3). Levoglucosan, which is specifically formed by a pyrolysis of cellulose, has been used as an excellent tracer of biomass burning. The highest level of levoglucosan indicates a significant contribution of biomass burning in ambient aerosols. Galactosan (average 20 ng m-3) and mannosan (average 27 ng m-3), which are also formed through the pyrolysis of cellulose/hemicelluloses, were identified in all samples. The average concentrations of arabitol, mannitol, glucose and sucrose were also found 14.7, 14.6, 14.1 and 16.8 ng m-3, respectively. They have been proposed as tracers for resuspension of surface soil and unpaved road dust, which contain biological materials including fungi and bacteria. These results suggest that there is some impact of bioaerosols on climate over Interior Alaska. We will also measure water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and inorganic ions for all samples.

  5. Combining projected changes in species richness and composition reveals climate change impacts on coastal Mediterranean fish assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albouy, Camille; Guilhaumon, François; Bastos Araujo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    future climatic niches of 288 coastal Mediterranean fish species based on a global warming scenario. We then aggregated geographically the species-level projections to analyse the projected changes in species richness and composition. Our results show that projected changes in assemblage composition......Species Temporal Turnover (STT) is one of the most familiar metrics to assess changes in assemblage composition as a consequence of climate change. However, STT mixes two components in one metric, changes in assemblage composition caused by a process of species loss or gain (i.e. the nestedness...... are caused by different processes (species replacement vs. nestedness) in several areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In addition, our mapping strategy highlights that the coastal fish fauna in several regions of the Mediterranean Sea could experience a ‘cul-de-sac’ effect if exposed to climate warming. Overall...

  6. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Induces Transcriptional Changes in Ex Vivo Human Corneas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP might be considered a novel tool for tissue disinfection in medicine since the active chemical species produced by low plasma doses, generated by ionizing helium gas in air, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS that kill microorganisms without substantially affecting human cells.In this study, we evaluated morphological and functional changes in human corneas exposed for 2 minutes (min to APCP and tested if the antioxidant n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC was able to inhibit or prevent damage and cell death.Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses of corneal tissues collected at 6 hours (h post-APCP treatment demonstrated no morphological tissue changes, but a transient increased expression of OGG1 glycosylase that returned to control levels in 24 h. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time PCR performed on different corneas revealed in the treated corneas many differentially expressed genes: namely, 256 and 304 genes showing expression changes greater than ± 2 folds in the absence and presence of NAC, respectively. At 6 h post-treatment, the most over-expressed gene categories suggested an active or enhanced cell functioning, with only a minority of genes specifically concerning oxidative DNA damage and repair showing slight over-expression values (<2 folds. Moreover, time-related expression analysis of eight genes up-regulated in the APCP-treated corneas overall demonstrated the return to control expression levels after 24 h.These findings of transient oxidative stress accompanied by wide-range transcriptome adjustments support the further development of APCP as an ocular disinfectant.

  7. Seasonal changes in biochemical composition of Holothuria leucospilota (Echinodermata)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayasree, V.; Parulekar, A.H.; Wahidullah, S.; Kamat, S.Y.

    Biochemical composition of body wall and gonads of Holothuria leucospilota was analysed for protein, carbohydrate, lipid, ash, dry weight and calorific values and was discussed in relation to its spawning activities. Lipids constituted the major...

  8. Tipping points? Ethnic composition change in Dutch big city neighbourhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, C

    2014-01-01

    Micro-level studies using individual and household data have shown that residential location choices are influenced by neighbourhood ethnic composition. Using three conurbation samples in the Netherlands - Amsterdam metropolitan area, Rotterdam-The Hague metropolitan area, and the country's largest conurbation, the 'Randstad' metropolitan area - this paper analyses the evolution of neighbourhood ethnic composition as a social interaction outcome of disaggregated household behaviour. The poten...

  9. Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP Composites using Electrical Resistance Change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Todoroki, Akira

    2007-01-01

    .... In this system, a tiny oscillation circuit is attached to the composite component. When delimitation of the component occurs, electrical resistance changes, which causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the circuit...

  10. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemical Composition Measurements for the Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    We received funding to provide measurements of the chemical composition of aerosols aboard the NASA Ames DC-8 research aircraft during the SUCCESS mission. These measurements were successfully completed and the final data resides in the Cloud I computer archive at NASA Ames Research Center. The interpretation of the data obtained on this mission over the central United States has been published in special issues of Geophysical Research Letters. The papers with the University of New Hampshire as first author constitute this report and summarize the salient features of our data. The paper by Talbot et al. discusses the impact of vertical transport on free tropospheric chemistry over the the central USA in springtime. This transport was a dominant feature of the aerosol chemistry during SUCCESS. The paper by Dibb et al. discusses aerosol chemistry specifically as it related to free tropospheric sulfate related to jet exhaust and surface sources. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that surface sources appeared to dominant the distribution of aerosol sulfate in the free troposphere. In addition to these first authored papers, researchers from the University of New Hampshire were co-authors on numerous other companion papers in the special issues.

  11. Nudging technique for scale bridging in air quality/climate atmospheric composition modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maurizi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between air quality and climate involves dynamical scales that cover a very wide range. Bridging these scales in numerical simulations is fundamental in studies devoted to megacity/hot-spot impacts on larger scales. A technique based on nudging is proposed as a bridging method that can couple different models at different scales.

    Here, nudging is used to force low resolution chemical composition models with a run of a high resolution model on a critical area. A one-year numerical experiment focused on the Po Valley hot spot is performed using the BOLCHEM model to asses the method.

    The results show that the model response is stable to perturbation induced by the nudging and that, taking the high resolution run as a reference, performances of the nudged run increase with respect to the non-forced run. The effect outside the forcing area depends on transport and is significant in a relevant number of events although it becomes weak on seasonal or yearly basis.

  12. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hiranuma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nuclei chamber (CCNC as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (hygroscopic salts but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres or adipic acid. The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from ambient measurements using this technique and AMS analysis were inconclusive, showing little chemical differentiation between ambient aerosol and activated droplet residuals, largely due to low signal levels. When employing as single particle mass spectrometer for compositional analysis, however, we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals.

  13. Following changes in total number of mesophilic bacteria and torry meter readings in samples of fresh trout packaged in modified atmosphere and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijašević Milan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, food must be healthy, subjected to minimal processing, and attractively packaged, as the expectations of consumers are ever higher. Consumers are highly sensitive to the use of additives in the food industry. There is a constant demand for fresh food that does not contain any unnecessarily added chemicals. In order to prevent spoilage of food items, an efficient and intelligent concept for preserving freshness has been developed - packaging in a modified atmosphere. Changes in a certain composition of the atmosphere within the packaging have resulted in a longer shelf life and a satisfactory quality of the food articles. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP is well-known and has been applied in practice in the food processing industry for more than one century. The objective of these investigations was to determine the growth of the total number of mesophilic bacteria in the meat of trout packaged in a vacuum and a modified atmosphere and torry meter reading results due to changes in the dielectric characteristics of the skin that take place during the period of storage of the fresh fish. California trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss with an average weight of 293 g was used for the experimental part of the investigations. Four groups of fish samples were set up for the research. The first three groups of samples were packaged in a modified atmosphere with a different ratio of gases: Group I - 60%CO2+40%N2; Group II - 40%CO2+60%N2; Group III - 90%CO2+10%N2. Group IV comprised samples packaged in a vacuum. Investigations were carried out on days 0, 7, 14, and 21 of storage. The total number of mesophilic bacteria in the examined samples was determined according to the method ISO 4833. Measurements of changes in the dielectric characteristics of the fish skin were performed using a torry meter apparatus (The Torry Fish Freshness Meter. The results have shown that packaging of fresh trout in a modified atmosphere (60% CO2 + 40% N2 and 40% CO2 + 60% N2

  14. Effect of small glass composition changes on flue gas emissions of glass furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Kersbergen, M.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Relatively small changes in glass composition might have drastic consequences on the evaporation rates of volatile glass components in glass melting furnaces. Transpiration evaporation tests have been applied to measure the impact of minor glass composition changes on the evaporation rates of

  15. A First Assessment of the Elemental Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols in the Canadian Oil Sands Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabek-Zlotorzynska E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Canadian Oil Sands, which comprise 97% of Canada’s 176 billion barrels of proven oil reserves, are located beneath 140,200 km2 of boreal forests, prairies and wetlands, and are the second largest known deposit of crude oil in the world. As such, this region has experienced rapid industrial development, which resulted also in increasing industrial air emissions, primarily from bitumen upgrading and mine vehicle fleet operations. This rapid development has led to concerns regarding health risk to humans, and other terrestrial and aquatic wildlife associated with exposure to toxic contaminants, especially metals and polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs particularly along the Athabasca River and its watershed. Canada’s Minister of the Environment announced that Environment Canada (EC will jointly lead, in collaboration with Government of Alberta and relevant stakeholders, the development and implementation of an enhanced monitoring system in the Oil Sands region to provide information on the state of the air, water, land andbiodiversity. This work presents preliminary data on the first assessment of elemental composition of fine particulate matter (particles<2.5 mm in diameter; PM2.5 at 3 air quality sites in close proximity to Oil Sands processing activities. Since December 2010, integrated 24 hour air samples were collected every sixth day on a 47-mm Teflon filters using Thermo Fisher Partisol 2000-FRM samplers operated by the National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS network that involves EC and the Canadian provinces and territories. All samples including laboratory, travel and field blanks were subjected to gravimetric determination of PM2.5 mass and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF analysis for 46 elements. Since ED-XRF is a non-destructive technique, PM2.5 samples were subsequently analyzed for 37 trace elements including rare earth elements using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS combined with microwave

  16. Unravelling proteome changes of chicken egg whites under carbon dioxide modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Jia, Fei; Luo, Changyao; Yu, Qianqian; Dai, Ruitong; Li, Xingmin

    2018-01-15

    Unfertilized chicken eggs within 24h of laying were chosen and stored at 25°C and 45% humidity for 0, 20, and 40days. The experimental group (EG) was the carbon dioxide-modified atmosphere packaging (CDMAP) group, whereas the control group (CG) contained eggs without special handling. Egg freshness indexes were measured. The proteome of the egg whites was determined by LC-MS/MS using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). A total of 87 proteins were detected. The results indicated that CDMAP can control the change in protein abundance. Using a correlation analysis between the protein abundance and freshness indexes of the EG, Beta-hexosaminidase, Trypsin inhibitor ClTI-1 and Apolipoprotein D were determined to be potential predictors of egg freshness. In comparing the proteomes of the EG and CG, it was concluded that CDMAP could affect the proteins related to egg vitelline membranes, eggshell matrix and metabolic intensity to maintain egg freshness. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2001-02-22

    The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

  18. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Tropospheric Ozone on Phytochemical Composition of Trembling Aspen ( Populus tremuloides ) and Paper Birch ( Betula papyrifera ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, John J; Meehan, Timothy D; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities are altering levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3). These changes can alter phytochemistry, and in turn, influence ecosystem processes. We assessed the individual and combined effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on the phytochemical composition of two tree species common to early successional, northern temperate forests. Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera) were grown at the Aspen FACE (Free-Air Carbon dioxide and ozone Enrichment) facility under four combinations of ambient and elevated CO2 and O3. We measured, over three years (2006-08), the effects of CO2 and O3 on a suite of foliar traits known to influence forest functioning. Elevated CO2 had minimal effect on foliar nitrogen and carbohydrate levels in either tree species, and increased synthesis of condensed tannins and fiber in aspen, but not birch. Elevated O3 decreased nitrogen levels in both tree species and increased production of sugar, condensed tannins, fiber, and lignin in aspen, but not birch. The magnitude of responses to elevated CO2 and O3 varied seasonally for both tree species. When co-occurring, CO2 offset most of the changes in foliar chemistry expressed under elevated O3 alone. Our results suggest that levels of CO2 and O3 predicted for the mid-twenty-first century will alter the foliar chemistry of northern temperate forests with likely consequences for forest community and ecosystem dynamics.

  19. Optical properties and chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in urban Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Schmid, Otmar; Yang, Hong; Chand, Duli; Zhen Yu, Jian; Zeng, Li-Min; Zhang, Yuan-Hang

    During the Pearl River Delta measurement campaign (Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over Pearl River Delta 2004, PRIDE-PRD2004, 4 October-5 November 2004), we measured aerosol light absorption and scattering (PM2.5) in urban Guangzhou, using a photoacoustic spectrometer and two integrating nephelometers (at ambient and dry humidity). In addition, 12-h averages of elemental carbon (EC a), organic carbon (OC), and inorganic species concentrations were determined. Aerosol concentrations in urban Guangzhou were extremely high, with average PM2.5, OC, and EC a concentrations of 103, 22.4, and 7.1 μg m -3, respectively. The chemical composition of the aerosol was dominated by particulate organic matter, EC a, sulfate and ammonium. Elevated levels of potassium indicated significant contributions from biomass burning to the regional haze. The high average OC/EC a ratio of 3.6±1.1 resulted from a mixture of regional haze with high OC content and local emissions with low OC/EC a, mostly from vehicular sources. The average scattering and absorption coefficients for dry aerosol were 418 and 91 Mm -1 ( λ˜540 nm), and the mean mass scattering and absorption efficiencies 4.2±1.0 and 0.78±0.19 m 2 g -1. During some episodes resulting from the trapping of local emissions in a nocturnal boundary layer, extreme values of aerosol absorption were reached (up to 490 Mm -1). The average single scattering albedo ( ω0, λ˜540 nm) at dry conditions was about 0.83, representing a mixture of fresh, strongly absorbing, urban pollution, and a more scattering regional haze. Because of the prevailing low humidity, the ambient ω0 was not significantly higher. The mass absorption efficiency of EC a was 7.7 m 2 g -1; an additional contribution to absorption was associated with OC, either as a result of light absorption by OC or the effects of internal mixing. The observed diurnal trends of the optical and chemical properties are consistent with aged regional haze

  20. Biogeochemical context impacts seawater pH changes resulting from atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, M.; Hunter, K.A.; Liss, P.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater acidification can be induced both by absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and by atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Their relative significance, interplay, and dependency on water column biogeochemistry are not well understood. Using a simple

  1. Atmospheric deposition, CO2, and change in the land carbon sink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Fernandez, Cristina; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-01-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have continued to increase whereas atmospheric deposition of sulphur and nitrogen has declined in Europe and the USA during recent decades. Using time series of flux observations from 23 forests distributed throughout Europe and the USA, and gene...

  2. Fungal community composition and function after long-term exposure of northern forests to elevated atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan P. Edwards; Donald R. Zak

    2011-01-01

    The long-term effects of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric O3 concentrations on fungal communities in soil are not well understood. Here, we examine fungal community composition and the activities of cellobiohydrolase and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) after 10 years of exposure to 1...

  3. Hard-yet-tough high-vanadium high-speed steel composite coating in-situ alloyed on ductile iron by atmospheric plasma arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Huatang; Dong, Xuanpu; Pei, Yutao T.

    2018-01-01

    A graded high-vanadium alloy composite coating was synthesized from premixed powders (V, Cr, Ti, Mo, Nb) on ductile iron (DI) substrate via atmospheric plasma arc surface alloying process. The resulted cross-section microstructure is divided into three distinct zones: upper alloyed zone (AZ) rich

  4. Atmospheric H2S and SO2 as sulfur source for Brassica juncea and Brassica rapa: Impact on the glucosinolate composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghajanzadeh, T.; Kopriva, S; Hawkesford, M.J.; Koprivova, A.; De Kok, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of sulfate deprivation and atmospheric H2S and SO2 nutrition on the content and composition of glucosinolates was studied in Brassica juncea and Brasscia rapa. Both species contained a number of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates. The total glucosinolate content was more than 5.5-fold

  5. Overview of the O3M SAF GOME-2 operational atmospheric composition and UV radiation data products and data availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinen, S.; Balis, D.; Bauer, H.; Begoin, M.; Delcloo, A.; Eleftheratos, K.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Granville, J.; Grossi, M.; Hao, N.; Hedelt, P.; Hendrick, F.; Hess, M.; Heue, K.-P.; Hovila, J.; Jønch-Sørensen, H.; Kalakoski, N.; Kiemle, S.; Kins, L.; Koukouli, M. E.; Kujanpää, J.; Lambert, J.-C.; Lerot, C.; Loyola, D.; Määttä, A.; Pedergnana, M.; Pinardi, G.; Romahn, F.; van Roozendael, M.; Lutz, R.; De Smedt, I.; Stammes, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Tamminen, J.; Theys, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Valks, P.; Zerefos, C.; Zimmer, W.; Zyrichidou, I.

    2015-07-01

    The three GOME-2 instruments will provide unique and long data sets for atmospheric research and applications. The complete time period will be 2007-2022, including the period of ozone depletion as well as the beginning of ozone layer recovery. Besides ozone chemistry, the GOME-2 products are important e.g. for air quality studies, climate modeling, policy monitoring and hazard warnings. The heritage for GOME-2 is in the ERS/GOME and Envisat/SCIAMACHY instruments. The current Level 2 (L2) data cover a wide range of products such as trace gas columns (NO2, BrO, H2CO, H2O, SO2), tropospheric columns of NO2, total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles in high and low spatial resolution, absorbing aerosol indices from the main science channels as well as from the polarization channels (AAI, AAI-PMD), Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity database, clear-sky and cloud-corrected UV indices and surface UV fields with different weightings and photolysis rates. The Ozone Monitoring and Atmospheric Composition Satellite Application Facility (O3M SAF) processing and data dissemination is operational and running 24/7. Data quality is quarantined by the detailed review processes for the algorithms, validation of the products as well as by a continuous quality monitoring of the products and processing. This is an overview paper providing the O3M SAF project background, current status and future plans to utilization of the GOME-2 data. An important focus is the provision of summaries of the GOME-2 products including product principles and validation examples together with the product sample images. Furthermore, this paper collects the references to the detailed product algorithm and validation papers.

  6. Simulating low frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 during the last 740 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores shows a natural variability of 80 to 100 ppmv during the last four glacial cycles and variations of approximately 60 ppmv in the two cycles between 410 and 650 kyr BP. We here use various paleo-climatic records from the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core and from oceanic sediment cores covering the last 740 kyr to force the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE in a forward mode over this time in order to interpret the natural variability of CO2. Our approach is based on the previous interpretation of carbon cycle variations during Termination I (Köhler et al., 2005a. In the absense of a process-based sediment module one main simplification of BICYCLE is that carbonate compensation is approximated by the temporally delayed restoration of deep ocean [CO32−]. Our results match the low frequency changes in CO2 measured in the Vostok and the EPICA Dome C ice core for the last 650 kyr BP (r2≈0.75. During these transient simulations the carbon cycle reaches never a steady state due to the ongoing variability of the overall carbon budget caused by the time delayed response of the carbonate compensation to other processes. The average contributions of different processes to the rise in CO2 during Terminations I to V and during earlier terminations are: the rise in Southern Ocean vertical mixing: 36/22 ppmv, the rise in ocean temperature: 26/11 ppmv, iron limitation of the marine biota in the Southern Ocean: 20/14 ppmv, carbonate compensation: 15/7 ppmv, the rise in North Atlantic deep water formation: 13/0 ppmv, the rise in gas exchange due to a decreasing sea ice cover: −8/−7 ppmv, sea level rise: −12/−4 ppmv, and rising terrestrial carbon storage: −13/−6 ppmv. According to our model the smaller interglacial CO2 values in the pre-Vostok period prior to Termination V are mainly caused by smaller interglacial Southern Ocean SST and an Atlantic THC which stayed

  7. Welding of a corrosion-resistant composite material based on VT14 titanium alloy obtained using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Chakin, I. K.; Komarov, P. N.; Ruktuev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates the possibility of inert gas arc welding of a double layer composite material on a titanium base with an anti-corrosive layer obtained by fused deposition of a powder mix containing tantalum and niobium over a titanium base using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere. Butt welding and fillet welding options were tested with two types of edge preparation. Welds were subjected to a metallographic examination including a structural study and an analysis of the chemical and phase composition of the welds. A conclusion was made regarding the possibility of using welding for manufacturing of items from the investigated composite material.

  8. Atmospheric composition in the Eastern Mediterranean: Influence of biomass burning during summertime using the WRF-Chem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossioli, E.; Tombrou, M.; Kalogiros, J.; Allan, J.; Bacak, A.; Bezantakos, S.; Biskos, G.; Coe, H.; Jones, B. T.; Kouvarakis, G.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Percival, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    The composition of the atmosphere over the Aegean Sea (AS) during an 'Etesian' outbreak under the influence of biomass burning (BB) activity is investigated. Simulations with the fully coupled WRF-Chem model during the Aegean-GAME campaign (29/8-9/9/2011) are used to examine the BB effect over the region. Two distinct Etesian flow patterns characterized by different transport conditions are analysed. The influence of the off-line calculated BB emissions on the atmospheric chemical composition over the AS under these conditions is estimated. In addition, sensitivity runs are used to examine the influence of the biogenic emissions calculated on-line and the realistic representation of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes are investigated through the time-varying chemical boundary conditions from the MOZART global chemical transport model. The horizontal and vertical distributions of gaseous and aerosol species are simulated under long-range transport conditions and interpreted in relation to the evolution of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). In the case of a weaker synoptic system (medium-range transport conditions), even a small variability of meteorological parameters in limited areas become critical for the spatial distribution of gases and aerosols. The BB activity increases O3, PM2.5 and organic matter concentrations up to 5.5 ppb, 5.8 μg m-3 and 3.3 μg m-3, respectively. The spatial extent of the simulated BB plumes is further examined by comparison with airborne measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN). The estimated effect of biogenic emissions on O3 and PM2.5 concentrations is either positive or negative (±6 ppb for O3 and up to ± 1 μg m-3 for PM2.5) depending on the emission algorithm employed. The realistic representation of the chemical boundary conditions reproduces an observed layer rich in O3 above 4 km, but also increases O3 concentrations inside the PBL by up to 40%.

  9. Estimating chemical composition of atmospheric deposition fluxes from mineral insoluble particles deposition collected in the western Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to measure the mass flux of atmospheric insoluble deposition and to constrain regional models of dust simulation, a network of automatic deposition collectors (CARAGA has been installed throughout the western Mediterranean Basin. Weekly samples of the insoluble fraction of total atmospheric deposition were collected concurrently on filters at five sites including four on western Mediterranean islands (Frioul and Corsica, France; Mallorca, Spain; and Lampedusa, Italy and one in the southern French Alps (Le Casset, and a weighing and ignition protocol was applied in order to quantify their mineral fraction. Atmospheric deposition is both a strong source of nutrients and metals for marine ecosystems in this area. However, there are few data on trace-metal deposition in the literature, since their deposition measurement is difficult to perform. In order to obtain more information from CARAGA atmospheric deposition samples, this study aimed to test their relevance in estimating elemental fluxes in addition to total mass fluxes. The elemental chemical analysis of ashed CARAGA filter samples was based on an acid digestion and an elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES and mass spectrometry (MS in a clean room. The sampling and analytical protocols were tested to determine the elemental composition for mineral dust tracers (Al, Ca, K, Mg and Ti, nutrients (P and Fe and trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, V and Zn from simulated wet deposition of dust analogues and traffic soot. The relative mass loss by dissolution in wet deposition was lower than 1 % for Al and Fe, and reached 13 % for P due to its larger solubility in water. For trace metals, this loss represented less than 3 % of the total mass concentration, except for Zn, Cu and Mn for which it could reach 10 %, especially in traffic soot. The chemical contamination during analysis was negligible for all the elements except for Cd

  10. The composition and variability of atmospheric aerosol over Southeast Asia during 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivitayanurak, W.; Palmer, P. I.; Barkley, M. P.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Oram, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    We use a nested version of the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry transport model to better understand the composition and variation of aerosol over Borneo and the broader Southeast Asian region in conjunction with aircraft and satellite observations. Our focus on Southeast Asia reflects the importance of this region as a source of reactive organic gases and aerosols from natural forests, biomass burning, and food and fuel crops. We particularly focus on July 2008 when the UK BAe-146 research aircraft was deployed over northern Malaysian Borneo as part of the ACES/OP3 measurement campaign. During July 2008 we find using the model that Borneo (defined as Borneo Island and the surrounding Indonesian islands) was a net exporter of primary organic aerosol (42 kT) and black carbon aerosol (11 kT). We find only 13% of volatile organic compound oxidation products partition to secondary organic aerosol (SOA), with Borneo being a net exporter of SOA (15 kT). SOA represents approximately 19% of the total organic aerosol over the region. Sulphate is mainly from aqueous-phase oxidation (68%), with smaller contributions from gas-phase oxidation (15%) and advection into the regions (14%). We find that there is a large source of sea salt, as expected, but this largely deposits within the region; we find that dust aerosol plays only a relatively small role in the aerosol burden. In contrast to coincident surface measurements over Northern Borneo that find a pristine environment with evidence for substantial biogenic SOA formation we find that the free troposphere is influenced by biomass burning aerosol transported from the northwest of the Island and further afield. We find several transport events during July 2008 over Borneo associated with elevated aerosol concentrations, none of which coincide with the aircraft flights. We use MODIS aerosol optical depths (AOD) data and the model to put the July campaign into a longer temporal perspective. We find that Borneo is where the model

  11. The composition and variability of atmospheric aerosol over Southeast Asia during 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Trivitayanurak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a nested version of the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry transport model to better understand the composition and variation of aerosol over Borneo and the broader Southeast Asian region in conjunction with aircraft and satellite observations. Our focus on Southeast Asia reflects the importance of this region as a source of reactive organic gases and aerosols from natural forests, biomass burning, and food and fuel crops. We particularly focus on July 2008 when the UK BAe-146 research aircraft was deployed over northern Malaysian Borneo as part of the ACES/OP3 measurement campaign. During July 2008 we find using the model that Borneo (defined as Borneo Island and the surrounding Indonesian islands was a net exporter of primary organic aerosol (42 kT and black carbon aerosol (11 kT. We find only 13% of volatile organic compound oxidation products partition to secondary organic aerosol (SOA, with Borneo being a net exporter of SOA (15 kT. SOA represents approximately 19% of the total organic aerosol over the region. Sulphate is mainly from aqueous-phase oxidation (68%, with smaller contributions from gas-phase oxidation (15% and advection into the regions (14%. We find that there is a large source of sea salt, as expected, but this largely deposits within the region; we find that dust aerosol plays only a relatively small role in the aerosol burden. In contrast to coincident surface measurements over Northern Borneo that find a pristine environment with evidence for substantial biogenic SOA formation we find that the free troposphere is influenced by biomass burning aerosol transported from the northwest of the Island and further afield. We find several transport events during July 2008 over Borneo associated with elevated aerosol concentrations, none of which coincide with the aircraft flights. We use MODIS aerosol optical depths (AOD data and the model to put the July campaign into a longer temporal perspective. We find that Borneo is where

  12. The ocean-atmosphere response to wind-induced thermocline changes in the tropical South Western Indian Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, F. M.; De Ruijter, W. P M; Hazeleger, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the Indian Ocean basin the sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are most sensitive to changes in the oceanic depth of the thermocline in the region of the Seychelles Dome. Observational studies have suggested that the strong SST variations in this region influence the atmospheric evolution around the

  13. Rapid atmospheric CO2 changes associated with the 8,200-years-B.P. cooling event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, F.; Aaby, B.; Visscher, H.

    2002-01-01

    By applying the inverse relation between numbers of leaf stomata and atmospheric CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis of fossil birch leaves from lake deposits in Denmark reveals a century-scale CO2 change during the prominent Holocene cooling event that occurred in the North Atlantic

  14. The Changing Global Atmospheric Electric Circuit as a Way of Causing Space Weather Effects on Middle Atmosphere Electrodynamic and Thermodynamic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, L.; Shirochkov, A.

    So far the solar wind energy contribution to energetic balance of the middle atmosphere was ignored in any climatic research. However the solar wind is a permanent source of electromagnetic energy constantly supplied to the near-Earth space and its role is evaluated properly in magnetospheric and ionospheric (to lesser extent) studies. We made extensive studies of the direct solar wind influence on the thermodynamic features of the middle atmosphere by analyzing data of the rocket and balloon sounding. Data of many stations covering latitudinal belt 80o N-55o N and 90o S-65o S- were used. It was found that the stratospheric temperature closely correlated with the solar wind energy expressed as the subsolar distance between the Earth and magnetopause. The best coupling between these two parameters (r>0,8) was obtained for altitudes 22-26 km with decreasing (but meaningful) coupling up and dawn from these heights. Similar dependence between this space parameter and ozone density in its stratospheric maximum was obtained also. As a very important factor a strong (r=0,78) coupling between magnetopause position and magnitude of atmospheric electric field measured by high-altitude balloons above South P leo Station must be mentioned. All these findings allowed us to propose concept of the global electric circuit as a physical mechanism for explanation of a direct coupling between the solar wind and the middle atmosphere. We suggest a new, modified version of the circuit where an external Electro-motive Force generator driven by the solar wind energy is located at dayside magnetopause. The passive elements of this circuit are the ionospheric Elayer (external element of previous version of the- circuit), stratospheric conducting layer of heavy ions (h=20-25 km) and conducting layer of the Earth surface. In this configuration a previous scheme of the global electric circuit is a part of the proposed version of it. The changes of stratospheric temperature could be explained

  15. Spatial and temporal variation in isotopic composition of atmospheric lead in Norwegian moss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, K.J.R.; Ly, C. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia). Dept. of Applied Physics; Steinnes, E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-09-01

    Earlier studies using moss as a biomonitor of pollution have shown that long-range transport is a major source of pollution in Norway. Until now, the origin of these pollutants has been inferred from concentration measurements of various elements in moss and the climatology at each sampling site. Lead isotopes provide an opportunity to identify the sources and to quantify the contribution of each. This preliminary study reports measurements of lead isotopes in moss from selected sites along the full extent of Norway that reveal significant spatial and temporal variations. There are significant north-south trends that differ at coastal and inland sites and differ between sampling periods (1974--1994). These variations reflect the changing contributions from the different source regions as the regulation of pollution from automobiles and industry takes effect. Identifiable sources are the U.K. and possibly France, which is noticeable at coastal sites; western Europe at the southern end; and eastern Europe and Russia influencing the inland and northernmost sites.

  16. Tipping points? Ethnic composition change in Dutch big city neighbourhoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, C.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-level studies using individual and household data have shown that residential location choices are influenced by neighbourhood ethnic composition. Using three conurbation samples in the Netherlands - Amsterdam metropolitan area, Rotterdam-The Hague metropolitan area, and the country's largest

  17. German Shepherd Dog Milk Composition and Its Changes During Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokoupilová A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Milk composition of nine lactating German Shepherd nursing females was studied. The experiment took place at the breeding facility of Police of the Czech Republic (breeding centre for service dogs in Domažlice in days 2−30 of the females’ lactation. Females were given a commercial granulated feeding mixture (starter category. Canine milk samples were analyzed using an infra-red instrument MilkoScan FT 120. Calculated mean values for colostrum (day 2 postpartum and normal milk (days 4−29 postpartum were: 23.86 and 24.63% for total solids, 8.14 and 7.22% for protein, 6.04 and 5.76% for casein, 10.22 and 11.32% for fat, 3.40 and 4.48% for lactose. German Shepherd milk showed almost no variation in composition after day 4 of lactation. Differences observed between colostrum and normal milk composition were statistically insignificant but not for lactose. No significant differences in density and other composition parameters between colostrum and normal milk were identified.

  18. Changes in the Nutrient Composition of Brewery Spent Grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spent sorghum grains were fermented naturally for a period of five weeks at room temperature with a view to determining the effects of fermentation on their nutrient compositions. The chemical analyses of the samples were carried out according to AOAC standard methods (AOAC, 1980). Fermentation brought about an ...

  19. Changes in body composition as a result of chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Maaike M.G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Because of the improved survival rate, both short term and long term adverse effects of breast cancer treatment have become increasingly important. Body weight and body composition before, during, and after chemotherapy may influence side effects during treatment and survival. The aims of this

  20. Temporal changes in collagen composition and metabolism during rodent palatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansell, J.P.; Kerrigan, J.; McGill, J.; Bailey, J.; TeKoppele, J.; Sandy, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is a common craniofacial malformation in man. The aetiology is multifactorial and not known. Since collagen is a major structural component of the developing palate, we studied its composition and metabolism during palate shelf formation and elevation in the rat. Palatal shelves

  1. Changes in the Nutrient Composition of Brewery Spent Grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    protein fraction. This is true, especially in the feeding of monogastrics. This paper investigates the possible enhancement of the nutrient composition brewery spent sorghum grain through solid state natural fermentation. Materials and methods. Fermentation Procedure: Twenty grams. (20g) each of dry spent sorghum grain ...

  2. Changes in aroma composition of blackberry wine during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed at investigating the influence of fermentation (primary and secondary) on aroma composition of blackberry wine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to quantify the compounds relevant to sparkling wine aroma. Investigation on this study revealed that a number of aroma ...

  3. Seasonal change in CO2 and H2O exchange between grassland and atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saigusa

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal change in CO2 flux over an artificial grassland was analyzed from the ecological and meteorological point of view. This grassland contains C3 and C4 plants; the three dominant species belonging to the Gramineae; Festuca elatior (C3 dominated in early spring, and Imperata cylindrica (C4 and Andropogon virginicus (C4 grew during early summer and became dominant in mid-summer. CO2 flux was measured by the gradient method, and the routinely observed data for the surface-heat budget were used to analyze the CO2 and H2O exchange between the grassland and atmosphere. From August to October in 1993, CO2 flux was reduced to around half under the same solar-radiation conditions, while H2O flux decreased 20% during the same period. The monthly values of water use efficiency, i.e., ratio of CO2 flux to H2O flux decreased from 5.8 to 3.3 mg CO2/g H2O from August to October, the Bowen ratio increased from 0.20 to 0.30, and the ratio of the bulk latent heat transfer coefficient CE to the sensible heat transfer coefficient CH was maintained around 0.40-0.50. The increase in the Bowen ratio was explained by the decrease in air temperature from 22.3 °C in August to 16.6 °C in October without considering biological effects such as stomatal closure on the individual leaves. The nearly constant CE/CH ratios suggested that the contribution ratio of canopy resistance to aerodynamic resistance did not change markedly, although the meteorological conditions changed seasonally. The decrease in the water use efficiency, however, suggested that the photosynthetic rate decreased for individual leaves from August to October under the same radiation conditions. Diurnal variations of CO2 exchange were simulated by the multi-layer canopy model taking into account the differences in the stomatal conductance and photosynthetic pathway between C3 and C4 plants. The results suggested that C4 plants played a major role in the CO2 exchange in August, the contribution

  4. Seasonal change in CO2 and H2O exchange between grassland and atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Oikawa

    Full Text Available The seasonal change in CO2 flux over an artificial grassland was analyzed from the ecological and meteorological point of view. This grassland contains C3 and C4 plants; the three dominant species belonging to the Gramineae; Festuca elatior (C3 dominated in early spring, and Imperata cylindrica (C4 and Andropogon virginicus (C4 grew during early summer and became dominant in mid-summer. CO2 flux was measured by the gradient method, and the routinely observed data for the surface-heat budget were used to analyze the CO2 and H2O exchange between the grassland and atmosphere. From August to October in 1993, CO2 flux was reduced to around half under the same solar-radiation conditions, while H2O flux decreased 20% during the same period. The monthly values of water use efficiency, i.e., ratio of CO2 flux to H2O flux decreased from 5.8 to 3.3 mg CO2/g H2O from August to October, the Bowen ratio increased from 0.20 to 0.30, and the ratio of the bulk latent heat transfer coefficient CE to the sensible heat transfer coefficient CH was maintained around 0.40-0.50. The increase in the Bowen ratio was explained by the decrease in air temperature from 22.3 °C in August to 16.6 °C in October without considering biological effects such as stomatal closure on the individual leaves. The nearly constant CE/CH ratios suggested that the contribution ratio of canopy resistance to aerodynamic resistance did not change markedly, although the meteorological conditions changed seasonally. The decrease in the water use efficiency, however, suggested that the photosynthetic rate decreased for individual leaves from August to October under the same radiation conditions. Diurnal variations of CO2 exchange were simulated by the multi-layer canopy model taking into account the differences in the stomatal conductance and photosynthetic pathway between C3 and C4 plants. The results suggested that C4 plants played a major role in the CO2 exchange in August, the contribution

  5. Decreasing, not increasing, leaf area will raise crop yields under global atmospheric change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatraman; Kumar, Praveen; Long, Stephen P

    2017-04-01

    Without new innovations, present rates of increase in yields of food crops globally are inadequate to meet the projected rising food demand for 2050 and beyond. A prevailing response of crops to rising [CO2 ] is an increase in leaf area. This is especially marked in soybean, the world's fourth largest food crop in terms of seed production, and the most important vegetable protein source. Is this increase in leaf area beneficial, with respect to increasing yield, or is it detrimental? It is shown from theory and experiment using open-air whole-season elevation of atmospheric [CO2 ] that it is detrimental not only under future conditions of elevated [CO2 ] but also under today's [CO2 ]. A mechanistic biophysical and biochemical model of canopy carbon exchange and microclimate (MLCan) was parameterized for a modern US Midwest soybean cultivar. Model simulations showed that soybean crops grown under current and elevated (550 [ppm]) [CO2 ] overinvest in leaves, and this is predicted to decrease productivity and seed yield 8% and 10%, respectively. This prediction was tested in replicated field trials in which a proportion of emerging leaves was removed prior to expansion, so lowering investment in leaves. The experiment was conducted under open-air conditions for current and future elevated [CO2 ] within the Soybean Free Air Concentration Enrichment facility (SoyFACE) in central Illinois. This treatment resulted in a statistically significant 8% yield increase. This is the first direct proof that a modern crop cultivar produces more leaf than is optimal for yield under today's and future [CO2 ] and that reducing leaf area would give higher yields. Breeding or bioengineering for lower leaf area could, therefore, contribute very significantly to meeting future demand for staple food crops given that an 8% yield increase across the USA alone would amount to 6.5 million metric tons annually. © 2016 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Abrupt Change in Atmospheric CO2 During the Last Ice Age, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the last glacial period atmospheric carbon dioxide and temperature in Antarctica varied in a similar fashion on millennial time scales, but previous work...

  7. Design and characterization of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for composition measurements in the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, E. Addison

    in-situ composition measurements of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) are challenging; this region is only accessible via high-speed sounding rockets, ambient pressures extend into the 10-3 Torr range, and particles of interest range in mass from electrons to meteoric smoke and dust particles. Time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MS) are capable of making fast, accurate measurements over a wide mass range. However, since they rely on pressure-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors and high voltages, they have rarely been applied at these altitudes. A new TOF-MS for making in-situ composition measurements in the MLT has been developed at the Space Dynamics Laboratory. This instrument employs modest acceleration potentials and a pressure-tolerant MCP detector. A Bradbury-Nielsen gate is used to produce short, well-defined ion pulses to reduce the temporal and spatial uncertainty of sampled ions. A prototype TOF-MS was constructed and used to demonstrate TOF-MS technology under conditions relevant to in-situ MLT measurements. Operational boundaries and capabilities of this new instrument were identified through laboratory experiments combined with computer modeling. The prototype instrument achieved a maximum resolution of 100 at m/z 40 (Ar), sufficient to resolve major atmospheric species of interest. During experiments at elevated pressures, the MCP detector maintained low background count rates (<10 /second) at pressures as high as 10 -3 Torr. A novel getter-based vacuum system was evaluated for use with the new TOF-MS, and a computer model was developed to simulate instrument pressure during a rocket flight. Results from these experiments suggest that when combined with an appropriately sized sampling aperture, this pumping system can extend the measurement range of the instrument to lower altitudes by 10 - 20 km, compared to an unpumped instrument. A computer model was developed to study the effects of critical operating parameters on instrument

  8. Changes in the Earth’s Spin Rotation due to the Atmospheric Effects and Reduction in Glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ho Na

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere strongly affects the Earth’s spin rotation in wide range of timescale from daily to annual. Its dominant role in the seasonal perturbations of both the pole position and spinning rate of the Earth is once again confirmed by a comparison of two recent data sets; i the Earth orientation parameter and ii the global atmospheric state. The atmospheric semi-diurnal tide has been known to be a source of the Earth’s spin acceleration, and its magnitude is re-estimated by using an enhanced formulation and an up-dated empirical atmospheric S2 tide model. During the last twenty years, an unusual eastward drift of the Earth’s pole has been observed. The change in the Earth’s inertia tensor due to glacier mass redistribution is directly assessed, and the recent eastward movement of the pole is ascribed to this change. Furthermore, the associated changes in the length of day and UT1 are estimated.

  9. Changes in the subgingival biofilm composition after coronally positioned flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadson Almeida Lima

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of coronally positioned flap (CPF on the subgingival biofilm composition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with gingival recessions were treated with CPF. Clinical parameters were assessed before and at 6 months after surgery. Subgingival biofilms were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique for 40 bacterial species. RESULTS: Recession height, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing improved significantly (p<0.05 at 6 months post-CPF. The proportions of 10 periodontal pathogens and the proportions of red and orange complexes decreased at 6 months. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, CPF can induce beneficial effects on the composition of the subgingival microbiota after 6 months.

  10. Variations of Younger Dryas atmospheric radiocarbon explicable without ocean circulation changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslar; Arnold; Tisnerat-Laborde; Czernik; Wieckowski

    2000-02-24

    The concentration of radiocarbon, 14C, in the atmosphere depends on its production rate by cosmic rays, and on the intensity of carbon exchange between the atmosphere and other reservoirs, for example the deep oceans. For the Holocene (the past approximately 11,500 years), it has been shown that fluctuations in atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations have been caused mostly by variations in the solar magnetic field. Recent progress in extending the radiocarbon record backwards in time has indicated especially high atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations in the Younger Dryas cold period, between 12,700 and 11,500 years before the present. These high concentrations have been interpreted as a result of a reduced exchange with the deep-ocean reservoir, caused by a drastic weakening of the deep-ocean ventilation. Here we present a high-resolution reconstruction of atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations, derived from annually laminated sediments of two Polish lakes, Lake Gosciaz and Lake Perespilno. These records indicate that the maximum in atmospheric radiocarbon concentrations in the early Younger Dryas was smaller than previously believed, and might have been caused by variations in solar activity. If so, there is no indication that the deep-ocean ventilation in the Younger Dryas was significantly different from today's.

  11. Major River Floods and Severe Winter Storms Linked To Changes of The Atmospheric Circulation Across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspary, H. J.

    During the last two decades Western and Central Europe faced several severe winter storms and major river floodings. The recent winter storms "Anatol" (3.-4.12.1999) in Northern Europe, "Lothar" (26.12.1999) in France, Switzerland, and Southwest Ger- many and "Martin" (27.12.1999) in France, Spain and Switzerland caused economic losses of 17.7 billion US- including 10.4 billion US- insured losses and more than 160 fatalities. From 25.01.-01.03.1990 a series of 8 winter storms caused economic losses of 14.8 billion US- and 230 fatalities. The major river floods of Dec. 1993 and Jan. 1995 in Germany, Belgium, France, and Netherlands caused economic losses of more than 4.7 billion US-. It will be demonstrated that all these winter storms and most of the major river floods in Southwest and Western Germany were produced by a few types of zonal circulations across Europe. The frequency and persistence of these zonal atmospheric circulation types have increased dramatically for the winter months (Dec.- Feb.) during the recent three decades. For their time series from 1881- 2001, nonparametric tests show that nonstationarity of the winter frequencies started in 1973. As a consequence of this, the winter precipitation has increased highly signif- icant in most parts of Southwest Germany. It will be demonstrated that the increasing trends in the time series of annual peak discharges of four river basins of Southwest Germany are closely linked to the frequency changes of the zonal circulations. During the observation period (1926-2001)nearly all extreme floods including the floods of Feb. 1990, Dec. 1993, Jan. 1995, Feb. 1997, and Oct. 1998 for all four basins have been caused by heavy, long lasting rainfall during zonal circulations, especially the type "West cyclonic" (Wz) during winter. It will be demonstrated that this leads to an increased flood risk. Nonstationarity of the peak discharges does not concern all Germany but for large areas of Southwest Germany the

  12. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Composite Phase Change Materials Containing Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Yu; Zhichao Yu; Chenlong Tang; Xuan Chen; Qingfei Song; Li Kong

    2016-01-01

    The phase change thermal control method is now widely used in aircraft thermal protection due to its high energy density, constant temperature control, flexible operation, and many other advantages.1–6 However, thermal conductivity of most current phase change materials is low in phase transition process.7–10 This paper will add high thermal nanoparticles to phase change material in order to enhance the thermal conductivity, which, however, has some problems, such as settlement in the macro, ...

  14. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-06-25

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings.

  15. Changes in Central European Soil Moisture Availability and Atmospheric Circulation Patterns between 1875 and 2005 - Regional Climate Change in Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, M.; Kysely, J.; Dubrovsky, M.; Mozny, M.; Hostynek, J.; Svoboda, M.; Hayes, M. J.; Zalud, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Relationships between the soil moisture availability and the atmospheric circulation in Central Europe were analyzed for the period 1881-2005. The analysis was based on the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue of circulation types (CTs), and a series of weekly self-calibrated Palmer Z-index (scZ-index) and Palmer Drought Severity Index (scPDSI) values at seven stations where high-quality daily data has recently become available. The results show that the large-scale droughts during spring months (MAM) were associated with east (E), south (S), and south- east (SE) circulation types, whereas during summer (JJA) and the whole vegetation season, i.e., April-September (VEG), the Central Europe high pressure systems (HM) and east (E) circulation types were conducive to drought. Statistically significant drying trends were noted at a majority of the stations, especially during MAM and JJA, over the whole period for which the scPDSI and scZ-index series were available (1875-2005). Although almost no statistically significant tendencies were found prior to 1940, a significant tendency towards more intense drought was present at all sites after this year. The largest drying trend was noted during the VEG and AMJ seasons. The overall drying trend might be associated with shifts in the frequency of CTs, especially during AMJ. Although the aggregate frequency of occurrence of drought-conducive CTs (i.e. E, S and HM) remained stable at approximately 30% up to the 1940s, a steady increase to the present 55% frequency is observed afterwards. Higher frequencies of S and HM types drove the observed increase of drought-conducive CTs at the expense of N types that are associated with wet conditions. The long-term shifts in the frequency of circulation types conducive to drought explain more than 50% of the long-term variations of both scZ-index and PDSI values over the territory of the Czech Republic, and they are likely to affect whole central European region as well. Acknowledgement: This study

  16. Evaluating changes in the elemental composition of micrometeorites during entry into the earth`s atmosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Dey, S.; Plane, J.M.C.; Feng, W.; Taylor, S.

    with a large probability of getting trapped in orbital resonance with Earth due to their smaller orbital eccentricities compared to cometary particles (Dermott et al. 1994; Reach et al. 1997; Brownlee 2001). There is some noteworthy contribution from... flux is challenging. The low orbital eccentricities of asteroidal dust compared to that of higher eccentricities of cometary dust gives an advantage of greater gravitational capture cross section to asteroidal particles making them as the largest...

  17. CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON SPECIES COMPOSITION MEDIATES DECOMPOSITION IN AN OLD-FIELD ECOSYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyner, M.L.; Classen, A.T.

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition of leaf litter collected from an old-fi eld community grown under a combination of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (+300ppm) and elevated surface temperature (+ 3.2°C) was examined in ambient conditions over 8 months in two separate experiments. In the fi rst experiment, we examined the main effects and interactions of CO2 and warming on litter quality and subsequent mass loss rates. Multi-species litter bags were constructed with litter collected from chambers with ambient CO2 and ambient temperatures (ACAT), elevated CO2 and elevated temperature (ECET), ambient CO2 and elevated temperature (ACET), and elevated CO2 and ambient temperature (ECAT). Litter collected from 6 species in each chamber was represented in decomposition bags in equal proportions. There were no differences in initial litter percent carbon (C) or nitrogen (N) among treatments. After 8 months, litter collected from ACET chambers lost over 20% more mass than litter collected from ECET or ACAT chambers, although biological differences were small. In the second experiment, we examined the indirect effect climate change may have on plant community composition, litter inputs, and subsequent mass loss rates. Litter bags were made from the same chambers mentioned above, but the amount of litter in the bag from each species was proportional to peak standing biomass of that species within the treatment. Initial litter in ECAT bags had up to 4% less C and 29% less N than ECET and ACET bags. Mass loss from ACET bags was 48% higher than mass loss from ECAT bags and 37% higher than mass loss from ACAT bags after 8 months of decomposition. These differences may have been driven by the higher proportion of litter from Lespedeza, a N-fi xer, in the natural ACET bags. Taken together, these data suggest that climate change will have a larger effect on decomposition by causing shifts in plant communities than it will by altering litter quality.

  18. Preparation and Properties of Paraffin/TiO2/Active-carbon Composite Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Yong-gan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel composite phase change materials (PCMs of paraffin/TiO2/active-carbon was prepared by a microemulsion method, where paraffin acted as a PCM and titanium dioxide (TiO2 as matrix material, and a small amount of active carbon was added to improve the thermal conductivity. The compositions, morphology and thermal properties of the paraffin/TiO2/active-carbon composite PCMs were characterized by XRD, SEM, TGA and DSC respectively. The shape stability during phase change process of this composite was also tested. The results show that paraffin is well encapsulated by TiO2 matrix, and thus exhibiting excellent shape-stabilized phase change feature. Besides, this composite PCM also presents superhydrophobic property. Therefore, these multifunctional features will endow PCMs with important application potential in energy efficient buildings.

  19. Gas-chromatographic analysis of the chemical composition of the Venusian atmosphere on the descent modules of the Venera-13 and Venera-14 probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, L. M.; Gelman, B. G.; Lamonov, N. I.; Melnikov, V. V.; Nenarokov, D. F.; Okhotnikov, B. P.; Rotin, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.

    1983-03-01

    The Sigma-2 gas-chromatograph developed for the analysis of the chemical composition of the Venusian atmosphere on the Venera 13, 14 descent modules is described, and a block diagram of Sigma-2 is presented. The presence of analysis channels with neon and electron-capture detectors made it possible to duplicate the analysis of several components and to determine the content of oxygen and argon in the atmosphere without chromatographic separation of these components. Volume concentrations (matched to heights of sampling) are presented for H2, O2, Kr, H2O, H2S, COS, and SF6 (N2O).

  20. Simulating atmospheric composition over a South-East Asian tropical rainforest: performance of a chemistry box model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. M. Pugh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric composition and chemistry above tropical rainforests is currently not well established, particularly for south-east Asia. In order to examine our understanding of chemical processes in this region, the performance of a box model of atmospheric boundary layer chemistry is tested against measurements made at the top of the rainforest canopy near Danum Valley, Malaysian Borneo. Multi-variate optimisation against ambient concentration measurements was used to estimate average canopy-scale emissions for isoprene, total monoterpenes and nitric oxide. The excellent agreement between estimated values and measured fluxes of isoprene and total monoterpenes provides confidence in the overall modelling strategy, and suggests that this method may be applied where measured fluxes are not available, assuming that the local chemistry and mixing are adequately understood. The largest contributors to the optimisation cost function at the point of best-fit are OH (29%, NO (22% and total peroxy radicals (27%. Several factors affect the modelled VOC chemistry. In particular concentrations of methacrolein (MACR and methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK are substantially overestimated, and the hydroxyl radical (OH concentration is substantially underestimated; as has been seen before in tropical rainforest studies. It is shown that inclusion of dry deposition of MACR and MVK and wet deposition of species with high Henry's Law values substantially improves the fit of these oxidised species, whilst also substantially decreasing the OH sink. Increasing OH production arbitrarily, through a simple OH recycling mechanism , adversely affects the model fit for volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Given the constraints on isoprene flux provided by measurements, a substantial decrease in the rate of reaction of VOCs with OH is the only remaining option to explain the measurement/model discrepancy for OH. A reduction in the isoprene+OH rate constant of 50%, in conjunction with

  1. Simulating atmospheric composition over a South-East Asian tropical rainforest: performance of a chemistry box model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Hewitt, C. N.; Langford, B.; Edwards, P. M.; Furneaux, K. L.; Heard, D. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Jones, C. E.; Karunaharan, A.; Lee, J.; Mills, G.; Misztal, P.; Moller, S.; Monks, P. S.; Whalley, L. K.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric composition and chemistry above tropical rainforests is currently not well established, particularly for south-east Asia. In order to examine our understanding of chemical processes in this region, the performance of a box model of atmospheric boundary layer chemistry is tested against measurements made at the top of the rainforest canopy near Danum Valley, Malaysian Borneo. Multi-variate optimisation against ambient concentration measurements was used to estimate average canopy-scale emissions for isoprene, total monoterpenes and nitric oxide. The excellent agreement between estimated values and measured fluxes of isoprene and total monoterpenes provides confidence in the overall modelling strategy, and suggests that this method may be applied where measured fluxes are not available, assuming that the local chemistry and mixing are adequately understood. The largest contributors to the optimisation cost function at the point of best-fit are OH (29%), NO (22%) and total peroxy radicals (27%). Several factors affect the modelled VOC chemistry. In particular concentrations of methacrolein (MACR) and methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK) are substantially overestimated, and the hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration is substantially underestimated; as has been seen before in tropical rainforest studies. It is shown that inclusion of dry deposition of MACR and MVK and wet deposition of species with high Henry's Law values substantially improves the fit of these oxidised species, whilst also substantially decreasing the OH sink. Increasing OH production arbitrarily, through a simple OH recycling mechanism , adversely affects the model fit for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Given the constraints on isoprene flux provided by measurements, a substantial decrease in the rate of reaction of VOCs with OH is the only remaining option to explain the measurement/model discrepancy for OH. A reduction in the isoprene+OH rate constant of 50%, in conjunction with increased

  2. Vertical groundwater storage properties and changes in confinement determined using hydraulic head response to atmospheric tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Timms, Wendy A.

    2017-04-01

    Accurate determination of groundwater state of confinement and compressible storage properties at vertical resolution over depth is notoriously difficult. We use the hydraulic head response to atmospheric tides at 2 cpd frequency as a tracer to quantify barometric efficiency (BE) and specific storage (Ss) over depth. Records of synthesized Earth tides, atmospheric pressure, and hydraulic heads measured in nine piezometers completed at depths between 5 and 55 m into unconsolidated smectitic clay and silt, sand and gravel were examined in the frequency domain. The barometric efficiency increased over depth from ˜0.05 in silty clay to ˜0.15 in sands and gravels. BE for silty clay was confirmed by calculating the loading efficiency as 0.95 using rainfall at the surface. Specific storage was calculated using effective rather than total moisture. The differences in phase between atmospheric pressure and hydraulic heads at 2 cpd were ˜180° below 10 m indicating confined conditions despite the low BE. Heads in the sediment above a fine sand and silt layer at 12 m exhibited a time variable phase difference between 0° and 180° indicating varying confinement. Our results illustrate that the atmospheric tide at 2 cpd is a powerful natural tracer for quantifying groundwater state of confinement and compressible storage properties in layered formations from hydraulic heads and atmospheric pressure records without the need for externally induced hydraulic stress. This approach could significantly improve the development of conceptual hydrogeological model used for groundwater resource development and management.

  3. Changing tree composition by life history strategy in a grassland-forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice B. Hanberry; John M. Kabrick; Hong S. He

    2014-01-01

    After rapid deforestation in the eastern United States, which generally occurred during the period of 1850-1920, forests did not return to historical composition and structure. We examined forest compositional change and then considered how historical land use and current land use may influence forests in a grassland-forest landscape, the Missouri Plains, where...

  4. Who Owns the Course? Online Composition Courses in an Era of Changing Intellectual Property Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Examines existing copyright law, the ambiguous case law concerning copyrightable material and educators; university policies toward patent and copyright law; and the changing nature of educational institutions in the 1990s. Considers the question of who "owns" an online composition course. Outlines issues that composition instructors need to…

  5. Early Holocene Change in Atmospheric Circulation in the North-Central USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, W. E.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous proxies in cores from Elk Lake, northwestern Minnesota, have provided a record of climatic and environmental change with annual resolution for the last 10,000 years. The proxies that allow reconstruction of the lake's physical and chemical paleolimnology (diatoms, redox-sensitive trace metals, and 18O values) show that that prior to about 8.2 cal ka the lake was a stable, dimictic lake that was strongly stratified. The same proxies show that after 8.2 cal. ka the lake was turbulent, well-mixed and shallower. The proxies that are related to climate factors external to the lake (dust as % Al and % Si, varve thickness, and pollen) show that prior to 8.2 cal. ka the lake was receiving relatively little dust, implying little wind activity. After 8.2 cal ka, there was a marked increase in the influx of dust indicating an increase in westerly winds. Lastly, the ostracode faunal assemblages, which provide information about the limnology and watershed characteristics, indicate that, for 1000 years prior to 8.2 cal. ka, the lake was stable and dilute with characteristics typical of lakes in boreal forests. At 8.2 cal. ka, the ostracode assemblage abruptly shifted to an assemblage typical of Canadian prairie lakes that exhibit large seasonal variability in physical characteristics. This marks the northward displacement of the polar front and beginning of westerlies. The Elk Lake record further shows that the so-called 8.2 cal. yr cold event, recognized in ice-core and other records from the circum-North Atlantic, and thought by some to be caused by catastrophic drainage of freshwater from proglacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway, was but a brief manifestation of a more fundamental and lasting change in the climate of North America. This fundamental climate change was the result of changes in atmospheric circulation in response to marked changes in the relative proportions of land, water, and, especially, glacial ice in North America during the early Holocene, the

  6. Impacts of large-scale atmospheric circulation changes in winter on black carbon transport and deposition to the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pozzoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Winter warming and sea-ice retreat observed in the Arctic in the last decades may be related to changes of large-scale atmospheric circulation pattern, which may impact the transport of black carbon (BC to the Arctic and its deposition on the sea ice, with possible feedbacks on the regional and global climate forcing. In this study we developed and applied a statistical algorithm, based on the maximum likelihood estimate approach, to determine how the changes of three large-scale weather patterns associated with increasing temperatures in winter and sea-ice retreat in the Arctic impact the transport of BC to the Arctic and its deposition. We found that two atmospheric patterns together determine a decreasing winter deposition trend of BC between 1980 and 2015 in the eastern Arctic while they increase BC deposition in the western Arctic. The increasing BC trend is mainly due to a pattern characterized by a high-pressure anomaly near Scandinavia favouring the transport in the lower troposphere of BC from Europe and North Atlantic directly into to the Arctic. Another pattern with a high-pressure anomaly over the Arctic and low-pressure anomaly over the North Atlantic Ocean has a smaller impact on BC deposition but determines an increasing BC atmospheric load over the entire Arctic Ocean with increasing BC concentrations in the upper troposphere. The results show that changes in atmospheric circulation due to polar atmospheric warming and reduced winter sea ice significantly impacted BC transport and deposition. The anthropogenic emission reductions applied in the last decades were, therefore, crucial to counterbalance the most likely trend of increasing BC pollution in the Arctic.

  7. Impacts of large-scale atmospheric circulation changes in winter on black carbon transport and deposition to the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Luca; Dobricic, Srdan; Russo, Simone; Vignati, Elisabetta

    2017-10-01

    Winter warming and sea-ice retreat observed in the Arctic in the last decades may be related to changes of large-scale atmospheric circulation pattern, which may impact the transport of black carbon (BC) to the Arctic and its deposition on the sea ice, with possible feedbacks on the regional and global climate forcing. In this study we developed and applied a statistical algorithm, based on the maximum likelihood estimate approach, to determine how the changes of three large-scale weather patterns associated with increasing temperatures in winter and sea-ice retreat in the Arctic impact the transport of BC to the Arctic and its deposition. We found that two atmospheric patterns together determine a decreasing winter deposition trend of BC between 1980 and 2015 in the eastern Arctic while they increase BC deposition in the western Arctic. The increasing BC trend is mainly due to a pattern characterized by a high-pressure anomaly near Scandinavia favouring the transport in the lower troposphere of BC from Europe and North Atlantic directly into to the Arctic. Another pattern with a high-pressure anomaly over the Arctic and low-pressure anomaly over the North Atlantic Ocean has a smaller impact on BC deposition but determines an increasing BC atmospheric load over the entire Arctic Ocean with increasing BC concentrations in the upper troposphere. The results show that changes in atmospheric circulation due to polar atmospheric warming and reduced winter sea ice significantly impacted BC transport and deposition. The anthropogenic emission reductions applied in the last decades were, therefore, crucial to counterbalance the most likely trend of increasing BC pollution in the Arctic.

  8. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-17

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  9. [Changes in body composition of oncological patients receiving nutritional support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iankovskaia, P A; Khoroshilov, I E; Korableva, N P; Ivanov, S V; Drogimiretskaia, E I; Kruglov, A N

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to problems of diagnostic and correction of malnutrition at patients with gastric cancer, undergoing the gastroectomy. to study losses of body mass and dynamics of boby composition in organism of patients with gastric cancer, undergoing surgery, to estimate the efficiency of nutritional support. open prospective cohort case-control study. Inspected 64 patients with cancer of stomach in II-IV phases, undergoing surgery. The duration of observation amounted to 12 months. 34 of these patients were obtained nutritional support (additional enteral nutrition) during 8 weeks. The efficiency of nutritional support estimated on dynamics of body mass, body composition, the content of total protein, albumin, hemoglobin, lymphocytes counts in the blood. When statistical processing of research results the non-parametric criterion of Wilcoxon for dependent samples, as well as the dispersion rank analysis of Kraskel-Walles was used. oncological process is followed by the progression of undernutrition, independently of disease stage. The nutritional support (the additional enteral nutrition) allows to substantially to improve the nutritional status of oncological patients.

  10. How does the latitudinal dependency of the cloud structure change Venus' atmosphere's general circulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate-Lopez, I.; Lebonnois, S.

    2017-09-01

    Differently to the previous simulation of the LMD/IPSL Venus GCM, we now take into account the latitudinal variation of the clouds' structure and we analyze its impacts on the general circulation of Venus atmosphere. Both solar heating rates and the infrared net-exchange rate matrix used in the radiative transfer code have been modified in that sense. Additional tuning below the clouds has also been performed. The current results show a better agreement with observations in both mean zonal wind and average temperature fields. Moreover, taking into account the latitudinal variation of the clouds has brought along with it the formation of a well defined cold collar poleward of 60º at cloud level. Besides, we have reanalyzed the wave activity present in Venus atmosphere and found new baroclinic mid-latitude waves. However, we do not obtain the gravity waves present in the deep atmosphere in the previous model.

  11. Cassini Results on Changes of Titan's Atmospheric Properties Near the Poles Since the Northern Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D. E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Lavvas, P.; Nixon, C. A.; Bampasidis, G.; Vinatier, S.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Flasar, F. M.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2010, we observe the onset and enhancement at Titan's south pole of several trace species such as HC3N and C6H6 previously observed only at high northern latitudes. This is due to the transition of Titan's seasons from northern winter in 2002 to (late) northern spring in 2012 and the advent of winter in the south pole. During this time, the reversal of Titan's main atmospheric circulation cell is expected to channel fresh photochemical products from mid latitudes towards the south pole. Meanwhile, gases transported north during the previous season remain concentrated around the north pole, undergoing slow photochemical destruction. Following the northern winter, species with longer chemical lifetimes should remain in the north for a little longer while those with shorter lifetimes disappear, reappearing in the south. We will present an analysis of spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS at high resolution from 2010 onwards, both in nadir and limb mode [1]. Subsidence gases that accumulate in the absence of ultraviolet sunlight, increased quickly since 2012 and some of them may be responsible for the haze decrease in the north and its appearance in the south at the same time [2]. For some of the most abundant and longest-lived hydrocarbons the evolution in the past years at a given latitude is not significant up to mid-2013 [1]. But in more recent dates these molecules show a dramatic trend for increase in the south. The 70°S and mid-latitudes show different behavior indicative of different dynamical processes in and out of the polar vortex region. While the 70°N data show generally no change with a trend rather to a small decrease for most species within 2014 the 70°S results indicate a strong enhancement in trace stratospheric gases after 2012. This is a strong indication of the rapid and sudden buildup of the gaseous inventory in the southern stratosphere during 2013-2014, as expected as the pole moves deeper into winter shadow. The limb spectra also show

  12. Relationship of changing social atmosphere, lifestyle and bone mineral density in college students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ja; Ko, Yo Han; Kim, Chung Kyung; Kim, Hee Sol; Park, Da Jeong; Yoon, Hyeo Min; Jeong, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Dongnam Health college, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The decrease of bone mineral density gives rise to the outbreak of osteopenia and makes the possibility of a bone fracture. It makes health problems in society. It's very important to prevent osteopenia in advance. Also it's critical to prevent and take care of it in adolescent because it's the most developing period comparing to middle ages because that bone mineral density decreases. There are genetic, physical and environmental factors that affect bone mineral density. Recently, a lifestyle and eating habits are also changing as the society atmosphere is gradually doing. This study have shown that 134 women and 75 men was chosen and responded to the survey of measuring bone mineral density and investigating a lifestyle. The measure of bone mineral density is to use Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA) and check femoral neck and lumbar spine. Also questionaries was required to pre-made survey about their lifestyles. Analysis of data was done with SPSS program. Multiple regression analysis was used for the relation of bone mineral density, the heigths and BMI. The sample of Groups are checked for drinking, smoking or excercising about differences by t-test. The results of the experiments were; first, there is statistically significant differences in the comparisons between BMD and BMD. But there isn't any special correlation between drinking, smoking and BMD. Secondly, bone mineral density becomes low related to an intake of caffeine. Particularly, this is statically significant on women. Also there is statically significant correlation between femoral neck and quantity of motion for both men and women. Third, there is significant relation between eating habits and bone mineral density on women's lumbar spine. However, there is no significant relation between men's lumbar spine and women's one. Therefore, to prevent osteopenia, it's good to abstain from intaking caffeine within an hour after a meal. In addition, it

  13. Regulation of Metabolic Changes in Shredded Cabbage by Modified Atmosphere Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Plestenjak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different storage conditions on the storability of packaged shredded cabbage has been studied. The cabbage cultivar Fieldrocket was cut and packaged in glass jars and in polyethylene (PE or polypropylene (PP film. Several initial atmospheres were established within the packaged cut cabbage: 100 % N2, 5 % O2/95 % N2, 10 % O2/90 % N2, normal atmosphere (NA, 70 % O2/30 % N2 and 100 % O2. Samples were stored at two different temperatures of 0 and 10 °C for 7 days. Variation in CO2 and O2 concentrations was higher at 10 °C compared to 0 °C and the highest at the atmosphere consisting of 70 % O2/30 % N2. A decrease of O2 below 3–5 % and an increase of CO2 above 2–5 % in the packed product resulted in the appearance of anaerobic metabolism. An initial atmosphere consisting of 100 % O2, and a storage temperature of 0 °C resulted in delayed anaerobic metabolism compared to other atmospheric conditions and storage temperature of 10 °C. Rinsing of fresh cut cabbage also resulted in lower accumulation of acetaldehyde and ethanol. A higher variation in CO2 and O2 concentrations, and consequent accumulation of anaerobic metabolites had a negative influence on the sensorial properties of the cut cabbage. The higher permeability of PE film compared to PP and glass enabled faster exchange of CO2 and O2, which resulted in lower accumulation of anaerobic metabolites. However, a higher O2 concentration had a negative influence on the colour of fresh-cut cabbage. The best results were achieved by packing the fresh-cut cabbage in PE film with an initial atmosphere of 100 % O2 and stored at 0 °C.

  14. Characterization of Cell Wall Composition of Radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. sativus) and Maturation Related Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Judith; Brett, Anika; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Bunzel, Mirko

    2016-11-16

    Cell wall composition affects the texture of plant-based foods. In addition, the main components of plant cell walls are dietary fiber constituents and are responsible for potential physiological effects that are largely affected by the structural composition of the cell walls. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. sativus) is known to develop a woody and firm texture during maturation and ripening, most likely due to changes in the cell wall composition. To describe these changes chemically, radish was cultivated and harvested at different time points, followed by detailed chemical analysis of insoluble fiber polysaccharides and lignin. During maturation, changes in polysaccharide profiles were observed, with a decrease in the portion of neutral pectic side chains and an increase in the xylan portion being predominant. Radish lignin was characterized by unexpectedly high incorporation of p-coumaryl alcohol into the polymer. Maturation dependent increases in lignin contents were accompanied by compositional changes of the lignin polymers with sinapyl alcohol being preferentially incorporated.

  15. The Effect of Compositional Changes of Binary Mixtures of n-alkane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stage phase transition as the volume ratios of the n-alkane solvents vary. This study can lead to a better understanding of the phase behavior of heavy organics under compositional changes and hence the prediction of heavy organic precipitation.

  16. Seasonal changes in meat weight and biochemical composition in the Black Clam Villorita cyprinoides (Grey)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    Seasonal changes in meat weight and biochemical composition are associated with reproduction, storage and utilization of reserves. The main period of increase in biochemical constituents corresponds to gametogenesis and maturation of gonads just...

  17. Particle hygroscopicity and its link to chemical composition in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, China, during summertime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of particle number size distribution, particle hygroscopic properties, and size-resolved chemical composition were made during the summer of 2014 in Beijing, China. During the measurement period, the mean hygroscopicity parameters (κs of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 nm particles were respectively 0.16  ±  0.07, 0.19  ±  0.06, 0.22  ±  0.06, 0.26  ±  0.07, and 0.28  ±  0.10, showing an increasing trend with increasing particle size. Such size dependency of particle hygroscopicity was similar to that of the inorganic mass fraction in PM1. The hydrophilic mode (hygroscopic growth factor, HGF  >  1.2 was more prominent in growth factor probability density distributions and its dominance of hydrophilic mode became more pronounced with increasing particle size. When PM2.5 mass concentration was greater than 50 μg m−3, the fractions of the hydrophilic mode for 150, 250, and 350 nm particles increased towards 1 as PM2.5 mass concentration increased. This indicates that aged particles dominated during severe pollution periods in the atmosphere of Beijing. Particle hygroscopic growth can be well predicted using high-time-resolution size-resolved chemical composition derived from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS measurements using the Zdanovskii–Stokes–Robinson (ZSR mixing rule. The organic hygroscopicity parameter (κorg showed a positive correlation with the oxygen to carbon ratio. During the new particle formation event associated with strongly active photochemistry, the hygroscopic growth factor or κ of newly formed particles is greater than for particles with the same sizes not during new particle formation (NPF periods. A quick transformation from external mixture to internal mixture for pre-existing particles (for example, 250 nm particles was observed. Such transformations may modify the state of the mixture of pre-existing particles and thus modify properties such

  18. Measurement and Modeling of Site-specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global mixing ratios of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, have increased nearly linearly from the beginning of the modern industrial period to today, with the current global average in excess of 325 ppb. This increase can be largely attributed to anthropogenic activity above the level of N2O emissions from natural biotic sources. The effect of N2O on Earth's climate is twofold: in the troposphere, N2O is radiatively active and chemically inert, while it serves as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. The marked altitudinal divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on Earth's climate. However, the understanding of the total impact of N2O is incomplete, as there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. Due to unique isotopic substitutions (15N and 18O) made by different N2O sources and stratospheric chemical reactions, the measurement of N2O isotopic ratios in ambient air can help identify the distribution and magnitude of distinct source types. We present the first year of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the MIT Stheno-tunable infrared direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) instrument at Mace Head, Ireland. Aided by the Stheno preconcentration system, Stheno-TILDAS can achieve measurement precisions of 0.10‰ or greater for all isotopic ratios (δ15N and δ18O) in ambient N2O. We further compare these data to the results from Model for Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) simulations, including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and MERRA/GEOS-5 reanalysis meteorological fields. These results will form the basis of future Bayesian inverse modeling simulations that will constrain global N2O source, circulation, and sink dynamics better.

  19. Factors Affecting Milk Composition and Changes in Milk Composition with Lactation Stage in Anatolian Buffaloes

    OpenAIRE

    ŞEKERDEN, Özel

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to investigate factors affecting milk composition and chaning of milk components with lactation stage in Anatolian buffaloes. The material of the research was formed by 109 milk samples belonging to 28 cows rasied at 12 units of 3 seperate village of Çarsamba District of Samsun Province. Milk samples were taken at AM milkings in one month intervals. Lactation stages' effect was found significant level statistically (P

  20. The effects of climate change on vegetation composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kovel, C.G.F. [Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    A simulation model has been developed to simulate the effects of climate change on vegetation succession. The model is based upon the idea that competition for resources is an important driving force in succession. Though other mechanisms may also be important in succession, competition for resources is likely to be affected by climate change. the resources incorporated concentration, rising temperature and changing precipitation pattern can change the availability of these resources for the different plant species. Parameters for the model were collected in measurements on the successional sequence in the Hulshorsterzand (Netherlands): a dry and nutrient poor system. An increased CO{sub 2} concentration can cause early species to remain in the system for a longer period. If the ecosystem is not extremely nutrient poor, a higher plant production is expected and, as a result, a higher mineralization rate than at current CO{sub 2} concentration. When nitrogen is limiting to plant production, the higher water use efficiency, caused by increased CO{sub 2} concentrations, will produce a higher soil moisture content. This is mainly the case early in the succession. When the system is less nitrogen limited, a higher leaf production can result in a higher evapotranspiration and the soil moisture content will drop, relative to current levels. These changes, induced by a higher CO{sub 2} concentration, may affect possibilities for species richness. 82 refs.

  1. Observing Decadal Trends in Atmospheric Feedbacks and Climate Change with Zeus and CLARREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revercomb, H. E.; Best, F. A.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.; Taylor, J. K.; Gero, P.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Mulligan, M.; Tobin, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    New technologies for observing decadal trends in atmospheric feedbacks and climate change from space have been recently demonstrated via a NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) project of our group and the Anderson Group of Harvard University. Using these new technologies, a mission named Zeus has been proposed to the first NASA Earth Venture Instruments opportunity (EVI-1). Zeus would provide a low cost mechanism to initiate a new era in high spectral resolution IR climate Benchmark and Intercalibration observations, the basis for which has been established by definition of the CLARREO mission in the 2007 NRC "Decadal Survey" and by the Science Definition Team established by NASA LaRC to further the full blown CLARREO mission. Zeus EVI is a low-cost, low-risk, and high-value EVI mission that will deploy an Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI) instrument to measure absolute spectrally resolved infrared radiance over much of the Earth-emitted spectrum with ultra-high accuracy (traditional spectrally-integrated measurements. While ARI requirements for accuracy and spectral properties are demanding, the overall instrument is relatively simple and low-cost because of the limited requirements on spatial sampling (25-100 km nadir-only footprints spaced at < 250 km) and on noise performance (climate products are created by combining many samples). The orbit chosen for Zeus must provide coverage immune to time-of-day sampling errors. Because of its relatively high rate of precession, an attractive baseline option for Zeus EVI is the 51.6 degrees inclination orbit of the International Space Station (ISS). For Zeus deployment on the ISS, higher latitude climate benchmark information will be obtained from operational sounders intercalibrated by Zeus. A key aspect of the Zeus ARI instrument is the On-orbit Verification and Test System (OVTS) for verifying its accuracy by reference to International Standards (SI) and testing on orbit. The OVTS includes an On-orbit Absolute

  2. Changes of glucosinolates in mixed fresh-cut broccoli and cauliflower florets in modified atmosphere packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, M; Peters, P; Krumbein, A

    2007-10-01

    Glucosinolates of broccoli and cauliflower florets were assessed to determine the effect of modified-atmosphere packaging on postharvest glucosinolate dynamics in mixed florets of Brassica vegetables. Mixed-packaged broccoli and cauliflower florets stored in food trays sealed with 2 different microperforated biaxial-oriented polypropylene films for up to 7 d at 8 degrees C were analyzed. Both applied modified atmospheres (1% O(2)+ 21% CO(2); 8% O(2)+ 14% CO(2)) maintained aliphatic glucosinolates in cauliflower florets, whereas in broccoli florets, the aliphatic glucosinolate concentration decreased slightly in each modified atmosphere. In addition, total indole glucosinolate concentration for both broccoli and cauliflower florets was maintained, and even increased in cauliflower florets at 1% O(2)+ 21% CO(2) due to rising neoglucobrassicin concentration. Thus, to simultaneously maintain glucosinolates and external appearance as well as to prevent off-odor, a modified atmosphere of 1% O(2)+ 21% CO(2) provides a suitable environment for storage of this Brassica floret medley for up to 7 d at 8 degrees C.

  3. Soil type influences the sensitivity of nutrient dynamics to changes in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous studies have indicated that increases in atmospheric CO2 have the potential to decrease nitrogen availability through the process of progressive nitrogen limitation (PNL). The timing and magnitude of PNL in field experiments is varied due to numerous ecosystem processes. Here we examined ...

  4. The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia: Analyzing Regional Land Use Change Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Keller; Maria Assunção Silva-Dias; Daniel C. Nepstad; Meinrat O. Andreae

    2004-01-01

    The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is a multi-disciplinary, multinational scientific project led by Brazil. LBA researchers seek to understand Amazonia in its global context especially with regard to regional and global climate. Current development activities in Amazonia including deforestation, logging, cattle ranching, and agriculture...

  5. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, T. D.

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included unidirectional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed.

  6. Composite desiccant material "CaCl2/Vermiculite/Saw wood": a new material for fresh water production from atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Avadhesh

    2017-09-01

    In this study a novel composite desiccant material "CaCl2/Vermiculite/Saw wood" have been synthesized and tested for the water generation from atmospheric air. The vermiculite- saw wood used as a host matrix and CaCl2 as a hygroscopic salt. A solar glass desiccant box type system with a collector area of 0.36 m2 has been used. Design parameters for water generation are height of glass from the desiccant material bed as 0.22 m, inclination in angle as 30º, the effective thickness of glass as 3 mm and number of glazing as single. It has been found that the concentration of calcium chloride is the most influencing factor for fresh water generation from atmospheric air. The maximum amount of water produced by using novel composite desiccant material is 195 ml/kg/day.

  7. Dynamics of changes in oil composition at the development of the Usinsk deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinykh, Yu. V.; Chuikina, D. I.

    2016-11-01

    To test new materials used for enhanced oil recovery, methods are needed for determining the effectiveness of their impact on the oil reservoir. Monitoring can be performed by analyzing reservoir fluids with a changed composition of oil. In the Usinsk deposit, a complex injection of surfactant compositions and the gel composition was carried out by the technology developed in the IPC SB RAS. The technology of the use of gel compositions is based on aluminum chloride and urea (GALKA-NT technology), and the technology of the use of surfactants is based on surfactant solutions and urea (IPC-PRO). The study shows that the use of gradient and displacement chromatography could effectively maintain a control over the development of the field where new materials and reagents are used for enhanced oil recovery. The change in the oil composition reflects processes occurring in the reservoir, which allows a purposeful regulation of them.

  8. Effect of Ladle Furnace Slag Composition in Si-Mn Killed Steel Transient Inclusion Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Stephano P. T.; Pistorius, P. Chris

    This work investigates the effect of slag composition in steel-slag and steel-inclusion reaction kinetics in silicon-manganese killed steels by using FactSage macros to simulate and predict inclusion composition and morphology changes during ladle treatment. Two different conditions of ladle treatment were simulated in regard to alumina and silica content in a basic slag. The simulated changes in inclusion chemical composition and phases, as well as total oxygen and dissolved aluminum in steel were compared. One experimental trial was made to simulate ladle steel-slag and steel-inclusion reactions using an induction furnace to simulate deoxidation and slag addition. The average steel mass transfer coefficient for the experimental setup was calculated from the analyzed aluminium pick-up by steel. Average inclusion composition was measured using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The chemical compositions of the inclusions and the steel agreed with the FactSage macro simulations.

  9. Firm Export Diversification and Change in Workforce Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillou, Sarah; Treibich, Tania

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that part of the fixed cost of firms' trade expansion is due to the acquisition of new internal capabilities (e.g. technology, production processes or skills), which imply a costly change in the firm's internal labor organisation. We investigate the

  10. Metabolic Aspects of Caloric Restriction (500 Calories): Body Composition Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    fat-free mass, as well as some loss of body water and protein. Other biochemical changes included the loss of electrolytes and marked ketosis (2,3). In...losses were still observed, ketosis was not evident but body protein was still being catabolized at almost the same rate as reported in the first study

  11. Changes in protein composition and protein phosphorylation during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in protein profiles and protein phosphorylation were studied in various stages of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos. Many proteins, which were expressed in cotyledonary stage somatic embryos, were also present in the zygotic embryos obtained from mature dry seed. The intensity of 22 kDa protein was ...

  12. Dust composition changes from Taylor Glacier (East Antarctica) during the last glacial-interglacial transition: A multi-proxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sarah M.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Arendt, Carli A.; Blakowski, Molly A.; Steigmeyer, August; Gabrielli, Paolo; Sierra-Hernández, M. Roxana; Beaudon, Emilie; Delmonte, Barbara; Baccolo, Giovanni; May, Nathaniel W.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-04-01

    Mineral dust is transported in the atmosphere and deposited in oceans, ice sheets and the terrestrial biosphere. Temporal changes in locations of dust source areas and transport pathways have implications for global climate and biogeochemical cycles. The chemical and physical characterization of the dust record preserved in ice cores is useful for identifying of dust source regions, dust transport, dominant wind direction and storm trajectories. Here, we present a 50,000-year geochemical characterization of mineral dust entrapped in a horizontal ice core from the Taylor Glacier in East Antarctica. Strontium (Sr) and neodymium (Nd) isotopes, grain size distribution, trace and rare earth element (REE) concentrations, and inorganic ion (Cl- and Na+) concentrations were measured in 38 samples, corresponding to a time interval from 46 kyr before present (BP) to present. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions of insoluble dust in the Taylor Glacier ice shows distinct changes between the Last Glacial Period (LGP in this study ranging from ∼46.7-15.3 kyr BP) the early Holocene (in this study ranging from ∼14.5-8.7 kyr BP), and zero-age samples. The 87Sr/86Sr isotopic composition of dust in the Taylor Glacier ice ranged from 0.708 to 0.711 during the LGP, while the variability during the early Holocene is higher ranging from 0.707 to 0.714. The εNd composition ranges from 0.1 to -3.9 during the LGP, and is more variable from 1.9 to -8.2 during the early Holocene. The increased isotopic variability during the early Holocene suggests a shift in dust provenance coinciding with the major climate transition from the LGP to the Holocene. The isotopic composition and multiple physical and chemical constraints support previous work attributing Southern South America (SSA) as the main dust source to East Antarctica during the LGP, and a combination of both local Ross Sea Sector dust sources and SSA after the transition into the Holocene. This study provides the first high time

  13. Non-isothermal compositional liquid gas Darcy flow: formulation, soil-atmosphere boundary condition and application to high energy geothermal simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Beaude, Laurence; Brenner, Konstantin; Lopez, Simon; Masson, Roland; Smai, Farid

    2018-01-01

    This article deals with the modelling and formulation of compositional gas liquid Darcy flow. Our model includes an advanced boundary condition at the interface between the porous medium and the atmosphere accounting for convective mass and energy transfer, liquid evaporation and liquid outflow. The formulation is based on a fixed set of unknowns whatever the set of present phases. The thermody-namic equilibrium is expressed as complementary constraints. The model and its formulation are appl...

  14. Atmospheric fate of nuclei-mode particles estimated from the number concentrations and chemical composition of particles measured at roadside and background sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujitani, Yuji; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Shinji

    Number concentrations and size-resolved chemical compositions of atmospheric particles at a roadside site in Kawasaki City, Japan, and a background site 200 m away were measured in winter to estimate the atmospheric fate of nuclei-mode particles emitted from vehicles. Measurements with a scanning mobility particle sizer showed a sharp peak in nuclei-mode particles with a modal diameter of around 0.020 μm at the roadside site; in contrast, no peak for nuclei-mode particles was observed at the background site. For chemical analysis, size-resolved particles were sampled by low-pressure impactors. Carbon analysis suggested that diesel exhaust particles contributed to both the roadside and background Stage 1 (S1; 0.030-0.060 μm) particles. The ratios of organic carbon (OC) to total carbon (TC) increased for smaller particles, and were 28% and 51% for the roadside and the background S1 particles, respectively. It is likely that the OC/TC ratio for nuclei-mode particles was larger than for the S1 particles, and that OC was one of the major constituents of the nuclei-mode particles at the roadside site. From this result and the greater Kelvin effect for smaller particles, it is likely that nuclei-mode particles in the roadside atmosphere are more volatile than the S1 particles. Organic analysis of the size-resolved particles suggested that lubricating oil from vehicles affected the organic composition of both the roadside and background S1 particles, and that C 33n-alkane and more volatile organic compounds in the S1 particles partially evaporated in the atmosphere following the emission of the particles from diesel vehicles. It is likely that evaporation of the constituents (or possibly coagulation with pre-existing particles after shrinking by partial evaporation) of the nuclei-mode particles in the atmosphere was responsible for the absence of nuclei-mode particles in the background atmosphere.

  15. Effect of processing on composition changes of selected spices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Hua Jia

    Full Text Available The present investigation was conducted to study the true retentions of α-tocopherol, tocotrienols and β-carotene in crown daisy, unripe hot pepper, onion, garlic, and red pepper as affected by various domestic cooking methods, those were, boiling, baking, stir-frying, deep-frying, steaming, roasting, and microwaving. Fatty acid compositions were determined by GC, and HPLC were used for quantification of α-tocopherol, tocotrienols, and β-carotene. True retentions of α-tocopherol in cooked foods were as follows: boiling (77.74-242.73%, baking (85.99-212.39%, stir-frying (83.12-957.08%, deep-frying (162.48-4214.53%, steaming (45.97-179.57%, roasting (49.65-253.69%, and microwaving (44.67-230.13%. Similarly for true retention of β-carotene were: boiling (65.69-313.75%, baking (71.46-330.16%, stir-frying (89.62-362.46%, deep-frying (178.22-529.16%, steaming (50.39-240.92%, roasting (73.54-361.47%, and microwaving (78.60-339.87%.

  16. Contribution of Changing Sources and Sinks to the Growth Rate of Atmospheric Methane Concentrations for the Last Two Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Elaine; Walter, B.; Bogner, J.; Sarma, D.; Portmey, G.; Travis, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric methane concentrations begun in the early 1980s show decadal trends, as well as large interannual variations, in growth rate. Recent research indicates that while wetlands can explain several of the large growth anomalies for individual years, the decadal trend may be the combined effect of increasing sinks, due to increases in tropospheric OH, and stabilizing sources. We discuss new 20-year histories of annual, global source strengths for all major methane sources, i.e., natural wetlands, rice cultivation, ruminant animals, landfills, fossil fuels, and biomass burning. We also present estimates of the temporal pattern of the sink required to reconcile these sources and atmospheric concentrations over this time period. Analysis of the individual emission sources, together with model-derived estimates of the OH sink strength, indicates that the growth rate of atmospheric methane observed over the last 20 years can only be explained by a combination of changes in source emissions and an increasing tropospheric sink. Direct validation of the global sources and the terrestrial sink is not straightforward, in part because some sources/sinks are relatively small and diffuse (e.g., landfills and soil consumption), as well as because the atmospheric record integrates multiple and substantial sources and tropospheric sinks in regions such as the tropics. We discuss ways to develop and test criteria for rejecting and/or accepting a suite of scenarios for the methane budget.

  17. Stable isotopes, ecological integration and environmental change: wolves record atmospheric carbon isotope trend better than tree rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bump, Joseph K; Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Bada, Jeffrey L; Koch, Paul L; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2007-10-07

    Large-scale patterns of isotope ratios are detectable in the tissues of organisms, but the variability in these patterns often obscures detection of environmental trends. We show that plants and animals at lower trophic levels are relatively poor indicators of the temporal trend in atmospheric carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) when compared with animals at higher trophic levels. First, we tested how differences in atmospheric delta13C values were transferred across three trophic levels. Second, we compared contemporary delta13C trends (1961-2004) in atmospheric CO2 to delta13C patterns in a tree species (jack pine, Pinus banksiana), large herbivore (moose, Alces alces) and large carnivore (grey wolf, Canis lupus) from North America. Third, we compared palaeontological (approx. 30000 to 12000 14C years before present) atmospheric CO2 trends to delta13C patterns in a tree species (Pinus flexilis, Juniperus sp.), a megaherbivore (bison, Bison antiquus) and a large carnivore (dire wolf, Canis dirus) from the La Brea tar pits (southern California, USA) and Great Basin (western USA). Contrary to previous expectations, we found that the environmental isotope pattern is better represented with increasing trophic level. Our results indicate that museum specimens of large carnivores would best reflect large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of carbon isotopes in the palaeontological record because top predators can act as ecological integrators of environmental change.

  18. Mapping Lunar global chemical composition from Chang'E-1 IIM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bokun; Xiong, Sheng Qing; Wu, Yunzhao; Wang, Zhenchao; Dong, Lina; Gan, Fuping; Yang, Suming; Wang, Runsheng

    2012-07-01

    The global distribution of the chemical composition of the lunar surface is an important factor helping us to understand the formation and evolution of the Moon. In this paper, formulas were established for deriving FeO, TiO2, Al2O3 and MnO abundances from Chang'E-1 (CE-1) Interference Imaging Spectrometer (IIM) data on the basis of the method "color ratio of UV/VIS and NIR/VIS versus VIS reflectance diagram" which was put forward by Lucey and Blewett. Global high-resolution maps (200 m/pixel) of FeO, TiO2, Al2O3 and MnO were produced, and then compared qualitatively with results from Clementine UVVIS, Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) and Neutron Prospector (NS) data. The abundance ranges of the above four elements are 0-21.0 wt%, 0-9.5 wt%, 5.4-32.1 wt%, and 0.015-0.28 wt% respectively. The abundance range of FeO is consistent with the results from LP-GRS data reported by Gillis et al. (2004), and the abundance range of TiO2 is consistent with the results from LP-NS data reported by Elphic et al. (2002). Relative abundance distributions of FeO and TiO2 from Clementine and IIM data are slightly different from those from LP-GRS and LP-NS data. In map from the LP-GRS data, FeO abundances are the highest at Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium. However, in the map from CE-1 IIM data they are the highest at Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Tranquillitatis. Although the spatial resolution of these maps is high, caution must be taken when the maps in this paper are used at the crater scale because they suffer from errors owing to topographically induced shading. In future work, a high-accuracy DEM from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data coupled with a photometric model can probably be used to resolve this problem.

  19. Changes in the composition of synthesis products upon transitioning from self-ignition to combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seplyarskii, B. S.; Ivleva, T. P.; Grachev, V. V.; Merzhanov, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of condensed products upon switching from synthesis in the self-ignition mode to combustion synthesis is studied by approximate analytical and numerical means for condensed substances that react via competing reaction pathways. It is shown that these different modes of synthesis produce different compositions of the reaction products. The conditions required for transitioning from one mode of combustion initiation (thermal explosion) to another (ignition) are determined. It is found that this transition can occur upon changing the temperature of a heater by just two characteristic intervals. A scaling procedure that allows the calculation results obtained at zero dimensionless temperature of the heater to be used to determine the effect its non-zero dimensionless temperature has on the ignition mode and the composition of the obtained products is proposed. Calculations show that materials with different distributions of the chemical composition along the sample can be obtained by deliberately changing the temperature of the heater.

  20. Quality changes of cuttlefish stored under various atmosphere modifications and vacuum packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouletis, Achilleas D; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Neofitou, Christos; Parlapani, Foteini F; Gkagtzis, Dimitrios C

    2016-06-01

    Seafood preservation and its shelf life prolongation are two of the main issues in the seafood industry. As a result, and in view of market globalization, research has been triggered in this direction by applying several techniques such as modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), vacuum packaging (VP) and active packaging (AP). However, seafood such as octopus, cuttlefish and others have not been thoroughly investigated up to now. The aim of this research was to determine the optimal conditions of modified atmosphere under which cuttlefish storage time and consequently shelf life time could be prolonged without endangering consumer safety. It was found that cuttlefish shelf life reached 2, 2, 4, 8 and 8 days for control, VP, MAP 1, MAP 2 and MAP 3 (20% CO2 -80% N2 , 50% CO2 -50% N2 and 70% CO2 -30% N2 for MAP 1, 2 and 3, respectively) samples, respectively, judging by their sensorial attributes. Elevated CO2 levels had a strong microbiostatic effect, whereas storage under vacuum did not offer significant advantages. All physicochemical attributes of MAP-treated samples were better preserved compared to control. Application of high CO2 atmospheres such as MAP 2 and MAP 3 proved to be an effective strategy toward preserving the characteristics and prolonging the shelf life of fresh cuttlefish and thereby improving its potential in the market. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Seasonal Changes in Soccer Players' Body Composition and Dietary Intake Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Brooke L; Kingsley, Michael; Leveritt, Michael D; Belski, Regina

    2017-12-01

    Devlin, BL, Kingsley, M, Leveritt, MD, and Belski, R. Seasonal changes in soccer players' body composition and dietary intake practices. J Strength Cond Res 31(12): 3319-3326, 2017-The aims of this study were 2-fold: to determine seasonal changes in dietary intake and body composition in elite soccer players and to evaluate the influence of self-determined individual body composition goals on dietary intake and body composition. This longitudinal, observational study assessed body composition (total mass, fat-free soft tissue mass, and fat mass) using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and dietary intake (energy and macronutrients) via multiple-pass 24-hour recalls, at 4 time points over a competitive season in elite soccer players from one professional club in the Australian A-League competition. Self-reported body composition goals were also recorded. Eighteen elite male soccer players took part (25 ± 5 years, 180.5 ± 7.4 cm, 75.6 ± 6.5 kg). Majority (≥67%) reported the goal to maintain weight. Fat-free soft tissue mass increased from the start of preseason (55,278 ± 5,475 g) to the start of competitive season (56,784 ± 5,168 g; p composition goals did not strongly influence dietary intake practices or changes in body composition. This study has demonstrated that body composition changes over the course of a soccer season are subtle in elite soccer players despite relatively low self-reported intake of energy and carbohydrate.

  2. Molecular composition of soil organic matter with land-use change along a bi-continental mean annual temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Oliva; Haddix, Michelle L; Conant, Richard T; Paul, Eldor A; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-12-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is critical for maintaining soil fertility and long-term agricultural sustainability. The molecular composition of SOM is likely altered due to global climate and land-use change; but rarely are these two aspects studied in tandem. Here we used molecular-level techniques to examine SOM composition along a bi-continental (from North to South America) mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from seven native grassland/forest and cultivated/pasture sites. Biomarker methods included solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation for the analysis of free lipids of plant and microbial origin, ester-bound lipids from cutin and suberin, and lignin-derived phenols, respectively. Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to examine the overall composition of SOM. Soil cultivation was found to increase the amount of microbial-derived compounds at warmer temperatures (up to 17% increase). The cultivated soils were characterized by much lower contributions of plant-derived SOM components compared to the native soils (up to 64% lower at the coldest site). In addition, cultivation caused an increase in lignin and cutin degradation (up to 68 and 15% increase, respectively), and an increase in the amount of suberin-derived inputs (up to 54% increase). Clear differences in the molecular composition of SOM due to soil cultivation were observed in soils of varying mineral composition and were attributed to disturbance, different vegetation inputs, soil aggregate destruction and MAT. A high organic allophanic tropical soil was characterized by its protection of carbohydrates and nitrogen-containing compounds. The conversion of native to cultivated land shows significant shifts in the degradation stage of SOM. In particular, cutin-derived compounds which are believed to be part of the stable SOM pool may undergo enhanced degradation with long-term cultivation and disruption of soil aggregates. On a per year basis, the total

  3. Connecting European snow cover variability with large scale atmospheric patterns and changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, E.; Claps, P.; D'Odorico, P.

    2009-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of snow cover extent in Europe and their possible dependence with large scale atmospheric patterns affecting European weather and climate. The temporal variability and the volume of winter snowfall are important factors in the development of water management strategies for snow-dominated regions. In fact, they affect both the volumes of available water, especially during the warm season which relies on snowmelt, and the temporal stability of the streamflow regime, influenced by the timing of snow accumulation and melt. For this reason, and also with respect to the debate on the anthropogenic effects on the climate variability, the detection of snow cover natural variability and possible driving causes assumes a major importance. The EASE Grid Weekly Snow Cover and Sea Ice Extent database is used to reconstruct European snow cover fields for the period 1972-2006. In order to evaluate the snow cover temporal behavior and its spatial distribution, frequencies of occurrence are derived for different aggregation time scales while snow cover persistency, intended as a measure of the probability of having snow cover, is taken into account to separate regions permanently covered by snow during winter and regions affected by higher varia