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  1. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agustí-Panareda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate – Interim Implementation (MACC-II service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they

  2. The AmazonFACE research program: assessing the effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 on the ecology and resilience of the Amazon forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapola, David; Quesada, Carlos; Norby, Richard; Araújo, Alessandro; Domingues, Tomas; Hartley, Iain; Kruijt, Bart; Lewin, Keith; Meir, Patrick; Ometto, Jean; Rammig, Anja

    2016-04-01

    The existence, magnitude and duration of a supposed "CO2 fertilization" effect in tropical forests remains largely undetermined, despite being suggested for nearly 20 years as a key knowledge gap for understanding the future resilience of Amazonian forests and its impact on the global carbon cycle. Reducing this uncertainty is critical for assessing the future of the Amazon region as well as its vulnerability to climate change. The AmazonFACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) research program is an integrated model-experiment initiative of unprecedented scope in an old-growth Amazon forest near Manaus, Brazil - the first of its kind in tropical forest. The experimental treatment will simulate an atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] of the future in order to address the question: "How will rising atmospheric CO2 affect the resilience of the Amazon forest, the biodiversity it harbors, and the ecosystem services it provides, in light of projected climatic changes?" AmazonFACE is divided into three phases: (I) pre-experimental ecological characterization of the research site; (II) pilot experiment comprised of two 30-m diameter plots, with one treatment plot maintained at elevated [CO2] (ambient +200 ppmv), and the other control plot at ambient [CO2]; and (III) a fully-replicated long-term experiment comprised of four pairs of control/treatment FACE plots maintained for 10 years. A team of scientists from Brazil, USA, Australia and Europe will employ state-of-the-art methods to study the forest inside these plots in terms of carbon metabolism and cycling, water use, nutrient cycling, forest community composition, and interactions with environmental stressors. All project phases also encompass ecosystem-modeling activities in a way such that models provide hypothesis to be verified in the experiment, which in turn will feed models to ultimately produce more accurate projections of the environment. Resulting datasets and analyses will be a valuable resource for a broad community

  3. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  4. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch

  5. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-01

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  6. CO2 Impacts on the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael; Bauer, James; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony; Stevenson, Rachel; Yelle, Roger

    2014-09-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass Mars at the extremely close distance of 140,000 km on 2014 Oct 19. This encounter is unique---a record close approach to a planet with spacecraft that can observe its passage---and currently, all 5 Mars orbiters have plans to observe the comet and/or its effects on the planet. Gas from the comet's coma is expected to collide with the Martian atmosphere, altering the abundances of some species and producing significant heating, inflating the upper atmosphere. We propose DDT observations with Spitzer/IRAC to measure the comet's CO2+CO coma (observing window Oct 30 - Nov 20), to use these measurements to derive the coma's CO2 density at Mars during the closest approach, and to aid the interpretation of any observed effects or changes in the Martian atmosphere.

  7. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  8. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K J; Richardson, S J; Miles, N L

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2-3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute

  9. Elevated CO2 effects on plant carbon, nitrogen, and water relations: six important lessons from FACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Rogers, Alistair; Long, Stephen P; Ort, Donald R

    2009-01-01

    Plant responses to the projected future levels of CO(2) were first characterized in short-term experiments lasting days to weeks. However, longer term acclimation responses to elevated CO(2) were subsequently discovered to be very important in determining plant and ecosystem function. Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) experiments are the culmination of efforts to assess the impact of elevated CO(2) on plants over multiple seasons and, in the case of crops, over their entire lifetime. FACE has been used to expose vegetation to elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) under completely open-air conditions for nearly two decades. This review describes some of the lessons learned from the long-term investment in these experiments. First, elevated CO(2) stimulates photosynthetic carbon gain and net primary production over the long term despite down-regulation of Rubisco activity. Second, elevated CO(2) improves nitrogen use efficiency and, third, decreases water use at both the leaf and canopy scale. Fourth, elevated CO(2) stimulates dark respiration via a transcriptional reprogramming of metabolism. Fifth, elevated CO(2) does not directly stimulate C(4) photosynthesis, but can indirectly stimulate carbon gain in times and places of drought. Finally, the stimulation of yield by elevated CO(2) in crop species is much smaller than expected. While many of these lessons have been most clearly demonstrated in crop systems, all of the lessons have important implications for natural systems. PMID:19401412

  10. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: A Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Amit; Podolak, Morris

    2016-01-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction that is large enough to form an external mantle composed of high pressure water ice polymorphs and that lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global deep liquid ocean. For these ocean planets we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2; the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that in steady state the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When the wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is esta...

  11. Understanding urban atmospheric CO2: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataki, D. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Forster, C. B.; Klewicki, J. C.; Pardyjak, E. R.; Peterson, R. E.; Steenburgh, W. J.; Tyler, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Many studies have shown that atmospheric CO2 concentrations are elevated far above ambient levels in cities due to strong local sources. Measurements of urban atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio, its isotopic composition, and its sources and sinks provide opportunities to understand the local carbon cycle and biogeochemistry of cities, which is increasingly important in studies of regional and global change as well as urban sustainability and planning. In an ongoing project in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, measurements of CO2 mixing ratio and the isotopic composition of CO2 have shown that vehicle exhaust significantly elevates CO2 mixing ratios above ambient, particularly in the wintertime when temperature inversions create stable conditions. Natural gas combustion also makes a large contribution to CO2 mixing ratio in the winter, but becomes negligible in the summer. However, the urban "forest" in the Salt Lake Valley plays an active role in influencing CO2 mixing ratio during the spring, summer, and fall through photosynthesis and respiration. Atmospheric CO2 measurements in the Salt Lake Valley are also useful in that they correlate with air pollutants such as aerosols, particularly in the wintertime when CO2 sources are dominated by combustion. The relationship between CO2 mixing ratio and other pollutants varies as a function of fuel source (natural gas versus gasoline) and meteorological variables that affect atmospheric chemistry of reactive compounds; therefore, these relationships provide additional information about sources and sinks for atmospheric constituents. Finally, CO2 is a stable atmospheric tracer in that it does not undergo chemical transformations in the atmosphere. Measurements in the Salt Lake Valley showed that the temporal and spatial distribution of CO2 in the wintertime may provide information about atmospheric transport during complex cold pools events if mixing ratios are monitored at multiple locations. These results suggest that studies of

  12. Constraints on the atmospheric CO2 deglacial rise based on its δ13CO2 evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Lourantou, A.; Lavric, J. V.; Köhler, Peter; Barnola, J.-M.; Michel, E.; Paillard, D.; D. Raynaud; Chappellaz, J.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of air bubbles trapped in polar ice permits the reconstruction of atmospheric evolution of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2 ), on various timescales. Within this study, the simultaneous analysis of the CO2 mixing ratio and its stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13 CO2 ) over the last two deglaciations allows us to better constrain the global carbon cycle. Based on the different isotopic signatures of the ocean and the terrestrial biosphere (major reservoirs re...

  13. Carbon Turnover in a Crop Rotation Under Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. J. WEIGEL; K. LEWIN; J. NAGY; A. PACHOLSKI; S. BURKART; M. HELAL; O. HEINEMEYER; B. KLEIKAMP; R. MANDERSCHEID; C. FR(U)HAUF; G. F. HENDREY

    2005-01-01

    Mostly based on assumptions derived from controlled-environment studies, predicted future atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] are expected to have considerable impacts on carbon (C) turnover in agro-ecosystems. In order to allow the in situ examination of C-transformations in the plant-soil system of arable crop rotations under future [CO2], a free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) experiment (550 μmol mol-1 CO2) was started at Braunschweig, Germany in 1999.The crop rotation under investigation comprised winter barley, a cover crop (ryegrass), sugar beets and winter wheat.Assessments of CO2 effects included the determination of above- and belowground biomass production, measurements of canopy CO2- and H2O- fluxes, soil microbial biomass and in situ soil respiration. The results obtained during the 1st crop rotation cycle (3 years) showed that for the selected crops elevated [CO2] entailed significant positive effects (P<0.05) on aboveground (6%-14% stimulation) and belowground biomass production (up to 90% stimulation), while canopy evapotranspiration was reduced. This resulted in increased soil water content. Also, depending on crop type and season, high CO2 stimulated in situ soil respiration (up to 30%), while soil microbial biomass did not show significant respoases to elevated [CO2] during the first rotation cycle.

  14. A role for atmospheric CO2 in preindustrial climate forcing

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas B. Van Hoof; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Visscher, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores, stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentration. CO2 trends based on leaf remains of Quercus robur (English oak) from the Netherlands support the presence of significant CO2 variability during the first half of the last millennium. The amplitude of the reconstructed multidecadal fluctuations, up to 34 parts per million by volu...

  15. Atmospheric CO2 Variability Observed during ASCENDS Flight Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B.; Browell, E. V.; Campbell, J. F.; Choi, Y.; Dobler, J. T.; Fan, T. F.; Harrison, F. W.; Kooi, S. A.; Liu, Z.; Meadows, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate observations of atmospheric CO2 with a space-based lidar system, such as for the NASA ASCENDS mission, will improve knowledge of global CO2 distribution and variability and increase the confidence in predictions of future climate changes. To prepare for the ASCENDS mission, the NASA Langley Research Center and Exelis Inc. (now part of Harris Corp.) have been collaborating in the development and evaluation of an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar approach for measuring atmospheric CO2 from space. Two airborne IM-CW lidars operating in the 1.57-mm CO2 absorption band have been developed and flight tested to demonstrate precise atmospheric CO2 column measurements. A total of 14 flight campaigns have been conducted with the two lidar and in-situ CO2 measurement systems. Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales were observed during these campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200×300 km2 over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Even over extended forests, about 2-ppm CO2 column variability was measured within about 500-km distance. For winter times, especially over snow covered ground, relatively less horizontal CO2 variability was observed, likely owing to minimal interactions between the atmosphere and land surface. Inter-annual variations of CO2 drawdown over cornfields in the Mid-West were found to be larger than 5 ppm due to slight differences in the corn growing phase and meteorological conditions even in the same time period of a year. Furthermore, considerable differences in atmospheric CO2 profiles were found during winter and summer campaigns. In the winter CO2 was found to decrease from about 400 ppm in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to about 392 ppm above 10 km, while in the summer CO2 increased from 386 ppm in the ABL to about 396 ppm in free troposphere. These and other CO2 observations are discussed in this presentation.

  16. A role for atmospheric CO2 in preindustrial climate forcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, T.B. van; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Kürschner, W.M.; Visscher, H.

    2008-01-01

    Complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores, stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentration. CO2 trends based on leaf remains of Quercus robur (English oak) from the Netherlan

  17. Will Elevated CO2 Increase Forest Productivity? Evidence from an Australian FACE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, L.

    2015-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 may enhance forest productivity via CO2 fertilisation and increased soil moisture associated with water savings. Quantification of the response of forest productivity to rising CO2 concentrations is important, as increased forest productivity may contribute to the mitigation of anthropogenic climate change. Vegetation greenness indices derived from digital photographs have been correlated with a number of measures of ecosystem productivity including total biomass, leaf area index and gross primary productivity. Our study examines the effect of elevated CO2 on patterns in overstorey and understorey vegetation greenness at a Free Air CO2 Enrichment facility (EucFACE) situated within a temperate eucalypt forest in Sydney, Australia. EucFACE consists of six treatment areas, three subjected to ambient CO2 ('ambient') and three with ambient plus 150 ppm CO2 ('elevated'). Each treatment area had one camera monitoring canopy greenness for a 12 month period and four cameras monitoring one understorey vegetation plot (2.25 m2) each for a 15 month period. Vegetation greenness was measured daily using the green chromatic coordinate (GCC). Understorey and overstorey GCC and rates of understorey greening and browning were not affected by elevated CO2. Periodic differences in canopy greening and browning between CO2 treatments were observed, though these probably reflect an insect defoliation event in one treatment area. Increases in canopy and understorey GCC were associated with a combination of extended periods of high soil volumetric water content (VWC) (>0.1) and high maximum temperatures (>25 °C). Browning appeared to be associated with a combination of periods of high maximum temperatures and low VWC or low minimum temperatures. Our short term findings suggest that eucalypt forest productivity will be sensitive to changes in climate, but may be relatively insensitive to changes in CO2 in the near future.

  18. Atmospheric CO2 Supersaturation Observed in the Martian Polar Nights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K.; Kuroda, T.; Hayashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    The present study shows the spatio-temporal distribution of the occurrence of CO2 supersaturation in the martian atmosphere by using the Mars Global Surveyor radio occultation data. We also compare the results with numerical simulation results.

  19. Wave-Modulated CO2 Condensation in Mars' Polar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, D.; Neumann, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have identified regions where atmospheric waves would be expected to significantly modulate CO2 cloud formation in Mars' polar winters. We have correlated this with MOLA cloud identifications but, surprisingly, only poor correlations were found.

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to de...

  1. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kiwamu eMinamisawa; Takashi eOkubo; Dongyan eLiu; Hirohito eTsurumaru; Seishi eIkeda; Susumu eAsakawa; Takeshi eTokida; Kanako eTago; Masahito eHayatsu; Naohiro eAoki; Ken eIshimaru; Kazuhiro eUjiie; Yasuhiro eUsui; Hirofumi eNakamura; Hidemitsu eSakai

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol⋅mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari (chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines) to determine...

  2. Mesoscale modelling of atmospheric CO2 across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansø, Anne Sofie

    2016-01-01

    It is scientifically well-established that the increase of atmospheric CO2 affects the entire globe and will lead to higher surface temperatures. Although anthropogenic CO2is emitted straight into the atmosphere, it does not all contribute to the existing atmospheric CO2 reservoir. Approximately 29...... the processes controlling the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. This PhD dissertation attempts to increase our understanding of the importance of accounting for high spatiotemporal variability in estimates of CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface. For this purpose, a mesoscale...... modelling system is constructed, centred around Denmark, based on an atmospheric transport model. In this study, the main areas of focus have been on improving the spatial surface representation, for both land and sea, and investigating the influence of the temporal resolution on the air–sea CO2 exchange...

  3. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  4. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  5. Elevated CO2 significantly delays reproductive development of soybean under Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Joseph C; Dohleman, Frank G; Bernacchi, Carl J; Long, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    The effect of rising atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide [CO(2)] on the reproductive development of soybean (Glycine max. Merr) has not been evaluated under open-air field conditions. Soybeans grown under Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) exhibit warmer canopies due to decreased latent heat loss because of decreased stomatal conductance. According to development models based on accumulated thermal time, or growing degree days ( degrees Cd), increased canopy temperature should accelerate development. The SoyFACE research facility (Champaign, Illinois, USA) was used to test the hypothesis that development is accelerated in soybean when grown in [CO(2)] elevated to 548 micromol mol(-1). Canopy temperature was measured continuously with infrared thermometry, and used in turn to calculate GDD. Opposite to expectation, elevated [CO(2)], while increasing canopy temperature, delayed reproductive development by up to 3 days (P <0.05). Soybean grown in elevated [CO(2)] required approximately 49 degrees Cd more GDD (P <0.05) to complete full bloom stage (R2) and approximately 52 degrees Cd more GDD (P <0.05) to complete the beginning seed (R5) stage, but needed approximately 46 degrees Cd fewer GDD (P <0.05) to complete seed filling (R6). Soybeans grown in elevated [CO(2)] produced significantly more nodes (P <0.01) on the main stem than those grown under current [CO(2)]. This may explain the delay in completion of reproductive development and final maturation of the crop under elevated [CO(2)]. These results show a direct effect of rising [CO(2)] on plant development that will affect both projections of grain supply and may be significant to other species including those in natural communities. PMID:19561049

  6. A 40-million-year history of atmospheric CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi Ge; Pagani, Mark; Liu, Zhonghui; Bohaty, Steven M; Deconto, Robert

    2013-10-28

    The alkenone-pCO2 methodology has been used to reconstruct the partial pressure of ancient atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) for the past 45 million years of Earth's history (Middle Eocene to Pleistocene epochs). The present long-term CO2 record is a composite of data from multiple ocean localities that express a wide range of oceanographic and algal growth conditions that potentially bias CO2 results. In this study, we present a pCO2 record spanning the past 40 million years from a single marine locality, Ocean Drilling Program Site 925 located in the western equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The trends and absolute values of our new CO2 record site are broadly consistent with previously published multi-site alkenone-CO2 results. However, new pCO2 estimates for the Middle Miocene are notably higher than published records, with average pCO2 concentrations in the range of 400-500 ppm. Our results are generally consistent with recent pCO2 estimates based on boron isotope-pH data and stomatal index records, and suggest that CO2 levels were highest during a period of global warmth associated with the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (17-14 million years ago, Ma), followed by a decline in CO2 during the Middle Miocene Climate Transition (approx. 14 Ma). Several relationships remain contrary to expectations. For example, benthic foraminiferal δ(18)O records suggest a period of deglaciation and/or high-latitude warming during the latest Oligocene (27-23 Ma) that, based on our results, occurred concurrently with a long-term decrease in CO2 levels. Additionally, a large positive δ(18)O excursion near the Oligocene-Miocene boundary (the Mi-1 event, approx. 23 Ma), assumed to represent a period of glacial advance and retreat on Antarctica, is difficult to explain by our CO2 record alone given what is known of Antarctic ice sheet history and the strong hysteresis of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet once it has grown to continental dimensions. We also demonstrate that in the

  7. Stability of CO_2 Atmospheres on Desiccated M Dwarf Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Peter; Hu, Renyu; Robinson, Tyler D.; Li, Cheng; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the chemical stability of CO2-dominated atmospheres of desiccated M dwarf terrestrial exoplanets using a 1-dimensional photochemical model. Around Sun-like stars, CO2 photolysis by Far-UV (FUV) radiation is balanced by recombination reactions that depend on water abundance. Planets orbiting M dwarf stars experience more FUV radiation, and could be depleted in water due to M dwarfs' prolonged, high-luminosity pre-main sequences (Luger & Barnes 2015). We show that, for water-depl...

  8. Halloysite Nanotubes Capturing Isotope Selective Atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Subhra Jana; Sankar Das; Chiranjit Ghosh; Abhijit Maity; Manik Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2, a nanocomposite has been developed through selective modification of the outer surface of the halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with an organosilane to make the nanocomposite a novel solid-phase adsorbent to adsorb CO2 from the atmosphere at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The preferential adsorption of three major abundant isotopes of CO2 (12C16O2, 13C16O2, and 12C16O18O) from the ambient air by amine functionalized HNTs ...

  9. Rapid removal of atmospheric CO2 by urban soils

    OpenAIRE

    Washbourne, Carla-Leanne; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Renforth, Phil; Ascough, Philippa L.; Manning, David A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The measured calcium carbonate content of soils to a depth of 100 mm at a large urban development site has increased over 18 months at a rate that corresponds to the sequestration of 85 t of CO2/ha (8.5 kg of CO2 m–2) annually. This is a consequence of rapid weathering of calcium silicate and hydroxide minerals derived from the demolition of concrete structures, which releases Ca that combines with CO2 ultimately derived from the atmosphere, precipitating as calcite. Stable isotope data confi...

  10. Atmospheric CO2: principal control knob governing Earth's temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacis, Andrew A; Schmidt, Gavin A; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A

    2010-10-15

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. This is because CO(2), like ozone, N(2)O, CH(4), and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO(2) and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state. PMID:20947761

  11. Atmospheric Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Norris, M. W.; Wiltshire, R.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) make up roughly one third of all fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. Currently, these emissions are determined from self-reported inventory data, and sometimes from smokestack emissions monitoring, and the uncertainty in emissions from individual power plants is about 20%. We examine the utility of atmospheric 14C measurements combined with atmospheric transport modelling as a tool for independently quantifying point source CO2ff emissions, to both improve the accuracy of the reported emissions and for verification as we move towards a regulatory environment. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Facility as a test case. It is located in rural New Zealand with no other significant fossil fuel CO2 sources nearby, and emits CO2ff at ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We use several different sampling methods to determine the 14C and hence the CO2ff content downwind of the emission source: grab flask samples of whole air; absorption of CO2 into sodium hydroxide integrated over many hours; and plant material which faithfully records the 14C content of assimilated CO2. We use a plume dispersion model to compare the reported emissions with our observed CO2ff mole fractions. We show that the short-term variability in plume dispersion makes it difficult to interpret the grab flask sample results, whereas the variability is averaged out in the integrated samples and we obtain excellent agreement between the reported and observed emissions, indicating that the 14C method can reliably be used to evaluated point source emissions.

  12. A role for atmospheric CO2 in preindustrial climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Thomas B; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Kürschner, Wolfram M; Visscher, Henk

    2008-10-14

    Complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores, stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of preindustrial atmospheric CO(2) concentration. CO(2) trends based on leaf remains of Quercus robur (English oak) from the Netherlands support the presence of significant CO(2) variability during the first half of the last millennium. The amplitude of the reconstructed multidecadal fluctuations, up to 34 parts per million by volume, considerably exceeds maximum shifts measured in Antarctic ice. Inferred changes in CO(2) radiative forcing are of a magnitude similar to variations ascribed to other mechanisms, particularly solar irradiance and volcanic activity, and may therefore call into question the concept of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which assumes an insignificant role of CO(2) as a preindustrial climate-forcing factor. The stomata-based CO(2) trends correlate with coeval sea-surface temperature trends in the North Atlantic Ocean, suggesting the possibility of an oceanic source/sink mechanism for the recorded CO(2) changes.

  13. Latitudinal variation in oxygen-18 of atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francey, Roger J.; Tans, Pieter P.

    1987-06-01

    A potentially important new atmospheric tracer of large-scale behavior at the earth's surface, the oxygen isotope composition of CO2, is reported. Measurements on flask air collected from Alaska, Hawaii, Samoa, Tasmania, coastal Antarctica, and the South Pole are compared with recent measurements of delta O-18 in CO2 extracted in situ from marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania. This comparison provides a measure of precision and demonstrates a marked improvement over previous measurements. While previous data suggested a north-south gradient, the flask data establish a strong, asymmetric meridional gradient. It is argued that this reflects the oxygen isotope ratio in ground water, via mechanisms involving gross catalyzed CO2 exchange with leaf (and possibly soil) water. Very large CO2 fluxes are involved, of the order of 200 Gt carbon/yr.

  14. The extraction of CO2 from the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having indicated some methods which are considered as ridiculous, hazardous or ethically questionable, the author first presents of method of extraction of CO2 from the atmosphere developed by a research team of the University of Calgary and applied by the Carbon Engineering Company. According to this concept, ambient air is circulated through an air-contactor in which air leaves its CO2 to a potassium hydroxide flow which transforms into potassium carbonate. This hydroxide is then re-generated by exchange with calcium hydroxide. The thus formed calcium carbonate is finally thermally decomposed to release CO2. He also presents the BECCS (Bio-energy with carbon capture and storage) which has been put forward by the IPCC, evokes the cost of the extracted ton of CO2 and the arguments of the opponents to this method

  15. Rapid Removal of Atmospheric CO2 by Urban Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, Carla-Leanne; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Renforth, Phil; Ascough, Philippa L; Manning, David A C

    2015-05-01

    The measured calcium carbonate content of soils to a depth of 100 mm at a large urban development site has increased over 18 months at a rate that corresponds to the sequestration of 85 t of CO2/ha (8.5 kg of CO2 m(-2)) annually. This is a consequence of rapid weathering of calcium silicate and hydroxide minerals derived from the demolition of concrete structures, which releases Ca that combines with CO2 ultimately derived from the atmosphere, precipitating as calcite. Stable isotope data confirm an atmospheric origin for carbonate carbon, and 14C dating indicates the predominance of modern carbon in the pedogenic calcite. Trial pits show that carbonation extends to depths of ≥1 m. Work at other sites shows that the occurrence of pedogenic carbonates is widespread in artificially created urban soils containing Ca and Mg silicate minerals. Appropriate management of fewer than 12000 ha of urban land to maximize calcite precipitation has the potential to remove 1 million t of CO2 from the atmosphere annually. The maximal global potential is estimated to be approximately 700-1200 Mt of CO2 per year (representing 2.0-3.7% of total emissions from fossil fuel combustion) based on current rates of production of industry-derived Ca- and Mg-bearing materials. PMID:25837769

  16. Upconversion-based lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Fix, Andreas; Wirth, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm, and dete......For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm......, and detected by a photomultiplier tube, to test how the upconversion technology performs in a long range detection system. The upconversion approach is compared to an existing direct detection scheme using a near-IR detector with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and quantum efficiency. It is for the first time...

  17. ROOT-GROWTH AND FUNCTIONING UNDER ATMOSPHERIC CO2 ENRICHMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STULEN, [No Value; DENHERTOG, J

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which atmospheric CO2 enrichment may influence growth of plant roots and function in terms of uptake of water and nutrients, and carbon allocation towards symbionts. It is concluded that changes in dry matter allocation greatly depend on the experimental conditions

  18. Climate change and CO2 removal from the atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed in recent years to counteract climate change and ocean acidification by removing CO2 from the atmosphere (Carbon Dioxide Removal). The most versatile and widely applicable of these methods is enhanced weathering of olivine, which is capable of removing billions of

  19. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO2-rich atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on a range of atmospheric and external parameters. We show that CO2 can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the mi...

  20. Algal constraints on the Cenozoic history of atmospheric CO2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. M. Rickaby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An urgent question for future climate, in light of increased burning of fossil fuels, is the temperature sensitivity of the climate system to atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2. To date, no direct proxy for past levels of pCO2 exists beyond the reach of the polar ice core records. We propose a new methodology for placing an upper constraint on pCO2 over the Cenozoic based on the living geological record. Specifically, our premise is that the contrasting calcification tolerance of various extant species of coccolithophore to raised pCO2 reflects an "evolutionary memory" of past atmospheric composition. The different times of first emergence of each morphospecies allows an upper constraint of past pCO2 to be placed on Cenozoic timeslices. Further, our hypothesis has implications for the response of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification. Geologically "ancient" species, which have survived large changes in ocean chemistry, are likely more resilient to predicted acidification.

  1. Detection of CO2 leaks from carbon capture and storage sites with combined atmospheric CO2 and O-2 measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Charlotte; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a transportable instrument that simultaneously measures the CO2 and (relative) O-2 concentration of the atmosphere with the purpose to aid in the detection of CO2 leaks from CCS sites. CO2 and O-2 are coupled in most processes on earth (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration and fossi

  2. Effects of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment on Soil CO2 Efflux in a Young Longleaf Pine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brett Runion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The southeastern landscape is composed of agricultural and forest systems that can store carbon (C in standing biomass and soil. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 on terrestrial C dynamics including CO2 release back to the atmosphere and soil sequestration. Longleaf pine savannahs are an ecologically and economically important, yet understudied, component of the southeastern landscape. We investigated the effects of ambient and elevated CO2 on soil CO2 efflux in a young longleaf pine system using a continuous monitoring system. A significant increase (26.5% in soil CO2 efflux across 90 days was observed under elevated CO2; this occurred for all weekly and daily averages except for two days when soil temperature was the lowest. Soil CO2 efflux was positively correlated with soil temperature with a trend towards increased efflux response to temperature under elevated CO2. Efflux was negatively correlated with soil moisture and was best represented using a quadratic relationship. Soil CO2 efflux was not correlated with root biomass. Our data indicate that, while elevated CO2 will increase feedback of CO2 to the atmosphere via soil efflux, terrestrial ecosystems will remain potential sinks for atmospheric CO2 due to greater biomass production and increased soil C sequestration.

  3. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivumyeast extract then for those growing on glucose, i.e. the effect of elevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. This indicates the increased activity of microorganisms, which leads to accelerated C turnover in soil under elevated CO2. Our results clearly showed that the functional characteristics of the soil microbial community (i.e. specific growth rates and enzymes activity) rather than total microbial biomass

  4. Climate Sensitivity, Sea Level, and Atmospheric CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, James; Russell, Gary; Kharecha, Pushker

    2012-01-01

    Cenozoic temperature, sea level and CO2 co-variations provide insights into climate sensitivity to external forcings and sea level sensitivity to climate change. Pleistocene climate oscillations imply a fast-feedback climate sensitivity 3 {\\pm} 1 {\\deg}C for 4 W/m2 CO2 forcing for the average of climate states between the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the error estimate being large and partly subjective because of continuing uncertainty about LGM global surface climate. Slow feedbacks, especially change of ice sheet size and atmospheric CO2, amplify total Earth system sensitivity. Ice sheet response time is poorly defined, but we suggest that hysteresis and slow response in current ice sheet models are exaggerated. We use a global model, simplified to essential processes, to investigate state-dependence of climate sensitivity, finding a strong increase in sensitivity when global temperature reaches early Cenozoic and higher levels, as increased water vapor eliminates the tropopause. It follows that...

  5. Changes in Belowground Carbon Cycling After 10 Years at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. B.; Cook, C. W.; Pippen, J. S.

    2006-05-01

    Carbon dioxide concentrations are increasing rapidly in the earth's atmosphere and have risen by a third since the start of the industrial revolution. Beginning in 1996, the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment has exposed a loblolly pine forest to an additional 200 parts per million CO2 (high CO2 treatment) compared to trees at ambient CO2. Root biomass has increased significantly at high CO2, as have soil respiration and the concentration of CO2 in the soil at different depths. Peak changes for root biomas, soil respiration, and many other variables occur in mid summer, with responses diminishing or disappearing in winter. This presentation will review the changes over the first decade of the experiment, emphasizing results from the most recent three years.

  6. Atmospheric verification of anthropogenic CO2 emission trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francey, Roger J.; Trudinger, Cathy M.; van der Schoot, Marcel; Law, Rachel M.; Krummel, Paul B.; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Paul Steele, L.; Allison, Colin E.; Stavert, Ann R.; Andres, Robert J.; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2013-05-01

    International efforts to limit global warming and ocean acidification aim to slow the growth of atmospheric CO2, guided primarily by national and industry estimates of production and consumption of fossil fuels. Atmospheric verification of emissions is vital but present global inversion methods are inadequate for this purpose. We demonstrate a clear response in atmospheric CO2 coinciding with a sharp 2010 increase in Asian emissions but show persisting slowing mean CO2 growth from 2002/03. Growth and inter-hemispheric concentration difference during the onset and recovery of the Global Financial Crisis support a previous speculation that the reported 2000-2008 emissions surge is an artefact, most simply explained by a cumulative underestimation (~ 9PgC) of 1994-2007 emissions; in this case, post-2000 emissions would track mid-range of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emission scenarios. An alternative explanation requires changes in the northern terrestrial land sink that offset anthropogenic emission changes. We suggest atmospheric methods to help resolve this ambiguity.

  7. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO2-rich atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on atmospheric composition (CO2 and N2 levels), planetary mass, and external parameters (stellar spectrum, orbital distance and impacts). From coupled 1D climate and escape modeling, we show that CO2 can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the middle and upper atmosphere acting as a bottleneck on escape in other circumstances. Around G-stars, efficient loss only occurs on planets with intermediate CO2 atmospheric partial pressures (0.1 to 1 bar) that receive a net flux close to the critical runaway greenhouse limit. Because G-star total luminosity increases with time but XUV/UV luminosity decreases, this places strong limits on moist...

  8. Biomass burial and storage to reduce atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, N.

    2012-04-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a theoretical carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC/y, but probably 1-3 GtC/y can be realized in practice. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other environmental concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from forest industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be 14/tCO2 (50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The low cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is possible because the technique uses the natural process of photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe, and can be stopped at any time, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  9. Energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for ''stabilization of greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system...''. A standard baseline scenario that assumes no policy intervention to limit greenhouse-gas emissions has 10 TW (10 x 1012 watts) of carbon-emission-free power being produced by the year 2050, equivalent to the power provided by all today's energy sources combined. Here we employ a carbon-cycle/energy model to estimate the carbon-emission-free power needed for various atmospheric CO2 stabilization scenarios. We find that CO2 stabilization with continued economic growth will require innovative, cost-effective and carbon-emission-free technologies that can provide additional tens of terawatts of primary power in the coming decades, and certainly by the middle of the twenty-first century, even with sustained improvement in the economic productivity of primary energy. (author)

  10. Atmospheric CO2 and climate: Importance of the transient response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary studies suggest that the thermal inertia of the upper layers of the oceans, combined with vertical mixing of deeper oceanic waters, could delay the response of the globally averaged surface temperature to an increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration by a decade or so relative to equilibrium calculations. This study extends the global analysis of the transient response to zonal averages, using a hierarchy of simple energy balance models and vertical mixing assumptions for water exchange between upper and deeper oceanic layers. It is found that because of the latitudinal dependence of both thermal inertia and radiative and dynamic energy exchange mechanisms, the approach toward equilibrium of the surface temperature of various regions of the earth will be significantly different from the global average approach. This suggests that the actual time evolution of the horizontal surface temperature gradients--and any associated regional climatic anomalies-may well be significantly different from that suggested by equilibrium climatic modeling simulations (or those computed with a highly unrealistic geographic distribution of ocean thermal capacity). Also, the transient response as a function of latitude is significantly different between globally equivalent CO2 and solar constant focusing runs. It is suggested that the nature of the transient response is a major uncertainty in characterizing the CO2 problem and that study of this topic should become a major priority for future research. An appendix puts this issue in the context of the overall CO2 problem

  11. Overlapping effect of atmospheric H2O, CO2 and 03 on the CO2 radiative effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ryan, P. Barry

    2011-01-01

    The effect of overlapping of atmospheric HThe effect of overlapping of atmospheric H2O, CO2 and 03 absorption bands on the radiation budget perturbation caused by CO2 doubling is investigated. Since the effect depends on the amount of gases in the atmosphere as well as on the strength of the absorption bands, we examine the effect associated with the variation of gas abundance using a narrow band representation for the absorption bands. This band representation allows for the absorption band ...

  12. Changes in calcification of coccoliths under stable atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, C.; Meier, K. J. S.; Kinkel, H.;

    2014-01-01

    The response of coccolithophore calcification to ocean acidification has been studied in culture experiments as well as in present and past oceans. The response, however, is different between species and strains, and for the relatively small carbonate chemistry changes observed in natural...... North Atlantic Ocean. The pre-industrial Holocene, with its predominantly stable atmospheric CO2, provides the conditions for such a comprehensive analysis. For an analysis on changes in major components of Holocene coccolithophores under natural conditions, the family Noelaerhabdaceae was selected...

  13. Deep Sea Memory of High Atmospheric CO2 Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesius, Sabine; Hofmann, Matthias; Caldeira, Ken; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed as a powerful measure to mitigate global warming and ocean acidification. Planetary-scale interventions of that kind are often portrayed as "last-resort strategies", which need to weigh in if humankind keeps on enhancing the climate-system stock of CO2. Yet even if CDR could restore atmospheric CO2 to substantially lower concentrations, would it really qualify to undo the critical impacts of past emissions? In the study presented here, we employed an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) to investigate how CDR might erase the emissions legacy in the marine environment, focusing on pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen. Against a background of a world following the RCP8.5 emissions path ("business-as-usual") for centuries, we simulated the effects of two massive CDR interventions with CO2 extraction rates of 5 GtC yr-1 and 25 GtC yr-1, respectively, starting in 2250. We found that the 5 GtC yr-1 scheme would have only minor ameliorative influence on the oceans, even after several centuries of application. By way of contrast, the extreme 25 GtC yr-1 scheme eventually leads to tangible improvements. However, even with such an aggressive measure, past CO2 emissions leave a substantial legacy in the marine environment within the simulated period (i.e., until 2700). In summary, our study demonstrates that anthropogenic alterations of the oceans, caused by continued business-as-usual emissions, may not be reversed on a multi-centennial time scale by the most aspirational geoengineering measures. We also found that a transition from the RCP8.5 state to the state of a strong mitigation scenario (RCP2.6) is not possible, even under the assumption of extreme extraction rates (25 GtC yr-1). This is explicitly demonstrated by simulating additional scenarios, starting CDR already in 2150 and operating until the atmospheric CO2 concentration reaches 280 ppm and 180 ppm, respectively. The simulated

  14. Short-term carbon cycling responses of a mature eucalypt woodland to gradual stepwise enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, John E; Macdonald, Catriona A; Tjoelker, Mark G; Crous, Kristine Y; Gimeno, Teresa E; Singh, Brajesh K; Reich, Peter B; Anderson, Ian C; Ellsworth, David S

    2016-01-01

    Projections of future climate are highly sensitive to uncertainties regarding carbon (C) uptake and storage by terrestrial ecosystems. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment was established to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2 ) on a native mature eucalypt woodland with low fertility soils in southeast Australia. In contrast to other FACE experiments, the concentration of CO2 at EucFACE was increased gradually in steps above ambient (+0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 ppm CO2 above ambient of ~400 ppm), with each step lasting approximately 5 weeks. This provided a unique opportunity to study the short-term (weeks to months) response of C cycle flux components to eCO2 across a range of CO2 concentrations in an intact ecosystem. Soil CO2 efflux (i.e., soil respiration or Rsoil ) increased in response to initial enrichment (e.g., +30 and +60 ppm CO2 ) but did not continue to increase as the CO2 enrichment was stepped up to higher concentrations. Light-saturated photosynthesis of canopy leaves (Asat ) also showed similar stimulation by elevated CO2 at +60 ppm as at +150 ppm CO2 . The lack of significant effects of eCO2 on soil moisture, microbial biomass, or activity suggests that the increase in Rsoil likely reflected increased root and rhizosphere respiration rather than increased microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. This rapid increase in Rsoil suggests that under eCO2, additional photosynthate was produced, transported belowground, and respired. The consequences of this increased belowground activity and whether it is sustained through time in mature ecosystems under eCO2 are a priority for future research. PMID:26426394

  15. Effects of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment on Soil CO2 Efflux in a Young Longleaf Pine System

    OpenAIRE

    G. Brett Runion; J. R. Butnor; Prior, S. A.; Mitchell, R. J.; Rogers, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The southeastern landscape is composed of agricultural and forest systems that can store carbon (C) in standing biomass and soil. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on terrestrial C dynamics including CO2 release back to the atmosphere and soil sequestration. Longleaf pine savannahs are an ecologically and economically important, yet understudied, component of the southeastern landscape. We investigated the effects of ambient and elevated C...

  16. Recent widespread tree growth decline despite increasing atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C R Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The synergetic effects of recent rising atmospheric CO(2 and temperature are expected to favor tree growth in boreal and temperate forests. However, recent dendrochronological studies have shown site-specific unprecedented growth enhancements or declines. The question of whether either of these trends is caused by changes in the atmosphere remains unanswered because dendrochronology alone has not been able to clarify the physiological basis of such trends. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we combined standard dendrochronological methods with carbon isotopic analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced water use efficiency (WUE and growth of two deciduous and two coniferous tree species along a 9 degrees latitudinal gradient across temperate and boreal forests in Ontario, Canada. Our results show that although trees have had around 53% increases in WUE over the past century, growth decline (measured as a decrease in basal area increment--BAI has been the prevalent response in recent decades irrespective of species identity and latitude. Since the 1950s, tree BAI was predominantly negatively correlated with warmer climates and/or positively correlated with precipitation, suggesting warming induced water stress. However, where growth declines were not explained by climate, WUE and BAI were linearly and positively correlated, showing that declines are not always attributable to warming induced stress and additional stressors may exist. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show an unexpected widespread tree growth decline in temperate and boreal forests due to warming induced stress but are also suggestive of additional stressors. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels during the past century resulted in consistent increases in water use efficiency, but this did not prevent growth decline. These findings challenge current predictions of increasing terrestrial carbon stocks under climate change scenarios.

  17. Leaf conductance decreased under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) for three perennials in the Nevada desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Robert S.; Defalco, Lesley A.; Wilcox, Carolyn S.; Jordan, Dean N.; Coleman, James S.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2001-01-01

    A common response of plants to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (CO2) is decreased leaf conductance. Consequently, leaf temperature is predicted to increase under elevated CO2.Diurnal patterns of leaf conductance and temperature were measured for three desert perennials, the C3 shrub Larrea tridentata, C3 tussock grass Achnatherum hymenoides and C4tussock grass Pleuraphis rigida, at the Nevada Desert FACE facility. Measurements were made on ambient and c. 550 µmol mol−1 CO2 plots through both a wet and dry year.Reductions in conductance were 35%, 20% and 13% for Pleuraphis, Achnatherum and Larrea, respectively. Decreased conductance occurred throughout the day only for Pleuraphis. Both C3species had smaller CO2 effects during dry periods than wet. Leaf temperature did not differ significantly between elevated and ambient CO2 for any species. Comparisons of blower-control and nonring plots indicated that the FACE apparatus did not confound our results.All three species exhibited decreased leaf conductance under elevated CO2, although reductions were not uniform during the day or among years. Nonetheless, leaf energy balance was only minimally changed for these microphyllous desert perennials.

  18. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Affects Ectomycorrhizal Species Abundance and Increases Sporocarp Production under Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Godbold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities during the last century have increased levels of atmospheric CO2. Forest net primary productivity increases in response to elevated CO2, altering the quantity and quality of carbon supplied to the rhizosphere. Ectomycorrhizal fungi form obligate symbiotic associations with the fine roots of trees that mediate improved scavenging for nutrients in exchange for a carbohydrate supply. Understanding how the community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi is altered by climate change is important to further our understanding of ecosystem function. Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica were grown in an elevated CO2 atmosphere delivered using free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE under field conditions in the U.K., and Picea abies was grown under elevated CO2 in glass domes in the Czech Republic. We used morphotyping and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the fungal ribosomal operon to study ectomycorrhizal community structure. Under FACE, un-colonised roots tips increased in abundance for Fagus sylvatica, and during 2006, sporocarp biomass of Peziza badia significantly increased. In domes, ectomycorrhizal community composition shifted from short-distance and smooth medium-distance to contact exploration types. Supply and competition for carbon belowground can influence ectomycorrhizal community structure with the potential to alter ecosystem function.

  19. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and O3 on Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera: Reproductive Fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N. T. Darbah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3 are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO3 and O3 for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO2 increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O3 increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little flowering has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO2 had significant positive effect on birch catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO2 increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO2 concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination, while the opposite was true of elevated O3 (elevated O3 decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%. Under elevated CO2, plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO2, while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O3. Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 and O3 can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.

  20. Development and consequences of atmospheric CO2 pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences of the use of fossil fuels and a number of trace gases have changed the composition of the atmosphere and, in this way, the radiation balance within the atmosphere. The influence on the climate of the rising atmospheric content of carbon dioxide (CO2) has become an important problem, which constitutes the background to energy policy. This problem has become more and more topical and multi-faceted over the past decade. Extreme climatic anomalies occur in various regions of the earth, which had not previously been experienced in this intensity in our century. Even more extreme weather and climatic events must be expected to occur in the future. From the most recent data climatologists conclude that the development will be different than had initially been assumed. For instance, the role of water vapor seems to have been underestimated. A change in climate, starting from the tropics, seems to be under way. The modeling results, which must be used as a starting point for specific predictions in any field, are still highly contradictory and do not at present permit a forecast to be made for a region such as Central Europe. It can only be said with some reliability that the process of warming up will continue, perhaps even at an increasing pace. (orig.)

  1. Stimulation of r- vs. K- selected microorganisms by elevated atmospheric CO2 depends on soil aggregate size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnikov, M.; Blagodatskaya, E.; Blagodatsky, S.; Fangmeier, A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Increased root exudation under elevated atmospheric CO2 and the contrasting environments in soil macro- and microaggregates could affect microbial growth strategy. We investigated the effect of elevated CO2 on the contribution of fast- (r-strategists) and slow-growing microorganisms (K-strategists) in soil macro- and microaggregates. We fractionated the bulk soil from the ambient and elevated (for 5 years) CO2 treatments of FACE-Hohenheim (Stuttgart) into large macro- (>2 mm), small macro- (0.25-2.00 mm), and microaggregates (<0.25 mm) using an "optimal moist" sieving. Microbial biomass (Cmic), the maximal specific growth rate (μ), growing microbial biomass (GMB) and lag-period (tlag) were estimated by the kinetics of CO2 emission from bulk soil and aggregates amended with glucose and nutrients. Although Corg and Cmic were unaffected by elevated CO2, μ values were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2 for bulk soil, small macroaggregates, and microaggregates. The substrate induced respiratory response increased with the decreasing of aggregates size under both CO2 treatments. Based on changes in μ, GMB, and lag-period, we conclude that elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulated the r-selected microorganisms, especially in soil microaggregates. Such an increase in r-selected microorganisms could increase C turnover in terrestrial ecosystems in a future elevated atmospheric CO2 environment.

  2. The impact of free-air CO_2 enrichment (FACE) and N supply on growth, yield and quality of rice crops with large panicle

    OpenAIRE

    Wang,Yulong / Yang,Lianxin / Huang,Jianye / Dong,Guichun

    2007-01-01

    Because CO_2 is needed for plant photosynthesis, the increase in atmospheric [CO_2] has the potential to enhance the growth and development of plant. However, the resultant effects on growth, yield and quality of field-grown rice remain unclear, especially under differing nitrogen (N) availability and/or using cultivars with large panicles. To investigate these, a Free-Air CO_2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment was performed at Wuxi, Jiangsu, China, in 2001-03. A japonica cultivar with large panic...

  3. Characterization of YBCO superconductor sintered in CO2-containing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of the YBCO superconductor toward reacting with CO2 in CO2/O2 gas mixtures during sintering was investigated as a function of the partial pressure of CO2 and temperature. Transport critical current density of the superconductor decreased drastically with increasing concentration of CO2 in the gas mixture. The microstructure and composition of the samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

  4. Soil carbon accumulation in a Populus spp. plantation supplied with high atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lagomarsino A; De Angelis P; Moscatelli MC; Grego S; Scarascia Mugnozza G

    2009-01-01

    This work was carried out in the experimental area POPFACE (Tuscania, Viterbo), where a poplar short rotation forest (SRF) was treated with 550 ppm of atmospheric CO2 for six years. The experimental plots (Control and FACE) were divided in two halves, one of which was treated with nitrogen fertilization. The general aim of this research was to quantify the impact of the two rotation cycles, the CO2 enrichment and the nitrogen fertilization on: i) soil organic matter fractions more relevant fo...

  5. The growth of soybean under free air [CO(2)] enrichment (FACE) stimulates photosynthesis while decreasing in vivo Rubisco capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, Carl J; Morgan, Patrick B; Ort, Donald R; Long, Stephen P

    2005-01-01

    Down-regulation of light-saturated photosynthesis (A(sat)) at elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration, [CO(2)], has been demonstrated for many C(3) species and is often associated with inability to utilize additional photosynthate and/or nitrogen limitation. In soybean, a nitrogen-fixing species, both limitations are less likely than in crops lacking an N-fixing symbiont. Prior studies have used controlled environment or field enclosures where the artificial environment can modify responses to [CO(2)]. A soybean free air [CO(2)] enrichment (FACE) facility has provided the first opportunity to analyze the effects of elevated [CO(2)] on photosynthesis under fully open-air conditions. Potential ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylation (V(c,max)) and electron transport through photosystem II (J(max)) were determined from the responses of A(sat) to intercellular [CO(2)] (C(i)) throughout two growing seasons. Mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)) was determined from the responses of A(sat) and whole chain electron transport (J) to light. Elevated [CO(2)] increased A(sat) by 15-20% even though there was a small, statistically significant, decrease in V(c,max). This differs from previous studies in that V(c,max)/J(max) decreased, inferring a shift in resource investment away from Rubisco. This raised the C(i) at which the transition from Rubisco-limited to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration-limited photosynthesis occurred. The decrease in V(c,max) was not the result of a change in g(m), which was unchanged by elevated [CO(2)]. This first analysis of limitations to soybean photosynthesis under fully open-air conditions reveals important differences to prior studies that have used enclosures to elevate [CO(2)], most significantly a smaller response of A(sat) and an apparent shift in resources away from Rubisco relative to capacity for electron transport. PMID:15252734

  6. Atmospheric Variability of CO2 impact on space observation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, A. L.; Sen, B.; Newhart, L.; Segal, G.

    2009-12-01

    If International governments are to reduce GHG levels by 80% by 2050, as recommended by most scientific bodies concerned with avoiding the most hazardous changes in climate, then massive investments in infrastructure and new technology will be required over the coming decades. Such an investment will be a huge commitment by governments and corporations, and while it will offer long-term dividends in lower energy costs, a healthier environment and averted additional global warming, the shear magnitude of upfront costs will drive a call for a monitoring and verification system. Such a system will be required to offer accountability to signatories of governing bodies, as well as, for the global public. Measuring the average global distribution of CO2 is straight forward, as exemplified by the long running station measurements managed by NOAA’s Global Monitoring Division that includes the longterm Keeling record. However, quantifying anthropogenic and natural source/sink distributions and atmospheric mixing have been much more difficult to constrain. And, yet, an accurate accounting of all anthropogenic source strengths is required for Global Treaty verification. The only way to accurately assess Global GHG emissions is to construct an integrated system of ground, air and space based observations with extensive chemical modeling capabilities. We look at the measurement requirements for the space based component of the solutions. To determine what space sensor performance requirements for ground resolution, coverage, and revisit, we have analyzed regional CO2 distributions and variability using NASA and NOAA aircraft flight campaigns. The results of our analysis are presented as variograms showing average spatial variability over several Northern Hemispheric regions. There are distinct regional differences with the starkest contrast between urban versus rural and Coastal Asia versus Coastal US. The results suggest specific consequences on what spatial and temporal

  7. Analysis of atmospheric CO2 growth rates at Mauna Loa using CO2 fluxes derived from an inverse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) growth rates are estimated for a period 1959-2004 from atmospheric CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Only during a few short periods, 1965-1966, 1972-1973, 1987-1988 and 1997-1998, in the last 45 yr have growth rates of atmospheric CO2 been of a similar magnitude or higher than that due to the total emission from burning of fossil fuels. Using results from a time-dependent inverse (TDI) model, based on observations of atmospheric CO2 at 87 stations, we establish that El Nino-induced climate variations in the tropics and large-scale forest fires in the boreal regions are the main causes of anomalous growth rates of atmospheric CO2. The high growth rate of 2.8 ppm/yr in 2002 can be predicted fairly successfully by using the correlations between (1) the peak-to-trough amplitudes in the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index and tropical flux anomaly, and (2) anomalies in CO2 flux and area burned by fire from the boreal regions. We suggest that the large interannual changes in CO2 growth rates can mostly be explained by natural climate variability. Our analysis also shows that the decadal average growth rate, linked primarily to human activity, has fluctuated around an all-time high value of 1.5 ppm/yr over the past 20 yr. A statistical model analysis is performed to identify the regions which have the maximum influence on the observed growth rate anomaly at Mauna Loa

  8. Elevated atmospheric CO2 alters the arthropod community in a forest understory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jason; Zangerl, Arthur R.; Berenbaum, May R.; Sparks, Jed P.; Elich, Lauren; Eisenstein, Alissa; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which overall population sizes and community composition of arthropods in a naturally occurring forest understory are altered by elevated CO2. The Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) method was used to fumigate large, replicated plots in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to achieve the CO2 concentration predicted for 2050 (˜580 μl l-1). In addition, the extent to which unrestricted herbivorous arthropods were spatially delimited in their resource acquisition was determined. Stable isotope data for spiders (δ13C and δ15N) were collected in ambient and elevated CO2 plots and analyzed to determine whether their prey species moved among plots. Elevated CO2 had no effect on total arthropod numbers but had a large effect on the composition of the arthropod community. Insects collected in our samples were identified to a level that allowed for an assignment of trophic classification (generally to family). For the groups of insects sensitive to atmospheric gas composition, there was an increase in the numbers of individuals collected in primarily predaceous orders (Araneae and Hymenoptera; from 60% to more than 150%) under elevated CO2 and a decrease in the numbers in primarily herbivorous orders (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera; from -30 to -45%). Isotopic data gave no indication that the treatment plots represented a "boundary" to the movement of insects or that there were distinct and independent insect populations inside and outside the treatment plots. A simple two-ended mixing model estimates 55% of the carbon and nitrogen in spider biomass originated external to the elevated CO2 plots. In addition to changes in insect performance, decreases in herbivorous arthropods and increases in predaceous arthropods may also be factors involved in reduced herbivory under elevated CO2 in this forest.

  9. Separation of biospheric and fossil fuel fluxes of CO2 by atmospheric inversion of CO2 and 14CO2 measurements: Observation System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sourish; Bharat Miller, John; Lehman, Scott

    2016-05-01

    National annual total CO2 emissions from combustion of fossil fuels are likely known to within 5-10 % for most developed countries. However, uncertainties are inevitably larger (by unknown amounts) for emission estimates at regional and monthly scales, or for developing countries. Given recent international efforts to establish emission reduction targets, independent determination and verification of regional and national scale fossil fuel CO2 emissions are likely to become increasingly important. Here, we take advantage of the fact that precise measurements of 14C in CO2 provide a largely unbiased tracer for recently added fossil-fuel-derived CO2 in the atmosphere and present an atmospheric inversion technique to jointly assimilate observations of CO2 and 14CO2 in order to simultaneously estimate fossil fuel emissions and biospheric exchange fluxes of CO2. Using this method in a set of Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), we show that given the coverage of 14CO2 measurements available in 2010 (969 over North America, 1063 globally), we can recover the US national total fossil fuel emission to better than 1 % for the year and to within 5 % for most months. Increasing the number of 14CO2 observations to ˜ 5000 per year over North America, as recently recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) (Pacala et al., 2010), we recover monthly emissions to within 5 % for all months for the US as a whole and also for smaller, highly emissive regions over which the specified data coverage is relatively dense, such as for the New England states or the NY-NJ-PA tri-state area. This result suggests that, given continued improvement in state-of-the art transport models, a measurement program similar in scale to that recommended by the NAS can provide for independent verification of bottom-up inventories of fossil fuel CO2 at the regional and national scale. In addition, we show that the dual tracer inversion framework can detect and minimize biases in

  10. [Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) Background Levels at Shangdianzi Station in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ling-ju; Zhou, Ling-xi; Liu, Li-xin; Zhang, Gen

    2016-04-15

    The study presented time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from flask sampling at SDZ regional station in Beijing during 2007 and 2013, together with delta(13)CO2) values during 2009 and 2013. The "representative data" of CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) were selected from the complete data for further analysis. Annual CO2 concentrations increased from 385.6 x 10(-6) in 2007 to 398.1 x 10(-6) in 2013, with an average growth rate of 2.0 x 10(-6) a(-1), while the delta(13)C values decreased from -8.38% per hundred in 2009 to -8.52% per hundred in 2013, with a mean growth rate of -0.03% per hundred x a(-1). The absolute increase of CO2 from 2007 to 2008 reached the lowest level during 2007 and 2013, possibly due to relatively less carbon emissions during the 2008 Olympic Games period. The peak-to-peak amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C seasonal variations were 23. 9 x 10 -6 and 1. 03%o, respectively. The isotopic signatures of CO2 sources/sinks were also discussed in this study. The delta8 value for heating season I (Jan. 01-Mar. 14) was -21.30% per hundred, while -25.39% per hundred for heating season 11 (Nov. 15-Dec.31) , and for vegetative season (Mar. 15-Nov. 14) the delta(bio) value was estimated to be -21.28% per hundred, likely suggesting the significant impact of fossil fuel and corn straw combustions during winter heating season and biological activities during vegetative season. PMID:27548943

  11. [Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) Background Levels at Shangdianzi Station in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ling-ju; Zhou, Ling-xi; Liu, Li-xin; Zhang, Gen

    2016-04-15

    The study presented time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from flask sampling at SDZ regional station in Beijing during 2007 and 2013, together with delta(13)CO2) values during 2009 and 2013. The "representative data" of CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) were selected from the complete data for further analysis. Annual CO2 concentrations increased from 385.6 x 10(-6) in 2007 to 398.1 x 10(-6) in 2013, with an average growth rate of 2.0 x 10(-6) a(-1), while the delta(13)C values decreased from -8.38% per hundred in 2009 to -8.52% per hundred in 2013, with a mean growth rate of -0.03% per hundred x a(-1). The absolute increase of CO2 from 2007 to 2008 reached the lowest level during 2007 and 2013, possibly due to relatively less carbon emissions during the 2008 Olympic Games period. The peak-to-peak amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C seasonal variations were 23. 9 x 10 -6 and 1. 03%o, respectively. The isotopic signatures of CO2 sources/sinks were also discussed in this study. The delta8 value for heating season I (Jan. 01-Mar. 14) was -21.30% per hundred, while -25.39% per hundred for heating season 11 (Nov. 15-Dec.31) , and for vegetative season (Mar. 15-Nov. 14) the delta(bio) value was estimated to be -21.28% per hundred, likely suggesting the significant impact of fossil fuel and corn straw combustions during winter heating season and biological activities during vegetative season.

  12. Uncertainties of predictions of future atmosphere CO2 concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear carbon cycle models, tuned to reproduce the CO2 increase observed at Mauna Loa, independently of their individual assumptions, predict almost identical CO2 concentration trends for fossil energy scenarios assuming a slightly increasing production in the next few decades. The basic information for such prognoses therefore is the airborne fraction observed over the last 20 years. Uncertainties in this quantity are due to possible errors in the estimate of fossil fuel consumption and the corresponding CO2 emission, possible natural fluctuations in the baseline CO2 level, and uncertainties regarding the biospheric CO2 input and uptake as a result of deforestation and reforestation and land management. Depending on different assumptions the effective airborne fraction, defined as the ratio of CO2 increase due to fossil fuel CO2 alone to the integrated CO2 production, might be as low as 0.38 or as high as 0.72, compared to the apparent airborne fraction of 0.55. The effective airborne fraction derived from carbon cycle models, considering only the CO2 uptake by the ocean, lies in the range 0.60--0.70. A value as low as 0.40 seems therefore highly improbable. A high biospheric anthropogenic CO2 input therefore must have been accompanied by a high CO2 fertilization effect. Model considerations, however, are not in contradiction with a high biospheric input with the maximum production before 1958, which also would imply low preindustrial CO2 concentrations in the range 270--280 ppm as reported recently

  13. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  14. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-02-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  15. Trend, seasonal and diurnal variations of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing increased rapidly at a mean growth rate of 3.7%@a?1 from 1993 to 1995. After displaying a peak of (409.7±25.9) ?mol@mol?1 in 1995, it decreased slowly. Both the almost stable anthropogenic CO2 source and increasing biotic CO2 sink contribute to the drop of CO2 concentration from 1995 to 2000. The seasonal variation of CO2 concentration exhibits a clear cycle with a maximum in winter, averaging (426.8±20.6) ?mol@mol?1, and a minimum in summer, averaging (369.1±6.1) ?mol@mol?1. The seasonal variation of CO2 concentration is mainly controlled by phenology. The mean diurnal variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration for a year in Beijing is highly clear: daily maximum CO2 concentration usually occurs at night, but daily minimum CO2 concentration does in the daytime, with a mean diurnal difference more than 34.7 ?mol@mol?1. It has been revealed that the interannual variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration in winter and autumn regulated the interannual trend of atmospheric CO2, whereas the interannual variation of CO2 concentration in summer affected the general tendency of atmospheric CO2 in a less degree.

  16. Atmospheric CO2 and soil extracellular enzyme activity: A meta-analysis and CO2 gradient experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may alter carbon and nutrient cycling and microbial processes in terrestrial ecosystems. One of the primary ways that microbes interact with soil organic matter is through the production of extracellular enzymes, which break down large, complex organic molecules...

  17. 3D modelling of the early Martian Climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Kerber, Laura; Leconte, Jeremy; Marcq, Emmanuel; Haberle, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young sun and a CO2 atmosphere with pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored by using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet...

  18. Model-data synthesis for the next generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Richard J; De Kauwe, Martin G; Domingues, Tomas F; Duursma, Remko A; Ellsworth, David S; Goll, Daniel S; Lapola, David M; Luus, Kristina A; MacKenzie, A Rob; Medlyn, Belinda E; Pavlick, Ryan; Rammig, Anja; Smith, Benjamin; Thomas, Rick; Thonicke, Kirsten; Walker, Anthony P; Yang, Xiaojuan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments has successfully provided deeper understanding about how forests respond to an increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Located in aggrading stands in the temperate zone, they have provided a strong foundation for testing critical assumptions in terrestrial biosphere models that are being used to project future interactions between forest productivity and the atmosphere, despite the limited inference space of these experiments with regards to the range of global ecosystems. Now, a new generation of FACE experiments in mature forests in different biomes and over a wide range of climate space and biodiversity will significantly expand the inference space. These new experiments are: EucFACE in a mature Eucalyptus stand on highly weathered soil in subtropical Australia; AmazonFACE in a highly diverse, primary rainforest in Brazil; BIFoR-FACE in a 150-yr-old deciduous woodland stand in central England; and SwedFACE proposed in a hemiboreal, Pinus sylvestris stand in Sweden. We now have a unique opportunity to initiate a model-data interaction as an integral part of experimental design and to address a set of cross-site science questions on topics including responses of mature forests; interactions with temperature, water stress, and phosphorus limitation; and the influence of biodiversity. PMID:26249015

  19. NEW CONSTRAINT ON ESTIMATION OF THE ANTHROPOGENIC CO_2 BUDGET : RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONCENTRATION AND δ^<13>C OF ATMOSPHERIC CO_2 DETERMINED FROM ICE CORE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    カトウ, キクオ; コマキ, カオリ; Kikuo, Kato; Kaori, KOMAKI

    1997-01-01

    Studies on ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland revealed variations in the concentration and δ^C of ancient atmospheric CO_2. Since the Industrial Revolution, addition of anthropogenic CO_2 to the atmosphere has caused a significant increase in atmospheric CO_2,accompanied by a decrease in δ^C of atmospheric CO_2. The relationship between them shows that the δ^C value of CO_2 which remained in the atmosphere is significantly larger than -25‰ of that originated from coal burning and defores...

  20. CO2 Leakage Identification in Geosequestration Based on Real Time Correlation Analysis Between Atmospheric O2 and CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马登龙; 邓建强; 张早校

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a method for monitoring CO2 leakage in geological carbon dioxide sequestration. A real time monitoring parameter, apparent leakage flux (ALF), is presented to monitor abnormal CO2 leakage, which can be calculated by atmospheric CO2 and O2 data. The computation shows that all ALF values are close to zero-line without the leakage. With a step change or linear perturbation of concentration to the initial CO2 concen-tration data with no leakage, ALF will deviate from background line. Perturbation tests prove that ALF method is sensitive to linear perturbation but insensitive to step change of concentration. An improved method is proposed based on real time analysis of surplus CO2 concentration in least square regression process, called apparent leakage flux from surplus analysis (ALFs), which is sensitive to both step perturbation and linear perturbations of concen-tration. ALF is capable of detecting concentration increase when the leakage occurs while ALFs is useful in all pe-riods of leakage. Both ALF and ALFs are potential approaches to monitor CO2 leakage in geosequestration project.

  1. Target atmospheric CO2: Where should humanity aim?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, J; Kharecha, P; Beerling, D; Masson-Delmotte, V; Pagani, M; Raymo, M; Royer, D L; Zachos, J C

    2008-01-01

    Paleoclimate data show that climate sensitivity is ~3 deg-C for doubled CO2, including only fast feedback processes. Equilibrium sensitivity, including slower surface albedo feedbacks, is ~6 deg-C for doubled CO2 for the range of climate states between glacial conditions and ice-free Antarctica. Decreasing CO2 was the main cause of a cooling trend that began 50 million years ago, large scale glaciation occurring when CO2 fell to 425 +/- 75 ppm, a level that will be exceeded within decades, barring prompt policy changes. If humanity wishes to preserve a planet similar to that on which civilization developed and to which life on Earth is adapted, paleoclimate evidence and ongoing climate change suggest that CO2 will need to be reduced from its current 385 ppm to at most 350 ppm. The largest uncertainty in the target arises from possible changes of non-CO2 forcings. An initial 350 ppm CO2 target may be achievable by phasing out coal use except where CO2 is captured and adopting agricultural and forestry practice...

  2. CO2 background concentra-tion in the atmosphere over the Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the long-term monitoring data on CO2 concentration, variation trend and characteristics of CO2 background concentration in the atmosphere over the Chinese mainland are analyzed. Results show that the increasing trend of CO2 background concentration in the atmosphere over the Chinese mainland has appeared during the period of 1991-2000. The average annual CO2 growth increment is 1.59 μL/L, and the average annual CO2 growth rate is 0.44%. Distinct seasonal variations of CO2 background concentration are observed, and the averaged amplitude of CO2 seasonal variations is 10.35 μL/L. Regional variation characteristics of CO2 background concentration in the atmosphere and possible impact of human activities on these variations over the Chinese mainland are discussed as well.

  3. Evidence for CO2 Ice Formation and CO2 Gas Depletion in the South Polar Winter Atmosphere of Mars from Mars Climate Sounder Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinboehl, A.; Patel, P.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Hayne, P. O.; McCleese, D. J.

    2016-09-01

    New 2D retrievals from MCS data show south polar winter atmospheric temperatures below the CO2 frost point, consistent with CO2 gas removal through condensation. Limb emission features suggest CO2 ice occurrence correlated with CO2 gas depletion.

  4. CO2 Flux Estimation Errors Associated with Moist Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43+/-0.35 PgC /yr). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  5. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menviel, L.; Mouchet, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Joos, F.; England, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    δ13CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores provides constraints on oceanic and terrestrial carbon cycle processes linked with millennial-scale and glacial/interglacial changes in atmospheric CO2. However, the interpretation of δ13CO2 is not straightforward. Using two Earth system models of intermediate complexity we perform a set of sensitivity experiments in which the formation rates of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW), Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are varied. We study the impact of these circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 as well as on the oceanic δ13C distribution. In general, we find that the formation rates of AABW, NADW, NPDW and AAIW are negatively correlated with changes in δ13CO2: namely strong oceanic ventilation decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. However, since large scale ocean circulation reorganizations also impact nutrient utilization and the Earth's climate the relationship between atmospheric δ13CO2 levels and ocean ventilation rate is not unequivocal. In both models atmospheric δ13CO2 is very sensitive to changes in AABW formation rates: increased AABW formation enhances the upwelling of low δ13C waters to the surface and decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. By contrast, the impact of NADW changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 is less robust and might be model dependent.

  6. Atmospheric CO2 retrieved from ground-based solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Toon, G. C.; Margolis, J. S.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    The column-averaged volume mixing ration of CO2 over Kitt Peak, Arizona, has been retrieved from high-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained with the fourier transform spectrometer on the McMath telescope.

  7. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on soil CO2 and N2O effluxes in a loess grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserhalmi, Dóra; Balogh, János; Papp, Marianna; Horváth, László; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration proved to be the primary factor causing global climate change. Exposition systems to study the response to increasing CO2 levels by the terrestrial vegetation include the open top chamber (OTC) exposition system, also used in this study. Response of biomass growth and ecophysiological variables (e.g. emission of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O) from the soil) to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were investigated in the OTC station, located in the Botanical Garden of the Szent István University, Gödöllő , Hungary. Loess grassland (Salvio nemorosae - Festucetum rupicolae) monoliths were studied in OTCs with target air CO2 concentration of 600 mikromol.mol-1 in 3 chambers. The chamber-effect (shade effect of the side of the chambers) was measured in 3 control chambers under present CO2 level. This management was compared to 3 free air parcels under the natural conditions. Changes of soil temperature and soil water content were recorded in each treatment, while PAR, air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity and humidity were measured by a micrometeorological station. Plant biomass was cut down to 5 cm height once a year. Leaf area index (LAI) was estimated weekly from ceptometer measurements, soil CO2 and N2O effluxes were also measured weekly during the growing period and less frequently during the rest of the year. Soil water content in the upper 30 cm of the soil was lower in the chambers by 3 % (v/v) in average than in the field plots. Soil temperature in the chambers at 3 cm depth was 1.5oC lower than in the free air parcels probably due to the shading effect of the larger biomass in the chambers. In the chambers (both the high CO2 and control ones) biomass values (536.59 ±222.43 gm-2) were higher than in the free parcels (315.67 ±73.36 gm-2). Average LAI was also higher (3.07 ± 2.78) in the chambers than in the free air treatment (2.08 ± 1.95). Soil respiration values in the high CO2 treatment was higher in

  8. Differential absorption lidar for volcanic CO(2) sensing tested in an unstable atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike; Fiorani, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the need for an extremely durable and portable instrument to quantify volcanic CO(2) we have produced a corresponding differential absorption lidar (DIAL). It was tested on a volcano (Vulcano, Italy), sensing a non-uniform volcanic CO(2) signal under turbulent atmospheric conditions. The measured CO(2) mixing ratio trend agrees qualitatively well but quantitatively poorly with a reference CO(2) measurement. The disagreement is not in line with the precision of the DIAL determined under conditions that largely exclude atmospheric effects. We show evidence that the disagreement is mainly due to atmospheric turbulence. We conclude that excluding noise associated with atmospheric turbulence, as commonly done in precision analysis of DIAL instruments, may largely underestimate the error of measured CO(2) concentrations in turbulent atmospheric conditions. Implications for volcanic CO(2) sensing with DIAL are outlined. PMID:25836880

  9. The optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration for the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming

    2015-07-20

    This study examined the optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration of the CO2 fertilization effect on the growth of winter wheat with growth chambers where the CO2 concentration was controlled at 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 ppm respectively. I found that initial increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration dramatically enhanced winter wheat growth through the CO2 fertilization effect. However, this CO2 fertilization effect was substantially compromised with further increase in CO2 concentration, demonstrating an optimal CO2 concentration of 889.6, 909.4, and 894.2 ppm for aboveground, belowground, and total biomass, respectively, and 967.8 ppm for leaf photosynthesis. Also, high CO2 concentrations exceeding the optima not only reduced leaf stomatal density, length and conductance, but also changed the spatial distribution pattern of stomata on leaves. In addition, high CO2 concentration also decreased the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc(max)) and the maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) of leaf photosynthesis. However, the high CO2 concentration had little effect on leaf length and plant height. The optimal CO2 fertilization effect found in this study can be used as an indicator in selecting and breeding new wheat strains in adapting to future high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change. PMID:26253981

  10. CO2 Spectroscopy Evaluation Using Atmospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Bhaswar; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Toth, Robert A.; Washenfelder, Rebecca A.; Wennberg, Paul O

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the improvements in successive versions (1996 - 2004) of HITRAN (1) and other molecular line parameter data set (2) to correctly simulate infrared (IR) and near-infrared (NIR) CO 2 transmittance spectra. Understanding the global sources and sinks of CO 2 requires highly accurate measurements (ó 0.3%) and makes extreme de- mands on the spectroscopy. We evaluated the line parameter data sets by fitting solar absorption spectra measured by the JPL MkIV FTIR spectrometer (3) and the ...

  11. Speculations on Cold, Dense Atmospheres, Faint Suns, and CO2 Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    If the early Mars atmosphere was sufficiently dense (>5 bar), liquid CO2 would have been a stable state. The result would be a mixed-phased system, with CO2 rain, lakes, rivers, and maybe oceans, with CO2 frost and snow in colder spots.

  12. Prolonged elevated atmospheric CO(2)does not affect decomposition of plant material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.A.; Six, J.; Blum, H.; Kessel, van C.

    2006-01-01

    Prolonged elevated atmospheric CO2 might alter decomposition. In a 90-day incubation study, we determined the long-term (9 years) impact of elevated CO2 on N mineralization of Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens plant material grown at ambient and elevated CO2 and low- and high-N-15 fertilizer addit

  13. Long-term observations of atmospheric CO2 and carbon isotopes at continental sites in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    LEVIN Ingeborg; Graul, Rolf; Trivett, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A network for regional atmospheric CO2 observations had already been established in Germany by 1972, consisting of 5 stations with basically different characteristics: Westerland, a coastal station at the North Sea, 2 regional stations, Waldhof and Deuselbach, as well as 2 mountain stations, Brotjacklriegel at the eastern border of Germany and Schauinsland in the Black Forest. In addition to CO2 concentration observations, from 1977 onwards quasi-continuous 13CO2 and 14CO2 measurements were p...

  14. Long-term observations of atmospheric CO2 and carbon isotopes at continental sites in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    LEVIN Ingeborg; Graul, Rolf; TRIVETT, NEIL B. A.

    2011-01-01

    A network for regional atmospheric CO2 observations had already been established in Germany by 1972, consisting of 5 stations with basically different characteristics: Westerland, a coastal station at the North Sea, 2 regional stations, Waldhof and Deuselbach, as well as 2 mountain stations, Brotjacklriegel at the eastern boarder of Germany and Schauinsland in the Black Forest. In addition to CO2 concentration observations, from 1977 onwards quasi-continuous 13CO2 and 14CO2 measurements were ...

  15. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) enhances biomass production in a short-rotation poplar plantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calfapietra, C.; Gielen, B.; Galema, A.N.J.; Lukac, M.; Angelis, de P.; Moscatelli, M.C.; Ceulemans, R.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the possible contribution of Short Rotation Cultures (SRC) to carbon sequestration in both current and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). A dense poplar plantation (1 x 1 m) was exposed to a [CO2] of 550 ppm in Central Italy using the free-air CO2 enrichment (FA

  16. How much has the increase in atmospheric CO2 directly affected past soybean production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Gen; Iizumi, Toshichika; Nishimori, Motoki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of climate change is vital for food security. Among the most important environmental impacts of climate change is the direct effect of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on crop yields, known as the CO2 fertilization effect. Although several statistical studies have estimated past impacts of temperature and precipitation on crop yield at regional scales, the impact of past CO2 fertilization is not well known. We evaluated how soybean yields have been enhanced by historical atmospheric [CO2] increases in three major soybean-producing countries. The estimated average yields during 2002-2006 in the USA, Brazil, and China were 4.34%, 7.57%, and 5.10% larger, respectively, than the average yields estimated using the atmospheric [CO2] of 1980. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering atmospheric [CO2] increases in evaluations of the past effects of climate change on crop yields. PMID:24827887

  17. The Impact of Elevated CO2 on Plant Production Responses to Drought: A Model-Data Comparison at Four US FACE Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. P.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Fenstermaker, L.; Medlyn, B. E.; Morgan, J. A.; Oren, R.; Zaehle, S.; Norby, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Plants respond to increased atmospheric CO[2] (eCO2) by reducing stomatal apatures which increases plant water use efficiency. In some environments, increased WUE allows for water savings and can prolong the onset of drought effects on plants.Ecosystem observations from four long-term free air CO[2] enrichment (FACE) experiments—the evergreen needleleaf Duke Forest FACE experiment (NC), the deciduous broadleaf Oak Ridge FACE experiment (TN), the prairie heating and FACE experiment (WY), and the Nevada desert FACE experiment—were used to evaluate the assumptions of a suite of terrestrial ecosystem models.All sites suffered from a drought that affected annual net primary production (NPP) in at least one year. In all cases the NPP response to drought was affected by eCO2, however the relative response was both greater and smaller under eCO2 compared with ambient CO[2] conditions depending on the climate of the site in question. Model assumptions that were important in determining the eCO2 by drought interaction on plant productivity were the soil water content at which soil water becomes limiting to plants; whether soil water limitation affects stomatal conductance, photosynthetic parameters, or both; and the shape of the soil water limitation curve.

  18. Dependence of global temperatures on atmospheric CO2 and solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    David J. Thomson

    1997-01-01

    Changes in global average temperatures and of the seasonal cycle are strongly coupled to the concentration of atmospheric CO2. I estimate transfer functions from changes in atmospheric CO2 and from changes in solar irradiance to hemispheric temperatures that have been corrected for the effects of precession. They show that changes from CO2 over the last century are about three times larger than those from changes in solar irradiance. The increase in global average ...

  19. Weak Northern and Strong Tropical Land Carbon Uptake from Vertical Profiles of Atmospheric CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, Britton B.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Tans, Pieter P.; Sweeney, Colm; Peters, Wouter; Bruhwiler, Lori; Ciais, Philippe; Ramonet, Michel; Bousquet, Philippe; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Aoki, Shuji; Machida, Toshinobu; Inoue, Gen; Vinnichenko, Nikolay; Lloyd, Jon; Jordan, Armin; Heimann, Martin; Shibistova, Olga; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Steele, L. Paul; Francey, Roger J.; Denning, A. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of midday vertical atmospheric CO2 distributions reveal annual-mean vertical CO2 gradients that are inconsistent with atmospheric models that estimate a large transfer of terrestrial carbon from tropical to northern latitudes. The three models that most closely reproduce the observed an

  20. Weak northern and strong tropical land carbon uptake from vertical profiles of atmospheric CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, B.B.; Gurney, K.R.; Tans, P.P.; Sweeney, C.; Peters, W.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of midday vertical atmospheric CO2 distributions reveal annual-mean vertical CO2 gradients that are inconsistent with atmospheric models that estimate a large transfer of terrestrial carbon from tropical to northern latitudes. The three models that most closely reproduce the observed an

  1. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon Under Uncertain Climate Change and Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhong-Bing; ZHANG Ren-Duo

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and elevated atmospheric CO2 should affect the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC).SOC dynamics under uncertain patterns of climate warming and elevated atmospheric CO2 as well as with different soil erosion extents at Nelson Farm during 1998-2100 were simulated using stochastic modelling.Results based on numerous simulations showed that SOC decreased with elevated atmospheric temperature but increased with atmospheric CO2 concentration.Therefore,there was a counteract effect on SOC dynamics between climate warming and elevated CO2.For different soil erosion extents,warming 1 ℃ and elevated atmospheric CO2 resulted in SOC increase at least 15%,while warming 5 ℃ and elevated CO2 resulted in SOC decrease more than 29%.SOCpredictions with uncertainty assessment were conducted for different scenarios of soil erosion,climate change,and elevated CO2.Statistically,SOC decreased linearly with the probability.SOC also decreased with time and the degree of soil erosion.For example,in 2100 with a probability of 50%,SOC was 1617,1 167,and 892 g m-2,respectively,for no,minimum,and maximum soil erosion.Under climate warming 5 ℃ and elevated CO2,the soil carbon pools became a carbon source to the atmosphere (P > 95%).The results suggested that stochastic modelling could be a useful tool to predict future SOC dynamics under uncertain climate change and elevated CO2.

  2. [CO2 Budget and Atmospheric Rectification (COBRA) Over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the CO2 Budget and Rectification Airborne (COBRA) study was to assess terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon dioxide using an air-borne study. The study was designed to address the measurement gap between plot-scale direct flux measurements and background hemispheric-scale constraints and to refine techniques for measuring terrestrial fluxes at regional to continental scales. The initial funded effort (reported on here) was to involve two air-borne campaigns over North America, one in summer and one in winter. Measurements for COBRA (given the acronym C02BAR in the initial proposal) were conducted from the University of North Dakota Citation 11, a twin-engine jet aircraft capable of profiling from the surface to 12 km and cruising for up to 4 hours and 175m/s. Onboard instrumentation measured concentrations of CO2, CO, and H2O, and meteorological parameters at high rates. In addition, two separate flask sampling systems collected discrete samples for laboratory analysis of CO2,CO, CH4, N2O, SF6, H2, 13CO2, C18O16O,O2/N2, and Ar/N2. The project involved a collaboration between a number of institutions, including (but not limited to) Harvard, NOAA-CMDL, the University of North Dakota, and Scripps.

  3. Isoprene leaf emission under CO2 free atmosphere: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S.

    2015-12-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) is a reactive hydrocarbon gas emitted at high rates by tropical vegetation, which affects atmospheric chemistry and climate and, in the leaf level, is a very important agent against environmental stress. Under optimal conditions for photosynthesis, the majority of carbon used for isoprene biosynthesis is a direct product from recently assimilated atmospheric CO2. However, the contribution of 'alternate' carbon sources, that increase with leaf temperature, have been demonstrated and emissions of isoprene from 'alternate' carbon sources under ambient CO2 below the compensation point for photosynthesis have been observed. In this study, we investigated the response of leaf isoprene emissions under 450 ppm CO2 and CO2 free atmosphere as a function of light and leaf temperature. At constant leaf temperature (30 °C) and CO2 free atmospheres, leaves of the tropical species Inga edulis showed net emissions of CO2 and light-dependent isoprene emissions which stagnated at low light levels (75 µmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and account for 25% of that observed with 450 ppm CO2. Under constant light (1000 µmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and CO2 free atmospheres, a increase of leaf temperatures from 25 to 40 °C resulted in net emissions of CO2 and temperature-dependent isoprene emissions which reached values up to 17% of those under 450 ppm CO2. Our observations suggest that, under environmental stress, as high light/temperature and drought (when the stomata close and the amount of internal CO2 decreases), the 'alternate' carbon can maintain photosynthesis rates resulting in the production of isoprene, independent of atmospheric CO2, through the re-assimilation of internal released CO2 as an 'alternate' carbon sources for isoprene.

  4. Responses of rice growth to copper stress under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The responses of rice to the second degree contamination of copper were studied by pot experiments under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) with 570 μmol·mol-1 of CO2. The results showed that the content of copper in rice leaves was reduced with the CO2 concentration reaching 570 μmol·mol-1 and this happened more significantly under the second degree contamination of copper. Under FACE, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme in rice leaves treated by copper contamination were induced, whereas the contents of glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) had no significant difference from the control. In the presence of ambient CO2, activities of SOD enzyme treated by copper pollution were suppressed during the whole rice growth, however, the contents of GSH and GSSG were induced at tillering and jointing stages, and then restored to the control levels in later growth under the second degree contamination of copper. With the rice growing, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) rises continuously, but there had been no significant difference between the treatments at the same growth stage. Further studies are needed on the response mechanism of rice to Cu stress under elevated CO2.

  5. The space and time impacts on U.S. regional atmospheric CO2 concentrations from a high resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine D. Corbin; Denning, A Scott; Gurney, Kevin R

    2011-01-01

    To improve fossil fuel CO2 emissions estimates, high spatial and temporal resolution inventories are replacing coarse resolution, annual-mean estimates distributed by population density. Because altering the emissions changes a key boundary condition to inverse-estimated CO2 fluxes, it is essential to analyse the atmospheric impacts of redistributing anthropogenic emissions. Using a coupled ecosystem–atmosphere model, we compare 2004 atmospheric CO2 concentrations resulting from coarse and hi...

  6. Quantifying the drivers of ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Williams, Richard G.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic framework for quantitatively mapping the regional drivers of air-sea CO2 fluxes at a global scale is developed. The framework evaluates the interplay between (1) surface heat and freshwater fluxes that influence the potential saturated carbon concentration, which depends on changes in sea surface temperature, salinity and alkalinity, (2) a residual, disequilibrium flux influenced by upwelling and entrainment of remineralized carbon- and nutrient-rich waters from the ocean interior, as well as rapid subduction of surface waters, (3) carbon uptake and export by biological activity as both soft tissue and carbonate, and (4) the effect on surface carbon concentrations due to freshwater precipitation or evaporation. In a steady state simulation of a coarse-resolution ocean circulation and biogeochemistry model, the sum of the individually determined components is close to the known total flux of the simulation. The leading order balance, identified in different dynamical regimes, is between the CO2 fluxes driven by surface heat fluxes and a combination of biologically driven carbon uptake and disequilibrium-driven carbon outgassing. The framework is still able to reconstruct simulated fluxes when evaluated using monthly averaged data and takes a form that can be applied consistently in models of different complexity and observations of the ocean. In this way, the framework may reveal differences in the balance of drivers acting across an ensemble of climate model simulations or be applied to an analysis and interpretation of the observed, real-world air-sea flux of CO2.

  7. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures. PMID:27005790

  8. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures.

  9. First direct observation of the atmospheric CO2 year-to-year increase from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reuter

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The reliable prediction of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global climate change requires an adequate understanding of the CO2 sources and sinks. The sparseness of the existing surface measurement network limits current knowledge about the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes. The retrieval of CO2 total vertical columns from satellite observations is predicted to improve this situation. Such an application however requires very high accuracy and precision. We report on retrievals of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, denoted XCO2, from the near-infrared nadir spectral radiance and solar irradiance measurements of the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument between 2003 and 2005. We focus on northern hemispheric large scale CO2 features such as the CO2 seasonal cycle and show - for the first time - that the atmospheric annual increase of CO2 can be directly observed using satellite measurements of the CO2 total column. The satellite retrievals are compared with global XCO2 obtained from NOAA's CO2 assimilation system CarbonTracker taking into account the spatio-temporal sampling and altitude sensitivity of the satellite data. We show that the measured CO2 year-to-year increase agrees within about 1 ppm/year with CarbonTracker. We also show that the latitude dependent amplitude of the northern hemispheric CO2 seasonal cycle agrees with CarbonTracker within about 2 ppm with the retrieved amplitude being systematically larger. The analysis demonstrates that it is possible using satellite measurements of the CO2 total column to retrieve information on the atmospheric CO2 on the level of a few parts per million.

  10. Algae Technology for Reduction of Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short overview about the climate situation with regard to CO2, the physiology of photosynthesis will be explained in nonprofessional's style using algae as an example. The photosynthesis products and their conversions into valuable materials for human nutrition or into base substances for diverse industries will be described. Furthermore, I will introduce the state of the art on current scientific projects aiming to improve algae productivity and for the synthesis of therapeutically medicinal proteins. A highly productive algae facility will be introduced including its integration in an energy concept.(author)

  11. Responses of plant rhizosphere to atmospheric CO2 enrichment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Plant root growth is generally stimulated under elevated CO2. This will bring more carbon to the below-ground through root death and exudate. This potential increase in below-ground carbon sink may lead to changes in long-term soil sequestration and relationship between host plants and symbions. On the other hand, changes in litter components due to the changes in plant chemical composition may also affect soil processes, such as litter decomposition, soil organic matter sequestration and hetero-nutritional bacteria activities. These issues are discussed.

  12. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menviel, L.; Mouchet, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Joos, F.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    δ13CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores provides constraints on oceanic and terrestrial carbon cycle processes linked with millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2. However, the interpretation of δ13CO2 is not straightforward. Using carbon isotope-enabled versions of the LOVECLIM and Bern3D models, we perform a set of sensitivity experiments in which the formation rates of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW), Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are varied. We study the impact of these circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 as well as on the oceanic δ13C distribution. In general, we find that the formation rates of AABW, NADW, NPDW, and AAIW are negatively correlated with changes in δ13CO2: namely, strong oceanic ventilation decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. However, since large-scale oceanic circulation reorganizations also impact nutrient utilization and the Earth's climate, the relationship between atmospheric δ13CO2 levels and ocean ventilation rate is not unequivocal. In both models atmospheric δ13CO2 is very sensitive to changes in AABW formation rates: increased AABW formation enhances the transport of low δ13C waters to the surface and decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. By contrast, the impact of NADW changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 is less robust and might be model dependent. This results from complex interplay between global climate, carbon cycle, and the formation rate of NADW, a water body characterized by relatively high δ13C.

  13. Global and Regional Constraints on Exchanges of CO2 Between the Atmosphere and Terrestrial Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, S. C.

    2001-12-01

    The vigorous atmospheric circulation rapidly mixes CO2 that is exchanged with the terrestrial biosphere and oceans. Therefore, at time scales greater than 1 year, the approximate interhemispheric exchange time of the atmosphere, an average of CO2 measurements from a network of surface stations can be used to accurately determine the global net change in atmospheric CO2. By subtracting CO2 produced by fossil fuel combustion, which is well characterized by national statistics, the global the sum of terrestrial biospheric and oceanic net fluxes, here termed the "nonfossil" CO2 flux, can also be accurately determined. The nonfossil CO2 flux averaged -2.1+/-0.3 PgC/yr and -3.2+/-0.4 PgC/yr in the 1980s and 1990s respectively (negative denotes out of the atmosphere), and varied in annual average from about 0 to -4 PgC/yr over these two decades. Two primary methods have been used to further partition the nonfossil CO2 flux between land and oceans: the O2 and 13C/12C methods, which rely, respectively, on measurements of atmospheric O2 (actually O2/N2 for technical reasons) and of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2. Burning of fossil fuel consumes atmospheric O2 and releases CO2 with a 13C/12C ratio lower than that of atmospheric CO2 whereas uptake of CO2 by terrestrial plants releases O2, and increases the atmospheric 13C/12C ratio owing to the preferential assimilation of 12CO2 relative to 13CO2. In contrast, the uptake of CO2 by the oceans has little effect on either the atmospheric O2 or 13C/12C ratio. Therefore, the net CO2 uptake or release from the terrestrial biosphere can be calculated in either method by subtracting the change owing to fossil fuel emissions from the measured change in the atmosphere, utilizing known stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO2 in the O2 method, and isotopic fractionation factors in the 13C/12C method. Currently, the O2 method gives a net global terrestrial biospheric CO2 flux of -0.2+/-0.7 PgC/yr and -1.4+/-0.7 PgC/yr for the 1980s and the 1990s

  14. Tropical forest response to elevated CO2: Model-experiment integration at the AmazonFACE site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, K.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere's response to current and future elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2) is a large source of uncertainty in future projections of the C cycle, climate and ecosystem functioning. In particular, the sensitivity of tropical rainforest ecosystems to eCO­2 is largely unknown even though the importance of tropical forests for biodiversity, carbon storage and regional and global climate feedbacks is unambiguously recognized. The AmazonFACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) project will be the first ecosystem scale eCO2 experiment undertaken in the tropics, as well as the first to be undertaken in a mature forest. AmazonFACE provides the opportunity to integrate ecosystem modeling with experimental observations right from the beginning of the experiment, harboring a two-way exchange, i.e. models provide hypotheses to be tested, and observations deliver the crucial data to test and improve ecosystem models. We present preliminary exploration of observed and expected process responses to eCO2 at the AmazonFACE site from the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, highlighting opportunities and pitfalls for model integration of tropical FACE experiments. The preliminary analysis provides baseline hypotheses, which are to be further developed with a follow-up multiple model inter-comparison. The analysis builds on the recently undertaken FACE-MDS (Model-Data Synthesis) project, which was applied to two temperate FACE experiments and exceeds the traditional focus on comparing modeled end-target output. The approach has proven successful in identifying well (and less well) represented processes in models, which are separated for six clusters also here; (1) Carbon fluxes, (2) Carbon pools, (3) Energy balance, (4) Hydrology, (5) Nutrient cycling, and (6) Population dynamics. Simulation performance of observed conditions at the AmazonFACE site (a.o. from Manaus K34 eddy flux tower) will highlight process-based model deficiencies, and aid the separation

  15. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Han Zhang; Long Cao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scen...

  16. Response of atmospheric CO2 to the abrupt cooling event 8200 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jinho; Brook, Edward J.; Buizert, Christo

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 records for the centennial scale cooling event 8200 years ago (8.2 ka event) may help us understand climate-carbon cycle feedbacks under interglacial conditions, which are important for understanding future climate, but existing records do not provide enough detail. Here we present a new CO2 record from the Siple Dome ice core, Antarctica, that covers 7.4-9.0 ka with 8 to 16 year resolution. We observe a small, about 1-2 ppm, increase of atmospheric CO2 during the 8.2 ka event. The increase is not significant when compared to other centennial variations in the Holocene that are not linked to large temperature changes. Our results do not agree with leaf stomata records that suggest a CO2 decrease of up to ~25 ppm and imply that the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 to the primarily Northern Hemisphere cooling of the 8.2 ka event was limited.

  17. The role of artificial atmospheric CO2 removal in stabilizing Earth's climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickfeld, K.; Tokarska, K.

    2014-12-01

    The current CO2 emission trend entails a risk that the 2°C target will be missed, potentially causing "dangerous" changes in Earth's climate system. This research explores the role of artificial atmospheric CO2 removal (also referred to as "negative emissions") in stabilizing Earth's climate after overshoot. We designed a range of plausible CO2 emission scenarios, which follow a gradual transition from a fossil fuel driven economy to a zero-emission energy system, followed by a period of negative emissions. The scenarios differ in peak emissions rate and, accordingly, the amount of negative emissions, to reach the same cumulative emissions compatible with the 2°C temperature stabilization target. The climate system components' responses are computed using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity. Results suggest that negative emissions are effective in reversing the global mean temperature and stabilizing it at a desired level (2°C above pre-industrial) after overshoot. Also, changes in the meridional overturning circulation and sea ice are reversible with the artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. However, sea level continues to rise and is not reversible for several centuries, even under assumption of large amounts of negative emissions. For sea level to decline, atmospheric CO2 needs to be reduced to pre-industrial levels in our simulations. During the negative emission phase, outgassing of CO2 from terrestrial and marine carbon sinks offsets the artificial removal of atmospheric CO2, thereby reducing its effectiveness. On land, the largest CO2 outgassing occurs in the Tropics and is partially compensated by CO2 uptake at northern high latitudes. In the ocean, outgassing occurs mostly in the Southern Ocean, North Atlantic and tropical Pacific. The strongest outgassing occurs for pathways entailing greatest amounts of negative emissions, such that the efficiency of CO2 removal - here defined as the change in

  18. Radiocarbon isotopic evidence for assimilation of atmospheric CO2 by the seagrass Zostera marina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Kuwae, T.

    2015-10-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation takes up water-column dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as a carbon source across its thin cuticle layer. It is expected that marine macrophytes also use atmospheric CO2 when exposed to air during low tide, although assimilation of atmospheric CO2 has never been quantitatively evaluated. Using the radiocarbon isotopic signatures (Δ14C) of the seagrass Zostera marina, DIC and particulate organic carbon (POC), we show quantitatively that Z. marina takes up and assimilates atmospheric modern CO2 in a shallow coastal ecosystem. The Δ14C values of the seagrass (-40 to -10 ‰) were significantly higher than those of aquatic DIC (-46 to -18 ‰), indicating that the seagrass uses a 14C-rich carbon source (atmospheric CO2, +17 ‰). A carbon-source mixing model indicated that the seagrass assimilated 0-40 % (mean, 17 %) of its inorganic carbon as atmospheric CO2. CO2 exchange between the air and the seagrass might be enhanced by the presence of a very thin film of water over the air-exposed leaves during low tide. Our radiocarbon isotope analysis, showing assimilation of atmospheric modern CO2 as an inorganic carbon source, improves our understanding of the role of seagrass meadows in coastal carbon dynamics.

  19. Radiocarbon isotopic evidence for assimilation of atmospheric CO2 by the seagrass Zostera marina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Watanabe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Submerged aquatic vegetation assimilates dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the water column as a carbon source across its thin cuticle layer. However, it is expected that marine macrophytes also use atmospheric CO2 when exposed to the air during low tide, although assimilation of atmospheric CO2 has never been quantitatively evaluated. Using the radiocarbon isotopic signatures (Δ14C of the seagrass Zostera marina and DIC, we show quantitatively that Z. marina takes up and assimilates atmospheric modern CO2 in a shallow coastal ecosystem. The Δ14C values of the seagrass (−36 to −8‰ were significantly higher than those of aquatic DIC (−45 to −18‰, indicating that the seagrass uses a 14C-rich carbon source (atmospheric CO2, +17‰. A carbon-source mixing model indicated that the seagrass assimilated ~ 46% (mean: 22% of its inorganic carbon as atmospheric CO2. CO2 exchange between the air and the seagrass may be enhanced by the presence of a very thin water film over the air-exposed leaves during low tide. Our radiocarbon isotope analysis, showing assimilation of atmospheric modern CO2 as an inorganic carbon source, offers better understanding of the role of seagrass meadows in coastal carbon dynamics.

  20. Nitrogen and carbon cycling in a grassland community ecosystem as affected by elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing global atmospheric CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystem and the long-term storage of C and N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (...

  1. An assessment procedure for chemical utilisation schemes intended to reduce CO2 emissions to atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audus, H.; Oonk, H.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere by producing chemicals has been suggested by many people as a potential greenhouse gas mitigation option. The goal of such schemes is either: (i) fixation of CO2 in a chemical compound for a significant time, or, (ii) reduction of emissions

  2. Measurement of Concentration of CO2 in Atmosphere In Situ Based on TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Fengxin; Guo, Jinjia; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-11-01

    As one of the main greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, CO2has a significant impact on global climate change and the ecological environment. Because of close relationship between human activities and the CO2 emissions, it is very meaningful of detecting atmospheric CO2accurately. Based on the technology of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, the wavelength of distributed feedback laser is modulated, Fresnel lens is used as the receiving optical system, which receives the laser-beam reflected by corner reflector, and focuses the receiving laser-beam to the photoelectric detector. The second harmonic signal is received through lock-in amplifier and collected by AD data acquisition card, after that the system is built up.By choosing the infrared absorption line of CO2at 1.57μm, the system is calibrated by 100% CO2 gas cell. The atmospheric CO2 in situ is measured with long open-path way. Furthermore, the results show that CO2 concentration decreases along time in the morning of day. It is proved that TDLAS technology has many advantages, including fast response, high sensitivity and resolution. This research provides a technique for monitoring secular change of CO2 in atmosphere.

  3. CO2 greenhouse in the early martian atmosphere: SO2 inhibits condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Y L; Nair, H; Gerstell, M F

    1997-01-01

    Many investigators of the early martian climate have suggested that a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere was present and warmed the surface above the melting point of water (J.B. Pollack, J.F. Kasting, S.M. Richardson, and K. Poliakoff 1987. Icarus 71, 203-224). However, J.F. Kasting (1991. Icarus 94, 1-13) pointed out that previous thermal models of the primitive martian atmosphere had not considered the condensation of CO2. When this effect was incorporated, Kasting found that CO2 by itself is inadequate to warm the surface. SO2 absorbs strongly in the near UV region of the solar spectrum. While a small amount of SO2 may have a negligible effect by itself on the surface temperature, it may have significantly warmed the middle atmosphere of early Mars, much as ozone warms the terrestrial stratosphere today. If this region is kept warm enough to inhibit the condensation of CO2, then CO2 remains a viable greenhouse gas. Our preliminary radiative modeling shows that the addition of 0.1 ppmv of SO2 in a 2 bar CO2 atmosphere raises the temperature of the middle atmosphere by approximately 10 degrees, so that the upper atmosphere in a 1 D model remains above the condensation temperature of CO2. In addition, this amount of SO2 in the atmosphere provides an effective UV shield for a hypothetical biosphere on the martian surface.

  4. Bioenergy from forestry and changes in atmospheric CO2: reconciling single stand and landscape level approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Guest, Geoffrey; Strømman, Anders H

    2013-11-15

    Analyses of global warming impacts from forest bioenergy systems are usually conducted either at a single stand level or at a landscape level, yielding findings that are sometimes interpreted as contrasting. In this paper, we investigate and reconcile the scales at which environmental impact analyses of forest bioenergy systems are undertaken. Focusing on the changes caused in atmospheric CO2 concentration of forest bioenergy systems characterized by different initial states of the forest, we show the features of the analyses at different scales and depict the connections between them. Impacts on atmospheric CO2 concentration at a single stand level are computed through impulse response functions (IRF). Results at a landscape level are elaborated through direct application of IRFs to the emission profile, so to account for the fluxes from all the stands across time and space. Impacts from fossil CO2 emissions are used as a benchmark. At a landscape level, forest bioenergy causes an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration for the first decades that is similar to the impact from fossil CO2, but then the dynamics clearly diverge because while the impact from fossil CO2 continues to rise that from bioenergy stabilizes at a certain level. These results perfectly align with those obtained at a single stand for which characterization factors have been developed. In the hypothetical case of a sudden cessation of emissions, the change caused in atmospheric CO2 concentration from biogenic CO2 emissions reverses within a couple of decades, while that caused by fossil CO2 emissions remains considerably higher for centuries. When counterfactual aspects like the additional sequestration that would have occurred in the forest if not harvested and the theoretical displacement of fossil CO2 are included in the analysis, results can widely differ, as the CO2 debt at a landscape level ranges from a few years to several centuries (depending on the underlying assumptions considered).

  5. Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin-Based Carbons for CO2 Separation at Sub-Atmospheric Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Álvarez-Gutiérrez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of developing effective separation and purification technologies that leave much smaller energy footprints is greater for carbon dioxide (CO2 than for other gases. In addition to its involvement in climate change, CO2 is present as an impurity in biogas and bio-hydrogen (biological production by dark fermentation, in post-combustion processes (flue gas, CO2-N2 and many other gas streams. Selected phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbons prepared in our laboratory have been evaluated under static conditions (adsorption isotherms as potential adsorbents for CO2 separation at sub-atmospheric pressures, i.e., in post-combustion processes or from biogas and bio-hydrogen streams. CO2, H2, N2, and CH4 adsorption isotherms at 25 °C and up to 100 kPa were obtained using a volumetric equipment and were correlated by applying the Sips model. Adsorption equilibrium was then predicted for multicomponent gas mixtures by extending the multicomponent Sips model and the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST in conjunction with the Sips model. The CO2 uptakes of the resin-derived carbons from CO2-CH4, CO2-H2, and CO2-N2 at atmospheric pressure were greater than those of the reference commercial carbon (Calgon BPL. The performance of the resin-derived carbons in terms of equilibrium of adsorption seems therefore relevant to CO2 separation in post-combustion (flue gas, CO2-N2 and in hydrogen fermentation (CO2-H2, CO2-CH4.

  6. Changes in coccolith calcification under stable atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bauke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coccolith calcification is known to respond to ocean acidification in culture experiments as well as in present and past oceans. Previous studies basically focus on changes in coccolith weight due to increasing CO2 and the resulting changes in the carbonate system but pay little attention to the influence of other environmental factors. In order to untangle changes in coccolithophore calcification due to environmental factors such as temperature and/or productivity from changes caused by increasing pCO2 and carbonate ion concentration we here present a study on coccolith calcification from the Holocene North Atlantic Ocean. The pre-industrial Holocene with its predominantly stable carbonate system provides the conditions for such a comprehensive analysis. For a realistic analysis on changes in major components of Holocene coccolithophores, the family Noelaerhabdaceae was selected, which constitutes the main part of the assemblage in the North Atlantic. Records of average coccolith weights from three Holocene sediment cores along a North–South transect in the North Atlantic were analysed. During the Holocene mean weight (and therefore calcification of Noelaerhabdaceae (E. huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa coccoliths decreases at the Azores (Geofar KF 16 from around 7 to 5.5 pg, but increases at the Rockall Plateau (ODP Site 980 from around 6 to 8 pg and at the Vøring Plateau (MD08-3192 from 7 to 10.5 pg. This amplitude of average weight variability is within the range of glacial/interglacial changes that were interpreted to be an effect of decreasing carbonate ion concentration. By comparison with SEM assemblage counts, we show that weight changes are partly due to variations in the coccolithophore assemblage, but also an effect of a change in calcification and/or morphotype variability within single species. Our results indicate that there is no single key factor responsible for the observed changes in coccolith weight. A major increase in coccolith

  7. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  8. Model-experiment synthesis at two FACE sites in the southeastern US. Forest ecosystem responses to elevated CO[2]. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. P.; Zaehle, S.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Medlyn, B. E.; Dietze, M.; Hickler, T.; Iversen, C. M.; Jain, A. K.; Luo, Y.; McCarthy, H. R.; Parton, W. J.; Prentice, C.; Thornton, P. E.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.; Warlind, D.; Warren, J.; Weng, E.; Hanson, P. J.; Oren, R.; Norby, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem observations from two long-term Free-Air CO[2] Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Duke forest and Oak Ridge forest) were used to evaluate the assumptions of 11 terrestrial ecosystem models and the consequences of those assumptions for the responses of ecosystem water, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes to elevated CO[2] (eCO[2]). Nitrogen dynamics were the main constraint on simulated productivity responses to eCO[2]. At Oak Ridge some models reproduced the declining response of C and N fluxes, while at Duke none of the models were able to maintain the observed sustained responses. C and N cycles are coupled through a number of complex interactions, which causes uncertainty in model simulations in multiple ways. Nonetheless, the major difference between models and experiments was a larger than observed increase in N-use efficiency and lower than observed response of N uptake. The results indicate that at Duke there were mechanisms by which trees accessed additional N in response to eCO[2] that were not represented in the ecosystem models, and which did not operate with the same efficiency at Oak Ridge. Sequestration of the additional productivity under eCO[2] into forest biomass depended largely on C allocation. Allocation assumptions were classified into three main categories--fixed partitioning coefficients, functional relationships and a partial (leaf allocation only) optimisation. The assumption which best constrained model results was a functional relationship between leaf area and sapwood area (pipe-model) and increased root allocation when nitrogen or water were limiting. Both, productivity and allocation responses to eCO[2] determined the ecosystem-level response of LAI, which together with the response of stomatal conductance (and hence water-use efficiency; WUE) determined the ecosystem response of transpiration. Differences in the WUE response across models were related to the representation of the relationship of stomatal conductance to CO[2] and

  9. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Grassland Community Ecosystem as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Torbert, H.A.; Johnson, H. B.; H. W. Polley

    2012-01-01

    Increasing global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems and the long-term storage of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (Huisache). Seedlings of Acacia along with grass species were grown for 13 months at CO2 concentrations of 385 (ambient), 690, and 980 μmol mol−1. Elevated CO2 ...

  10. Simulation of atmospheric CO2 over Europe and western Siberia using the regional scale model REMO

    OpenAIRE

    Chevillard, Anne; Karstens, Ute; Ciais, Philippe; Lafont, Sébastien; Heimann, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the temporal variability of atmospheric CO2 over Europe and western Siberia are investigated using the regional atmospheric model, REMO. The model, of typical horizontal resolution 50 km, is part of a nested modelling framework that has been established as a concerted action during the EUROSIBERIAN CARBONFLUX project. In REMO, the transport of CO2 is simulated together with climate variables, which offers the possibility of calculating at each time step the land a...

  11. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  12. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  13. Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Measurements of Martian Atmospheric CO2 by the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Paul B.; Boynton, W. V.; Hoffman, J. H.; Ming, D. W.; Hamara, D.

    2010-01-01

    Precise stable isotope measurements of the CO2 in the martian atmosphere have the potential to provide important constraints for our understanding of the history of volatiles, the carbon cycle, current atmospheric processes, and the degree of water/rock interaction on Mars [1]. The isotopic composition of the martian atmosphere has been measured using a number of different methods (Table 1), however a precise value (carbonates in martian meteorites [2-4] it has been proposed that the martian atmosphere was enriched in 13C [8]. This was supported by measurements of trapped CO2 gas in EETA 79001[2] which showed elevated Delta(sup 13)C values (Table 1). More recently, Earth-based spectroscopic measurements of the martian atmosphere have measured the martian CO2 to be depleted in C-13 relative to CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere[ 7, 9-11]. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Mars Phoenix Lander [12] included a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (EGA) [13] which had the goal of measuring the isotopic composition of martian atmospheric CO2 to within 0.5%. The mass spectrometer is a miniature instrument intended to measure both the martian atmosphere as well as gases evolved from heating martian soils.

  14. The declining uptake rate of atmospheric CO2 by land and ocean sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Raupach

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through 1959–2012, an airborne fraction (AF of 0.44 of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions remained in the atmosphere, with the rest being taken up by land and ocean CO2 sinks. Understanding of this uptake is critical because it greatly alleviates the emissions reductions required for climate mitigation, and also reduces the risks and damages that adaptation has to embrace. An observable quantity that reflects sink properties more directly than the AF is the CO2 sink rate (kS, the combined land–ocean CO2 sink flux per unit excess atmospheric CO2 above preindustrial levels. Here we show from observations that kS declined over 1959–2012 by a factor of about 1 / 3, implying that CO2 sinks increased more slowly than excess CO2. Using a carbon–climate model, we attribute the decline in kS to four mechanisms: slower-than-exponential CO2 emissions growth (~ 35% of the trend, volcanic eruptions (~ 25%, sink responses to climate change (~ 20%, and nonlinear responses to increasing CO2, mainly oceanic (~ 20%. The first of these mechanisms is associated purely with the trajectory of extrinsic forcing, and the last two with intrinsic, feedback responses of sink processes to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2. Our results suggest that the effects of these intrinsic, nonlinear responses are already detectable in the global carbon cycle. Although continuing future decreases in kS will occur under all plausible CO2 emission scenarios, the rate of decline varies between scenarios in non-intuitive ways because extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms respond in opposite ways to changes in emissions: extrinsic mechanisms cause kS to decline more strongly with increasing mitigation, while intrinsic mechanisms cause kS to decline more strongly under high-emission, low-mitigation scenarios as the carbon–climate system is perturbed further from a near-linear regime.

  15. Atmosphere-soil-vegetation model including CO2 exchange processes; SOLVEG2

    OpenAIRE

    永井 晴康

    2004-01-01

    A new atmosphere-soil-vegetation model named SOLVEG2 (SOLVEG version 2) was developed to study the heat, water, and CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and land-surface. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer sub-models for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. It also includes sophisticated processes for solar and long-wave radiation transmission in vegetation canopy and CO2 exchanges among the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. The model can be also used by coupling with a three-d...

  16. Phanerozoic atmospheric CO 2 change: evaluating geochemical and paleobiological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Dana L.; Berner, Robert A.; Beerling, David J.

    2001-08-01

    . In addition, it assumes that there are no biological or temperature effects and that diagenetic alteration of the boron isotopic composition does not occur. A fifth CO 2 proxy, based on the redox chemistry of marine cerium, has several fundamental flaws and is not discussed in detail here.

  17. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of

  18. Effects of 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation and ethnicity on face memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Angela S; Catling, Jon C; Kwong, Alex S F; Munafò, Marcus R

    2015-08-01

    The ability to accurately verify facial identity has important forensic implications, but this ability is fallible. Research suggests that anxiety at the time of encoding can impair subsequent recall, but no studies have investigated the effects of anxiety at the time of recall in an experimental paradigm. This study addresses this gap using the carbon dioxide (CO2) model of anxiety induction. Thirty participants completed two inhalations: one of 7.5% CO2-enriched air and one of medical air (i.e., placebo). Prior to each inhalation, participants were presented with 16 facial images (50% own-ethnicity, 50% other-ethnicity). During the inhalation they were required to identify which faces had been seen before from a set of 32 images (16 seen-before and 16 novel images). Identification accuracy was lower during CO2 inhalation compared to air (F[1,29]=5.5, p=.026, ηp(2)=.16), and false alarm rate was higher for other-ethnicity faces compared to own-ethnicity faces (F[1,29]=11.3, p=.002, ηp(2)=.28). There was no evidence of gas by ethnicity interactions for accuracy or false alarms (ps>.34). Ratings of decision confidence did not differ by gas condition, suggesting that participants were unaware of differences in performance. These findings suggest that anxiety, at the point of recognition, impairs facial identification accuracy. This has substantial implications for eyewitness memory situations, and suggests that efforts should be made to attenuate the anxiety in these situations in order to improve the validity of identification.

  19. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sawa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e., a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on

  20. Covariation of deep Southern Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 through the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F

    2016-02-11

    No single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles. A build-up of carbon in the deep ocean has been shown to have occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the mechanisms responsible for the release of the deeply sequestered carbon to the atmosphere at deglaciation, and the relative importance of deep ocean sequestration in regulating millennial-timescale variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration before the Last Glacial Maximum, have remained unclear. Here we present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace-metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide a reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our data suggest that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the Northern Hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 concentration increased rapidly, reflecting--at least in part--a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our records show that the observed covariation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the past 80,000 years. This suggests that on millennial timescales deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean played a consistent role in modifying atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  1. Covariation of deep Southern Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 through the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F

    2016-02-11

    No single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles. A build-up of carbon in the deep ocean has been shown to have occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the mechanisms responsible for the release of the deeply sequestered carbon to the atmosphere at deglaciation, and the relative importance of deep ocean sequestration in regulating millennial-timescale variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration before the Last Glacial Maximum, have remained unclear. Here we present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace-metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide a reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our data suggest that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the Northern Hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 concentration increased rapidly, reflecting--at least in part--a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our records show that the observed covariation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the past 80,000 years. This suggests that on millennial timescales deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean played a consistent role in modifying atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:26840491

  2. Improving the Ginkgo CO2 barometer: Implications for the early Cenozoic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Richard S.; Wing, Scott L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomatal properties of fossil Ginkgo have been used widely to infer the atmospheric concentration of CO2 in the geological past (paleo-pCO2). Many of these estimates of paleo-pCO2 have relied on the inverse correlation between pCO2 and stomatal index (SI - the proportion of epidermal cells that are stomata) observed in recent Ginkgo biloba, and therefore depend on the accuracy of this relationship. The SI - pCO2 relationship in G. biloba has not been well documented, however. Here we present new measurements of SI for leaves of G. biloba that grew under pCO2 from 290 to 430 ppm. We prepared and imaged all specimens using a consistent procedure and photo-documented each count. As in prior studies, we found a significant inverse relationship between SI and pCO2, however, the relationship is more linear, has a shallower slope, and a lower correlation coefficient than previously reported. We examined leaves of G. biloba grown under pCO2 of 1500 ppm, but found they had highly variable SI and a large proportion of malformed stomata. We also measured stomatal dimensions, stomatal density, and the carbon isotope composition of G. biloba leaves in order to test a mechanistic model for inferring pCO2. This model overestimated observed pCO2, performing less well than the SI method between 290 and 430 ppm. We used our revised SI-pCO2 response curve, and new observations of selected fossils, to estimate late Cretaceous and Cenozoic pCO2 from fossil Ginkgo adiantoides. All but one of the new estimates is below 800 ppm, and together they show little long-term change in pCO2 or relation to global temperature. The low Paleogene pCO2 levels indicated by the Ginkgo SI proxy are not consistent with the high pCO2 inferred by some climate and carbon cycle models. We cannot currently resolve the discrepancy, but greater agreement between proxy data and models may come from a better understanding of the stomatal response of G. biloba to elevated pCO2, better counts and measurements of

  3. Root damage by insects reverses the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on Eucalypt seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Johnson

    Full Text Available Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 are widely anticipated to increase biomass accumulation by accelerating rates of photosynthesis in many plant taxa. Little, however, is known about how soil-borne plant antagonists might modify the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2, with root-feeding insects being particularly understudied. Root damage by insects often reduces rates of photosynthesis by disrupting root function and imposing water deficits. These insects therefore have considerable potential for modifying plant responses to eCO2. We investigated how root damage by a soil-dwelling insect (Xylotrupes gideon australicus modified the responses of Eucalyptus globulus to eCO2. eCO2 increased plant height when E. globulus were 14 weeks old and continued to do so at an accelerated rate compared to those grown at ambient CO2 (aCO2. Plants exposed to root-damaging insects showed a rapid decline in growth rates thereafter. In eCO2, shoot and root biomass increased by 46 and 35%, respectively, in insect-free plants but these effects were arrested when soil-dwelling insects were present so that plants were the same size as those grown at aCO2. Specific leaf mass increased by 29% under eCO2, but at eCO2 root damage caused it to decline by 16%, similar to values seen in plants at aCO2 without root damage. Leaf C:N ratio increased by >30% at eCO2 as a consequence of declining leaf N concentrations, but this change was also moderated by soil insects. Soil insects also reduced leaf water content by 9% at eCO2, which potentially arose through impaired water uptake by the roots. We hypothesise that this may have impaired photosynthetic activity to the extent that observed plant responses to eCO2 no longer occurred. In conclusion, soil-dwelling insects could modify plant responses to eCO2 predicted by climate change plant growth models.

  4. Atmosphere-soil-vegetation model including CO2 exchange processes: SOLVEG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new atmosphere-soil-vegetation model named SOLVEG2 (SOLVEG version 2) was developed to study the heat, water, and CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and land-surface. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer sub-models for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. It also includes sophisticated processes for solar and long-wave radiation transmission in vegetation canopy and CO2 exchanges among the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. Although the model usually simulates only vertical variation of variables in the surface-layer atmosphere, soil, and vegetation canopy by using meteorological data as top boundary conditions, it can be used by coupling with a three-dimensional atmosphere model. In this paper, details of SOLVEG2, which includes the function of coupling with atmosphere model MM5, are described. (author)

  5. Interannual variability in the oxygen isotopes of atmospheric CO2 driven by El Nino

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Bollenbacher, Alane F.; Piper, Stephen C.; Yoshimura, Kei; Francey, Roger J.; Allison, Colin E.; Wahlen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2 (O-18/O-16 and C-13/C-12) have been monitored since 1977 to improve our understanding of the global carbon cycle, because biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes affect the different atomic masses in a measurable way(1). Interpreting the O-18/O-16 variabilit

  6. A possible mechanism of mineral responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 in rice grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jia; ZHANG Ming-qian; WANG Xiao-wen; ZHANG Wei-jian

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attentions have been paid to mineral concentration decrease in miled rice grains caused by CO2 enrichment, but the mechanisms stil remain unclear. Therefore, mineral (Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn and Mn) translocation in plant-soil system with a FACE (Free-air CO2 enrichment) experiment were investigated in Eastern China after 4-yr operation. Results mainly showed that: (1) elevated CO2 signiifcantly increased the biomass of stem and panicle by 21.9 and 24.0%, respectively, but did not affect the leaf biomass. (2) Elevated CO2 signiifcantly increased the contents of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Mn in panicle by 61.2, 28.9, 87.0, 36.7, and 66.0%, respectively, and in stem by 13.2, 21.3, 47.2, 91.8, and 25.2%, respectively, but did not affect them in leaf. (3) Elevated CO2 had positive effects on the weight ratio of mineral/biomass in stem and panicle. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 can favor the translocation of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Mn from soil to stem and panicle. The CO2-led mineral decline in miled rice grains may mainly attribute to the CO2-led unbalanced stimulations on the translocations of minerals and carbohydrates from vegetative parts (e.g., leaf, stem, branch and husk) to the grains.

  7. The characteristics of atmospheric CO2 concentration variation of four national background stations in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an important kind of greenhouse gas which influences global temperature. Its concentration variation could indicate the distribution of human and natural activities in various regions. Through the non-dispersive infrared method, flask sampling of atmospheric CO2 concen- tration was measured weekly at four national background stations including Waliguan, Shangdianzi, Lin’an, and Longfengshan. Based on the data collected from September 2006 to August 2007, along with the Waliguan station’s experience on in situ observational data processing, the selection methods for sampling data through the atmospheric background CO2 concentration analysis were preliminarily discussed. On the basis of this result, the variation features of the four typical regions’ atmospheric background CO2 concentration was analyzed for the first time. The results show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration at Waliguan, Shangdianzi, Lin’an, and Longfengshan is 383.5, 385.9, 387.8, and 384.3 ppm, respectively. During the research period, CO2 concentration at the Waliguan station changed slightly. However, the CO2 concentration changed sharply at the Shangdianzi and the Lin’an stations due to the great influence of human activities in the Jingjinji and the Changjiang Delta economic zones, and changed regularly with seasons at Longfengshan station under dual influences of human activities and plant photosynthesis. The results from this study can lay the foundation for more profound studies on atmospheric CO2 concentration level of different areas in China, and could be used to improve the understanding of carbon source and sink distribution.

  8. Advances on the Responses of Root Dynamics to Increased Atmospheric CO2 and Global Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots dynamics responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperature and changed precipitation can be a key link between plant growth and long-term changes in soil organic matter and ecosystem carbon balance. This paper reviews some experiments and hypotheses developed in this area, which mainly include plant fine roots growth, root turnover, root respiration and other root dynamics responses to elevated CO2 and global climate change. Some recent new methods of studying root systems were also discussed and summarized. It holds herein that the assemblage of information about root turnover patterns, root respiration and other dynamic responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 and global climatic change can help to better understand and explore some new research areas. In this paper, some research challenges in the plant root responses to the elevated CO2 and other environmental factors during global climate change were also demonstrated.

  9. Development of a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, M.; Haszpra, L.; Major, I.; Svingor, É.; Veres, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays one of the most burning questions for the science is the rate and the reasons of the recent climate change. Greenhouse gases (GHG), mainly CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere could affect the climate of our planet. However, the relation between the amount of atmospheric GHG and the climate is complex, full with interactions and feedbacks partly poorly known even by now. The only way to understand the processes, to trace the changes, to develop and validate mathematical models for forecasts is the extensive, high precision, continuous monitoring of the atmosphere. Fossil fuel CO2 emissions are a major component of the European carbon budget. Separation of the fossil fuel signal from the natural biogenic one in the atmosphere is, therefore, a crucial task for quantifying exchange flux of the continental biosphere through atmospheric observations and inverse modelling. An independent method to estimate trace gas emissions is the top-down approach, using atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements combined with simultaneous radiocarbon (14C) observations. As adding fossil fuel CO2 to the atmosphere, therefore, leads not only to an increase in the CO2 content of the atmosphere but also to a decrease in the 14C/12C ratio in atmospheric CO2. The ATOMKI has more than two decade long experience in atmospheric 14CO2 monitoring. As a part of an ongoing research project being carried out in Hungary to investigate the amount and temporal and spatial variations of fossil fuel CO2 in the near surface atmosphere we developed a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station. We describe the layout and the operation of the measuring system which is designed for the continuous, unattended monitoring of CO2 mixing ratio in the near surface atmosphere based on an Ultramat 6F (Siemens) infrared gas analyser. In the station one atmospheric 14CO2 sampling unit is also installed which is developed and widely used since more than one decade by ATOMKI. Mixing ratio of CO2 is

  10. ENSO, Volcanic Activities and Interannual Variations of Atmospheric CO2%ENSO,火山活动与大气CO2的年际变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈中笑; 程军

    2011-01-01

    利用大气CO2及其δ13C的观测数据分析了不同区域大气CO2的季节和年际变化特征,并结合δ13C的变化趋势判断大气CO2变化的主要影响因素是来自陆地还是海洋.结果表明:大气CO2的年际变化主要受ENSO引起的陆地植被初级生产量而不是海洋吸收变化的影响,且La Ni(n)a对大气CO2的影响大于El Ni(n)o.火山活动后大气CO2的增加幅度减小,甚至掩盖了ENSO的影响,喷发后δ13C的增幅同步减小说明大气CO2增幅减小缘自温度持续降低引起的海洋吸收的增加或陆地呼吸作用的减弱.%Based on the observations of atmospheric CO2 and its δ13C, the characters of seasonal and interannual variations of atmospheric CO2 were analyzed in different regions.The trends of atmospheric δ13C were used to distinguish whether the dominative influential factor for the variations of atmospheric CO2 is from the terrestrial or the ocean.The results show that the interannual variations of atmospheric CO2 are mainly influenced by ENSOrelated change of terrestrial vegetation primary production, not by oceanic sink.And the intensity of La Ni(n)a has more effect on atmospheric CO2 than that of El Ni(n)o.The atmospheric CO2 increase would decrease after volcano events, which even conceal ENSO effects.The synchronized decrease in atmospheric δ13C increase after volcano eruptions indicates that it is likely due to the increase of oceanic uptake or the weakening of terrestrial respiration resulted from persistent decrease of surface temperature.

  11. Simulation of CO2 dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer using a mesoscale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granvold, P. W.; Chow, F. K.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    The consequences of unexpected releases of CO2 from underground carbon sequestration sites must be understood before large-scale carbon capture and storage projects are implemented. Carbon dioxide gas can migrate through faults, fractures, or abandoned wells that penetrate the subsurface storage site and provide a pathway to the ground surface. Though such leakage is typically slow and in small amounts, CO2 can accumulate at the ground surface because it is denser than the surrounding atmosphere. Such accumulation presents health risks for humans and animals in the vicinity, and can cause damage to crops, trees, and other vegetation. Because atmospheric dispersion of CO2 is driven by gravity and ambient wind conditions, the danger from CO2 is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool, or under stably- stratified background atmospheric conditions which further inhibit mixing and dilution of the gas. We are developing a simulation tool for predictions of CO2 releases from underground storage sites in a mesoscale atmospheric model. The model solves the compressible fluid flow equations, and has been modified to account for transport of dense gases. Example simulations from sources of different release strengths over various topography and background atmospheric conditions illustrate the behavior of the model and its utility for risk assessment and certification of carbon sequestration sites.

  12. The seasonal cycle of ocean-atmosphere CO2 Flux in Ryder Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula.

    OpenAIRE

    Legge, Oliver J.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Johnson, Martin T.; Meredith, Michael P.; Venables, Hugh J.; Brown, Peter J.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 15 million km2 of the Southern Ocean is seasonally ice covered, yet the processes affecting carbon cycling and gas exchange in this climatically important region remain inadequately understood. Here, 3 years of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measurements and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from Ryder Bay on the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) are presented. During spring and summer, primary production in the surface ocean promotes atmospheric CO2 uptake. In winter, higher DIC, caus...

  13. CO2 Dissociation using the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Experiment (VADER)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Allen Lindon; Earl eScime

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of CO2 is investigated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a simple, zero dimensional (0-D) chemical model and through experiment. The model predicts that the primary CO2 dissociation pathway within a DBD is electron impact dissociation and electron-vibrational excitation. The relaxation kinetics following dissociation are dominated by atomic oxygen chemistry. The experiments included investigating the energy efficiencies and dissociation rates of...

  14. CO2 dissociation using the Versatile atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge experiment (VADER)

    OpenAIRE

    Lindon, Michael A.; Scime, Earl E.

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of CO2 is investigated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a simple, zero dimensional (0-D) chemical model and through experiment. The model predicts that the primary CO2 dissociation pathway within a DBD is electron impact dissociation and electron-vibrational excitation. The relaxation kinetics following dissociation are dominated by atomic oxygen chemistry. The experiments included investigating the energy efficiencies and dissociation rates of C...

  15. LA Megacity: An Integrated Land-Atmosphere System for Urban CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Newman, S.; Rao, P.; Patarasuk, R.; o'Keefe, D.; Huang, J.; Ahmadov, R.; Wong, C.; Song, Y.; Gurney, K. R.; Diaz Isaac, L. I.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.; Miller, C. E.; Duren, R. M.; Li, Z.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    About 10% of the global population lives in the word's 20 megacities (cities with urban populations greater than 10 million people). Megacities account for approximately 20% of the global anthropogenic fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions, and their proportion of emissions increases monotonically with the world population and urbanization. Megacities range in spatial extent from ~1000 - 10,000 km2 with complex topography and variable landscapes. We present here the first attempt at building an integrated land-atmosphere modeling system for megacity environments, developed and evaluated for urban CO2 emissions over the Los Angeles (LA) Megacity area. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) - Chem model was coupled to a ~1.3-km FFCO2 emission product, "Hestia-LA", to simulate the transport of CO2 across the LA magacity. We define the optimal model resolution to represent both the spatial variability of the atmospheric dynamics and the spatial patterns from the CO2 emission distribution. In parallel, we evaluate multiple configurations of WRF with various physical schemes, using meteorological observations from the CalNex-LA campaign of May-June 2010. Our results suggest that there is no remarkable difference between the medium- (4-km) and high- (1.3-km) resolution simulations in terms of atmospheric model performance. However, the high-resolution modeled CO2 mixing ratios clearly outperform the results at medium resolution for capturing both the spatial distribution and the temporal variability of the urban CO2 signals. We compare the impact of physical representation errors and emission aggregation errors on the modeled CO2 mixing ratios across the LA megacity. Finally, we present a novel approach to evaluate the design of the current surface network over the LA megacity using the modeled spatial correlations. These results reinforce the importance of using high-resolution emission products over megacities to represent correctly the large spatial gradients in

  16. Fast Atmosphere-Ocean Model Runs with Large Changes in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gary L.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Rind, David H.; Colose, Christopher; Opstbaum, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    How does climate sensitivity vary with the magnitude of climate forcing? This question was investigated with the use of a modified coupled atmosphere-ocean model, whose stability was improved so that the model would accommodate large radiative forcings yet be fast enough to reach rapid equilibrium. Experiments were performed in which atmospheric CO2 was multiplied by powers of 2, from 1/64 to 256 times the 1950 value. From 8 to 32 times, the 1950 CO2, climate sensitivity for doubling CO2 reaches 8 C due to increases in water vapor absorption and cloud top height and to reductions in low level cloud cover. As CO2 amount increases further, sensitivity drops as cloud cover and planetary albedo stabilize. No water vapor-induced runaway greenhouse caused by increased CO2 was found for the range of CO2 examined. With CO2 at or below 1/8 of the 1950 value, runaway sea ice does occur as the planet cascades to a snowball Earth climate with fully ice covered oceans and global mean surface temperatures near 30 C.

  17. CO2 Dissociation using the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Experiment (VADER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindon, Michael Allen

    As of 2013, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) estimates that the world emits approximately 36 trillion metric tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere every year. These large emissions have been correlated to global warming trends that have many consequences across the globe, including glacial retraction, ocean acidification and increased severity of weather events. With green technologies still in the infancy stage, it can be expected that CO2 emissions will stay this way for along time to come. Approximately 41% of the emissions are due to electricity production, which pump out condensed forms of CO2. This danger to our world is why research towards new and innovative ways of controlling CO2 emissions from these large sources is necessary. As of now, research is focused on two primary methods of CO2 reduction from condensed CO2 emission sources (like fossil fuel power plants): Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and Carbon Capture and Utilization (CCU). CCS is the process of collecting CO2 using absorbers or chemicals, extracting the gas from those absorbers and finally pumping the gas into reservoirs. CCU on the other hand, is the process of reacting CO2 to form value added chemicals, which can then be recycled or stored chemically. A Dielectric Barrier discharge (DBD) is a pulsed, low temperature, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma which creates high energy electrons suitable for dissociating CO2 into its components (CO and O) as one step in the CCU process. Here I discuss the viability of using a DBD for CO2 dissociation on an industrial scale as well as the fundamental physics and chemistry of a DBD for CO2 dissociation. This work involved modeling the DBD discharge and chemistry, which showed that there are specific chemical pathways and plasma parameters that can be adjusted to improve the CO2 reaction efficiencies and rates. Experimental studies using the Versatile Atmospheric dielectric barrier Discharge Expe

  18. An Assessment of Biases in Satellite CO2 Measurements Using Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. F.; O'Dell, C.

    2014-12-01

    Column-integrated CO2 mixing ratio measurements from satellite should provide a new view of the global carbon cycle, thanks to their ability to measure with great coverage in places that are poorly sampled by the in situ network (e.g. the tropics) using a new approach (full-column averages rather than point measurements). For this new insight to be useful, however, systematic errors in these data must first be identified and removed. Here we use atmospheric transport modeling to perform a global comparison of satellite CO2 measurements to higher-quality reference data (in situ data from flasks and aircraft, column CO2 data from the upward-looking spectrometers of the TCCON network) to assess systematic errors in the satellite data. This broad comparison is meant to complement the more direct validation done at specific TCCON sites. A suite of 3-D CO2 mixing ratio histories are generated across 2009-2014 using combinations of several different a priori fossil fuel, land biospheric, and oceanic CO2 fluxes run through the PCTM off-line atmospheric transport model driven by MERRA 1°x1.25° winds and vertical mixing parameters. Each member of the suite is forced to agree with in situ CO2 measurements (flask, tall tower, and routine light aircraft profiles) through use of a variational carbon data assimilation (4Dvar) system. The optimized 3-D CO2 fields are then compared to ACOS column CO2 retrievals of GOSAT data, with the differences being fit to different independent variables (aerosol optical depth, atmospheric path length, surface albedo, etc.) to derive a GOSAT bias correction. ACOS-GOSAT CO2 retrievals, corrected by this scheme, as well as with the "official" ACOS bias correction, will then be assimilated using the same 4Dvar approach. The benefit of the GOSAT data with and without the bias corrections will then be assessed by comparing the optimized CO2 fields to independent data (TCCON column data, as well as aircraft data left out of the in situ inversions

  19. Modern soil system constraints on reconstructing deep-time atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montañez, Isabel P.

    2013-01-01

    Paleosol carbonate-based estimates of paleo-atmospheric CO2 play a prominent role in constraining radiative-forcing and climate sensitivity in the deep-time. Large uncertainty in paleo-CO2 estimates made using the paleosol-carbonate CO2-barometer, however, arises primarily from their sensitivity to soil-respired CO2 (S(z)). This parameter is poorly constrained due to a paucity of soil CO2 measurements during carbonate formation in modern soils and a lack of widely applicable proxies of paleo-soil CO2. Here the δ13C values of carbonate and soil organic matter (SOM) pairs from 130 Holocene soils are applied to a two-component CO2-mixing equation to define soil order-specific ranges of soil CO2 applicable for constraining S(z) in their corresponding paleosol analogs. Equilibrium carbonate-SOM pairs, characterized by Δ13Ccarb-SOM values of 12.2-15.8‰, define a mean effective fractionation of 14.1‰ and overall inferred total soil CO2 contents during calcite formation of Calcisols and Argillisols), a best estimate of S(z) during calcite formation is 1500-2000 ppmv (range of 500-2500 ppmv). Overall higher values (2000-5000 ppmv) are indicated by the subset of these soils characterized by higher moisture content and productivity. Near atmospheric levels (400 ± 200 ppmv) of estimated S(z) are indicated by immature soils, recording their low soil productivity. Vertisols define the largest range in total soil CO2 (25,000 ppmv) reflecting their seasonally driven dynamic hydrochemistry. A S(z) range of 1000-10,000 ppmv is suggested for paleo-Vertisols for which calcite precipitation can be constrained to have occurred in an open system with two-component CO2 mixing, with a best estimate of 2000 ppmv ± 1000 ppmv appropriate for paleo-Vertisols for which evidence of protracted water saturation is lacking. Mollisol pairs define a best estimate of S(z) of 2500 ppmv (range of 600-4000 ppmv) for late Cretaceous and Cenozoic analogs. Non-equilibrium pairs with Δ13C values >16

  20. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment alters energy assimilation, investment and allocation in Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jennifer M; Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D; Fung, Howard A; Tissue, David T; Griffin, Kevin L

    2005-05-01

    Energy-use efficiency and energy assimilation, investment and allocation patterns are likely to influence plant growth responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Here, we describe the influence of elevated [CO2] on energetic properties as a mechanism of growth responses in Xanthium strumarium. Individuals of X. strumarium were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] and harvested. Total biomass and energetic construction costs (CC) of leaves, stems, roots and fruits and percentage of total biomass and energy allocated to these components were determined. Photosynthetic energy-use efficiency (PEUE) was calculated as the ratio of total energy gained via photosynthetic activity (Atotal) to leaf CC. Elevated [CO2] increased leaf Atotal, but decreased CC per unit mass of leaves and roots. Consequently, X. strumarium individuals produced more leaf and root biomass at elevated [CO2] without increasing total energy investment in these structures (CCtotal). Whole-plant biomass was associated positively with PEUE. Whole-plant construction required 16.1% less energy than modeled whole-plant energy investment had CC not responded to increased [CO2]. As a physiological mechanism affecting growth, altered energetic properties could positively influence productivity of X. strumarium, and potentially other species, at elevated [CO2]. PMID:15819914

  1. Intra-seasonal variability of atmospheric CO2 concentrations over India during summer monsoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kumar, K.; Valsala, Vinu; Tiwari, Yogesh K.; Revadekar, J. V.; Pillai, Prasanth; Chakraborty, Supriyo; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-10-01

    In a study based on a data assimilation product of the terrestrial biospheric fluxes of CO2 over India, the subcontinent was hypothesized to be an anomalous source (sink) of CO2 during the active (break) spells of rain in the summer monsoon from June to September (Valsala et al., 2013). We test this hypothesis here by investigating intraseasonal variability in the atmospheric CO2 concentrations over India by utilizing a combination of ground-based and satellite observations and model outputs. The results show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration also varies in synchrony with the active and break spells of rainfall with amplitude of ±2 ppm which is above the instrumental uncertainty of the present day techniques of atmospheric CO2 measurements. The result is also consistent with the signs of the Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) flux anomalies estimated in our earlier work. The study thus offers the first observational affirmation of the above hypothesis although the data gap in the satellite measurements during monsoon season and the limited ground-based stations over India still leaves some uncertainty in the robust assertion of the hypothesis. The study highlights the need to capture these subtle variabilities and their responses to climate variability and change since it has implications for inverse estimates of terrestrial CO2 fluxes.

  2. Soil fertility limits carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems in a CO2-enriched atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northern mid-latitude forests are a larger terrestrial carbon sink. Ignoring nutrient limitations, large increases in carbon sequestration from carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization are expected in these forests. Yet, forests are usually relegated to sites of moderate to poor fertility, where tree growth is often limited by nutrient supply, in particular nitrogen. Here we present evidence that estimates of increases in carbon sequestration of forests, which is expected to partially compensate for increasing CO2 in the atmosphere, are unduly optimistic. In two forest experiments on maturing pines exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2, the CO2-induced biomass carbon increment without added nutrients was undetectable at a nutritionally poor site, and the stimulation at a nutritionally moderate site was transient, stabilizing at a marginal gain after three years. However, a large synergistic gain from higher CO2 and nutrients was detected with nutrients added. This gain was even larger at the poor site (threefold higher than the expected additive effect) than at the moderate site (twofold higher). Thus, fertility can restrain the response of wood carbon sequestration to increased atmospheric CO2. Assessment of future carbon sequestration should consider the limitations imposed by soil fertility, as well as interactions with nitrogen deposition. (author)

  3. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and/or O3 on intra- and interspecific competitive ability of aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiske, M E; Quinn, V S; Marquardt, P E; Karnosky, D F

    2007-03-01

    Three model communities of trembling aspen (monoculture, and mixed with either paper birch or sugar maple) were grown for seven years in elevated atmospheric CO(2) and O(3) using Free Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) technology. We utilized trends in species' importance, calculated as an index of volume growth and survival, as indications of shifting community composition. For the pure aspen communities, different clones emerged as having the highest change in relative importance values depending on the pollutant exposure. In the control and elevated CO(2) treatments, clone 42E was rapidly becoming the most successful clone while under elevated O(3), clone 8 L emerged as the dominant clone. In fact, growth of clone 8 L was greater in the elevated O(3) treatment compared to controls. For the mixed aspen-birch community, importance of aspen and birch changed by - 16 % and + 62 %, respectively, in the controls. In the treatments, however, importance of aspen and birch changed by - 27 % and + 87 %, respectively, in elevated O(3), and by - 10 % and + 45 %, respectively, in elevated CO(2). Thus, the presence of elevated O(3) hastened conversion of stands to paper birch, whereas the presence of elevated CO(2) delayed it. Relative importance of aspen and maple changed by - 2 % and + 3 %, respectively, after seven years in the control treatments. But in elevated O(3), relative importance of aspen and maple changed by - 2 % and + 5 %, respectively, and in elevated CO(2) by + 9 and - 20 %, respectively. Thus, elevated O(3) slightly increases the rate of conversion of aspen stands to sugar maple, but maple is placed at a competitive disadvantage to aspen under elevated CO(2).

  4. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.

    2011-01-01

    The 14C-free fossil carbon added to atmospheric CO2 by combustion dilutes the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C), potentially providing a means to verify fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. However, sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract this dilution and may bias 14C/C-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if these nuclear influences are not correctly accounted for. Previous studies have examined nuclear influenc...

  5. Enhanced priming of old, not new soil carbon at elevated atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergard, Mette; Reinsch, Sabine; Bengtson, Per;

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations accompanied by global warming and altered precipitation patterns calls for assessment of long-term effects of these global changes on carbon (C) dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, as changes in net C exchange between soil and atmosphere will impact...... the atmospheric CO2 concentration profoundly. In many ecosystems, including the heath/grassland system studied here, increased plant production at elevated CO2 increase fresh C input from litter and root exudates to the soil and concurrently decrease soil N availability. Supply of labile C to the soil may...... accelerate the decomposition of soil organic C (SOC), a phenomenon termed ‘the priming effect’, and the priming effect is most pronounced at low soil N availability. Hence, we hypothesized that priming of SOC decomposition in response to labile C addition would increase in soil exposed to long-term elevated...

  6. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0degree of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. It is evident, from this analysis, that SCIAMACHY therefore has the potential to

  7. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in-situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0° of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing a seasonal signal that is representative of lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. The presented analysis suggests that

  8. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  9. Variability of Atmospheric CO2 Over India and Surrounding Oceans and Control by Surface Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, R. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Majumdar, A.; Patel, N. R.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002-2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP) were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc) and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO) were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  10. The impact on atmospheric CO2 of iron fertilization induced changes in the ocean's biological pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. McWilliams

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Using numerical simulations, we quantify the impact of changes in the ocean's biological pump on the air-sea balance of CO2 by fertilizing a small surface patch in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the eastern tropical Pacific with iron. Decade-long fertilization experiments are conducted in a basin-scale, eddy-permitting coupled physical biogeochemical ecological model. In contrast to previous studies, we find that most of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC removed from the euphotic zone by the enhanced biological export is replaced by uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. Atmospheric uptake efficiencies, the ratio of the perturbation in air-sea CO2 flux to the perturbation in export flux across 100 m, are 0.75 to 0.93 in our patch size-scale experiments. The atmospheric uptake efficiency is insensitive to the duration of the experiment. The primary factor controlling the atmospheric uptake efficiency is the vertical distribution of the enhanced biological production. Iron fertilization at the surface tends to induce production anomalies primarily near the surface, leading to high efficiencies. In contrast, mechanisms that induce deep production anomalies (e.g. altered light availability tend to have a low uptake efficiency, since most of the removed DIC is replaced by lateral and vertical transport and mixing. Despite high atmospheric uptake efficiencies, patch-scale iron fertilization of the ocean's biological pump tends to remove little CO2 from the atmosphere over the decadal timescale considered here.

  11. VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 OVER INDIA AND SURROUNDING OCEANS AND CONTROL BY SURFACE FLUXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002–2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  12. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venot Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm. Within the studied range of temperature, the CO2 cross section can vary by more than two orders of magnitude. This, in particular, makes the absorption of CO2 significant up to wavelengths as high as 230 nm, while it is negligible above 200 nm at 300 K. To investigate the influence of these new data on the photochemistry of exoplanets, we implemented the measured cross section into a 1D photochemical model. The model predicts that accounting for this temperature dependency of CO2 cross section can affect the computed abundances of NH3, CO2, and CO by one order of magnitude in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter and hot Neptune.

  13. Impact of atmospheric and terrestrial CO2 feedbacks on fertilization-induced marine carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oschlies

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of oceanic CO2 uptake to alterations in the marine biological carbon pump, such as brought about by natural or purposeful ocean fertilization, has repeatedly been investigated by studies employing numerical biogeochemical ocean models. It is shown here that the results of such ocean-centered studies are very sensitive to the assumption made about the response of the carbon reservoirs on the atmospheric side of the sea surface. Assumptions made include prescribed atmospheric pCO2, an interactive atmospheric CO2 pool exchanging carbon with the ocean but not with the terrestrial biosphere, and an interactive atmosphere that exchanges carbon with both oceanic and terrestrial carbon pools. The impact of these assumptions on simulated annual to millennial oceanic carbon uptake is investigated for a hypothetical increase in the C:N ratio of the biological pump and for an idealized enhancement of phytoplankton growth. Compared to simulations with interactive atmosphere, using prescribed atmospheric pCO2 overestimates the sensitivity of the oceanic CO2 uptake to changes in the biological pump, by about 2%, 25%, 100%, and >500% on annual, decadal, centennial, and millennial timescales, respectively. Adding an interactive terrestrial carbon pool to the atmosphere-ocean model system has a small effect on annual timescales, but increases the simulated fertilization-induced oceanic carbon uptake by about 4%, 50%, and 100% on decadal, centennial, and millennial timescales, respectively. On longer than decadal timescales, a substantial fraction of oceanic carbon uptake induced by natural or purposeful ocean fertilization may not come from the atmosphere but from the terrestrial biosphere.

  14. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  15. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Venot, Olivia; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Hébrard, Eric; Larcher, Gwenaelle; Schwell, Martin; Dobrijevic, Michel; Selsis, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm....

  16. Atmospheric column CO2 measurement from a new automatic ground-based sun photometer in Beijing from 2010 to 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Z Q; Y. S. Xie; Gu, X. F.; D. H. Li; K. T. Li; Zhang, X. Y.; J. Wu; Xiong, W.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is generally regarded as the most important greenhouse gas affecting global warming. Many researches have been conducted to measure atmospheric CO2 concentration, analyze CO2 variation on both seasonal and interannual scales and predict future CO2 tendencies. Among them, ground-based remote sensing observation of CO2 is the essential approach to provide validation data for satellite observation owning to its much higher accuracy and column CO2 measurement capability. Unlike the...

  17. Atmospheric CO2 fertilization effects on biomass yields of 10 crops in northern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F. Degener

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality and quantity of the influence that atmospheric CO2 has on cropgrowth is still a matter of debate. This study's aim is to estimate if CO2 will have an effect on biomass yields at all, to quantify and spatially locate the effects and to explore if an elevated photosynthesis rate or water-use-efficiency is predominantly responsible. This study uses a numerical carbon based crop model (BioSTAR to estimate biomass yields within theadministrative boundaries of Niedersachsen in Northern Germany. 10 crops are included (winter grains: wheat, barley,rye, triticale - early, medium, late maize variety - sunflower, sorghum, spring wheat, modeled annuallyfor the entire 21st century on 91,014 separate sites. Modeling was conducted twice, once with an annually adaptedCO2 concentration according to the SRES-A1B scenario and once with a fixed concentration of 390 ppm to separate the influence of CO2 from that of the other input variables.Rising CO2 concentrations will play a central role in keeping future yields of all crops above or aroundtoday's level. Differences in yields between modeling with fixed or adapted CO2 can be as high as60 % towards the century's end. Generally yields will increase when CO2 rises and decline whenit is kept constant. As C4-crops are equivalently affected it is presumed that anelevated efficiency in water use is the main responsible factor for all plants.

  18. Rapid coupling of Antarctic temperature and atmospheric CO2 during deglaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. van Ommen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic ice cores provide clear evidence of a close coupling between variations in Antarctic temperature and the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during the glacial/interglacial cycles of the past 800 thousand years. Precise information on the relative timing of the temperature and CO2 changes can assist in refining our understanding of the physical processes involved in this coupling. Here, we focus on the last deglaciation, 19 000 to 11 000 years before present, during which CO2 concentrations increased by ~80 parts per million by volume and Antarctic temperature increased by ~10 °C. Utilising a recently developed proxy for regional Antarctic temperature, derived from five near-coastal ice cores, and two ice core CO2 records with high dating precision, we show that the increase in CO2 lagged the increase in regional Antarctic temperature by only 0–400 years. This new value for the lag, consistent for both CO2 records, implies a faster feedback between temperature and CO2 than the centennial to millennial-scale lags suggested by previous studies.

  19. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K.; Chauhan, Bhagirath S.; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant’s functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be

  20. Agricultural Green Revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George J.; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-01

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 25° N and 60° N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 50° N and 70° N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 +/- 0.027 per cent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001-2010 than in 1961

  1. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant's functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be of

  2. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant's functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be of

  3. Large-Scale Atmospheric Variability in AIRS CO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Jiang, X.; Chahine, M.; Yung, Y.; Olsen, E.; Chen, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a modeling analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3) from AIRS with results from two atmospheric chemistry and transport models (CTMs), in the context of the large-scale atmospheric transport. AIRS data, from selected periods in 2003 are retrieved applying the Vanishing Partial Derivative (VPD) method (Chahine et al. [GRL, 2005] and the presentation by Chahine et al., this meeting). Corresponding model results are simulated by 2-D and 3-D atmospheric CTMs. The AIRS retrieved and model simulated CO2 mixing ratios, averaged over 300-500 hPa, are compared with the Matsueda et al. observations in the tropics between 9 and 13 km (see the presentation by Jiang et al., this meeting). The latitudinal distributions of O3, both retrieved and simulated, are compared with ozonesonde data. Both comparisons show reasonable agreement. We then examine the spatiotemporal variabilities of CO2 and O3 and their correlation, both in the AIRS data and model results. Our objective is to better understand the AIRS observed atmospheric variability in CO2 that is associated with underlying large-scale atmospheric transport, particularly the stratosphere-troposphere- exchange (STE) at northern high latitudes in spring and the Asian monsoon summer circulation over South Asia.

  4. The paper trail of the 13C of atmospheric CO2 since the industrial revolution period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C concentration in atmospheric CO2 has been declining over the past 150 years as large quantities of 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil fuel burning are added to the atmosphere. Deforestation and other land use changes have also contributed to the trend. Looking at the 13C variations in the atmosphere and in annual growth rings of trees allows us to estimate CO2 uptake by land plants and the ocean, and assess the response of plants to climate. Here I show that the effects of the declining 13C trend in atmospheric CO2 are recorded in the isotopic composition of paper used in the printing industry, which provides a well-organized archive and integrated material derived from trees' cellulose. 13C analyses of paper from two European and two American publications showed, on average, a - 1.65 ± 1.00 per mille trend between 1880 and 2000, compared with - 1.45 and - 1.57 per mille for air and tree-ring analyses, respectively. The greater decrease in plant-derived 13C in the paper we tested than in the air is consistent with predicted global-scale increases in plant intrinsic water-use efficiency over the 20th century. Distinct deviations from the atmospheric trend were observed in both European and American publications immediately following the World War II period.

  5. Recent advances in developing COS as a tracer of Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaf, D.; Stimler, K.; Yakir, D.

    2012-04-01

    Potential use of COS as tracer of CO2 flux into vegetation, based on its co-diffusion with CO2 into leaves without outflux, stimulated research on COS-CO2 interactions. Atmospheric measurements by NOAA in recent years, across a global latitudinal transect, indicated a ratio of the seasonal drawdowns in COS and CO2 (normalized to their respective ambient concentrations) of about 6. We carried out leaf-scale gas exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species of deciduous, evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities and ambient COS concentrations (using mid IR laser spectroscopy). A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS and CO2 (termed leaf relative uptake; LRU) was observed with a mean value of 1.61±0.26. These results reflect the dominance of stomatal conductance over both COS and CO2 uptake, imposing a relatively constant ratio between the two fluxes, except under low light conditions when CO2, but not COS, metabolism is light limited. A relatively constant ratio under common ambient conditions will facilitate the application of COS as a tracer of gross photosynthesis from leaf to global scales. We also report first eddy flux measurements of COS/CO2 at the ecosystem scales. Preliminarily results indicate a ratio of the COS flux, Fcos, to net ecosystem CO2 exchange, NEE, of 3-5 (termed ecosystem relative uptake; ERU). Combining measurements of COS and CO2 and the new information on their ratios at different scales should permit the direct estimation of gross CO2 uptake, GPP, by land ecosystems according to: GPP=NEE*ERU/LRU. In addition, we show that COS effect on stomatal conductance may require a special attention. Increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2800 pmol mol-1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) stimulate stomatal conductance. It seems likely that the stomata are responding to H2S produced in the leaves from COS.

  6. Potential impact of rising atmospheric CO2 on quality of grains in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saurav; Chakraborty, Debashis; Sehgal, Vinay K; Pal, Madan

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were conducted in open-top chambers to assess the effect of atmospheric CO2 enrichment (E-CO2) on the quality of grains in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) crop. Physical attributes of the grains was not affected, but the hydration and swelling capacities of the flour increased. Increase in carbohydrates and reduction in protein made the grains more carbonaceous (higher C:N) under E-CO2. Among other mineral nutrients, K, Ca and Zn concentrations decreased, while P, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn and B concentrations did not change. The pH, bulk density and cooking time of chickpea flour remained unaffected, although the water absorption capacity of flour increased and oil absorption reduced. Results suggest that E-CO2 could affect the grain quality adversely and nutritional imbalance in grains of chickpea might occur.

  7. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and vegetation type on microbiota associated with decomposing straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Helle B.; Ronn, R.; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    concentration in the recovered straw samples. After five months of decomposition, hyphal biomass was significantly lower in straw from plants grown at elevated CO2 (-30% and -13% in the fallow and wheat field, respectively). Bacterial biomass was not significantly affected by the CO2 induced changes...... in the litter quality, but the lower decomposition rate and fewer bacterial grazers in the straw from plants grown at elevated CO2 together indicate reduced microbial activity and turnover. Notwithstanding this, these data show that growth at elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration results in slower...... decomposition of wheat straw, but the effect is probably of minor importance compared to the effect of varying crops, agricultural practise or changing land use....

  8. A biogenic CO2 flux adjustment scheme for the mitigation of large-scale biases in global atmospheric CO2 analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí-Panareda, Anna; Massart, Sébastien; Chevallier, Frédéric; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Dutra, Emanuel; Beljaars, Anton

    2016-08-01

    Forecasting atmospheric CO2 daily at the global scale with a good accuracy like it is done for the weather is a challenging task. However, it is also one of the key areas of development to bridge the gaps between weather, air quality and climate models. The challenge stems from the fact that atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the CO2 fluxes at the surface, which are difficult to constrain with observations. In particular, the biogenic fluxes simulated by land surface models show skill in detecting synoptic and regional-scale disturbances up to sub-seasonal time-scales, but they are subject to large seasonal and annual budget errors at global scale, usually requiring a posteriori adjustment. This paper presents a scheme to diagnose and mitigate model errors associated with biogenic fluxes within an atmospheric CO2 forecasting system. The scheme is an adaptive scaling procedure referred to as a biogenic flux adjustment scheme (BFAS), and it can be applied automatically in real time throughout the forecast. The BFAS method generally improves the continental budget of CO2 fluxes in the model by combining information from three sources: (1) retrospective fluxes estimated by a global flux inversion system, (2) land-use information, (3) simulated fluxes from the model. The method is shown to produce enhanced skill in the daily CO2 10-day forecasts without requiring continuous manual intervention. Therefore, it is particularly suitable for near-real-time CO2 analysis and forecasting systems.

  9. A critique of Phanerozoic climatic models involving changes in the CO 2 content of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucot, A. J.; Gray, Jane

    2001-12-01

    Critical consideration of varied Phanerozoic climatic models, and comparison of them against Phanerozoic global climatic gradients revealed by a compilation of Cambrian through Miocene climatically sensitive sediments (evaporites, coals, tillites, lateritic soils, bauxites, calcretes, etc.) suggests that the previously postulated climatic models do not satisfactorily account for the geological information. Nor do many climatic conclusions based on botanical data stand up very well when examined critically. Although this account does not deal directly with global biogeographic information, another powerful source of climatic information, we have tried to incorporate such data into our thinking wherever possible, particularly in the earlier Paleozoic. In view of the excellent correlation between CO 2 present in Antarctic ice cores, going back some hundreds of thousands of years, and global climatic gradient, one wonders whether or not the commonly postulated Phanerozoic connection between atmospheric CO 2 and global climatic gradient is more coincidence than cause and effect. Many models have been proposed that attempt to determine atmospheric composition and global temperature through geological time, particularly for the Phanerozoic or significant portions of it. Many models assume a positive correlation between atmospheric CO 2 and surface temperature, thus viewing changes in atmospheric CO 2 as playing the critical role in regulating climate/temperature, but none agree on the levels of atmospheric CO 2 through time. Prior to the relatively recent interval of time in which atmospheric CO 2 is directly measurable, a variety of biological and geological proxies have been proposed to correlate with atmospheric CO 2 level or with pCO 2/temperature. Atmospheric models may be constructed for the Pre-Cenozoic but the difficulties of assessing variables in their construction are many and complex. None of the modelers have gathered enough biological and geological data to

  10. Evaluating Satellite Observed CO2 Column by a 3-D Atmospheric Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satellite remote sensing is the latest method of measuring atmospheric CO2, which covers a wide range and makes periodic observation. But due to lack of ground-based observation sites, global satellite observed CO2 column is not evaluated efficiently. This paper assess the applicability of using GEOS-Chem model to forward simulate atmospheric CO2 for verifying Greenhouse Gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) observed CO2 column. It is shown that GEOS-Chem performs well in modelling atmospheric CO2 and there are generally no significant differences between ground-based observation and model results. According to the comparsion, the spatial and temporal distribution of XCO2 agrees well between GOSAT and GEOS-Chem. GOSAT XCO2 is turned out to be 2.6 ppm lower than the model results. The mean difference observed between GOSAT and GEOS-Chem varies from −1.8 to −3.1 ppm seasonally, with the standard deviation ranging from 1.4 to 2.1 ppm. And in general, the difference is larger in summer than that in winter, in land area than in sea area. It might have been caused by the different land-sea distribution and eco-system's changing with seasons

  11. Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P; Butler, Harry J; Strong, Craig L; McTainsh, Grant H; Leys, John F; Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A

    2013-10-01

    Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within terrestrial ecosystems, to the atmosphere and oceans. Dust export is an essential component of the carbon (C) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) budget because wind erosion contributes to the C cycle by removing selectively SOC from vast areas and transporting C dust quickly offshore; augmenting the net loss of C from terrestrial systems. However, the contribution of wind erosion to rates of C release and sequestration is poorly understood. Here, we describe how SOC dust emission is omitted from national C accounting, is an underestimated source of CO(2) and may accelerate SOC decomposition. Similarly, long dust residence times in the unshielded atmospheric environment may considerably increase CO(2) emission. We developed a first approximation to SOC enrichment for a well-established dust emission model and quantified SOC dust emission for Australia (5.83 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)) and Australian agricultural soils (0.4 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)). These amount to underestimates for CO(2) emissions of ≈10% from combined C pools in Australia (year = 2000), ≈5% from Australian Rangelands and ≈3% of Australian Agricultural Soils by Kyoto Accounting. Northern hemisphere countries with greater dust emission than Australia are also likely to have much larger SOC dust emission. Therefore, omission of SOC dust emission likely represents a considerable underestimate from those nations' C accounts. We suggest that the omission of SOC dust emission from C cycling and C accounting is a significant global source of uncertainty. Tracing the fate of wind-eroded SOC in the dust cycle is therefore essential to quantify the release of CO(2) from SOC dust to the atmosphere and the contribution of SOC deposition to downwind C sinks.

  12. NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Superfine pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 atmosphere is a new promising technology. • NO emissions of superfine pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 mixture were focused. • Coal particle sizes have significant effects on NO emissions in O2/CO2 combustion. - Abstract: The combination of O2/CO2 combustion and superfine pulverized coal combustion technology can make full use of their respective merits, and solve certain inherent disadvantages of each technology. The technology of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere is easy and feasible to be retrofitted with few reconstructions on the existing devices. It will become a useful and promising method in the future. In this paper, a one-dimensional drop-tube furnace system was adopted to study the NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere. The effects of coal particle size, coal quality, furnace temperature, stoichiometric ratio, etc. were analyzed. It is important to note that coal particle sizes have significant influence on NO emissions in the O2/CO2 combustion. For the homogeneous NO reduction, smaller coal particles can inhibit the homogeneous NO formations under fuel-rich combustion conditions, while it becomes disadvantageous for fuel-lean combustion. However, under any conditions, heterogeneous reduction is always more significant for smaller coal particle sizes, which have smoother pore surfaces and simpler pore structures. The results from this fundamental research will provide technical support for better understanding and developing this new combustion process

  13. Atmospheric pCO2 Reconstructed across the Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Schubert, B.

    2015-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are commonly associated with extreme global warming. The Early Eocene is punctuated by five such CIEs, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ca. 55.8 Ma), H1 (ca. 53.6 Ma), H2 (ca. 53.5 Ma), I1 (ca. 53.3 Ma), and I2 (ca. 53.2 Ma), each characterized by global warming. The negative CIEs are recognized in both marine and terrestrial substrates, but the terrestrial substrates exhibit a larger absolute magnitude CIE than the marine substrates. Here we reconcile the difference in CIE magnitude between the terrestrial and marine substrates for each of these events by accounting for the additional carbon isotope fractionation by C3 land plants in response to increased atmospheric pCO2. Our analysis yields background and peak pCO2 values for each of the events. Assuming a common mechanism for each event, we calculate that background pCO2 was not static across the Early Eocene, with the highest background pCO2 immediately prior to I2, the last of the five CIEs. Background pCO2 is dependent on the source used in our analysis with values ranging from 300 to 720 ppmv provided an injection of 13C-depleted carbon with δ13C value of -60‰ (e.g. biogenic methane). The peak pCO2 during each event scales according to the magnitude of CIE, and is therefore greatest during the PETM and smallest during H2. Both background and peak pCO2 are higher if we assume a mechanism of permafrost thawing (δ13C = -25‰). Our reconstruction of pCO2 across these events is consistent with trends in the δ18O value of deep-sea benthic foraminifera, suggesting a strong link between pCO2 and temperature during the Early Eocene.

  14. Future atmospheric CO2 concentration and environmental consequences for the feed market: a consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed......With the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], crops will assimilate more carbon. This will increase yields in terms of carbohydrates but dilute the content of protein and minerals in crops. This consequential life cycle assessment study modelled the environmental consequences...... produced under today’s conditions. However, this did not translate into lower greenhouse gas emissions, because the benefit of increased crop yield was counteracted by changes in the composition of the feed formulation. Among the important changes, feed produced under high [CO2] was shown to integrate 23...

  15. Atmospheric CO2 Inversions of the Mid-Continental Intensive (MCI) Region (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A.; Ogle, S. M.; Corbin, K.; Uliasz, M.; Davis, K. J.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Petron, G.; Huntzinger, D. N.

    2009-12-01

    We combine the SiB3 biosphere model with the RAMS mesoscale meteorology model and associated Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) and use CO2 observations from an extensive tower network in 2007 to correct a priori ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary productivity (GPP) fluxes for a domain consisting of most of North America. In particular, eight of these towers are located in a concentrated ring around the Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) region of the United States providing one of the densest tower networks (CO2) in the world, in the midst of one of the strongest areas of seasonal carbon flux in the world. The unique area combined with dense observations and relatively simple atmospheric transport provides an incredible test-bed to investigate atmospheric CO2 inversions. Multiple inversion approaches are compared and contrasted. The results are then investigated for sensitivity to a priori inversion designs, boundary inflow contributions, and network density.

  16. Glacial atmospheric CO2 decline in association with decrease of marine sedimentary phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG; Huanxin; ZHANG; Xingmao; WU; Nengyou; WANG; Ying; CHEN; Lihong; ZHONG; Hexian; QIN; Yachao

    2006-01-01

    The environmental and biogeochemical information extracted from the sediments collected from the northern shelf of the South China Sea shows that terrigenous inputs of phosphorus into the sea remained relatively constant, and the variation of phosphorus contents at different depths was caused by climatic and environmental changes. The findings also suggest that the vertical variation of phosphorus content was opposite to those of calcium carbonate and cadmium, and the functional correlation between CO2 and PO43? in seawater was given by calculating the chemical equilibrium, indicating that the accumulation of marine sedimentary phosphorus may have something to do with the variation of atmospheric CO2. The decreased phosphorus accumulation as well as the correspondingly-increased calcium carbonate content might be one of key factors causing glacial atmospheric CO2 decline.

  17. Recharge of the early atmosphere of Mars by impact-induced release of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael H.

    1989-01-01

    The question as to whether high impact rates early in the history of Mars could have aided in maintaining a relatively thick CO2 atmosphere is discussed. Such impacts could have released CO2 into the atmosphere by burial, by shock-induced release during impact events, and by the addition of carbon to Mars from the impacting bolides. On the assumption that cratering rates on Mars were comparable to those of the moon's Nectarial period, burial rates are a result of 'impact gardening' at the end of heavy bombardment are estimated to have ranged from 20 to 45 m/million years; at these rates, 0.1-0.2 bar of CO2 would have been released every 10 million years as a result of burial to depths at which carbonate dissociation temperatures are encountered.

  18. Effect of CO2 on Atmospheric Corrosion of UNS G10190 Steel under Thin Electrolyte Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of UNS G10190 steel under a thin electrolyte film in the atmosphere polluted by CO2 has been studied in the lab using an atmospheric corrosion monitor(ACM) in combination with XRD and SEM observations of the surface of steel. The ACM study indicated that the corrosion rate of the steel increased with increasing carbon dioxide concentration. The XRD and SEM observations showed that no carbonate was found in the corrosion product on the steel surface. The corrosion product consisted of two layers, i. e., inner and outer layer. From the experimental results, it was concluded that CO2 played an enhancing role in the atmospheric corrosion of UNS G10190 steel. The film of the corrosion product showed slight protection.

  19. Characteristics of coupled atmosphere-ocean CO2 sensitivity experiments with different ocean formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research has been coupled to a simple mixed-layer ocean model and to a coarse-grid ocean general circulation model (OGCM). This paper compares the responses of simulated climate to increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in these two coupled models. Three types of simulations were run: (1) control runs with both ocean models, with CO2 held constant at present-day concentrations, (2) instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2 (from 330 to 660 ppm) with both ocean models, and (3) a gradually increasing (transient) CO2 concentration starting at 330 ppm and increasing linearly at 1% per year, with the OGCM. The mixed-layer and OGCM cases exhibit increases of 3.5 C and 1.6 C, respectively, in globally averaged surface air temperature for the instantaneous doubling cases. The transient-forcing case warms 0.7 C by the end of 30 years. The mixed-layer ocean yields warmer-than-observed tropical temperatures and colder-than-observed temperatures in the higher latitudes. The coarse-grid OGCM simulates lower-than-observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropics and higher-than-observed SSTs and reduced sea-ice extent at higher latitudes. Sensitivity in the OGCM after 30 years is much lower than in simulations with the same atmosphere coupled to a 50-m slab-ocean mixed layer. The OGCM simulates a weaker thermohaline circulation with doubled CO2 as the high-latitude ocean-surface layer warms and freshens and the westerly wind stress decreases. Convective overturning in the OGCM decreases substantially with CO2 warming

  20. Characteristics of coupled atmosphere-ocean CO2 sensitivity experiments with different ocean formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research has been coupled to a simple mixed-layer ocean model and to a coarse-grid ocean general circulation model (OGCM). This paper compares the responses of simulated climate to increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in these two coupled models. Three types of simulations were run: (1) control runs with both ocean models, with CO2 held constant at present-day concentrations, (2) instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2 (from 330 to 660 ppm) with both ocean models, and (3) a gradually increasing (transient) CO2 concentration starting at 330 ppm and increasing linearly at 1% per year, with the OGCM. The mixed-layer and OGCM cases exhibit increases of 3.5 C and 1.6 C, respectively, in globally averaged surface air temperature for the instantaneous doubling cases. The transient-forcing case warms 0.7 C by the end of 30 years. The mixed-layer ocean yields warmer-than-observed tropical temperatures and colder-than-observed temperatures in the higher latitudes. The coarse-grid OGCM simulates lower-than-observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropics and higher-than-observed SSTs and reduced sea-ice extent at higher latitudes. Sensitivity in the OGCM after 30 years is much lower than in simulations with the same atmosphere coupled to a 50-m slab-ocean mixed layer. The OGCM simulates a weaker thermohaline circulation with doubled CO2 as the high-latitude ocean-surface layer warms and freshens and the westerly wind stress decreases. Convective overturning in the OGCM decreases substantially with CO2 warming. 46 refs.; 20 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through Carbon-13 stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Thesis ‘Studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 through carbon-13 stable isotopes’ Ivar van der Velde Making predictions of future climate is difficult, mainly due to large uncertainties in the carbon cycle. The rate at which carbon is stored in the oceans and terrestrial b

  2. Prebiotic synthesis in atmospheres containing CH4, CO, and CO2. I - Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, G.; Miller, S. L.

    1983-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of amino acids, HCN, H2CO, and NH3 using a spark discharge on various simulated primitive earth atmospheres at 25 C is investigated. Various mixtures of CH4, CO, CO2, N2, NH3, H2O, and H2 were utilized in different experiments. The yields of amino acids (1.2-4.7 percent based on the carbon) are found to be approximately independent of the H2/CH4 ratio and the presence of NH3, and a wide variety of amino acids are obtained. Glycine is found to be almost the only amino acid produced from CO and CO2 model atmospheres, with the maximum yield being about the same for the three carbon sources at high H2/carbon ratios,whereas CH4 is superior at low H2/carbon ratios. In addition, it is found that the directly synthesized NH3 together with the NH3 obtained from the hydrolysis of HCN, nitriles, and urea could have been a major source of ammonia in the atmosphere and oceans of the primitive earth. It is determined that prebiotic syntheses from HCN and H2CO to give products such as purines and sugars and some amino acids could have occurred in primitive atmospheres containing CO and CO2 provided the H2/CO and H2/CO2 ratios were greater than about 1.0.

  3. Stabilization of CO2 Atmospheres on Exoplanets around M Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Peter; Robinson, Tyler D; Li, Cheng; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the chemical stability of CO2-dominated atmospheres of M dwarf terrestrial exoplanets using a 1-dimensional photochemical model. On planets orbiting Sun-like stars, the photolysis of CO2 by Far-UV (FUV) radiation is balanced by the reaction between CO and OH, the rate of which depends on H2O abundance. By comparison, planets orbiting M dwarf stars experience higher FUV radiation compared to planets orbiting Sun-like stars, and they are also likely to have low H2O abundance due to M dwarfs having a prolonged, high-luminosity pre-main sequence (Luger & Barnes 2015). We show that, for H2O-depleted planets around M dwarfs, a CO2-dominated atmosphere is stable to conversion to CO and O2 by relying on a catalytic cycle involving H2O2 photolysis. However, this cycle breaks down for planets with atmospheric hydrogen mixing ratios below ~1 ppm, resulting in ~40% of the atmospheric CO2 being converted to CO and O2 on a time scale of 1 Myr. The increased abundance of O2 also results in high O3 concent...

  4. On the repetitive operation of a self-switched transversely excited atmosphere CO2 laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pallavi Raote; Gautam Patil; J Padma Nilaya; D J Biswas

    2010-11-01

    The repetition rate capability of self-switched transversely excited atmosphere (TEA) CO2 laser was studied for different gas flow configurations. For an optimized gas flow configuration, repetitive operation was achieved at a much smaller gas replenishment factor between two successive pulses when compared with repetitive systems energized by conventional pulsers.

  5. Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Environmental Consequences for the Feed Market: a Consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed...

  6. Airborne 2-Micron Double Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Reithmaier, Karl; Remus, Ruben; Singh, Upendra; Johnson, Will; Boyer, Charlie; Fay, James; Johnston, Susan; Murchison, Luke

    2016-06-01

    An airborne 2-micron double-pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar has been developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. This new instrument has been flown in spring of 2014 for a total of ten flights with 27 flight hours. This IPDA lidar provides high precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the results.

  7. N2O influence on isotopic measurements of atmospheric CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sirignano, C; Neubert, REM; Meijer, HAJ

    2004-01-01

    In spite of extensive efforts, even the most experienced laboratories dealing with isotopic measurements of atmospheric CO2 still suffer from poor inter-laboratory consistency. One of the complicating factors of these isotope measurements is the presence of N2O, giving rise to mass overlap in the is

  8. Soil type influences the sensitivity of nutrient dynamics to changes in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous studies have indicated that increases in atmospheric CO2 have the potential to decrease nitrogen availability through the process of progressive nitrogen limitation (PNL). The timing and magnitude of PNL in field experiments is varied due to numerous ecosystem processes. Here we examined ...

  9. The future role of reforestation in reducing buildup of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the options posed for mitigating the buildup of atmospheric CO2 is planting new forest areas to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. Among the questions of interest in modeling the global carbon cycle is the extent to which reforestation is likely to succeed in providing physical removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. There are many strategies for using forest land to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of CO2: decreasing the rate at which forests are cleared for other land uses, increasing the density of carbon storage in existing forests, improving the rate and efficiency at which forest products are used in the place of other energy intensive products, substitution of renewable wood fuels for fossil fuels, improved management of forests and agroforestry, and increasing the amount of land in standing forest. Because increasing the area of forests has social, political, and economic limitations; in addition to physical limitations; it is hard to envision a large increase in forest area except where there are associated economic benefits. The authors speculation is that, over the next several decades, the forest strategies most likely to be pursued for the express purpose of CO2 mitigation are those which provide more or more-efficient substitution of forest products for energy or energy-intensive resources and that the physical accumulation of additional carbon in forests will be of lesser importance

  10. Leakage and atmospheric dispersion of CO2 associated with carbon capture and storage projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzoldi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Climate change is affecting planet Earth. The main cause is anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, the principal one being carbon dioxide, released in the atmosphere as a by-product of the combustion of hydrocarbons for the generation of energy. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a technology that would prevent carbon dioxide from being emitted into the atmosphere by safely sequestering it underground. For so doing, CO2 must be captured at large emission points and transported at high ...

  11. Rates of consumption of atmospheric CO2 through the weathering of loess during the next 100 yr of climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pollard

    2012-08-01

    lysocline expected in the oceans with increasing atmospheric CO2, we predict an acceleration of the lysocline deepening in soils in the central area of the Mississippi Valley, but a slowdown of its deepening in the Southern and Northern section. This result illustrates the complex behavior of carbonate weathering facing short term global climate change. Predicting the global response of terrestrial weathering to increased atmospheric CO2 and temperature in the future will mostly depend upon our ability to make precise assessments of which areas of the globe increase or decrease in precipitation and soil drainage.

  12. Rates of consumption of atmospheric CO2 through the weathering of loess during the next 100 yr of climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pollard

    2013-01-01

    pH and shallower lysocline expected in the oceans with increasing atmospheric CO2, we predict a deeper lysocline in future soils. Furthermore, in the central Mississippi Valley, soil lysocline deepening accelerates but in the south and north the deepening rate slows. This result illustrates the complex behavior of carbonate weathering facing short term global climate change. Predicting the global response of terrestrial weathering to increased atmospheric CO2 and temperature in the future will mostly depend upon our ability to make precise assessments of which areas of the globe increase or decrease in precipitation and soil drainage.

  13. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Toumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA, comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to

  14. Glacial-Interglacial Atmospheric CO2 Change--The Glacial Burial Hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning ZENG

    2003-01-01

    Organic carbon buried under the great ice sheets of the Northern Hemisphere is suggested to bethe missing link in the atmospheric CO2 change over the glacial-interglacial cycles. At glaciation, theadvancement of continental ice sheets buries vegetation and soil carbon accumulated during warmer pe-riods. At deglaciation, this burial carbon is released back into the atmosphere. In a simulation over twoglacial-interglacial cycles using a synchronously coupled atmosphere-land-ocean carbon model forced byreconstructed climate change, it is found that there is a 547-Gt terrestrial carbon release from glacialmaximum to interglacial, resulting in a 60-Gt (about 30-ppmv) increase in the atmospheric CO2, with theremainder absorbed by the ocean in a scenario in which ocean acts as a passive buffer. This is in contrastto previous estimates of a land uptake at deglaciation. This carbon source originates from glacial burial,continental shelf, and other land areas in response to changes in ice cover, sea level, and climate. The inputof light isotope enriched terrestrial carbon causes atmospheric 513C to drop by about 0.3% at deglaciation,followed by a rapid rise towards a high interglacial value in response to oceanic warming and regrowthon land. Together with other ocean based mechanisms such as change in ocean temperature, the glacialburial hypothesis may offer a full explanation of the observed 80 100-ppmv atmospheric CO2 change.

  15. Temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 and CO at Ahmedabad in western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Naveen; Lal, Shyam; Venkataramani, S.; Patra, Prabir K.; Sheel, Varun

    2016-05-01

    About 70 % of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is emitted from the megacities and urban areas of the world. In order to draw effective emission mitigation policies for combating future climate change as well as independently validating the emission inventories for constraining their large range of uncertainties, especially over major metropolitan areas of developing countries, there is an urgent need for greenhouse gas measurements over representative urban regions. India is a fast developing country, where fossil fuel emissions have increased dramatically in the last three decades and are predicted to continue to grow further by at least 6 % per year through to 2025. The CO2 measurements over urban regions in India are lacking. To overcome this limitation, simultaneous measurements of CO2 and carbon monoxide (CO) have been made at Ahmedabad, a major urban site in western India, using a state-of-the-art laser-based cavity ring down spectroscopy technique from November 2013 to May 2015. These measurements enable us to understand the diurnal and seasonal variations in atmospheric CO2 with respect to its sources (both anthropogenic and biospheric) and biospheric sinks. The observed annual average concentrations of CO2 and CO are 413.0 ± 13.7 and 0.50 ± 0.37 ppm respectively. Both CO2 and CO show strong seasonality with lower concentrations (400.3 ± 6.8 and 0.19 ± 0.13 ppm) during the south-west monsoon and higher concentrations (419.6 ± 22.8 and 0.72 ± 0.68 ppm) during the autumn (SON) season. Strong diurnal variations are also observed for both the species. The common factors for the diurnal cycles of CO2 and CO are vertical mixing and rush hour traffic, while the influence of biospheric fluxes is also seen in the CO2 diurnal cycle. Using CO and CO2 covariation, we differentiate the anthropogenic and biospheric components of CO2 and found significant contributions of biospheric respiration and anthropogenic emissions in the late night (00:00-05:00 h, IST

  16. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO2 responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO2 responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO2 responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO2 exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO2 scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  17. Persistent stimulation of photosynthesis in short rotation coppice mulberry under elevated CO2 atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhana Sekhar, Kalva; Rachapudi, Venkata Sreeharsha; Mudalkar, Shalini; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2014-08-01

    Current study was undertaken to elucidate the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry under elevated CO2 atmosphere (550μmolmol(-1)). Throughout the experimental period, elevated CO2 grown mulberry plants showed significant increase in light saturated photosynthetic rates (A') by increasing intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci) despite reduced stomatal conductance (gs). Reduced gs was linked to decrease in transpiration (E) resulting in improved water use efficiency (WUE). There was a significant increase in carboxylation efficiency (CE) of Rubisco, apparent quantum efficiency (AQE), light and CO2 saturated photosynthetic rates (AMAX), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), chlorophyll a fluorescence characteristics (FV/FM and PIABS), starch and other carbohydrates in high CO2 grown plants which clearly demonstrate no photosynthetic acclimation in turn resulted marked increase in above and below ground biomass. Our results strongly suggest that short rotation forestry (<1year) with mulberry plantations should be effective to mitigate raising CO2 levels as well as for the production of renewable bio-energy.

  18. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda S.; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-02-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results suggest that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oligocene transition and that when a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed, the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  19. Potential effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere has steadily increased from 280 parts per million (ppm) in preindustrial times to 381 ppm today and is predicted by some models to double within the next century. Some of the important pathways whereby changes in atmospheric CO2 may impact coastal wetlands include changes in temperature, rainfall, and hurricane intensity (fig. 1). Increases in CO2 can contribute to global warming, which may (1) accelerate sea-level rise through melting of polar ice fields and steric expansion of oceans, (2) alter rainfall patterns and salinity regimes, and (3) change the intensity and frequency of tropical storms and hurricanes. Sea-level rise combined with changes in storm activity may affect erosion and sedimentation rates and patterns in coastal wetlands and maintenance of soil elevations.Feedback loops between plant growth and hydroedaphic conditions also contribute to maintenance of marsh elevations through accumulation of organic matter. Although increasing CO2 concentration may contribute to global warming and climate changes, it may also have a direct impact on plant growth and development by stimulating photosynthesis or improving water use efficiency. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are examining responses of wetland plants to elevated CO2 concentration and other factors. This research will lead to a better understanding of future changes in marsh species composition, successional rates and patterns, ecological functioning, and vulnerability to sea-level rise and other global change factors.

  20. Error characterization of CO2 vertical mixing in the atmospheric transport model WRF-VPRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Karstens

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the dominant uncertainties in inverse estimates of regional CO2 surface-atmosphere fluxes is related to model errors in vertical transport within the planetary boundary layer (PBL. In this study we present the results from a synthetic experiment using the atmospheric model WRF-VPRM to realistically simulate transport of CO2 for large parts of the European continent at 10 km spatial resolution. To elucidate the impact of vertical mixing error on modeled CO2 mixing ratios we simulated a month during the growing season (August 2006 with different commonly used parameterizations of the PBL (Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ and Yonsei-University (YSU scheme. To isolate the effect of transport errors we prescribed the same CO2 surface fluxes for both simulations. Differences in simulated CO2 mixing ratios (model bias were on the order of 3 ppm during daytime with larger values during night. We present a simple method to reduce this bias by 70–80% when the true height of the mixed layer is known.

  1. Error characterization of CO2 vertical mixing in the atmospheric transport model WRF-VPRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Karstens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the dominant uncertainties in inverse estimates of regional CO2 surface-atmosphere fluxes is related to model errors in vertical transport within the planetary boundary layer (PBL. In this study we present the results from a synthetic experiment using the atmospheric model WRF-VPRM to realistically simulate transport of CO2 for large parts of the European continent at 10 km spatial resolution. To elucidate the impact of vertical mixing error on modeled CO2 mixing ratios we simulated a month during the growing season (August 2006 with different commonly used parameterizations of the PBL (Mellor-Yamada-Janjić (MYJ and Yonsei-University (YSU scheme. To isolate the effect of transport errors we prescribed the same CO2 surface fluxes for both simulations. Differences in simulated CO2 mixing ratios (model bias were on the order of 3 ppm during daytime with larger values at night. We present a simple method to reduce this bias by 70–80% when the true height of the mixed layer is known.

  2. Why CO2 cools the middle atmosphere - a consolidating model perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Helge F.; Bathiany, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Complex models of the atmosphere show that increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, while warming the surface and troposphere, lead to lower temperatures in the stratosphere and mesosphere. This cooling, which is often referred to as "stratospheric cooling", is evident also in observations and considered to be one of the fingerprints of anthropogenic global warming. Although the responsible mechanisms have been identified, they have mostly been discussed heuristically, incompletely, or in combination with other effects such as ozone depletion, leaving the subject prone to misconceptions. Here we use a one-dimensional window-grey radiation model of the atmosphere to illustrate the physical essence of the mechanisms by which CO2 cools the stratosphere and mesosphere: (i) the blocking effect, associated with a cooling due to the fact that CO2 absorbs radiation at wavelengths where the atmosphere is already relatively opaque, and (ii) the indirect solar effect, associated with a cooling in places where an additional (solar) heating term is present (which on Earth is particularly the case in the upper parts of the ozone layer). By contrast, in the grey model without solar heating within the atmosphere, the cooling aloft is only a transient blocking phenomenon that is completely compensated as the surface attains its warmer equilibrium. Moreover, we quantify the relative contribution of these effects by simulating the response to an abrupt increase in CO2 (and chlorofluorocarbon) concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model. We find that the two permanent effects contribute roughly equally to the CO2-induced cooling, with the indirect solar effect dominating around the stratopause and the blocking effect dominating otherwise.

  3. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M; Batke, Sven P; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency.

  4. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M.; Batke, Sven P.; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency. PMID:27605929

  5. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M; Batke, Sven P; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency. PMID:27605929

  6. Novel applications of carbon isotopes in atmospheric CO2: what can atmospheric measurements teach us about processes in the biosphere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. C. White

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, measurements of carbon isotopes in atmospheric CO2 (δ13CO2 have been used to partition fluxes between terrestrial and ocean carbon pools. However, novel analytical approaches combined with an increase in the spatial extent and frequency of δ13CO2 measurements allow us to conduct a global analysis of δ13CO2 variability to infer the isotopic composition of source CO2 to the atmosphere (δs. This global analysis yields coherent seasonal patterns of isotopic enrichment. Our results indicate that seasonal values of δs are more highly correlated with vapor pressure deficit (r=0.404 than relative humidity (r=0.149. We then evaluate two widely used stomatal conductance models and determine that Leuning Model, which is primarily driven by vapor pressure deficit is more effective globally at predicting δs (RMSE = 1.7 ‰ than the Ball-Berry model, which is driven by relative humidity (RMSE = 2.8 ‰. Thus stomatal conductance on a global scale may be more sensitive to changes in vapor pressure deficit than relative humidity. This approach highlights a new application of using δ13CO2 measurements to test global models.

  7. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. W.; Andres, R. J.; Davis, K. J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, D. J.; Huntzinger, D. N.; de Jong, B.; Kurz, W. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Vargas, R.; Wei, Y.; West, T. O.; Woodall, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990-2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, "best" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990-2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr-1 and assuming the estimate of -472 Tg C yr-1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was 1720:472, or nearly 4:1.

  8. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A.W.; Andres, R.J.; Davis, K.J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, D.J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, W.A.; McGuire, Anthony; Vargas, Rodrigo I.; Wei, Y.; West, Tristram O.; Woodall, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land–atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990–2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from −890 to −280 Tg C yr−1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, "best" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are −472 ± 281 Tg C yr−1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and −360 Tg C yr−1 (with an interquartile range of −496 to −337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990–2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr−1 and assuming the estimate of −472 Tg C yr−1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was

  9. DISTRIBUTION OF CO2 IN SATURN'S ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/CIRS INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the CO2 distribution in Saturn's atmosphere based on analysis of infrared spectral observations of Saturn made by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The Cassini spacecraft was launched in 1997 October, inserted in Saturn's orbit in 2004 July, and has been successfully making infrared observations of Saturn, its rings, Titan, and other icy satellites during well-planned orbital tours. The infrared observations, made with a dual Fourier transform spectrometer in both nadir- and limb-viewing modes, cover spectral regions of 10-1400 cm–1, with the option of variable apodized spectral resolutions from 0.53 to 15 cm–1. An analysis of the observed spectra with well-developed radiative transfer models and spectral inversion techniques has the potential to provide knowledge of Saturn's thermal structure and composition with global distributions of a series of gases. In this paper, we present an analysis of a large observational data set for retrieval of Saturn's CO2 distribution utilizing spectral features of CO2 in the Q-branch of the ν2 band, and discuss its possible relationship to the influx of interstellar dust grains. With limited spectral regions available for analysis, due to low densities of CO2 and interference from other gases, the retrieved CO2 profile is obtained as a function of a model photochemical profile, with the retrieved values at atmospheric pressures in the region of ∼1-10 mbar levels. The retrieved CO2 profile is found to be in good agreement with the model profile based on Infrared Space Observatory measurements with mixing ratios of ∼4.9 × 10–10 at atmospheric pressures of ∼1 mbar

  10. CO2 and CH4 fluxes and carbon balance in the atmospheric interaction of boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    associated heterotrophic CO2 release. Much of the spatial variability in the gas fluxes was attributed to the microsite properties in natural peatlands. Winter CO2 and CH4 emissions were important components in the C balance, comprising 10Ae30 % of the annual gas release from peat. According to the simulation results, the CH4 release from expanding peatlands could have contributed to the early interglacial atmospheric warming during several millennia, at least prior to the ombrotrophication and increased peat accumulation from about 3500 years BP onwards. The atmospheric cooling effect by peat accumulation is less clear. (orig.)

  11. Spatial variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the ARCTAS-CARB 2008 Summer Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrevu, K. P.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) was a major NASA field campaign designed to understand the transport and transformation of trace gases and aerosols on transcontinental and intercontinental scales and their impact on the composition of the arctic atmosphere and climate. Preceding the summer ARCTAS deployment, measurements were conducted over the state of California in collaboration with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) utilizing the airborne chemistry payload already integrated on the NASA DC-8. In situ CO2 measurements were made using a modified infrared CO2 gas analyzer having a precision of 0.1 ppmv and accuracy of ±0.25 ppmv traceable to the WMO scale. This analysis focuses on the atmospheric CO2 variability and biospheric/atmospheric exchange over California. We used multi-satellite remote sensing datasets to relate airborne observations of CO2 to infer sources and sinks. Georeferencing the airborne CO2 transect data with the LANDSAT derived land cover datasets over California suggested significant spatial variations. The airborne CO2 concentrations were found to be 375-380ppm over the Pacific ocean, 385-391ppm in the highly vegetated agricultural areas, 400-420 in the near coastal areas and greater than 425ppmv in the urban areas. Analysis from MODIS fire products suggested significant fires in northern California. CO2 emissions exceeded 425ppmv in the fire affected regions, where mostly Douglas and White Fir conifers and mixed Chaparral vegetation was burnt. Analysis from GOES-East and GOES-West visible satellite imagery suggested significant smoke plumes moving from northern California towards Nevada and Idaho. To infer the biospheric uptake of CO2, we tested the potential correlations between airborne CO2 data and MODIS normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI). Results suggested significant anti-correlations between the airborne CO2 data and

  12. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (2, and are associated with 71–76 % of CO2 emissions from global final energy use. Although many cities have set voluntary climate plans, their CO2 emissions are not evaluated by Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV procedures that play a key role for market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010 during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma. We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to

  13. Carbon and energy yields in prebiotic syntheses using atmospheres containing CH4, CO and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1984-01-01

    Yields based on carbon are usually reported in prebiotic experiments, while energy yields (moles/cal) are more useful in estimating the yields of products that would have been obtained from the primitive atmosphere of the earth. Energy yields for the synthesis of HCN and H2CO from a spark discharge were determined for various mixtures of CH4, CO, CO2, H2, H2O, N2 an NH3. The maximum yields of HCN and H2CO from CH4, CO, and CO2 as carbon sources are about 4 x 10 to the -8th moles/cal.

  14. Phytochemical changes in leaves of subtropical grasses and fynbos shrubs at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattas, D.; Stock, W. D.; Mabusela, W. T.; Green, I. R.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant polyphenolic, tannin, nitrogen, phosphorus and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations were investigated in leaves of subtropical grass and fynbos shrub species. The hypothesis tested was that carbon-based secondary compounds would increase when carbon gain is in excess of growth requirements. This premise was tested in two ecosystems involving plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms and growth strategies. The first ecosystem comprised grasses from a C 4-dominated, subtropical grassland, where three plots were subjected to three different free air CO 2 enrichment treatments, i.e., elevated (600 to 800 μmol mol -1), intermediate (400 μmol mol -1) and ambient atmospheric CO 2. One of the seven grass species, Alloteropsis semialata, had a C 3 photosynthetic pathway while the other grasses were all C 4. The second ecosystem was simulated in a microcosm experiment where three fynbos species were grown in open-top chambers at ambient and 700 μmol mol -1 atmospheric CO 2 in low nutrient acid sands typical of south western coastal and mountain fynbos ecosystems. Results showed that polyphenolics and tannins did not increase in the grass species under elevated CO 2 and only in Leucadendron laureolum among the fynbos species. Similarly, foliar nitrogen content of grasses was largely unaffected by elevated CO 2, and among the fynbos species, only L. laureolum and Leucadendron xanthoconus showed changes in foliar nitrogen content under elevated CO 2, but these were of different magnitude. The overall decrease in nitrogen and phosphorus and consequent increase in C:N and C:P ratio in both ecosystems, along with the increase in polyphenolics and tannins in L. laureolum in the fynbos ecosystem, may negatively affect forage quality and decomposition rates. It is concluded that fast growing grasses do not experience sink limitation and invest extra carbon into growth rather than polyphenolics and

  15. What would dense atmospheric observation networks bring to the quantification of city CO2 emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Broquet, Grégoire; Ciais, Philippe; Bellassen, Valentin; Vogel, Felix; Chevallier, Frédéric; Xueref-Remy, Irène; Wang, Yilong

    2016-06-01

    Cities currently covering only a very small portion ( road transport, by 18 % for the production of energy by power plants, and by 31 % for total emissions. These results indicate that such a high number of stations would be likely required for the monitoring of sectoral emissions in Paris using this observation-model framework. They demonstrate some high potential that atmospheric inversions can contribute to the monitoring and/or the verification of city CO2 emissions (baseline) and CO2 emission reductions (commitments) and the advantage that could be brought by the current developments of lower-cost medium precision (LCMP) sensors.

  16. Abiotic formation of O2 and O3 in high-CO2 terrestrial atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Segura, A; Kasting, J F; Crisp, D; Cohen, M

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that high amounts of ozone (O3) and oxygen (O2) may be produced abiotically in atmospheres with high concentrations of CO2. The abiotic production of these two gases, which are also characteristic of photosynthetic life processes, could pose a potential "false-positive" for remote-sensing detection of life on planets around other stars.We show here that such false positives are unlikely on any planet that possesses abundant liquid water, as rainout of oxidized species onto a reduced planetary surface should ensure that atmospheric H2 concentrations remain relatively high, and that O2 and O3 remain low. Our aim is to determine the amount of O3 and O2 formed in a high CO2 atmosphere for a habitable planet without life. We use a photochemical model that considers hydrogen (H2) escape and a detailed hydrogen balance to calculate the O2 and O3 formed on planets with 0.2 of CO2 around the Sun, and 0.02, 0.2 and 2 bars of CO2 around a young Sun-like star with higher UV radiation. The ...

  17. Climate variability as reflected in a regional atmospheric CO2 record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses a 15-year long atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio record measured at a mid-continental, low-elevation station (Hegyhatsal, Hungary) to reveal the effect of regional climate variability. While the long-term trend and the temporal fluctuation of the growth rate of CO2 mixing ratio follow the global tendencies to a large extent, the shorter-term variations show special features. We present the distorted seasonal cycle caused by the seasonality in the atmospheric vertical mixing and the tendentious change in its shape, which can be attributed to the gradual warming and to the resulted prolongation of the growing season. The decreasing summer diurnal amplitude and the decreasing seasonal amplitude in the mixing ratio, furthermore the higher than average summer CO2 mixing ratio growth rate in the first period of the measurements (1994-2003) with generally rising temperature and decreasing precipitation are explained as the consequence of the reduced activity of the biosphere in the influence area of the station and that of the reduced biomass under environmental conditions getting increasingly unfavourable. The explanation is supported by the co-located tall tower surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange measurements and by the crop yield statistics of the dominantly agricultural region around the station.

  18. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-07-13

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) can affect biotic and abiotic conditions in soil, such as microbial activity and water content. In turn, these changes might be expected to alter the production and consumption of the important greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) (refs 2, 3). However, studies on fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) from soil under increased atmospheric CO(2) have not been quantitatively synthesized. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased CO(2) (ranging from 463 to 780 parts per million by volume) stimulates both N(2)O emissions from upland soils and CH(4) emissions from rice paddies and natural wetlands. Because enhanced greenhouse-gas emissions add to the radiative forcing of terrestrial ecosystems, these emissions are expected to negate at least 16.6 per cent of the climate change mitigation potential previously predicted from an increase in the terrestrial carbon sink under increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. Our results therefore suggest that the capacity of land ecosystems to slow climate warming has been overestimated.

  19. Response of biomass and nitrogen yield of white clover to radiation and atmospheric CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the present study were to test (i) whether the effect of season-long CO2 enrichment on plant dry matter production of white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Karina) depends on the temperature or can solely be explained by changes in radiation use efficiency, and (ii) whether the atmospheric CO2 concentration affects the relationship between tissue %N and plant biomass. Plants were grown in pots with adequate nutrient and water supply and were exposed to ambient and above ambient CO2 concentrations (approximately +80 ppm, +160 ppm, +280 ppm) in open-top chambers for two seasons. Nitrogen fertilizer was given only before the experiment started to promote N2 fixation. Plants were clipped to a height of 5 cm, when the canopy had reached a height of about 20 cm and when the CO2 effect had not been diminished due to self-shading of the leaves. Photon exposure (400–700 nm) measured above the canopy was linearly related to the above ground biomass, the leaf area index and the nitrogen yield (r2 > 0.94). The slopes of the curves depended on the CO2 concentration. Since most of the radiation (>90%) was absorbed by the foliage, the slopes were used to calculate the CO2 effect on the radiation use efficiency of biomass production, which is shown to increase curvilinearly between 380 and 660 ppm CO2 from 2.7 g MJ−1 to 3.9 g MJ−1. CO2 enrichment increased above ground biomass by increasing the leaf number, the individual leaf weight and the leaf area; specific leaf weight was not affected. The relative CO2 response varied between harvests; there was a slight but not significant positive relationship with mean daytime temperature. At the beginning of the season, plant nitrogen concentration in the above ground biomass was decreased by CO2 enrichment. However, at later growth stages, when the plants depended solely on N2 fixation, nitrogen concentration was found to be increased when the nitrogen concentration value was adjusted for the decrease due to the

  20. Carbon Dioxide Production Responsibility on the Basis of comparing in Situ and mean CO2 Atmosphere Concentration Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, S Cht; Vachev, B

    2008-01-01

    The method is proposed for estimation of regional CO2 and other greenhouses and pollutants production responcibility. The comparison of CO2 local emissions reduction data with world CO2 atmosphere data will permit easy to judge for overall effect in curbing not only global warming but also chemical polution.

  1. A review of elevated atmospheric CO2 effects on plant growth and water relations: implications for horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical records provide incontestable evidence for the global rise in CO2 concentration in the earth's atmosphere. Plant growth can be stimulated by elevation of CO2; photosynthesis increases and economic yield is often enhanced. The application of more CO2 can increase plant water use efficiency ...

  2. Atmospheric Modeling and Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, E. D.; Turnbull, J. C.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M. W.; Zondervan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Emissions from large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions are currently determined from self-reported "bottom-up" inventory data, with an uncertainty of about 20% for individual power plants. As the world moves towards a regulatory environment, there is a need for independent, objective measurements of these emissions both to improve the accuracy of and to verify the reported amounts. "Top-down" atmospheric methods have the potential to independently constrain point source emissions, combining observations with atmospheric transport modeling to derive emission estimates. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies and model sensitivities for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes and vents CO2 from locally extracted natural gas at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We measured the CO2ff content in three different types of observations: air samples collected in flasks over a period of a few minutes, sodium hydroxide solution exposed the atmosphere, and grass samples from the surrounding farmland, the latter two representing ~1 week integrated averages. We use the WindTrax Lagrangian plume dispersion model to compare these atmospheric observations with "expected" values given the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the short-term variability in the flask samples but does well in representing the longer-term averages from grass samples, suggesting that passive integrated-sampling methods have the potential to monitor long-term emissions. Our results indicate that using this method, point source emissions can be verified to within about 30%. Further improvements in atmospheric transport modelling are needed to reduce uncertainties. In view of this, we discuss model strengths and weaknesses and explore model sensitivity to meteorological conditions

  3. Rapid exchange between atmospheric CO2 and carbonate anion intercalated within magnesium rich layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Pathik; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Eisaku, Nii; Sasai, Ryo; Labuta, Jan; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Iyi, Nobuo

    2014-10-22

    The carbon cycle, by which carbon atoms circulate between atmosphere, oceans, lithosphere, and the biosphere of Earth, is a current hot research topic. The carbon cycle occurring in the lithosphere (e.g., sedimentary carbonates) is based on weathering and metamorphic events so that its processes are considered to occur on the geological time scale (i.e., over millions of years). In contrast, we have recently reported that carbonate anions intercalated within a hydrotalcite (Mg0.75Al0.25(OH)2(CO3)0.125·yH2O), a class of a layered double hydroxide (LDH), are dynamically exchanging on time scale of hours with atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. (Ishihara et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 18040-18043). The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by infrared spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between the initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. In this article, we report the significant influence of Mg/Al ratio of LDH on the carbonate anion exchange dynamics. Of three LDHs of various Mg/Al ratios of 2, 3, or 4, magnesium-rich LDH (i.e., Mg/Al ratio = 4) underwent extremely rapid exchange of carbonate anions, and most of the initially intercalated carbonate anions were replaced with carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2 within 30 min. Detailed investigations by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, adsorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR revealed that magnesium rich LDH has chemical and structural features that promote the exchange of carbonate anions. Our results indicate that the unique interactions between LDH and CO2 can be optimized simply by varying the chemical composition of LDH, implying that LDH is a promising material for CO2 storage and/or separation.

  4. The impact on atmospheric CO2 of iron fertilization induced changes in the ocean's biological pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. McWilliams

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Using numerical simulations, we quantify the impact of changes in the ocean's biological pump on the air-sea balance of CO2 by fertilizing a small surface patch in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the eastern tropical Pacific with iron. Decade-long fertilization experiments are conducted in a basin-scale, eddy-permitting coupled physical/biogeochemical/ecological model. In contrast to previous studies, we find that most of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC removed from the euphotic zone by the enhanced biological export is replaced by uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. Atmospheric uptake efficiencies, the ratio of the perturbation in air-sea CO2 flux to the perturbation in export flux across 100 m, integrated over 10 years, are 0.75 to 0.93 in our patch size-scale experiments. The atmospheric uptake efficiency is insensitive to the duration of the experiment. The primary factor controlling the atmospheric uptake efficiency is the vertical distribution of the enhanced biological production and export. Iron fertilization at the surface tends to induce production anomalies primarily near the surface, leading to high efficiencies. In contrast, mechanisms that induce deep production anomalies (e.g. altered light availability tend to have a low uptake efficiency, since most of the removed DIC is replaced by lateral and vertical transport and mixing. Despite high atmospheric uptake efficiencies, patch-scale iron fertilization of the ocean's biological pump tends to remove little CO2 from the atmosphere over the decadal timescale considered here.

  5. Operational constraints and strategies for systems to effect the sustainable, solar-driven reduction of atmospheric CO_2

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yikai; Lewis, Nathan S.; Xiang, Chengxiang

    2015-01-01

    The operational constraints for a 6-electron/6-proton CO_2 reduction system that operates at the concentration of CO_2 in the current atmosphere (p_(CO_2) = 400 ppm) have been evaluated on a variety of scale lengths that span from laboratory scale to global scale. Due to the low concentration of CO_2 in the atmosphere, limitations due to mass transport of CO_2 from the tropopause have been evaluated through five different regions, each with different characteristic length scales: the troposph...

  6. Observations and modelling of the global distribution and long-term trend of atmospheric 14CO2

    OpenAIRE

    LEVIN Ingeborg; Naegler, Tobias; Kromer, Bernd; Diehl, Moritz; Francey, Roger J.; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J.; Steele, L. Paul; Wagenbach, Dietmar; Weller, Rolf; Worthy, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Global high-precision atmospheric Δ14CO2 records covering the last two decades are presented, and evaluated in terms of changing (radio)carbon sources and sinks, using the coarse-grid carbon cycle model GRACE. Dedicated simulations of global trends and interhemispheric differences with respect to atmospheric CO2 as well as δ13CO2 and Δ14CO2, are shown to be in good agreement with the available observations (1940–2008). While until the 1990s the decreasing trend of Δ14CO2 was governed by equil...

  7. Atmospheric CO2 Amplification of Orbitally Forced Changes in the Hydrological Cycle in the Early Mesozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, P. E.; Schaller, M. F.; Kent, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Models of increasing atmospheric CO2 predict an intensification of the hydrological cycle coupled with warming, possibly amplifying effects of orbitally-forced fluctuations. While there is some Pleistocene evidence of this, CO2 concentrations were much lower than projected for the future. For the potentially more relevant Early Mesozoic, with CO2 >1000 ppm, we observe that both the soil carbonate and stomatal proxies for CO2 strongly and positively correlate with climatic-precession variance in correlative continental and marine strata of both eastern North America and Europe with temporal correlation robustly supported by magneto-, astro-, and U-Pb zircon geochronology. Eastern North American lacustrine and paleosol strata are generally characterized by >3000 ppm CO2 over most of the Norian (228-207 Ma) dropping to ~1000-3000 ppm during the succeeding latest Norian to late Rhaetian (207 to 201.6 Ma) correlative with a dramatic drop in the amplitude of the response to orbital forcing. This is followed by an extraordinary doubling to nearly tripling of CO2 (~2000-5000 ppm) in the latest Rhaetian to Early Jurassic (201.6 to 200.6 Ma) and a concurrent profound increase in the amplitude of the apparent climatic-precession variance during the eruption of the massive Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. Decreasing CO2 (~1000-2000 ppm) afterward is tracked by decreasing amplitude in the orbitally-paced cyclicity. Likewise, in the UK, high amplitude cyclicity in the lacustrine to paralic Twyning Md. Fm. gives way upward into the paralic Blue Anchor and marine Rhaetian Westbury fms in which lithological cyclicity is muted. Again, the amplitude of the orbitially-paced lithological cyclicity dramatically increases into the paralic to marine late Rhaetian Lilstock Fm. and marine latest Rhaetian to Early Jurassic Blue Lias. Parallel and correlative transitions are seen in at least western Germany. The agreement between the continental eastern US and paralic to marine European

  8. Stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO_{2} and CH_{4} over Siberia measured at ZOTTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, Anastasiya; Prokushkin, Anatily; Lavric, Jost; Heimann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The boreal and arctic zones of Siberia housing the large amounts of carbon stored in the living biomass of forests and wetlands, as well as in soils and specifically permafrost, play a crucial role in earth's global carbon cycle. The long-term studies of greenhouse gases (GHG) concentrations are important instruments to analyze the response of these systems to climate warming. In parallel to GHG observations, the measurements of their stable isotopic composition can provide useful information for distinguishing contribution of individual GHG source to their atmospheric variations, since each source has its own isotopic signature. In this study we report first results of laboratory analyses of the CO2 and CH4 concentrations, the stable isotope ratio of δ13C-CO2, δ18O-CO2, δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 measured in one-liter glass flasks which were obtained from 301 height of ZOTTO (Zotino Tall Tower Observatory, near 60° N, 90° E, about 20 km west of the Yenisei River) during 2008 - 2013 and 2010 - 2013 for stable isotope composition of CO2 and CH4. The magnitudes of δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 in a seasonal cycle are -1.4±0.1‰ (-7.6 - -9.0‰) and -2.2±0.2‰ (-0.1 - -2.3‰), respectively. The δ13C-CO2 seasonal pattern opposes the CO2 concentrations, with a gradual enrichment in heavy isotope occurring during May - July, reflecting its discrimination in photosynthesis, and further depletion in August - September as photosynthetic activity decreases comparatively to ecosystem respiration. Relationship between the CO2 concentrations and respective δ13C-CO2 (Keeling plot) reveals isotopic source signature for growing season (May - September) -27.3±1.4‰ and -30.4±2.5‰ for winter (January - March). The behavior of δ18O-CO2 associated with both high photosynthetic rate in the June (enrichment of atmospheric CO2 by 18O as consequence of CO2 equilibrium with "heavy" leaf water) and respiratory activity of forest floor in June - October (depletion of respired CO2 by 18O

  9. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbon allocation patterns in Eriphorum vaginatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gases of particular importance to the human induced greenhouse effect are, e.g., CO2 and CH4. Natural and agricultural wetlands together contribute with over 40 % of the annual atmospheric emissions of CH4 and are, therefore, considered to be the largest single contributor of this gas to the troposphere. There is a growing concern that increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will stimulate CH4 production and emission from wetland ecosystems, resulting in feedback mechanisms that in future will increase the radiative forcing of these ecosystems. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on fluxes of CO2 and CH4, biomass allocation patterns and amount of labile substrates (i.e. low molecular weight organic acids, OAs) for CH4 production in the root vicinity of Eriophorum vaginatum. Eriophorum cores and plants were collected at Fäjemyr, a temperate ombrotrophic bog situated in the south of Sweden. These were cultivated under controlled environmental conditions in an atmosphere of 390 or 800 ppm of CO2 (n=5 per treatment). After a one month development period gas fluxes were measured twice per week over one month using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (Gasmet Dx-4030) and OAs using a liquid chromatography-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry system (Dionex ICS-2500 and Applied Biosystems 2000 Q-Trap triple quadrupole MS). The results clearly show that elevated CO2 significantly affects all measured parts of the carbon cycle. Greenhouse gas fluxes were significantly (repeated measures test) higher under elevated CO2 conditions, NEE p Reco p = 0.005, GPP p = 0.012 and CH4 p = 0.022. As were biomass of leaves, roots and concentration of OAs around the roots of plants, p = 0.045, p = 0 = 0.045 and p = 0.045 respectively (Kruskal wallis 1-way anova). The study shows higher CH4 emissions under elevated CO2 and that this may be due to a priming effect, due to input of fresh labile-C via living roots and possibly

  10. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  11. Atmospheric CO2, δ(O2/N2 and δ13CO2 measurements at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland: results from a flask sampling intercomparison program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. T. van der Laan-Luijkx

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present results from an intercomparison program of CO2, δ(O2/N2 and δ13CO2 measurements from atmospheric flask samples. Flask samples are collected on a bi-weekly basis at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch in Switzerland for three European laboratories: the University of Bern, Switzerland, the University of Groningen, the Netherlands and the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany. Almost 4 years of measurements of CO2, δ(O2/N2 and δ13CO2 are compared in this paper to assess the measurement compatibility of the three laboratories. While the average difference for the CO2 measurements between the laboratories in Bern and Jena meets the required compatibility goal as defined by the World Meteorological Organization, the standard deviation of the average differences between all laboratories is not within the required goal. However, the obtained annual trend and seasonalities are the same within their estimated uncertainties. For δ(O2/N2 significant differences are observed between the three laboratories. The comparison for δ13CO2 yields the least compatible results and the required goals are not met between the three laboratories. Our study shows the importance of regular intercomparison exercises to identify potential biases between laboratories and the need to improve the quality of atmospheric measurements.

  12. Response of leaf litter decomposition to rises in atmospheric CO2 and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammrich, A.; Flury, S.; Gessner, M. O.

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have considerably increased in the last century and are expected to rise further. Elevated CO2 concentrations not only increase global temperature but also have potential to change plant litter quality, for example by increasing lignin content, changing C:N ratios and altering tannin contents. These chemical changes may interact with increased temperature to alter litter decomposition. To test whether changes in litter quality and warming affect decomposition, we conducted a field experiment with leaf litter collected from six species of mature deciduous trees exposed to either ambient or elevated CO2 levels. We used a set of 16 enclosures installed in four blocks in a freshwater marsh in a prealpine lake to test for the effects of CO2-mediated litter quality and temperature and the interaction of both factors. We measured leaf mass loss of the twelve litter types in control and heated enclosures (4 °C above ambient) and also in the open marsh. In contrast to expectations, species decomposing at low (oak and beech) and medium (hornbeam and maple) rates showed faster mass loss when leaves were grown under elevated CO2 conditions, whereas fast-decomposing species (cherry and basswood) showed no clear response. The accelerated decomposition of CO2-enriched litter could be due to higher amounts of nonstructural carbohydrates, which may have been either leached or readily degraded. Warming had a surprisingly small influence on mass loss of the tested litter species, and interactive effects were weak. These results suggest that direct and indirect effects of elevated CO2 levels on litter decomposition may not be readily predictable from first principles.

  13. Analysis of influence of atmosphere extinction to Raman lidar monitoring CO2 concentration profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Pei-Tao; Zhang Yin-Chao; Wang Lian; Zhao Yue-Feng; Su Jia; Fang Xin; Cao Kai-Fa; Xie Jun; Du Xiao-Yong

    2007-01-01

    Lidar (Light detection and ranging) system monitoring of the atmosphere is a novel and powerful technique tool. The Raman lidar is well established today as a leading research tool in the study of numerous important areas in the atmospheric sciences. In this paper, the principle of Raman lidar technique measurement CO2 concentration profile is presented and the errors caused by molecular and aerosol extinction for CO2 concentration profile measurement with Raman lidar are also presented. The standard atmosphere extinction profile and 'real-time' Hefei area extinction profile are used to conduct correction and the corresponding results are yielded. Simulation results with standard atmosphere mode correction indicate that the errors caused by molecule and aerosol extinction should be counted for the reason that they could reach about 8 ppm and 5 ppm respectively. The relative error caused by Hefei area extinction correction could reach about 6%. The errors caused by the two components extinction influence could produce significant changes for CO2 concentration profile and need to be counted in data processing which could improve the measurement accuracies.

  14. Effect of industrial fuel combustion on the carbon-14 level of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As was previously noticed in 1953 by SUESS, the radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 was slightly lower in the 20th century (before the increase in the carbon-14 level due to the addition of artificial 14C) than at the time before the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century. An exact knowledge of the magnitude of this effect is of interest in connection with the question of the rate of isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and the bicarbonates of the oceans. However, the radiocarbon level in the CO2 of the atmosphere is also subject to natural fluctuations caused by a variable cosmic-ray production rate of carbon-14. To investigate this the authors have cross-correlated sunspot numbers (as indicators of cosmic-ray activity) with the carbon-14 level in wood, and have detected a significant coherence between the two time series. The observed coherence permits an extrapolation of the natural carbon-14 values beyond the time of the beginning of artificial combustion of fossil fuel, around 1880. The results show that the observed small decrease in the carbon-14 level is somewhat affected by the increase of the production rate of carbon-14, as a consequence of relatively low solar activity during the preceding decades. The effect of industrial fuel combustion upon the carbon-14 level of the atmosphere can then be estimated for the Northern Hemisphere to be in the vicinity of -3%. (author)

  15. New Approaches to Quantifying Transport Model Error in Atmospheric CO2 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Nielsen, J. E.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in observing CO2 distributions from space. However, the use of these observations to infer source/sink distributions in inversion studies continues to be complicated by difficulty in quantifying atmospheric transport model errors. We will present results from several different experiments designed to quantify different aspects of transport error using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). In the first set of experiments, an ensemble of simulations is constructed using perturbations to parameters in the model s moist physics and turbulence parameterizations that control sub-grid scale transport of trace gases. Analysis of the ensemble spread and scales of temporal and spatial variability among the simulations allows insight into how parameterized, small-scale transport processes influence simulated CO2 distributions. In the second set of experiments, atmospheric tracers representing model error are constructed using observation minus analysis statistics from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The goal of these simulations is to understand how errors in large scale dynamics are distributed, and how they propagate in space and time, affecting trace gas distributions. These simulations will also be compared to results from NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project that quantified the impact of uncertainty in satellite constrained CO2 flux estimates on atmospheric mixing ratios to assess the major factors governing uncertainty in global and regional trace gas distributions.

  16. Atmospheric Mixing of CO2 above Carbon Storage Sites: Coupling Physics Based Models within a CO2 Sequestration System Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, P. H.; Olsen, S. C.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dubey, M. K.; Guthrie, G. D.; Pawar, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is studying the injection of CO2 into geologic repositories. We are formulating the problem as science based decision framework that can address issues of risk, cost, and technical requirements at all stages of the sequestration process. The framework, called CO2-PENS , is implemented in a system model that is capable of performing stochastic simulations to address uncertainty in different geologic sequestration scenarios. In this talk we examine the changes atmospheric concentrations directly above a potential repository caused by diffuse CO2 leakage that migrates to the atmosphere from the repository. We present an atmospheric mixing model that accounts for local surface effects, local climate data, and daily variations in the mixing layer thickness. We compare model results to field data collected at a controlled flux tower experiment. We next show how the atmospheric mixing model can provide estimates of uncertainty when used from within the CO2- PENS framework. Finally, we discuss data needs and future work needed to make the atmospheric component more flexible so that it can quickly be applied to any potential repository.

  17. Oceanic iron fertilization:one of strategies for sequestration atmospheric CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋金明

    2003-01-01

    Carbon cycle is connected with the most important environmental issue of Global Change.As one of the major carbon reservoirs, oceans play an important part in the carbon cycle. In recentyears, iron seems to give us a good news that oceanic iron fertilization could stimulate biological produc-tivity as CO2 sink of human-produced CO2. Oceanic iron fertilization experiments have verified thatadding iron into high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) seawaters can increase phytoplankton productionand export organic carbon, and hence increase carbon sink of anthropogenic CO2, to reduce globalwarming. In sixty days, the export organic carbon could reach 10 000 times for adding iron by modelprediction and in situ experiment, I.e. The atmospheric CO2 uptake and inorganic carbon drawdown inupper seawaters also have the same magnitude. Therefore, oceanic iron fertilization is one of the strate-gies for increasing carbon sink of anthropogenic CO2. The paper is focused on the iron fertilization, es-pecially in situ ocean iron experiments in order that the future research is more efficient.

  18. A Broad Bank Lidar for Precise Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption Measurement from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.; Huang, W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. In order to uncover the "missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget the critical precision for a measurement from space needs to be on the order of 1 ppm. To better understand the CO2 budget and to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council (NRC) in its recent decadal survey report (NACP) to NASA recommended a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. That's the goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission - to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. Our current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with a high power broadband source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system and considerably reduces the risk of failure. It also tremendously reduces the requirement for wavelength stability in the source putting this responsibility instead on the Fabry- Perot subsystem.

  19. Phosphorus feedbacks constraining tropical ecosystem responses to changes in atmospheric CO2 and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Thornton, Peter E.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of phosphorus (P) availability on carbon (C) cycling in the Amazon region are investigated using CLM-CNP. We demonstrate that the coupling of P dynamics reduces the simulated historical terrestrial C sink due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) by about 26%. Our exploratory simulations show that the response of tropical forest C cycling to increasing [CO2] depends on how elevated CO2 affects phosphatase enzyme production. The effects of warming are more complex, depending on the interactions between humidity, C, and nutrient dynamics. While a simulation with low humidity generally shows the reduction of net primary productivity (NPP), a second simulation with higher humidity suggests overall increases in NPP due to the dominant effects of reduced water stress and more nutrient availability. Our simulations point to the need for (1) new observations on how elevated [CO2] affects phosphatase enzyme production and (2) more tropical leaf-scale measurements under different temperature/humidity conditions with different soil P availability.

  20. Plate tectonic controls on atmospheric CO2 levels since the Triassic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Meer, Douwe G; Zeebe, Richard E; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J J; Sluijs, Appy; Spakman, Wim; Torsvik, Trond H

    2014-03-25

    Climate trends on timescales of 10s to 100s of millions of years are controlled by changes in solar luminosity, continent distribution, and atmosphere composition. Plate tectonics affect geography, but also atmosphere composition through volcanic degassing of CO2 at subduction zones and midocean ridges. So far, such degassing estimates were based on reconstructions of ocean floor production for the last 150 My and indirectly, through sea level inversion before 150 My. Here we quantitatively estimate CO2 degassing by reconstructing lithosphere subduction evolution, using recent advances in combining global plate reconstructions and present-day structure of the mantle. First, we estimate that since the Triassic (250-200 My) until the present, the total paleosubduction-zone length reached up to ∼200% of the present-day value. Comparing our subduction-zone lengths with previously reconstructed ocean-crust production rates over the past 140 My suggests average global subduction rates have been constant, ∼6 cm/y: Higher ocean-crust production is associated with longer total subduction length. We compute a strontium isotope record based on subduction-zone length, which agrees well with geological records supporting the validity of our approach: The total subduction-zone length is proportional to the summed arc and ridge volcanic CO2 production and thereby to global volcanic degassing at plate boundaries. We therefore use our degassing curve as input for the GEOCARBSULF model to estimate atmospheric CO2 levels since the Triassic. Our calculated CO2 levels for the mid Mesozoic differ from previous modeling results and are more consistent with available proxy data. PMID:24616495

  1. Carbon allocation changes: an adaptive response to variations in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sandy; Li, Guangqi; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2016-04-01

    Given the ubiquity of nutrient constraints on primary production, an optimal carbon allocation strategy is expected to increase total below-ground allocation (fine root production and turnover, allocation to mycorrhizae and carbon exudation to the rhizophere) as atmospheric CO2 concentration increases. Conversely, below-ground allocation should be reduced when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were low, as occurred during glacial times. Using a coupled generic primary production and tree-growth model, we quantify the changes in carbon allocation that are required to explain the apparent homoeostasis of tree radial growth during recent decades and between glacial and interglacial conditions. These results suggest a resolution of the apparent paradox of continuing terrestrial CO2 uptake (a consequence of CO2 fertilization) and the widespread lack of observed enhancement of stem growth in trees. Adaptive shifts in carbon allocation are thus a key feature that should to be accounted for in models to predict tree growth and future timber harvests, as well as in large-scale ecosystem and carbon cycle models.

  2. Changes in Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation under Different Atmospheric CO2 Scenarios in a Climate Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The changes in the thermohaline circulation (THC) because of the increased CO2 in the atmosphere play an important role in future climate regimes.In this article, a new climate model developed at the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology is used to study the variation in THC strength, the changes of North Atlantic deep-water (NADW) formation, and the regional responses of the THC in the North Atlantic to increasing atmospheric CO2.From 2000 to 2100, under increased CO2 scenarios (B1, A1B, and A2), the strength of THC decreases by 4 Sv (106 m3/s), 5.1 Sv, and 5.2 Sv, respectively, equivalent to a reduction of 20%, 25%, and 25.1% of the present THC strength.The analyses show that the oceanic deep convective activity significantly strengthens in the Greenland-Iceland-Norway(GIN) Seas owing to saltier (denser) upper oceans, whereas weakens in the Labrador Sea and in the south of the Denmark Strait region (SDSR) because of surface warming and freshening due to global warming.The saltiness of the GIN Seas is mainly caused by the increase of the saline North Atlantic inflow through the Faro-Bank (FB) Channel.Under the scenario A1B, the deep-water formation rate in the North Atlantic decreases from 16.2 Sv to 12.9 Sv with increasing CO2.

  3. Changes in fungal community composition in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization varies with soil horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F Weber

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 and rates of nitrogen (N-deposition to forest ecosystems are predicted to alter the structure and function of soil fungal communities, but the spatially heterogeneous distribution of soil fungi has hampered investigations aimed at understanding such impacts. We hypothesized that soil physical and chemical properties and fungal community composition would be differentially impacted by elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2 and N-fertilization in spatially separated field samples, in the forest floor, 0-2 cm, 2-5 cm and 5-10 cm depth intervals in a loblolly pine Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE experiment. In all soils, quantitative PCR-based estimates of fungal biomass were highest in the forest floor. Fungal richness, based on pyrosequencing of the fungal ribosomal large subunit gene, increased in response to N-fertilization in 0-2 cm and forest floor intervals. Composition shifted in forest floor, 0-2 cm and 2-5 cm intervals in response to N-fertilization, but the shift was most distinct in the 0-2 cm interval, in which the largest number of statistically significant changes in soil chemical parameters (i.e phosphorus, organic matter, calcium, pH was also observed. In the 0-2 cm interval, increased recovery of sequences from the Thelephoraceae, Tricholomataceae, Hypocreaceae, Clavicipitaceae, and Herpotrichiellaceae families and decreased recovery of sequences from the Amanitaceae correlated with N-fertilization. In this same depth interval, Amanitaceae, Tricholomataceae and Herpotriciellaceae sequences were recovered less frequently from soils exposed to eCO2 relative to ambient conditions. These results demonstrated that vertical stratification should be taken into consideration in future efforts to elucidate environmental impacts on fungal communities and their feedbacks on ecosystem processes.

  4. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.; Bellassen, V.; Vogel, F.; Chevallier, F.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Wang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010) during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma). We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to 70 stations, the inversion can meet this requirement. As for major sectoral CO2 emissions, the uncertainties in the inverted emissions using 70 stations are reduced significantly over that obtained using 10 stations by 32 % for commercial and residential buildings, by 33 % for

  5. Scaling laws for perturbations in the ocean–atmosphere system following large CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Towles

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scaling relationships are found for perturbations to atmosphere and ocean variables from large transient CO2 emissions. Using the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir (LOSCAR model (Zeebe et al., 2009; Zeebe, 2012b, we calculate perturbations to atmosphere temperature, total carbon, ocean temperature, total ocean carbon, pH, alkalinity, marine-sediment carbon, and carbon-13 isotope anomalies in the ocean and atmosphere resulting from idealized CO2 emission events. The peak perturbations in the atmosphere and ocean variables are then fit to power law functions of the form of γ DαEβ, where D is the event duration, E is its total carbon emission, and γ is a coefficient. Good power law fits are obtained for most system variables for E up to 50 000 PgC and D up to 100 kyr. Although all of the peak perturbations increase with emission rate E/D, we find no evidence of emission-rate-only scaling, α + β = 0. Instead, our scaling yields α + β ≃ 1 for total ocean and atmosphere carbon and 0 < α + β < 1 for most of the other system variables.

  6. Modeling the Performance of a Spaceborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Nehrir, A. R.; Dobler, J. T.; Moore, B.; Refaat, T.; Kooi, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate global observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with a laser-based space mission, such as the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission, are crucial to improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. This study focuses on modeling of the performance of a spaceborne laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) system for CO2 column measurements. The model accounts for all of the fundamental physics of the instrument subsystems and components and the influences of measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems and their components are based on existing technologies and the implementation of operational systems. The modeled instrument is specifically assumed to be an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) LAS system like the Exelis airborne Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 um CO2 absorption band. Environmental effects such as gas absorption, solar radiation, scattering of aerosols and thin clouds, atmospheric turbulence, and surface reflection are also considered in the model. The modeled results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles of multiple model runs to accurately represent the random nature of all of the noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. Model simulations demonstrate very good agreement when compared to prior airborne and ground based MFLL measurements. The model predicted lidar return powers for various calibrated surface targets show good agreement with those measured by the MFLL instrument during ground tests at NASA Langley Research Center in the summer of 2012. The difference between modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the LAS CO2 column optical depths (Tau_d) for the summer 2011 flight campaign on board the NASA DC-8 over Railroad Valley (RRV), NV is generally within 20%. The simulations for spaceborne Tau_d measurements over RRV indicate

  7. Measurement of Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Isotopic CO2 Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambaliza, M. O.; Mount, G.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.; Gibson, R.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of the isotopic content of atmospheric carbon dioxide provides a wealth of information about the complex interaction between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Traditionally, the isotopic content of atmospheric CO2 has been determined by taking grab samples from field sites followed by laboratory mass spectrometry analysis. This procedure severely limits the duration and frequency of measurements. In this work, we investigate the performance of a measurement method that is based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The FTIR separately measures the concentrations of the 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopomers of carbon dioxide at approximately one minute intervals with very high signal-to-noise ratio using molecular absorption in a 1-meter cell in the 2100 to 2600 cm-1 region of the isotopic vibration-rotation bands. δ13C values are determined with a precision of approximately 0.7‰ every minute, with higher precision obtained by averaging the short integrations. The FTIR system also measures CO2 flux using the disjunct eddy covariance technique, so the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and isoflux can also be measured, potentially allowing for the partitioning of the NEE into its photosynthetic and respiratory components. First scientific results from this new instrument are presented from two field campaigns conducted in summer 2005 in a poplar forest near Boardman, Oregon. A 25-m tower was used with air inlets at 0.3, 4.1, 7.5, 10.8, 14.0, and 20.6 meters above the ground. These were switched sequentially into the instrument to achieve height resolution in the canopy, or were kept at constant height. Canopy height was 13 meters. Carbon dioxide concentrations are measured to a precision of about 0.7 ppmv from a one-minute integration with higher precisions obtained from time averaging. CO2 isotopic concentrations were measured with a precision of about 2 ppmv/minute. In this work, we present results of temporal and vertical variations of CO2 concentrations

  8. On the development of a methodology for extensive in-situ and continuous atmospheric CO2 monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Chang, S.; Jhang, T.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is recognized as the dominating greenhouse gas contributing to anthropogenic global warming. Stringent controls on carbon dioxide emissions are viewed as necessary steps in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. From the view point of policy making, regulation of carbon dioxide emissions and its monitoring are keys to the success of stringent controls on carbon dioxide emissions. Especially, extensive atmospheric CO2 monitoring is a crucial step to ensure that CO2 emission control strategies are closely followed. In this work we develop a methodology that enables reliable and accurate in-situ and continuous atmospheric CO2 monitoring for policy making. The methodology comprises the use of gas filter correlation (GFC) instrument for in-situ CO2 monitoring, the use of CO2 working standards accompanying the continuous measurements, and the use of NOAA WMO CO2 standard gases for calibrating the working standards. The use of GFC instruments enables 1-second data sampling frequency with the interference of water vapor removed from added dryer. The CO2 measurements are conducted in the following timed and cycled manner: zero CO2 measurement, two standard CO2 gases measurements, and ambient air measurements. The standard CO2 gases are calibrated again NOAA WMO CO2 standards. The methodology is used in indoor CO2 measurements in a commercial office (about 120 people working inside), ambient CO2 measurements, and installed in a fleet of in-service commercial cargo ships for monitoring CO2 over global marine boundary layer. These measurements demonstrate our method is reliable, accurate, and traceable to NOAA WMO CO2 standards. The portability of the instrument and the working standards make the method readily applied for large-scale and extensive CO2 measurements.

  9. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Gasson, Edward; Kuhn, Gerhard; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco

    2016-03-29

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23-14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3-4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (∼280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (∼500 ppm) atmospheric CO2 These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2 during the early to mid-Miocene. PMID:26903644

  10. Plate tectonic controls on atmospheric CO2 levels since the Triassic

    OpenAIRE

    van der Meer, D.G; Zeebe, R. E.; D. J. J. van Hinsbergen; A. Sluijs; Spakman, W.; T. H. Torsvik

    2014-01-01

    Although plate tectonics is generally considered to be the main contributor of CO2 production, despite decades of paleoproxy and solid-earth research, this very first-order assumption remains unproven. Based on estimates of total subduction-zone lengths, from a combined analysis of seismic tomography models and plate tectonic reconstructions, we have bridged a major gap between solid-earth sciences and the atmosphere and biosphere sciences by providing understanding of one of the most fundame...

  11. Statistical Analysis of Long Term Trends in Atmospheric CO2 Concentration at Baseline Stations

    OpenAIRE

    Antonovsky, M.Y.; Buchstaber, V. M.; Zubenko, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of several greenhouse gases that can modify the earth's heat balance by absorbing outgoing radiation from the earth's surface, thereby increasing the amount of heat retained by the atmosphere (the so-called greenhouse effect). Changes in CO2 are therefore of considerable importance. In this paper, the long-term trends are assessed at four baseline stations -- Mauna Loa (Hawaii), Barrow (Alaska), American Samoa and South Pole. The authors conclude that a parabolic model ...

  12. Potentialities of the atmospheric CO2 remote sensing thanks to static Fourier transform spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global measurement of atmospheric CO2 concentration is required to improve the prediction of the range of global warming. A satellite mission could provide such a measurement. CNES developed a new generation instrument dedicated to atmospheric sounding. It is a static Fourier transform spectrometer whose mass and size are smaller than those of classical spectrometers. The application of the concept for CO2 sounding is studied thanks to an on ground experimental bread board representative of a satellite borne spectrometer. The CO2 concentration is deduced from atmospheric spectra at 1.6 μm thanks to differential spectroscopy technique. The instrumental concept is presented. Then the conception of the spectrometer and the working procedure are described. A study of information content is done. Retrieval simulations show that an error of ±0.6 ppm can be expected, lower than the ±1 ppm goal. Finally the results of a measurement campaign are given. The retrieval precision is compatible with the objectives. Yet the instrument is also sensitive to disruptive parameters. For example deformations of the instrument could engender significant measurement errors. Instrument improvements are proposed to increase the retrieval precision. (author)

  13. Two micron Heterodyne Doppler DIAL Lidar remote sensing of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the development of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument and its use for absolute CO2 measurements with a 1-2% precision. The first chapter describes the scientific framework of the thesis: atmospheric branch of the carbon cycle, climatic change and Kyoto protocol, present day monitoring network and main space missions. The modeling, experimental and theoretical aspects of the study are presented in the more general framework of the recovery of surface fluxes and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Chapter 2 treats of the evolution of atmospheric CO2 at the meso-scale. The time, horizontal and vertical representativeness of a CO2 measurement is evaluated. The processes at the origin of the variability of a mixing ratio in the different parts of the atmosphere is presented in order to develop an efficient measurement method. Chapter 3 discusses the DIAL measurement and its optimization for a maximum preciseness of the concentration measurement. A particular attention is given to the spectroscopy and to the optimization of parameters like the optical thickness of the air column, the energy of laser pulses in the atmosphere, and the analysis of statistical and systematic errors. Chapter 4 describes the experimental setup 'LIDIA', the existing Lidar used, its transformations and added parts. A particular attention is given to the signal processing. Then follows the presentation and discussion of the measurements performed night and day during the end of 2004 and during 2005: integrated measurements at the ground level and validation using in-situ measurements, vertical measurements inside the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), use of cloudy targets, measurements inside the free troposphere and resolved measurements inside the ABL. The contribution of simultaneous wind and vertical velocity measurements with concentration measurements is used to explain the natural and anthropic processes at the origin of the variations with time of the CO2

  14. Investigating the Multiple Food Sources and N Chemistry of Invasive Earthworms at the Rhinelander, WI, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 can directly and indirectly alter biogeochemical cycling in forest ecosystems through changes to plant productivity, tissue chemistry, and associated feedbacks to microbial and faunal communities. At the Rhinelander free air CO2 enrichment site (FACE), Rhinelander WI, we examined the consumption and movement of plant tissue and soil by invasive earthworm species using a multi-proxy stable isotope and amino acid chemistry analysis of plant and soil, as well as fecal matter extracted from invasive earthworms present at the site. Using an isotopic mixing model that exploits the 13C-depleted CO2 source and a previous 15N labeling in the FACE experiment, we determined potential sources to the earthworm fecal matter and the movement of amino compounds. For epigeic, surface dwelling earthworms, the stable isotope modeling showed the largest contribution to the C and N in fecal matter was from leaf litter (up to 80%) which was depleted in amino acid C under elevated CO2 conditions. Fecal matter from the endogeic, mineral soil dwelling earthworms was primarily derived from 0-5 cm soil (up to 56%) and fine root tissue (up to 70%). Additionally, amino acid C in this group of earthworms had a proportionately greater relative concentration compared to the epigeic species and the 0-5cm soil. Here we demonstrate that earthworms are incorporating multiple sources (leaf litter, root, and soil) into their fecal matter, which then get deposited throughout the soil profile, where nutrients could become available for plant use.

  15. Proposing a mechanistic understanding of changes in atmospheric CO2 during the last 740 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores shows a natural variability of 80 to 100 ppmv during the last four glacial cycles and variations of approximately 60 ppmv in the two cycles between 410 and 650 kyr BP. We here use dust and the isotopic temperature proxy deuterium (δD from the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core covering the last 740 kyr together with other paleo-climatic records to force the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE in a forward mode over this time in order to reconstruct the natural variability of pCO2. Our simulation results covered by our proposed scenario are based on process understanding gained previously for carbon cycle variations during Termination I. These results match the pCO2 measured in the Vostok ice core well (r2=0.80 and we predict prior to Termination V significantly smaller amplitudes in pCO2 variations mainly based on a reduced interglacial ocean circulation and reduced interglacial Southern Ocean sea surface temperature. These predictions for the pre-Vostok period match the new pCO2 data from the EPICA Dome C ice core for the time period 410 to 650 kyr BP equally well (r2=0.79. This is the first forward modelling approach which covers all major processes acting on the global carbon cycle on glacial/interglacial time scales. The contributions of different processes (terrestrial carbon storage, sea ice, sea level, ocean temperature, ocean circulation, CaCO3 chemistry, marine biota are analysed.

  16. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gruber

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Since aged carbon in fossil fuel contains no 14C, 14C/C ratios (Δ14C measured in atmospheric CO2 can be used to estimate CO2 added by combustion and, potentially, provide verification of fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. Sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract dilution by fossil CO2. Therefore, these nuclear sources can bias observation-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if they are not correctly accounted for or included as a source of uncertainty. We estimate annual 14C emissions from each nuclear site in the world and conduct an Eulerian transport modeling study to investigate the continental-scale, steady-state gradients of Δ14C caused by nuclear activities and fossil fuel combustion. Over Europe, North America and East Asia, nuclear enrichment may offset 0–260 % of the fossil fuel dilution in Δ14C, corresponding to potential biases of 0 to −8 ppm in the CO2 attributed to fossil fuel emissions, larger than the bias from respiration in some areas. Growth of 14C emissions increased the potential nuclear bias over 1985–2005. The magnitude of this potential bias is largely independent of the choice of reference station in the context of Eulerian transport and inversion studies, but could potentially be reduced by an appropriate choice of reference station in the context of local-scale assessments.

  17. Climate warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2 - Simulations with a multilayer coupled atmosphere-ocean seasonal energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Chou, Ming-Dah; Arking, Albert

    1987-01-01

    The transient response of the climate to increasing CO2 is studied using a modified version of the multilayer energy balance model of Peng et al. (1982). The main characteristics of the model are described. Latitudinal and seasonal distributions of planetary albedo, latitude-time distributions of zonal mean temperatures, and latitudinal distributions of evaporation, water vapor transport, and snow cover generated from the model and derived from actual observations are analyzed and compared. It is observed that in response to an atmospheric doubling of CO2, the model reaches within 1/e of the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature in 9-35 years for the probable range of vertical heat diffusivity in the ocean. For CO2 increases projected by the National Research Council (1983), the model's transient response in annually and globally averaged surface temperatures is 60-75 percent of the corresponding equilibrium response, and the disequilibrium increases with increasing heat diffusivity of the ocean.

  18. Atmospheric constraints for the CO2 partial pressure on terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, Philip; Hedelt, Pascal; Rauer, Heike; Selsis, Franck; Stracke, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, several potentially habitable, probably terrestrial exoplanets and exoplanet candidates have been discovered. The amount of CO2 in their atmosphere is of great importance for surface conditions and habitability. In the absence of detailed information on the geochemistry of the planet, this amount could be considered as a free parameter. Up to now, CO2 partial pressures for terrestrial planets have been obtained assuming an available volatile reservoir and outgassing scenarios. This study aims at calculating the allowed maximum CO2 pressure at the surface of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting near the outer boundary of the habitable zone by coupling the radiative effects of the CO2 and its condensation at the surface. These constraints might limit the permitted amount of atmospheric CO2, independent of the planetary reservoir. A 1D radiative-convective cloud-free atmospheric model was used. CO2 partial pressures are fixed according to surface temperature and vapor pressure curve. Considered scena...

  19. Response of free-living soil protozoa and microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 and presence of mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, R.; Gavito, M.; Larsen, J.;

    2002-01-01

    Possible interactions between mycorrhiza, atmospheric CO2, free-living soil microorganisms and protozoa were investigated in pot experimental systems. Pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Solara) were grown under ambient (360 mul l(-1)) or elevated (700 mul l(-1)) atmospheric CO2 concentration...... with or without the presence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus caledonium. It was hypothesised that (1) the populations of free-living soil protozoa would increase as a response to elevated CO2, (2) the effect of elevated CO2 on protozoa would be moderated by the presence of mycorrhiza and (3......) the presence of arbuscular mycorrhiza would affect soil protozoan numbers regardless of atmospheric CO2. After 3 weeks growth there was no difference in bacterial numbers (direct counts) in soil, but the number of free-living bacterial-feeding protozoa was significantly higher under elevated CO2...

  20. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro-and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmos-pheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to util-ize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photo-synthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physi-ology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  1. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro- and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU HongYan; ZOU DingHui; GAO KunShan

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmospheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to utilize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photosynthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physiology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  2. Gliese 581d Habitable with a CO2-rich atmosphere: Results from Numerical Climate Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, Robin; Forget, F.; Selsis, F.; Madeleine, J. B.; Millour, E.; Eymet, V.

    2010-10-01

    The exoplanet Gl581d (discovered in 2007) is relatively low mass and near to the outer edge of its system's habitable zone, which has led to much speculation on its possible climate. To help understand the possible conditions on this planet, we have developed a new universal 3D global climate model (GCM). It is derived from the LMD GCMs already used to simulate the Earth, Mars and other terrestrial atmospheres in the solar system, and hence has already been validated over a wide range of physical conditions. We have performed a range of simulations to assess whether, given simple combinations of chemically stable gases (CO2, H2O and N2), Gl581d could sustain liquid water on its surface. Compared to a Sun-like star, the red dwarf Gliese 581 allows higher planetary temperatures, because Rayleigh scattering is reduced. Taking into account the scattering greenhouse effect of both CO2 and H2O clouds, we find that several tens of bars of CO2 are sufficient to maintain global mean temperatures above the melting point of water. As Gl581d is probably in a tidally resonant orbit, condensables such as water and CO2 may be trapped on its dark sides or poles. However, we find that even with conservative assumptions, redistribution of heat by the atmosphere is enough to allow stable conditions with surface liquid water. A dense atmosphere of this kind is quite possible for such a large planet, and could be distinguished from other cases using future observations.

  3. Effect of temperature-dependent organic carbon decay on atmospheric pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Katsumi; Hashioka, Taketo; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2007-06-01

    Extendingy an almost universal observation that the rate of microbial activity increases with temperature, we propose that marine microbial activity was suppressed during previous glacial periods and allowed proportionally more organic carbon to be exported out of the surface ocean. A stronger organic carbon pump and therefore lower rain ratios of CaCO3 to organic carbon may have contributed to the low atmospheric CO2 content during the Last Glacial Maximum. Previous study of temperature-dependent export production (Laws et al., 2000) and our map of data-based, global distribution of the rain ratios lend support to today's rain ratios being controlled at least partly by temperature. A close examination with a high-resolution regional ocean ecosystem model indicates that the correlation between rain ratio and temperature is caused indeed by preferential remineralization of organic matter, but a part of the correlation is also driven by temperature-dependent community composition. An extrapolation of these results to the globe using a global carbon cycle box model with a module for sediments indicates that the drawdown of atmospheric CO2 by the proposed mechanism is approximately 30 ppm. While this estimate is subject to uncertainty, the fact that it represents nearly one third of the glacial-interglacial variation in atmosphere pCO2 suggests the potential importance of the new mechanism. Given the historical difficulty in explaining the full CO2 amplitude with a single cause, we suggest that a set of multiple mechanisms were responsible and that the temperature-dependent POC degradation rate is one of them. We discuss two possible difficulties with our proposal that have to do with the potentially important role that ballasts play in organic carbon export and the possibility that enhanced biological pump is self limiting.

  4. Forest water use and water use efficiency at elevated CO2 : a model-data intercomparison at two contrasting temperate forest FACE sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul K; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William J; Prentice, I Colin; Smith, Benjamin; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Ying-Ping; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Crous, Kristine Y; Ellsworth, David S; Hanson, Paul J; Seok Kim, Hyun-; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2013-06-01

    Predicted responses of transpiration to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2 ) are highly variable amongst process-based models. To better understand and constrain this variability amongst models, we conducted an intercomparison of 11 ecosystem models applied to data from two forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments at Duke University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We analysed model structures to identify the key underlying assumptions causing differences in model predictions of transpiration and canopy water use efficiency. We then compared the models against data to identify model assumptions that are incorrect or are large sources of uncertainty. We found that model-to-model and model-to-observations differences resulted from four key sets of assumptions, namely (i) the nature of the stomatal response to elevated CO2 (coupling between photosynthesis and stomata was supported by the data); (ii) the roles of the leaf and atmospheric boundary layer (models which assumed multiple conductance terms in series predicted more decoupled fluxes than observed at the broadleaf site); (iii) the treatment of canopy interception (large intermodel variability, 2-15%); and (iv) the impact of soil moisture stress (process uncertainty in how models limit carbon and water fluxes during moisture stress). Overall, model predictions of the CO2 effect on WUE were reasonable (intermodel μ = approximately 28% ± 10%) compared to the observations (μ = approximately 30% ± 13%) at the well-coupled coniferous site (Duke), but poor (intermodel μ = approximately 24% ± 6%; observations μ = approximately 38% ± 7%) at the broadleaf site (Oak Ridge). The study yields a framework for analysing and interpreting model predictions of transpiration responses to eCO2 , and highlights key improvements to these types of models. PMID:23504858

  5. Sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 and climate to explosive volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Raible

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of low-latitude, explosive volcanic eruptions on climate and the carbon cycle are quantified by forcing a comprehensive, fully coupled carbon cycle-climate model with pulse-like stratospheric aerosol optical depth changes. The model represents the radiative and dynamical response of the climate system to volcanic eruptions and simulates a decrease of global and regional atmospheric surface temperature, regionally distinct changes in precipitation, a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a decrease in atmospheric CO2 after volcanic eruptions. The volcanic-induced cooling reduces overturning rates in tropical soils, which dominates over reduced litter input due to soil moisture decrease, resulting in higher land carbon inventories for several decades. The perturbation in the ocean carbon inventory changes sign from an initial weak carbon sink to a carbon source. Positive carbon and negative temperature anomalies in subsurface waters last up to several decades. The multi-decadal decrease in atmospheric CO2 yields a small additional radiative forcing that amplifies the cooling and perturbs the Earth System on longer time scales than the atmospheric residence time of volcanic aerosols. In addition, century-scale global warming simulations with and without volcanic eruptions over the historical period show that the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds for different physical and biogeochemical parameters such as steric sea level or dissolved oxygen. Results from a suite of sensitivity simulations with different magnitudes of stratospheric aerosol optical depth changes and from global warming simulations show that the carbon cycle-climate sensitivity γ, expressed as change in atmospheric CO2 per unit change in global mean surface temperature, depends on the magnitude and temporal evolution of the perturbation, and time scale of interest. On decadal time scales, modeled γ is several times larger for a

  6. Carbon isotope evidence implying high O2/CO2 ratios in the Permo-Carboniferous atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerling, D. J.; Lake, J. A.; Berner, R. A.; Hickey, L. J.; Taylor, D. W.; Royer, D. L.

    2002-11-01

    Theoretical models predict a marked increase in atmospheric O2 to ∼35% during the Permo-Carboniferous (∼300 Ma) occurring against a low (∼0.03%) CO2 level. An upper O2 value of 35%, however, remains disputed because ignition data indicate that excessive global forest fires would have ensued. This uncertainty limits interpretation of the role played by atmospheric oxygen in Late Paleozoic biotic evolution. Here, we describe new results from laboratory experiments with vascular land plants that establish that a rise in O2 to 35% increases isotopic fractionation (Δ13C) during growth relative to control plants grown at 21% O2. Despite some effect of the background atmospheric CO2 level on the magnitude of the increase, we hypothesize that a substantial Permo-Carboniferous rise in O2 could have imprinted a detectable geochemical signature in the plant fossil record. Over 50 carbon isotope measurements on intact carbon from four fossil plant clades with differing physiological ecologies and ranging in age from Devonian to Cretaceous reveal a substantial Δ13C anomaly (5‰) occurring between 300 and 250 Ma. The timing and direction of the Δ13C excursion is consistent with the effects of a high O2 atmosphere on plants, as predicted from photosynthetic theory and observed in our experiments. Preliminary calibration of the fossil Δ13C record against experimental data yields a predicted O2/CO2 mixing ratio of the ancient atmosphere consistent with that calculated from long-term models of the global carbon and oxygen cycles. We conclude that further work on the effects of O2 in the combustion of plant materials and the spread of wildfire is necessary before existing data can be used to reliably set the upper limit for paleo-O2 levels.

  7. Sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 and climate to explosive volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Raible

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of low-latitude, explosive volcanic eruptions on climate and the carbon cycle are quantified by forcing a comprehensive, fully coupled carbon cycle-climate model with pulse-like stratospheric sulfur release. The model represents the radiative and dynamical response of the climate system to volcanic eruptions and simulates a decrease of global and regional atmospheric surface temperature, regionally distinct changes in precipitation, a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a decrease in atmospheric CO2 after volcanic eruptions. The volcanic-induced cooling reduces overturning rates in tropical soils, which dominates over reduced litter input due to soil moisture decrease, resulting in higher land carbon inventories for several decades. The perturbation in the ocean carbon inventory changes sign from an initially weak carbon sink to a carbon source. Positive carbon and negative temperature anomalies in subsurface waters last up to several decades. The multi-decadal decrease in atmospheric CO2 yields an additional radiative forcing that amplifies the cooling and perturbs the Earth System on much longer time scales than the atmospheric residence time of volcanic aerosols. In addition, century-scale global warming simulations with and without volcanic eruptions over the historical period show that the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds for different physical and biogeochemical parameters such as steric sea level or dissolved oxygen. Results from a suite of sensitivity simulations with different amounts of sulfur released and from global warming simulations show that the carbon cycle-climate sensitivity γ, expressed as change in atmospheric CO2 per unit change in global mean surface temperature, depends on the perturbation. On decadal time scales, modeled γ is several times larger for a Pinatubo-like eruption than for the industrial period and for a high emission, 21st century scenario.

  8. Subarctic weathering of mineral wastes provides a sink for atmospheric CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Siobhan A; Dipple, Gregory M; Power, Ian M; Barker, Shaun L L; Fallon, Stewart J; Southam, Gordon

    2011-09-15

    The mineral waste from some mines has the capacity to trap and store CO(2) within secondary carbonate minerals via the process of silicate weathering. Nesquehonite [MgCO(3)·3H(2)O] forms by weathering of Mg-silicate minerals in kimberlitic mine tailings at the Diavik Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Less abundant Na- and Ca-carbonate minerals precipitate from sewage treatment effluent deposited in the tailings storage facility. Radiocarbon and stable carbon and oxygen isotopes are used to assess the ability of mine tailings to trap and store modern CO(2) within these minerals in the arid, subarctic climate at Diavik. Stable isotopic data cannot always uniquely identify the source of carbon stored within minerals in this setting; however, radiocarbon isotopic data provide a reliable quantitative estimate for sequestration of modern carbon. At least 89% of the carbon trapped within secondary carbonate minerals at Diavik is derived from a modern source, either by direct uptake of atmospheric CO(2) or indirect uptake though the biosphere. Silicate weathering at Diavik is trapping 102-114 g C/m(2)/y within nesquehonite, which corresponds to a 2 orders of magnitude increase over the background rate of CO(2) uptake predicted from arctic and subarctic river catchment data. PMID:21854037

  9. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Grassland Community Ecosystem as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Torbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems and the long-term storage of carbon (C and nitrogen (N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L. Willd (Huisache. Seedlings of Acacia along with grass species were grown for 13 months at CO2 concentrations of 385 (ambient, 690, and 980 μmol mol−1. Elevated CO2 increased both C and N inputs from plant growth which would result in higher soil C from litter fall, root turnover, and excretions. Results from the incubation indicated an initial (20 days decrease in N mineralization which resulted in no change in C mineralization. However, after 40 and 60 days, an increase in both C and N mineralization was observed. These increases would indicate that increases in soil C storage may not occur in grass ecosystems that are invaded with Acacia over the long term.

  10. Direct measurement of biosphere-atmosphere isotopic CO2 exchange using the eddy covariance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, T. J.; Sargent, S. D.; Baker, J. M.; Lee, X.; Tanner, B. D.; Greene, J.; Swiatek, E.; Billmark, K.

    2008-04-01

    Quantifying isotopic CO2 exchange between the biosphere and atmosphere presents a significant measurement challenge, but has the potential to provide important constraints on local, regional, and global carbon cycling. Past approaches have indirectly estimated isotopic CO2 exchange using relaxed eddy accumulation, the flask-based isoflux method, and flux-gradient techniques. Eddy covariance (EC) is an attractive method because it has the fewest theoretical assumptions and the potential to give a direct measure of isotopic CO2 flux, but it requires a highly sensitive and relatively fast response instrument. To date, no such field measurements have been reported. Here we describe the use of a closed-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and eddy covariance (EC-TDL) system for isotopic (C16O2, 13CO2, C18O16O) flux measurements. Results are presented from an intensive field experiment conducted over a soybean canopy from 18 July to 20 September 2006. This experiment represents a rigorous field test of the EC-TDL technique because the transport was dominated by relatively high frequency eddies. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange (FN) measured with the EC-TDL system showed strong correlation (r2 = 0.99) in the half-hourly fluxes with an EC open-path infrared gas analyzer (EC-IRGA) over the 60-d period. Net CO2 flux measured with the EC-IRGA and EC-TDL systems agreed to within 9%. Flux loss associated with diminished frequency response beyond 1 Hz for the EC-TDL system was approximately 8% during daytime windy (>4 m s-1) conditions. There was no significant evidence of a kinetic-type fractionation effect related to a phase shift among isotopologues due to tube attenuation. Investigation of isotopic spectral similarity in the flux ratio (δNx) for both 13CO2 and C18O16O transport showed that δNx was relatively independent of eddy scale for this ecosystem type. Flux loss, therefore, did not significantly bias δNx. There was excellent agreement between isofluxes (F

  11. Clumped isotopes in near-surface atmospheric CO2 over land, coast and ocean in Taiwan and its vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain Laskar, Amzad; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2016-09-01

    Molecules containing two rare isotopes (e.g., 13C18O16O in CO2), called clumped isotopes, in atmospheric CO2 are powerful tools to provide an alternative way to independently constrain the sources of CO2 in the atmosphere because of their unique physical and chemical properties. We presented clumped isotope data (Δ47) in near-surface atmospheric CO2 from urban, suburban, ocean, coast, high mountain ( ˜ 3.2 km a.s.l.) and forest in Taiwan and its vicinity. The primary goal of the study was to use the unique Δ47 signature in atmospheric CO2 to show the extents of its deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium due to different processes such as photosynthesis, respiration and local anthropogenic emissions, which the commonly used tracers such as δ13C and δ18O cannot provide. We also explored the potential of Δ47 to identify/quantify the contribution of CO2 from various sources. Atmospheric CO2 over ocean was found to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with the surrounding surface sea water. Respired CO2 was also in close thermodynamic equilibrium at ambient air temperature. In contrast, photosynthetic activity result in significant deviation in Δ47 values from that expected thermodynamically. The disequilibrium could be a consequence of kinetic effects associated with the diffusion of CO2 in and out of the leaf stomata. We observed that δ18O and Δ47 do not vary similarly when photosynthesis was involved unlike simple water-CO2 exchange. Additionally we obtained Δ47 values of car exhaust CO2 that were significantly lower than the atmospheric CO2 but higher than that expected at the combustion temperature. In urban and suburban regions, the Δ47 values were found to be lower than the thermodynamic equilibrium values at the ambient temperature, suggesting contributions from local combustion emission.

  12. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly

  13. A recent build-up of atmospheric CO2 over Europe. Part 1: observed signals and possible explanations

    OpenAIRE

    Ramonet, Michael; Ciais, Philippe; Aalto, Tuula; Aulagnier, Céline; Chevallier, Frédéric; Cipriano, Domenico; Conway, Thomas J.; Haszpra, Laszlo; Kazan, Victor; Meinhardt, Frank; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Schmidt, Martina; Simmonds, Peter; Xueref-Rémy, Irène; Necki, Jaroslaw N.

    2011-01-01

    We analysed interannual and decadal changes in the atmospheric CO2 concentration gradient (ΔCO2) between Europe and the Atlantic Ocean over the period 1995–2007. Fourteen measurement stations are used, with Mace-Head being used to define background conditions. The variability of ΔCO2 reflects fossil fuel emissions and natural sinks activity over Europe, as well as atmospheric transport variability. The mean ΔCO2 increased by 1–2 ppm at Eastern European stations (∼30% growth), between 1990–199...

  14. A permafrost glacial hypothesis to explain atmospheric CO2 and the ice ages during the Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tarozo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several 100 ka glacial-interglacial cycles, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was closely coupled to global temperature, which indicates the importance of CO2 as a greenhouse gas. The reasons for changes in atmospheric CO2 have mainly been sought in the ocean, yet proxy evidence does not support the notion of increased oceanic carbon storage during glacials. Here we present results from the first permafrost loess sequence in Siberia spanning two glacial cycles (~240 ka, which reveal that permafrost soils repeatedly sequestered huge amounts of terrestrial carbon during glacial periods. This can be explained with permafrost favouring more intensive waterlogging conditions and better preservation of soil organic matter. Terrestrial carbon stored in permafrost soils was released upon warming and provided a powerful feedback mechanism for the glacial terminations. We outline a "permafrost glacial hypothesis" building on integrated annual insolation forcing, which readily explains the observed succession of the ice ages during the Pleistocene, including the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  15. Attribution of atmospheric CO2 and temperature increases to regions: importance of preindustrial land use change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical contribution of each country to today’s observed atmospheric CO2 excess and higher temperatures has become a basis for discussions around burden-sharing of greenhouse gas reduction commitments in political negotiations. However, the accounting methods have considered greenhouse gas emissions only during the industrial era, neglecting the fact that land use changes (LUC) have caused emissions long before the Industrial Revolution. Here, we hypothesize that considering preindustrial LUC affects the attribution because the geographic pattern of preindustrial LUC emissions differs significantly from that of industrial-era emissions and because preindustrial emissions have legacy effects on today’s atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures. We test this hypothesis by estimating CO2 and temperature increases based on carbon cycle simulations of the last millennium. We find that accounting for preindustrial LUC emissions results in a shift of attribution of global temperature increase from the industrialized countries to less industrialized countries, in particular South Asia and China, by up to 2–3%, a level that may be relevant for political discussions. While further studies are needed to span the range of plausible quantifications, our study demonstrates the importance of including preindustrial emissions for the most scientifically defensible attribution. (letter)

  16. Pollutants transport and atmospheric variability of CO2 over Siberia: contribution of airborne measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here intends to characterize the variations of atmospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, O3 and ultrafine particles, over a large scale aircraft transect above Siberia, during three intensive YAK-AEROSIB campaigns in April 2006, September 2006 and August 2007, respectively. Pollutant and greenhouse gases distribution in this poorly studied region is needed to model atmospheric long range transport. I show here that CO concentrations at the time of the campaigns is broadly affected by (1) advection of Chinese pollutants through baro-clinic perturbations, (2) advection (diffuse or not) of European pollutants at various altitudes, (3) and of biomass burning from Central Asia. This set of factors is analyzed through a novel statistical technique based on clustering of backward transport simulated by the FLEXPART Lagrangian model. Large observed CO2 gradients in summer are matched against vertical mixing in GCM simulated CO2. At last I present ultrafine particle measurements, and a possible nucleation summer maximum in the clean, continental mid-troposphere. (author)

  17. GEOCARBSULF: A combined model for Phanerozoic atmospheric O 2 and CO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Robert A.

    2006-12-01

    A model for the combined long-term cycles of carbon and sulfur has been constructed which combines all the factors modifying weathering and degassing of the GEOCARB III model [Berner R.A., Kothavala Z., 2001. GEOCARB III: a revised model of atmospheric CO 2 over Phanerozoic time. Am. J. Sci. 301, 182-204] for CO 2 with rapid recycling and oxygen dependent carbon and sulfur isotope fractionation of an isotope mass balance model for O 2 [Berner R.A., 2001. Modeling atmospheric O 2 over Phanerozoic time. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta65, 685-694]. New isotopic data for both carbon and sulfur are used and new feedbacks are created by combining the models. Sensitivity analysis is done by determining (1) the effect on weathering rates of using rapid recycling (rapid recycling treats carbon and sulfur weathering in terms of young rapidly weathering rocks and older more slowly weathering rocks); (2) the effect on O 2 of using different initial starting conditions; (3) the effect on O 2 of using different data for carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis and alternative values of oceanic δ13C for the past 200 million years; (4) the effect on sulfur isotope fractionation and on O 2 of varying the size of O 2 feedback during sedimentary pyrite formation; (5) the effect on O 2 of varying the dependence of organic matter and pyrite weathering on tectonic uplift plus erosion, and the degree of exposure of coastal lands by sea level change; (6) the effect on CO 2 of adding the variability of volcanic rock weathering over time [Berner, R.A., 2006. Inclusion of the weathering of volcanic rocks in the GEOCARBSULF model. Am. J. Sci.306 (in press)]. Results show a similar trend of atmospheric CO 2 over the Phanerozoic to the results of GEOCARB III, but with some differences during the early Paleozoic and, for variable volcanic rock weathering, lower CO 2 values during the Mesozoic. Atmospheric oxygen shows a major broad late Paleozoic peak with a maximum value of about 30% O 2 in

  18. Shellfish face uncertain future in high CO2 world: influence of acidification on oyster larvae calcification and growth in estuaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Whitman Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human activities have increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by 36% during the past 200 years. One third of all anthropogenic CO(2 has been absorbed by the oceans, reducing pH by about 0.1 of a unit and significantly altering their carbonate chemistry. There is widespread concern that these changes are altering marine habitats severely, but little or no attention has been given to the biota of estuarine and coastal settings, ecosystems that are less pH buffered because of naturally reduced alkalinity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address CO(2-induced changes to estuarine calcification, veliger larvae of two oyster species, the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica, and the Suminoe oyster (Crassostrea ariakensis were grown in estuarine water under four pCO(2 regimes, 280, 380, 560 and 800 microatm, to simulate atmospheric conditions in the pre-industrial era, present, and projected future concentrations in 50 and 100 years respectively. CO(2 manipulations were made using an automated negative feedback control system that allowed continuous and precise control over the pCO(2 in experimental aquaria. Larval growth was measured using image analysis, and calcification was measured by chemical analysis of calcium in their shells. C. virginica experienced a 16% decrease in shell area and a 42% reduction in calcium content when pre-industrial and end of 21(st century pCO(2 treatments were compared. C. ariakensis showed no change to either growth or calcification. Both species demonstrated net calcification and growth, even when aragonite was undersaturated, a result that runs counter to previous expectations for invertebrate larvae that produce aragonite shells. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that temperate estuarine and coastal ecosystems are vulnerable to the expected changes in water chemistry due to elevated atmospheric CO(2 and that biological responses to acidification, especially calcifying

  19. The impact of boreal deciduous and evergreen forests on atmospheric CO2 seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L.; Graven, H. D.; Keeling, R. F.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the terrestrial biosphere. It is well known that the seasonal amplitude of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) is the largest in the far north, where forest productivity is compressed into a short growing season. Since 1960, the seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO2 north of 45N has increased by 35-55%. The increase in the seasonal amplitude is a difficult benchmark for coupled climate-carbon models to replicate. In fact, the models vary widely in their mean seasonal cycle representation. The boreal region has a strong influence on CO2 seasonality at Barrow. Deciduous and evergreen plant functional types (PFTs) have different patterns of NEP. We identified four pairs of nearby deciduous and evergreen forest PFTs with eddy covariance measurements. Evergreen forests show an early peak in NEP in May-June, while deciduous forests have a larger peak in NEP later in June-July. The influence of each PFT on the seasonal cycle at Barrow was computed from atmospheric transport results. We normalized the amplitude influence by the growing season NEP of the tower-based PFT flux and found that deciduous forests have 1.4 to 1.8 times more influence (per unit of growing season NEP) at Barrow than evergreen PFT. This diagnosis depends on the timing of the sharp seasonal draw-down at Barrow, which occurs too late to be explained by evergreen forests. The cycle at Barrow therefore appears to be strongly influenced by deciduous PFT, despite the dominance of evergreen PFTs in boreal forests. This paradoxical conclusion is also reached when examining the seasonality of land surface fluxes calculated using atmospheric inverse methods. We examine how these different PFTs, and possible trends in relative abundance, affect the seasonality of atmosphere CO2 using FluxNet data and atmospheric transport modelling. Our results highlight the importance of parameterizing multiple PFTs or individual species within grid cells in models in

  20. Carbon-13 isotope composition of the mean CO2 source in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Jasek, Alina; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of carbon emissions in urbanized areas constitutes an important part of the current research on the global carbon cycle. As the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide can serve as a fingerprint of its origin, systematic observations of δ13CO2 and/or Δ14CO2, combined with atmospheric CO2mixing ratio measurements can be used to better constrain the urban sources of this gas. Nowadays, high precision optical analysers based on absorption of laser radiation in the cavity allow a real-time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its 13CO2/12CO2 ratio, thus enabling better quantification of the contribution of different anthropogenic and natural sources of this gas to the local atmospheric CO2load. Here we present results of a 2-year study aimed at quantifying carbon isotopic signature of the mean CO2 source and its seasonal variability in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland. The Picarro G2101-i CRDS isotopic analyser system for CO2and 13CO2/12CO2 mixing ratio measurements has been installed at the AGH University of Science and Technology campus in July 2011. Air inlet was located at the top of a 20m tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building (ca. 42m a.g.l.), close to the city centre. While temporal resolution of the analyser is equal 1s, a 2-minute moving average was used for calculations of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratio to reduce measurement uncertainty. The measurements were calibrated against 2 NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) primary standard tanks for CO2 mixing ratio and 1 JRAC (Jena Reference Air Cylinder) isotope primary standard for δ13C. A Keeling approach based on two-component mass and isotope balance was used to derive daily mean isotopic signatures of local CO2 from individual measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratios. The record covers a 2-year period, from July 2011 to July 2013. It shows a clear seasonal pattern, with less negative and less variable δ13CO2 values

  1. Regional inversion of CO2 ecosystem fluxes from atmospheric measurements. Reliability of the uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broquet, G.; Chevallier, F.; Breon, F.M.; Yver, C.; Ciais, P.; Ramonet, M.; Schmidt, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, UMR8212, IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alemanno, M. [Servizio Meteorologico dell' Aeronautica Militare Italiana, Centro Aeronautica Militare di Montagna, Monte Cimone/Sestola (Italy); Apadula, F. [Research on Energy Systems, RSE, Environment and Sustainable Development Department, Milano (Italy); Hammer, S. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Haszpra, L. [Hungarian Meteorological Service, Budapest (Hungary); Meinhardt, F. [Federal Environmental Agency, Kirchzarten (Germany); Necki, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Piacentino, S. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Palermo (Italy); Thompson, R.L. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Vermeulen, A.T. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, EEE-EA, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The Bayesian framework of CO2 flux inversions permits estimates of the retrieved flux uncertainties. Here, the reliability of these theoretical estimates is studied through a comparison against the misfits between the inverted fluxes and independent measurements of the CO2 Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) made by the eddy covariance technique at local (few hectares) scale. Regional inversions at 0.5{sup 0} resolution are applied for the western European domain where {approx}50 eddy covariance sites are operated. These inversions are conducted for the period 2002-2007. They use a mesoscale atmospheric transport model, a prior estimate of the NEE from a terrestrial ecosystem model and rely on the variational assimilation of in situ continuous measurements of CO2 atmospheric mole fractions. Averaged over monthly periods and over the whole domain, the misfits are in good agreement with the theoretical uncertainties for prior and inverted NEE, and pass the chi-square test for the variance at the 30% and 5% significance levels respectively, despite the scale mismatch and the independence between the prior (respectively inverted) NEE and the flux measurements. The theoretical uncertainty reduction for the monthly NEE at the measurement sites is 53% while the inversion decreases the standard deviation of the misfits by 38 %. These results build confidence in the NEE estimates at the European/monthly scales and in their theoretical uncertainty from the regional inverse modelling system. However, the uncertainties at the monthly (respectively annual) scale remain larger than the amplitude of the inter-annual variability of monthly (respectively annual) fluxes, so that this study does not engender confidence in the inter-annual variations. The uncertainties at the monthly scale are significantly smaller than the seasonal variations. The seasonal cycle of the inverted fluxes is thus reliable. In particular, the CO2 sink period over the European continent likely ends later than

  2. Responses to iron limitation in Hordeum vulgare L. as affected by the atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S; Rothe, A; Kania, A; Wasaki, J; Römheld, V; Engels, C; Kandeler, E; Neumann, G

    2008-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 treatments stimulated biomass production in Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley plants, both in hydroponics and in soil culture. Root/shoot biomass ratio was increased in severely Fe-deficient plants grown in hydroponics but not under moderate Fe limitation in soil culture. Significantly increased biomass production in high CO2 treatments, even under severe Fe deficiency in hydroponic culture, indicates an improved internal Fe utilization. Iron deficiency-induced secretion of PS in 0.5 to 2.5 cm sub-apical root zones was increased by 74% in response to elevated CO2 treatments of barley plants in hydroponics but no PS were detectable in root exudates collected from soil-grown plants. This may be attributed to suppression of PS release by internal Fe concentrations above the critical level for Fe deficiency, determined at final harvest for soil-grown barley plants, even without additional Fe supply. However, extremely low concentrations of easily plant-available Fe in the investigated soil and low Fe seed reserves suggest a contribution of PS-mediated Fe mobilization from sparingly soluble Fe sources to Fe acquisition of the soil-grown barley plants during the preceding culture period. Higher Fe contents in shoots (+52%) of plants grown in soil culture without Fe supply under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations may indicate an increased efficiency for Fe acquisition. No significant influence on diversity and function of rhizosphere-bacterial communities was detectable in the outer rhizosphere soil (0-3 mm distance from the root surface) by DGGE of 16S rRNA gene fragments and analysis of marker enzyme activities for C-, N-, and P-cycles. PMID:18453445

  3. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H; Edgar, Kirsty M; Foster, Gavin L; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N; Pancost, Richard D; Lunt, Daniel J; Pearson, Paul N

    2016-04-25

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ(11)B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  4. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H.; Edgar, Kirsty M.; Foster, Gavin L.; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N.; Pancost, Richard D.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pearson, Paul N.

    2016-05-01

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ11B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  5. The potential for regional-scale bias in top-down CO2 flux estimates due to atmospheric transport errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of CO2 fluxes that are based on atmospheric data rely upon a meteorological model to simulate atmospheric CO2 transport. These models provide a quantitative link between surface fluxes of CO2 and atmospheric measurements taken downwind. Therefore, any errors in the meteorological model can propagate into atmospheric CO2 transport and ultimately bias the estimated CO2 fluxes. These errors, however, have traditionally been difficult to characterize. To examine the effects of CO2 transport errors on estimated CO2 fluxes, we use a global meteorological model-data assimilation system known as "CAM–LETKF" to quantify two aspects of the transport errors: error variances (standard deviations and temporal error correlations. Furthermore, we develop two case studies. In the first case study, we examine the extent to which CO2 transport uncertainties can bias CO2 flux estimates. In particular, we use a common flux estimate known as CarbonTracker to discover the minimum hypothetical bias that can be detected above the CO2 transport uncertainties. In the second case study, we then investigate which meteorological conditions may contribute to month-long biases in modeled atmospheric transport. We estimate 6 hourly CO2 transport uncertainties in the model surface layer that range from 0.15 to 9.6 ppm (standard deviation, depending on location, and we estimate an average error decorrelation time of ∼2.3 days at existing CO2 observation sites. As a consequence of these uncertainties, we find that CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes would need to be biased by at least 29%, on average, before that bias were detectable at existing non-marine atmospheric CO2 observation sites. Furthermore, we find that persistent, bias-type errors in atmospheric transport are associated with consistent low net radiation, low energy boundary layer conditions. The meteorological model is not necessarily more uncertain in these conditions. Rather, the extent to which meteorological

  6. Responses of wheat and rice to factorial combinations of ambient and elevated CO2 and temperature in FACE experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chuang; Yin, Xinyou; He, Shuaiqi; Jiang, Wenyu; Si, Chuanfei; Struik, Paul C; Luo, Weihong; Li, Gang; Xie, Yingtian; Xiong, Yan; Pan, Genxing

    2016-02-01

    Elevated CO2 and temperature strongly affect crop production, but understanding of the crop response to combined CO2 and temperature increases under field conditions is still limited while data are scarce. We grew wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two levels of CO2 (ambient and enriched up to 500 μmol mol(-1) ) and two levels of canopy temperature (ambient and increased by 1.5-2.0 °C) in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) systems and carried out a detailed growth and yield component analysis during two growing seasons for both crops. An increase in CO2 resulted in higher grain yield, whereas an increase in temperature reduced grain yield, in both crops. An increase in CO2 was unable to compensate for the negative impact of an increase in temperature on biomass and yield of wheat and rice. Yields of wheat and rice were decreased by 10-12% and 17-35%, respectively, under the combination of elevated CO2 and temperature. The number of filled grains per unit area was the most important yield component accounting for the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature in wheat and rice. Our data showed complex treatment effects on the interplay between preheading duration, nitrogen uptake, tillering, leaf area index, and radiation-use efficiency, and thus on yield components and yield. Nitrogen uptake before heading was crucial in minimizing yield loss due to climate change in both crops. For rice, however, a breeding strategy to increase grain number per m(2) and % filled grains (or to reduce spikelet sterility) at high temperature is also required to prevent yield reduction under conditions of global change.

  7. Assessment of model estimates of land–atmosphere CO2 exchange across Northern Eurasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rawlins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A warming climate is altering land–atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land–atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2 dynamics through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP and ecosystem respiration (ER and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs over a region spanning the drainage basin of northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations were conducted over the 1960–2009 record and at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate model simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote sensing data. The site-based comparisons show the timing of peak GPP to be well simulated. Modest overestimates in model GPP and ER are also found, which are relatively higher for two boreal forest validation sites than the two tundra sites. Across the suite of model simulations, NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m−2 yr−2, equivalent to 3 to 340% of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135% of the mean from the first to last ten years of record (1960–1969 vs 2000–2009, with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30% from the first to last ten years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains, while model mean residence time for soil organic carbon decreased by 10% (−5 to −16%. This suggests that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our analysis points to improvements in model elements controlling vegetation

  8. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Vanheerwaarden, C.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-12-01

    We will present and discuss a conceptual modelling framework that can facilitate the understanding of the interactions between land processes and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics/chemistry at diurnal scales. This framework has been successful applied to the interpretation of field experiments, but also to identify the non-linear relations that occur at larger spatial and temporal scales. We will then discuss in depth the link between shallow cumulus and vegetation exchange of water and carbon dioxide. Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms, and in modulating the Earth's reflectivity and climate. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cycle is poorly understood. It is expected that as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 the plant stomata will close leading to lower latent heat fluxes and higher sensible heat fluxes. During the presentation, we will show that this causes a decline in boundary layer cloud formation in middle latitudes. This could be partly counteracted by the greater ability of a warmer atmosphere to take up water and by a growth in biomass due to CO2 fertilization. Our results are based on a new soil-water-atmosphere-plant model supported by comprehensive observational evidence, from which we identify the dominant atmospheric responses to plant physiological processes. They emphasize the intricate connection between biological and physical aspects of the climate system and the relevance of short-term and small-scale processes in establishing this connection

  9. Response of microbial extracellular enzyme activities and r- vs. K- selected microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 depends on soil aggregate size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatskiy, Sergey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Increased belowground carbon (C) transfer by plant roots under elevated atmospheric CO2 and the contrasting environment in soil macro- and microaggregates could affect properties of the microbial community in the rhizosphere. We evaluated the effect of 5 years of elevated CO2 (550 ppm) on four extracellular enzymes: ß-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase along with the contribution of fast- (r-strategists) and slow-growing microorganisms (K-strategists) in soil aggregates. We fractionated the bulk soil from the ambient and elevated CO2 treatments of FACE-Hohenheim (Stuttgart) into large macro- (>2 mm), small macro- (0.25-2.00 mm), and microaggregates (<0.25 mm) using a modified dry sieving. Microbial biomass (C-mic by SIR), the maximal specific growth rate (µ), growing microbial biomass (GMB) and lag-period (t-lag) were estimated by the kinetics of CO2 emission from bulk soil and aggregates amended with glucose and nutrients. In the bulk soil and isolated aggregates before and after activation with glucose, the actual and the potential enzyme activities were measured. Although C-org and C-mic as well as the activities of ß-glucosidase, phosphatase, and sulfatase were unaffected in bulk soil and in aggregate-size classes by elevated CO2, significant changes were observed in potential enzyme production after substrate amendment. After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. In addition, µ values were significantly higher under elevated than ambient CO2 for bulk soil, small macroaggregates, and microaggregates. Based on changes in µ, GMB, and lag-period, we conclude that elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulated the r-selected microorganisms, especially in soil microaggregates. In contrast, significantly higher chitinase activity in bulk soil and in large macroaggregates under elevated CO2 revealed an increased contribution of fungi to turnover processes. We conclude that quantitative and

  10. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on leaf dark respiration of Xanthium strumarium in light and in darkness

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D.; Tissue, David T.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Griffin, Kevin L.

    2001-01-01

    Leaf dark respiration (R) is an important component of plant carbon balance, but the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 on leaf R during illumination are largely unknown. We studied the effects of elevated CO2 on leaf R in light (RL) and in darkness (RD) in Xanthium strumarium at different developmental stages. Leaf RL was estimated by using the Kok method, whereas leaf RD was measured as the rate of CO2 efflux at zero light. Leaf RL and RD were sign...

  11. What Controls the Global Value of Oxygen-18 in Atmospheric CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, C. J.; Noone, D. C.; Buenning, N. H.; Randerson, J. T.; Welp, L. R.; White, J.; Vaughn, B.; Riley, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    While spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric CO2 and its carbon isotope composition have received considerable attention from the carbon cycle community, much less is known about the δ18O of atmospheric CO2 (δ18O-atm). Because δ18O-atm represents a fundamental coupling between the carbon and water cycles, there is great interest in using it to diagnose underlying variations in each cycle. While much progress has been made in global simulations of δ18O-atm, basic aspects of its behavior at a range of spatial and temporal scales remain poorly understood, ranging from the phase shift between the seasonal cycles of CO2 and δ18O-atm at high northern latitudes to the large interannual variability of δ18O-atm observed at a range of spatial scales. Also, the mean annual global δ18O-atm exhibits large, multi-year excursions that imply large isotope fluxes driven by carbon and/or water cycle variations. In this work, we identify and quantify new forcings on δ18O-atm as determined from site-level and global simulations. Among the new forcings is a previously unrecognized strong relationship between relative humidity and leaf-atmosphere oxygen-18 discrimination and isofluxes through relative humidity sensitivities in leaf water δ18O-atm and bi- directional leaf carbon fluxes. We show how this relationship varies with ecosystem type, and quantify the potential impact of relative humidity variations on global budgets of δ18O-atm. We identify key biomes that help determine the mean global δ18O-atm and its variations.

  12. Influence of Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Terrestrial Vegetation on the 18O Content of Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Jim; Yakir, Dan

    2001-03-01

    The oxygen-18 (18O) content of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important indicator of CO2 uptake on land. It has generally been assumed that during photosynthesis, oxygen in CO2 reaches isotopic equilibrium with oxygen in 18O-enriched water in leaves. We show, however, large differences in the activity of carbonic anhydrase (which catalyzes CO2 hydration and 18O exchange in leaves) among major plant groups that cause variations in the extent of 18O equilibrium (θeq). A clear distinction in θeq between C3 trees and shrubs, and C4 grasses makes atmospheric C18OO a potentially sensitive indicator to changes in C3 and C4 productivity. We estimate a global mean θeq value of ~0.8, which reasonably reconciles inconsistencies between 18O budgets of atmospheric O2 (Dole effect) and CO2.

  13. Modelling Maastrichtian climate: investigating the role of geography, atmospheric CO2 and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Haywood

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results from an ensemble of palaeoclimate simulations of the Maastrichtian using the fully-coupled dynamic ocean-atmosphere General Circulation Model, HadCM3L. Using appropriate Maastrichtian boundary conditions, we investigate the sensitivity of the predicted palaeoclimate to changing atmospheric CO2 levels and modelled vegetation treatment. In addition, we explore the climatic response to the changed geography using a comparison with a pre-industrial experiment. We describe our results alongside the findings of previous modelling studies in particular with consideration to concepts of climate equability. Our findings demonstrate increased global temperatures compared with the pre-industrial experiment, with a 5.9°C increase in temperatures associated with the change to 1×CO2 Maastrichtian conditions and a further 3.9°C warming associated with a quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 levels. Compared to the pre-industrial we find a latitudinal temperature profile that is reduced in gradient and shifted to higher temperatures. Our control 4×CO Maastrichtian experiment exceeds the pre-industrial by 6.5–8.6°C, 7.4–11.2°C, and 10.1–32.4°C in the equatorial, mid and high latitudes respectively. We also find a general pattern of increased thermal seasonality in the high latitudes. In terms of global mean annual temperatures we find a range of 18.1–23.6°C for our 1���6×atmospheric CO2 envelope. Other than in the northern high latitudes we find satisfactory levels of agreement between the ensemble temperature envelope and estimates from palaeotemperature proxies. The inclusion of a dynamic vegetation model (TRIFFID leads to a further increase in the thermal seasonality at high latitudes, warming in the mid to high latitudes and increased precipitation in the low and mid latitudes.

  14. Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the abrupt4xCO2 scenario

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaoyong; Annette Rinke; JI Duoying; CUI Xuefeng; John C Moore

    2014-01-01

    We analyze sea ice changes from eight different earth system models that have conducted experiment abrupt4xCO2 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). In response to abrupt quadrupling of CO2 from preindustrial levels, Arctic temperatures dramatically rise by about 10°C—16°C in winter and the seasonal sea ice cycle and sea ice concentration are signiifcantly changed compared with the pre-industrial control simulations (piControl). Changes of Arctic sea ice concentration are spatially correlated with temperature patterns in all seasons and highest in autumn. Changes in sea ice are associated with changes in atmospheric circulation patterns at heights up to the jet stream. While the pattern of sea level pressure changes is generally similar to the surface air temperature change pattern, the wintertime 500 hPa circulation displays a positive Paciifc North America (PNA) anomaly under abrupt4xCO2-piControl. This large scale teleconnection may contribute to, or feedback on, the simulated sea ice cover change and is associated with an intensiifcation of the jet stream over East Asia and the north Paciifc in winter.

  15. Modelling representation errors of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Peters

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modelling of carbon sources and sinks requires an accurate estimate of the quality of the observations to obtain a realistic estimate of the inferred fluxes and their uncertainties. Representation errors, defined here as the mismatch between point observations and grid cell averages, may add substantial uncertainty to the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 concentration data. We used a high resolution (2 km mesoscale model (RAMS to simulate the variations in the CO2 concentration to estimate the representation errors for grid sizes of 10–100 km. Meteorology is the main driver of representation errors in our study causing spatial and temporal variations in the error estimate. Within the nocturnal boundary layer the representation errors are relatively large and mainly determined by unresolved topography at lower model resolutions. During the day, surface CO2 flux variability and mesoscale circulations were found to be the main sources of representation errors. Careful up-scaling of point observations can reduce the importance of the representation error substantially. The remaining representation error is in the order of 0.5–1.5 ppm at 20–100 km resolution.

  16. Modelling representation errors of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Peters

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modelling of carbon sources and sinks requires an accurate quality estimate of the modelling framework to obtain a realistic estimate of the inferred fluxes and their uncertainties. So-called "representation errors" result from our inability to correctly represent point observations with simulated average values of model grid cells. They may add substantial uncertainty to the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio data. We simulated detailed variations in the CO2 mixing ratios with a high resolution (2 km mesoscale model (RAMS to estimate the representation errors introduced at larger model grid sizes of 10–100 km. We found that meteorology is the main driver of representation errors in our study causing spatial and temporal variations in the error estimate. Within the nocturnal boundary layer, the representation errors are relatively large and mainly caused by unresolved topography at lower model resolutions. During the day, convective structures, mesoscale circulations, and surface CO2 flux variability were found to be the main sources of representation errors. Interpreting observations near a mesoscale circulation as representative for air with the correct footprint relative to the front can reduce the representation error substantially. The remaining representation error is 0.5–1.5 ppm at 20–100 km resolution.

  17. Limited carbon storage in soil and litter of experimental forest plots under increased atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration is thought to be mitigated in part by carbon sequestration within forest ecosystems, where carbon can be stored in vegetation or soils. The storage of carbon in soils is determined by the fraction that is sequestered in persistent organic materials, such as humus. In experimental forest plots of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) exposed to high CO2 concentrations, nearly half of the carbon uptake is allocated to short-lived tissues, largely foliage. These tissues fall to the ground and decompose, normally contributing only a small portion of their carbon content to refractory soil humic materials. Such findings call into question the role of soils as long-term carbon sinks, and show the need for a better understanding of carbon cycling in forest soils. Here we report a significant accumulation of carbon in the litter layer of experimental forest plots after three years of growth at increased CO2 concentrations (565 μ l1). But fast turnover times of organic carbon in the litter layer (of about three years) appear to constrain the potential size of this carbon sink. Given the observation that carbon accumulation in the deeper mineral soil layers was absent, we suggest that significant, long-term net carbon sequestration in forest soils is unlikely. (author)

  18. CHEMICAL WEATHERING PROCESSES AND ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONSUMPTION OF HUANGHE RIVER AND CHANGJIANG RIVER BASINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-ying; ZHANG Jing

    2005-01-01

    Rock weathering plays an important role in studying the long-term carbon cycles and global climaticchange. According to the statistics analysis, the Huanghe (Yellow) River water chemistry was mainly controlled byevaporite and carbonate weathering, which were responsible for over 90% of total dissolved ions. As compared withthe Huanghe River basin, dissolved load of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River was mainly originated from the carbonate dissolution.The chemical weathering rates were estimated to be 39.29t/(km2·a)and 61.58t/(km2·a)by deduting the HCO3- derived from atmosphere in the Huanghe River and Changjiang River watersheds, respectively. The CO2 con-sumption rates by rock weathering were calculated to be 120.84 × 103mol/km2 and 452.46 × 103mol/km2 annually in thetwo basins, respectively. The total CO2 consumption of the two basins amounted to 918.51 × 109mol/a, accounting for3.83% of the world gross. In contrast to other world watersheds, the stronger evaporite reaction and infirm silicateweathering can explain such feature that CO2 consumption rates were lower than a global average, suggesting that thesequential weathering may be go on in the two Chinese drainage basins.

  19. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and N fertilization on bahiagrass pastures in the Southeastern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on pasture systems remain understudied in the Southeastern US. A 10-year study of bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flüggé) response to elevated CO2 was established in 2005 using open top field chambers on a Blanton loamy sand (loamy siliceous, thermic, Grossarenic...

  20. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Experimental overview and diurnal cycle results for 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R.; Peters, W.; Krol, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    A forward atmospheric transport modeling experiment has been coordinated by the TransCom group to investigate synoptic and diurnal variations in CO2. Model simulations were run for biospheric, fossil, and air-sea exchange of CO2 and for SF6 and radon for 2000-2003. Twenty-five models or model varian

  1. A natural experiment on plant acclimation: lifetime stomatal frequency response of an individual tree to annual atmospheric CO2increase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, F.; Below, R.; Klerk, P. de; Dilcher, D.L.; Joosten, H.; Kürschner, W.M.; Visscher, H.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been increasing in atmospheric concentration since the Industrial Revolution. A decreasing number of stomata on leaves of land plants still provides the only morphological evidence that this man-made increase has already affected the biosphere. The current rate of CO2 respon

  2. Rapid atmospheric CO2 changes associated with the 8,200-years-B.P. cooling event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, F.; Aaby, B.; Visscher, H.

    2002-01-01

    By applying the inverse relation between numbers of leaf stomata and atmospheric CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis of fossil birch leaves from lake deposits in Denmark reveals a century-scale CO2 change during the prominent Holocene cooling event that occurred in the North Atlantic regi

  3. Fixing atmospheric CO2 by environment adaptive sorbent and renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Liu, J.; Ge, K.; Fang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Fixing atmospheric CO2, followed by geologic storage in remote areas is considered an environmentally secure approach to climate mitigation. A moisture swing sorbent was investigated in the laboratory for CO2 capture at a remote area with humid and windy conditions. The energy requirement of moisture swing absorption could be greatly reduced compared to that of traditional high-temperature thermal swing, by assuming that the sorbent can be naturally dried and regenerated at ambient conditions. However, for currently developed moisture swing materials, the CO2 capacity would drop significantly at high relative humidity. The CO2 capture amount can be reduced by the poor thermodynamics and kinetics at high relative humidity or low temperature. Similar challenges also exist for thermal or vacuum swing sorbents. Developing sorbent materials which adapt to specific environments, such as high humidity or low temperature, can ensure sufficient capture capacity on the one hand, and realize better economics on the other hand (Figure 1) .An environment adaptive sorbent should have the abilities of tunable capacity and fast kinetics at extreme conditions, such as high humidity or low temperature. In this presentation, the possibility of tuning CO2 absorption capacity of a polymerized ionic liquid material is discussed. The energy requirement evaluation shows that tuning the CO2 binding energy of sorbent, rather than increasing the temperature or reducing the humidity of air, could be much more economic. By determining whether the absorption process is controlled by physical diffusion controlled or chemical reaction, an effective approach to fast kinetics at extreme conditions is proposed. A shrinking core model for mass transfer kinetics is modified to cope with the relatively poor kinetics of air capture. For the studied sample which has a heterogeneous structure, the kinetic analysis indicates a preference of sorbent particle size optimization, rather than support layer

  4. Using Mauna Loa Atmospheric CO2 Data in Large General Education Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Kapp, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    We have been using the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 dataset (http://scrippsco2.ucsd.edu/data/in_situ_co2/monthly_mlo.csv) in a large (up to 300) General Education Geoscience course, primarily in small breakout groups (30 students). The exercise is designed to address quantitative literacy including percentages, slopes and linear trends, issues of data completeness and bias, quality of extrapolations, as well as implications for climate change. We are significantly revising the course, which serves 600 students a semester, with help from a curriculum grant. A major goal is to improve student learning by incorporating inquiry based activities in the large lecture setting. Lectures now incorporate several activities throughout a given class period, in which students are asked to use critical thinking skills such as interpreting patterns in data and graphs, analyzing a scientific hypothesis for its coherence with the scientific method, and answering higher order synthesis questions in both verbal and written form. This differs from our past format where class periods were dominated by lecture, with a single short activity done individually about every other lecture. To test the effectiveness of the new course format we will give students the same atmospheric CO2 exercise in the lecture setting that they were given previously in breakout groups. Students will work in small groups in lecture after receiving a short introduction to the exercise by the instructor. They will plot CO2 concentrations, make extrapolations, and interpret patterns in the data. We will compare scores on the exercise with previous semesters. We expect that students will do better having had more experience with interpreting scientific data and practicing higher order thinking skills. We also expect working in small groups will foster better learning through peer teaching and discussion. We will incorporate responses from students who took part in the exercises from current and previous semesters. We

  5. Simulating low frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 during the last 740 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores shows a natural variability of 80 to 100 ppmv during the last four glacial cycles and variations of approximately 60 ppmv in the two cycles between 410 and 650 kyr BP. We here use various paleo-climatic records from the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core and from oceanic sediment cores covering the last 740 kyr to force the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE in a forward mode over this time in order to interpret the natural variability of CO2. Our approach is based on the previous interpretation of carbon cycle variations during Termination I (Köhler et al., 2005a. In the absense of a process-based sediment module one main simplification of BICYCLE is that carbonate compensation is approximated by the temporally delayed restoration of deep ocean [CO32−]. Our results match the low frequency changes in CO2 measured in the Vostok and the EPICA Dome C ice core for the last 650 kyr BP (r2≈0.75. During these transient simulations the carbon cycle reaches never a steady state due to the ongoing variability of the overall carbon budget caused by the time delayed response of the carbonate compensation to other processes. The average contributions of different processes to the rise in CO2 during Terminations I to V and during earlier terminations are: the rise in Southern Ocean vertical mixing: 36/22 ppmv, the rise in ocean temperature: 26/11 ppmv, iron limitation of the marine biota in the Southern Ocean: 20/14 ppmv, carbonate compensation: 15/7 ppmv, the rise in North Atlantic deep water formation: 13/0 ppmv, the rise in gas exchange due to a decreasing sea ice cover: −8/−7 ppmv, sea level rise: −12/−4 ppmv, and rising terrestrial carbon storage: −13/−6 ppmv. According to our model the smaller interglacial CO2 values in the pre-Vostok period prior to Termination V are mainly caused by smaller interglacial Southern Ocean SST and an Atlantic THC which stayed

  6. 2-micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U.; Petros, M.

    2012-12-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar is being developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Our objective is to integrate an existing high energy double-pulsed 2-micron laser transmitter with a direct detection receiver and telescope to enable an airborne capability to perform a first proof of principle demonstration of airborne direct detection CO2 measurements. The 2-micron transmitter provides 100mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL/IPDA instrument. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. A 16-inch diameter telescope has been designed and being manufactured for the direct detection lidar. The detector is an InGaAs Positive-Intrinsic-Negative (PIN) photodiode manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. The performance of the detector is characterized at various operating temperatures and bias voltages for spectral response, NEP, response time, dynamic range, and linearity. A collinear lidar structure is designed to be integrated to NASA UC12 or B200 research aircrafts. This paper will describe the design of the airborne 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar system; the lidar operation parameters; the wavelength pair selection; laser transmitter energy, pulse rate, beam divergence, double pulse generation and accurate frequency control; detector characterization; telescope design; lidar structure design

  7. Terrestrial carbon cycle responses to drought and climate stress: New insights using atmospheric observations of CO2 and delta13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Caroline B.

    Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) continue to rise well into the second decade of the new millennium, in spite of broad-scale human understanding of the impacts of fossil fuel emissions on the earth's climate. Natural sinks for CO2 that are relevant on human time scales---the world's oceans and land biosphere---appear to have kept pace with emissions. The continuously increasing strength of the land biosphere sink for CO2 is surpassing expectations given our understanding of the CO2 fertilization and warming effects on the balance between photosynthesis and respiration, especially in the face of ongoing forest degradation. The climate and carbon cycle links between the atmosphere and land biosphere are not well understood, especially at regional (100 km to 10,000 km) scales. The climate modulating effects of changing plant stomatal conductance in response to temperature and water availability is a key area of uncertainty. Further, the differential response to climate change of C3 and C4 plant functional types is not well known at regional scales. This work outlines the development of a novel application of atmospheric observations of delta13C of CO2 to investigate the links between climate and water and carbon cycling and the integrated responses of C3 and C4 ecosystems to climate variables. A two-step Bayesian batch inversion for 3-hourly, 1x1º CO2 fluxes (step one), and for 3-hourly 1x1º delta13C of recently assimilated carbon (step two) is created here for the first time, and is used to investigate links between regional climate indicators and changes in delta13C of the biosphere. Results show that predictable responses of regional-scale, integrated plant discrimination to temperature, precipitation and relative humidity anomalies can be recovered from atmospheric signals. Model development, synthetic data simulations to test sensitivity, and results for the year 2010 are presented here. This dissertation also includes two other applications

  8. Exchanges of Atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2 with the Terrestrial Biosphere and Oceans from 1978 to 2000. II. A Three-Dimensional Tracer Inversion Model to Deduce Regional Fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Charles D.; HEIMANN Martin; Stewart, Elisabeth F

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer inversion model is described that couples atmospheric CO2 transport with prescribed and adjustable source/sink components of the global car- bon cycle to predict atmospheric CO2 concentration and 13C/12C isotopic ratio taking account of exchange fluxes of atmospheric CO2 with the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans. Industrial CO2 emissions are prescribed from fuel production data. Transport of CO2 is prescribed by a model, TM2, that employs 9 vertical levels from ...

  9. Sensitivity of Pliocene Arctic climate to orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 and sea ice albedo parameterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Fergus W.; Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2016-05-01

    General circulation model (GCM) simulations of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP, 3.264 to 3.025 Myr ago) do not reproduce the magnitude of Northern Hemisphere high latitude surface air and sea surface temperature (SAT and SST) warming that proxy data indicate. There is also large uncertainty regarding the state of sea ice cover in the mPWP. Evidence for both perennial and seasonal mPWP Arctic sea ice is found through analyses of marine sediments, whilst in a multi-model ensemble of mPWP climate simulations, half of the ensemble simulated ice-free summer Arctic conditions. Given the strong influence that sea ice exerts on high latitude temperatures, an understanding of the nature of mPWP Arctic sea ice would be highly beneficial. Using the HadCM3 GCM, this paper explores the impact of various combinations of potential mPWP orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 concentrations and minimum sea ice albedo on sea ice extent and high latitude warming. The focus is on the Northern Hemisphere, due to availability of proxy data, and the large data-model discrepancies in this region. Changes in orbital forcings are demonstrated to be sufficient to alter the Arctic sea ice simulated by HadCM3 from perennial to seasonal. However, this occurs only when atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceed 300 ppm. Reduction of the minimum sea ice albedo from 0.5 to 0.2 is also sufficient to simulate seasonal sea ice, with any of the combinations of atmospheric CO2 and orbital forcing. Compared to a mPWP control simulation, monthly mean increases north of 60°N of up to 4.2 °C (SST) and 9.8 °C (SAT) are simulated. With varying CO2, orbit and sea ice albedo values we are able to reproduce proxy temperature records that lean towards modest levels of high latitude warming, but other proxy data showing greater warming remain beyond the reach of our model. This highlights the importance of additional proxy records at high latitudes and ongoing efforts to compare proxy signals between sites.

  10. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO2 absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occulation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO2 (e.g., 2.0, 2.7, or 4.3 microns), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  11. The 2009–2010 step in atmospheric CO2 inter-hemispheric difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Francey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The annual average CO2 difference between baseline data from Mauna Loa and the Southern Hemisphere increased by ∼ 0.8 μmol mol−1 (0.8 ppm between 2009 and 2010, a step unprecedented in over 50 years of reliable data. We find no evidence for coinciding, sufficiently large and rapid, source/sink changes. A statistical anomaly is unlikely due to the highly systematic nature of the variation in observations. An explanation for the step, and the subsequent 5 year stability in this north–south difference, involves inter-hemispheric atmospheric exchange variation. The selected data describing this episode provide a critical test for studies that employ atmospheric transport models that interpret global carbon budgets and inform management of anthropogenic emissions.

  12. Measurement of Lower-Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Distribution Using a Compact 1.6 μm DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial distribution and their variation in time is one of the essential information for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and a 25 cm telescope. CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 2.5 km altitude.

  13. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-10-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (~1-8 × 10(6)  km(2) ) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  14. Free atmospheric CO2 enrichment increased above ground biomass but did not affect symbiotic N2-fixation and soil carbon dynamics in a mixed deciduous stand in Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Through increases in net primary production (NPP, elevated CO2 is hypothesized to increase the amount of plant litter entering the soil. The fate of this extra carbon on the forest floor or in mineral soil is currently not clear. Moreover, increased rates of NPP can be maintained only if forests can escape nitrogen limitation. In a Free atmospheric CO2 Enrichment (FACE experiment near Bangor, Wales, 4 ambient and 4 elevated [CO2] plots were planted with patches of Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa and Fagus sylvatica on a former arable field. After 4 years, biomass averaged for the 3 species was 5497 (se 270 g m−2 in ambient and 6450 (se 130 g m−2 in elevated [CO2] plots, a significant increase of 17% (P = 0.018. During that time, only a shallow L forest floor litter layer had formed due to intensive bioturbation. Total soil C and N contents increased irrespective of treatment and species as a result of afforestation. We could not detect an additional C sink in the soil, nor were soil C stabilization processes affected by elevated [CO2]. We observed a decrease of leaf N content in Betula and Alnus under elevated [CO2], while the soil C/N ratio decreased regardless of CO2 treatment. The ratio of N taken up from the soil and by N2-fixation in Alnus was not affected by elevated [CO2]. We infer that increased nitrogen use efficiency is the mechanism by which increased NPP is sustained under elevated [CO2] at this site.

  15. Impact of difference in absorption line parameters in spectroscopic databases on CO2 and CH4 atmospheric content retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, T. Yu.; Chentsov, A. V.; Rokotyan, N. V.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of uncertainties in CH4 and CO2 absorption line parameters in modern spectroscopic databases on the atmospheric transmission simulation in the near-infrared region is investigated. The atmospheric contents of CH4 and CO2 are retrieved from the absorption solar spectra measured by a ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer. Different spectroscopic databases are used in the forward radiative transfer model and a comparison of the retrieved results is made.

  16. Atmospheric CO2 source and sink patterns over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadnavis, Suvarna; Kumar, K. Ravi; Tiwari, Yogesh K.; Pozzoli, Luca

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we examine CO2 emission hot spots and sink regions over India as identified from global model simulations during the period 2000-2009. CO2 emission hot spots overlap with locations of densely clustered thermal power plants, coal mines and other industrial and urban centres; CO2 sink regions coincide with the locations of dense forest. Fossil fuel CO2 emissions are compared with two bottom-up inventories: the Regional Emission inventories in ASia (REAS v1.11; 2000-2009) and the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v4.2) (2000-2009). Estimated fossil fuel emissions over the hot spot region are ˜ 500-950 gC m-2 yr-1 as obtained from the global model simulation, EDGAR v4.2 and REAS v1.11 emission inventory. Simulated total fluxes show increasing trends, from 1.39 ± 1.01 % yr-1 (19.8 ± 1.9 TgC yr-1) to 6.7 ± 0.54 % yr-1 (97 ± 12 TgC yr-1) over the hot spot regions and decreasing trends of -0.95 ± 1.51 % yr-1 (-1 ± 2 TgC yr-1) to -5.7 ± 2.89 % yr-1 (-2.3 ± 2 TgC yr-1) over the sink regions. Model-simulated terrestrial ecosystem fluxes show decreasing trends (increasing CO2 uptake) over the sink regions. Decreasing trends in terrestrial ecosystem fluxes imply that forest cover is increasing, which is consistent with India State of Forest Report (2009). Fossil fuel emissions show statistically significant increasing trends in all the data sets considered in this study. Estimated trend in simulated total fluxes over the Indian region is ˜ 4.72 ± 2.25 % yr-1 (25.6 TgC yr-1) which is slightly higher than global growth rate ˜ 3.1 % yr-1 during 2000-2010.

  17. 大气CO2浓度升高对绿豆生长及C、N吸收的影响%Effects of enriched atmospheric CO2 on the growth and uptake of N and C in mung bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝兴宇; 李萍; 杨宏斌; 韩雪; 林而达

    2011-01-01

    The inter-governmental panel on climate change projects that atmospheric [CO2] will reach 550 umol'inol ' by 2050. Elevation of [CO2] will invariably influence the growth and yield of mung bean. Research on the growth and uptake of C and N in mung bean in response to elevated [CO2] will benefit the study of the balance of nutrients under future climate change. This could provide the scientific basis for high-value mung bean production through the implementation of climate-oriented policies. Contrary to recent studies of crop response to elevated [CO2] in chambers and other enclosures, FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) was used in this study. In the study, mung bean was planted under ambient [CO2] of 389±40 umolmor1 and FACE regimes of 55O±6O umolmol-1, respectively. The results showed that leaf, stem, pod, root, above-ground part and total biomass, and root/shoot ratio increased under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increased the weight of leaf by I7.15%~80.20% and that of stem by 25.29%~97.38%, compared with ambient [CO2]. Under FACE, the weight of pod significantly increased by 24.50% at harvest. The weight of root increased by 34.17% and 60.41% at pod-filling and harvest stages, respectively. Elevated [CO2] Increased above-ground biomass weight by 12.90%~83.09%. Total biomass weight increased by 13.98% and 25.79% at pod-filling and harvest stages, respectively. Root/shoot ratio increased by 18.68% at pod-filling stage. N concentration in above-ground part of mung bean decreased by 10.39%~2I.06% under FACE compared with ambient [CO:]. Elevated [CO2] increased C concentration and C/N ratio by 0.41%~1.13% and 12.23%~26.68%, respectively. The change in seed N and C concentration and C/N ratio was insignificant. N and C uptake by above-ground part of mung bean increased by 1.99%~50.87% and 14.43%~92.69%, respectively. Biomass increase suggested higher crop assimilation of C and absorption of soil N under elevated [CO2] conditions. This implied that mung bean production

  18. The Influence of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Climate Variability on Amazon Tropical Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, A. D. D. A.; Galbraith, D.; Zhang, K.; Coe, M. T.; Costa, M. H.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are important regulators of atmospheric CO2 concentration and any change in tropical forest C balance will directly affect global climate. Long term studies from undisturbed old-growth forest monitoring sites distributed across Amazonia have presented an overall increase in aboveground biomass in the last decades, and the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is considered the main driver for this observed carbon sink. The main goal of this work was to use simulations from dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) to explore how much of the observed historical (1970-2008) increase in biomass in undisturbed tropical forest in Amazonia could be attributed to the CO2 fertilization effect or associated to climate change. We compared simulated biomass and productivity from three DGVMs (IBIS, ED2 and JULES) with observations from forest plots (RAINFOR). The analyses helped clarify the variability of historical and potential future simulations.The analyses showed that models shared similar results and deficiencies. The three models represented the two major model types: conventional dynamic global vegetation models that simulate community dynamics and competition between plant functional types (PFTs) using an aggregated 'big-leaf' representation (IBIS and Jules), and a size-and-age structured terrestrial ecosystem model that captures individual scale dynamics and competition (ED2). In general, the ED2 model results were more sensitive to climate, but all models greatly underestimate the impact of extreme climatic events (e.g. drought) compared to field data.All the DGVM's studied tend to simulate the average biomass well and to overestimate productivity of vegetation under current conditions. All the models presented very low spatial variability compared to field observation. The lack of spatial variability of biomass and productivity is attributed to the lack of nutrient and residence time spatial heterogeneity. All of the DGVMs results suggest that

  19. Atmospheric CO2 uptake throughout bio-enhanced brucite-water reaction at Montecastelli serpentinites (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedini, Federica; Boschi, Chiara; Ménez, Benedicte; Perchiazzi, Natale; Zanchetta, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In the last several years, interactions between microorganisms and minerals have intrigued and catched the interest of the scientific community. Montecastelli serpentinites (Tuscany, Italy) are characterized by CO2-mineral carbonation, an important process which leads to spontaneous formation of carbonate phases uptaking atmospheric CO2. In the studied areas carbonate precipitates, mainly hydrated Mg-carbonates, are present in form of crusts, coating and spherules on exposed rock surfaces, and filling rock fractures. Petrographic and mineralogical observations revealed that Tuscan brucite-rich serpentinites hosts preserve their original chemical compositions with typical mesh-textured serpentine (± brucite) after olivine, magnetite-rich mesh rims and relicts of primary spinel. Representative hydrated carbonate samples have been collected in three different areas and analyzed to investigate the role of biological activity and its influence in the serpentine-hydrated Mg-carbonates reaction. The different types of whitish precipitates have been selected under binocular microscope for XRD analyses performed at the Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra (University of Pisa, Italy): their mineralogical composition consists of mainly hydromagnesite and variable amount of other metastable carbonate phases (i.e. nesquehonite, manasseite, pyroaurite, brugnatellite and aragonite). Moreover, the crystallinity analysis of whitish crust and spherules have been carried out by detailed and quantitative XRD analyses to testify a possible biologically controlled growth, inasmuch as the crystal structure of biominerals could be affected by many lattice defects (i.e. dislocations, twinning, etc.) and this observation cause low crystallinity of the mineral. The presence of microbial cells and relicts of organic matter has already been detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) combined with Raman spectromicroscopy in a previous study (Bedini et al., 2013). The presence of

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO2 triggers compensatory feeding by root herbivores on a C3 but not a C4 grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Johnson

    Full Text Available Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations often reduce nutritional quality for herbivores by increasing the C:N ratio of plant tissue. This frequently triggers compensatory feeding by aboveground herbivores, whereby they consume more shoot material in an attempt to meet their nutritional needs. Little, however, is known about how root herbivores respond to such changes. Grasslands are particularly vulnerable to root herbivores, which can collectively exceed the mass of mammals grazing aboveground. Here we provide novel evidence for compensatory feeding by a grass root herbivore, Sericesthis nigrolineata, under elevated atmospheric CO2 (600 µmol mol(-1 on a C3 (Microlaena stipoides but not a C4 (Cymbopogon refractus grass species. At ambient CO2 (400 µmol mol(-1 M. stipoides roots were 44% higher in nitrogen (N and 7% lower in carbon (C concentrations than C. refractus, with insects performing better on M. stipoides. Elevated CO2 decreased N and increased C:N in M. stipoides roots, but had no impact on C. refractus roots. Root-feeders displayed compensatory feeding on M. stipoides at elevated CO2, consuming 118% more tissue than at ambient atmospheric CO2. Despite this, root feeder biomass remained depressed by 24%. These results suggest that compensatory feeding under elevated atmospheric CO2 may make some grass species particularly vulnerable to attack, potentially leading to future shifts in the community composition of grasslands.

  1. Low atmospheric CO2 levels during the Little Ice Age due to cooling-induced terrestrial uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Allison, C. E.; Rayner, P. J.; Enting, I.; Mulvaney, R.; Steele, L. P.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Sturges, W. T.; Curran, M. A. J.; Smith, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Low atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration during the Little Ice Age has been used to derive the global carbon cycle sensitivity to temperature. Recent evidence confirms earlier indications that the low CO2 was caused by increased terrestrial carbon storage. It remains unknown whether the terrestrial biosphere responded to temperature variations, or there was vegetation re-growth on abandoned farmland. Here we present a global numerical simulation of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide concentrations in the pre-industrial period. Carbonyl sulfide concentration is linked to changes in gross primary production and shows a positive anomaly during the Little Ice Age. We show that a decrease in gross primary production and a larger decrease in ecosystem respiration is the most likely explanation for the decrease in atmospheric CO2 and increase in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide concentrations. Therefore, temperature change, not vegetation re-growth, was the main cause of the increased terrestrial carbon storage. We address the inconsistency between ice-core CO2 records from different sites measuring CO2 and δ13CO2 in ice from Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica). Our interpretation allows us to derive the temperature sensitivity of pre-industrial CO2 fluxes for the terrestrial biosphere (γL = -10 to -90 Pg C K-1), implying a positive climate feedback and providing a benchmark to reduce model uncertainties.

  2. Global modelling of the early Martian climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Water cycle and ice evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, R.; Forget, F.; Millour, E.; Head, J.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Charnay, B.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss 3D global simulations of the early Martian climate that we have performed assuming a faint young Sun and denser CO2 atmosphere. We include a self-consistent representation of the water cycle, with atmosphere-surface interactions, atmospheric transport, and the radiative effects of CO2 and H2O gas and clouds taken into account. We find that for atmospheric pressures greater than a fraction of a bar, the adiabatic cooling effect causes temperatures in the southern highland valley net...

  3. The Role of Vegetation Response to Elevated CO2 in Modifying Land-Atmosphere Feedback Across the Central United States Agro-Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, D.; Kumar, P.; Sivapalan, M.; Long, S.; Liang, X.

    2009-05-01

    Recent local-scale observational studies have demonstrated significant modifications to the partitioning of incident energy by two key mid-west agricultural species, soy and corn, as ambient atmospheric CO2 concentrations are experimentally augmented to projected future levels. The uptake of CO2 by soy, which utilizes the C3 photosynthetic pathway, has likewise been observed to significantly increase under elevated growth CO2 concentrations. Changes to the sensible and latent heat exchanges between the land surface and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) across large portions of the mid-western US has the potential to affect ABL growth and composition, and consequently feed-back to the near-surface environment (air temperature and vapor content) experienced by the vegetation. Here we present a simulation analysis that examines the changes in land-atmosphere feedbacks associated with projected increases in ambient CO2 concentrations over extended soy/corn agricultural areas characteristic of the US mid-west. The model canopies are partitioned into several layers, allowing for resolution of the shortwave and longwave radiation regimes that drive photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and leaf energy balance in each layer, along with the canopy microclimate. The canopy component of the model is coupled to a multi-layer soil-root model that computes soil moisture and heat transport and root water uptake. Model skill in capturing the sub-diurnal variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange is evaluated through multi-year records of canopy-top eddy covariance CO2, water vapor and heat fluxes collected at the Bondville (Illinois) FluxNet site. An evaluation of the ability of the model to simulate observed changes in energy balance components (canopy temperature, net radiation and soil heat flux) under elevated CO2 concentrations projected for 2050 (550 ppm) is made using observations collected at the SoyFACE Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) experimental facilities located in

  4. Microtopographic hydrologic variability change resulting from vegetation acclimation response to elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    The elevated concentration of atmospheric CO2 increases the ratio of carbon fixation to water loss from plants or water use efficiency, which reduces transpiration. However, the magnitude of the effects of this vegetation acclimation on hydrologic dynamics, such as soil moisture content and surface runoff controlled by microtopographic variability on the land surface, remains unclear. Here we integrate a multi-layer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) with a coupled surface-subsurface flow model (GCSFlow) to capture the acclimation responses of vegetation to climate change and predict how these changes affect hydrologic dynamics on landscapes at fine scales. The model is implemented on a hybrid CPU-GPU parallel computing environment to overcome challenges associated with the high density of computational grid and nonlinear solvers. The model is capable of simulating large-scale heterogeneities due to both microtopography and soils and lateral water fluxes at emerging lidar-scale resolutions (~1m). We demonstrate that hybrid computing is feasible for detailed, large-scale ecohydrologic modeling, which has been previously assumed to be an intractable computational problem. Simulations are performed for corn crop in the Goose Creek watershed in central Illinois, USA at present and projected higher concentrations of atmospheric CO2, 400 ppm and 550 ppm, respectively. The results show a net decrease of 11% for the average annual evapotranspiration of corn, which increases water content in the soil and at the land surface. These results highlight the critical role of a warming climate on atmospheric-soil-vegetation interactions and the need to understand other dynamics near the soil surface associated with water and vegetation.

  5. In-situ measurement of atmospheric CO2 at the four WMO/GAW stations in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. X Fang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 mole fractions were continuously measured from January 2009 to December 2011 at 4 atmospheric observatories in China ((Lin'an, LAN, (Longfengshan, LFS, (Shangdianzi, SDZ, and (Waliguan, WLG using Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy instruments. All sites are regional (LAN, LFS, SDZ or global (WLG measurement stations of the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch program (WMO/GAW. LAN is located near the megacity of Shanghai, in China's most economically developed region. LFS is in a forest and rice production area, close to the city of Harbin in the northern east of China. SDZ is located 150 km north east of Beijing. WLG, hosting the longest record of measured CO2 mole fractions in China, is a high altitude site in northwest China recording background CO2 values. The CO2 growth rates are 2.2 ± 0.2 ppm yr−1 for LAN, 2.3 ± 0.2 ppm yr−1 for LFS, 2.0 ± 0.2 ppm yr−1 for SDZ, and 1.2 ± 0.1 ppm yr−1 (1σ for WLG, during the period of 2009 to 2011. The growth rate at WLG may be underestimated due to the data gaps during the observation period. The highest annual mean CO2 mole fraction of 404.1 ± 4.1 ppm was observed at LAN in 2011. A comprehensive analysis of CO2 variations, their diurnal and seasonal cycles as well as the analysis of the influence of different wind regimes on the CO2 mole fractions allows a thorough characterization of the sampling sites and of the key processes driving the CO2 mole fractions. These data form a basis to improve our understanding of atmospheric CO2 variations in China and the underlying fluxes, using atmospheric inversion models.

  6. Modelling changes in nitrogen cycling to sustain increases in forest productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2 and contrasting site conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Grant

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available If increases in net primary productivity (NPP caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (Ca are to be sustained, key N processes such as soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and plant translocation must be hastened. Simulating the response of these processes to elevated Ca is therefore vital for models used to project the effects of rising Ca on NPP. In this modelling study, hypotheses are proposed for changes in soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and plant translocation with changes in Ca. Algorithms developed from these hypotheses were tested in the ecosystem model ecosys against changes in N and C cycling measured over several years under ambient vs. elevatedCa in Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE experiments at the Duke Forest in North Carolina, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory forest in Tennessee, and the USDA research forest in Wisconsin, USA. Simulating more rapid soil N mineralization was found to be vital for modelling sustained increases in NPP measured under elevated vs. ambient Ca at all three FACE sites. This simulation was accomplished by priming decomposition of N-rich humus from increases in microbial biomass generated by increased litterfall modelled under elevated Ca. Simulating more rapid nonsymbiotic N2 fixation, root N uptake and plant N translocation under elevated Ca was found to make much smaller contributions to modelled increases in NPP, although such contributions might be greater over longer periods and under more N-limited conditions than those simulated here. Greater increases in NPP with Ca were also modelled with increased temperature and water stress, and with coniferous vs. deciduous plant functional types. These increases were also associated with changes in N cycling.

  7. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.

    2011-12-01

    The 14C-free fossil carbon added to atmospheric CO2 by combustion dilutes the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C), potentially providing a means to verify fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. However, sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract this dilution and may bias 14C/C-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if these nuclear influences are not correctly accounted for. Previous studies have examined nuclear influences on local scales, but the potential for continental-scale influences on Δ14C has not yet been explored. We estimate annual 14C emissions from each nuclear site in the world and conduct an Eulerian transport modeling study to investigate the continental-scale, steady-state gradients of Δ14C caused by nuclear activities and fossil fuel combustion. Over large regions of Europe, North America and East Asia, nuclear enrichment may offset at least 20% of the fossil fuel dilution in Δ14C, corresponding to potential biases of more than -0.25 ppm in the CO2 attributed to fossil fuel emissions, larger than the bias from plant and soil respiration in some areas. Model grid cells including high 14C-release reactors or fuel reprocessing sites showed much larger nuclear enrichment, despite the coarse model resolution of 1.8°×1.8°. The recent growth of nuclear 14C emissions increased the potential nuclear bias over 1985-2005, suggesting that changing nuclear activities may complicate the use of Δ14C observations to identify trends in fossil fuel emissions. The magnitude of the potential nuclear bias is largely independent of the choice of reference station in the context of continental-scale Eulerian transport and inversion studies, but could potentially be reduced by an appropriate choice of reference station in the context of local-scale assessments.

  8. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gruber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 14C-free fossil carbon added to atmospheric CO2 by combustion dilutes the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C, potentially providing a means to verify fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. However, sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract this dilution and may bias 14C/C-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if these nuclear influences are not correctly accounted for. Previous studies have examined nuclear influences on local scales, but the potential for continental-scale influences on Δ14C has not yet been explored. We estimate annual 14C emissions from each nuclear site in the world and conduct an Eulerian transport modeling study to investigate the continental-scale, steady-state gradients of Δ14C caused by nuclear activities and fossil fuel combustion. Over large regions of Europe, North America and East Asia, nuclear enrichment may offset at least 20% of the fossil fuel dilution in Δ14C, corresponding to potential biases of more than −0.25 ppm in the CO2 attributed to fossil fuel emissions, larger than the bias from plant and soil respiration in some areas. Model grid cells including high 14C-release reactors or fuel reprocessing sites showed much larger nuclear enrichment, despite the coarse model resolution of 1.8°×1.8°. The recent growth of nuclear 14C emissions increased the potential nuclear bias over 1985–2005, suggesting that changing nuclear activities may complicate the use of Δ14C observations to identify trends in fossil fuel emissions. The magnitude of the potential nuclear bias is largely independent of the choice of reference station in the context of continental-scale Eulerian transport and inversion studies, but could potentially be reduced by an appropriate choice of reference station in the context of local-scale assessments.

  9. Atmospheric observations of carbon monoxide and fossil fuel CO2 emissions from East Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turnbull, Jocelyn C.; Tans, Pieter P.; Lehman, Scott J.;

    2011-01-01

    Flask samples from two sites in East Asia, Tae-Ahn Peninsula, Korea (TAP), and Shangdianzi, China (SDZ), were measured for trace gases including CO2, CO and fossil fuel CO2(CO(2)ff, derived from Delta(CO2)-C-14 observations). The five-year TAP record shows high CO(2)ff when local air comes from...... the Korean Peninsula. Most samples, however, reflect air masses from Northeastern China with lower CO(2)ff. Our small set of SDZ samples from winter 2009/2010 have strongly elevated CO(2)ff. Biospheric CO2 contributes substantially to total CO2 variability at both sites, even in winter when non-fossil CO2...

  10. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on leaf dark respiration of Xanthium strumarium in light and in darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Lewis, J D; Tissue, D T; Seemann, J R; Griffin, K L

    2001-02-27

    Leaf dark respiration (R) is an important component of plant carbon balance, but the effects of rising atmospheric CO(2) on leaf R during illumination are largely unknown. We studied the effects of elevated CO(2) on leaf R in light (R(L)) and in darkness (R(D)) in Xanthium strumarium at different developmental stages. Leaf R(L) was estimated by using the Kok method, whereas leaf R(D) was measured as the rate of CO(2) efflux at zero light. Leaf R(L) and R(D) were significantly higher at elevated than at ambient CO(2) throughout the growing period. Elevated CO(2) increased the ratio of leaf R(L) to net photosynthesis at saturated light (A(max)) when plants were young and also after flowering, but the ratio of leaf R(D) to A(max) was unaffected by CO(2) levels. Leaf R(N) was significantly higher at the beginning but significantly lower at the end of the growing period in elevated CO(2)-grown plants. The ratio of leaf R(L) to R(D) was used to estimate the effect of light on leaf R during the day. We found that light inhibited leaf R at both CO(2) concentrations but to a lesser degree for elevated (17-24%) than for ambient (29-35%) CO(2)-grown plants, presumably because elevated CO(2)-grown plants had a higher demand for energy and carbon skeletons than ambient CO(2)-grown plants in light. Our results suggest that using the CO(2) efflux rate, determined by shading leaves during the day, as a measure for leaf R is likely to underestimate carbon loss from elevated CO(2)-grown plants. PMID:11226264

  11. Potential maternal effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on development and disease severity in a Mediterranean legume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Grünzweig

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Global change can greatly affect plant populations both directly by influencing growing conditions and indirectly by maternal effects on development of offspring. More information is needed on transgenerational effects of global change on plants and on their interactions with pathogens. The current study assessed potential maternal effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on performance and disease susceptibility of first-generation offspring of the Mediterranean legume Onobrychis crista-galli. Mother plants were grown at three CO2 concentrations, and the study focused on their offspring that were raised under common ambient climate and CO2. In addition, progeny were exposed to natural infection by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew. In one out of three years, offspring of high-CO2 treatments (440 and 600 ppm had lower shoot biomass and reproductive output than offspring of low-CO2 treatment (280 ppm. Disease severity in a heavy-infection year was higher in high-CO2 than in low-CO2 offspring. However, some of the findings on maternal effects changed when the population was divided into two functionally diverging plant types distinguishable by flower color (pink, Type P; white Type W. Disease severity in a heavy-infection year was higher in high-CO2 than in low-CO2 progeny in the more disease-resistant (Type P, but not in the more susceptible plant type (Type W. In a low-infection year, maternal CO2 treatments did not differ in disease severity. Mother plants of Type P exposed to low CO2 produced larger seeds than all other combinations of CO2 and plant type, which might contribute to higher offspring performance. This study showed that elevated CO2 potentially exerts environmental maternal effects on performance of progeny and, notably, also on their susceptibility to natural infection by a pathogen. Maternal effects of global change might differently affect functionally divergent plant types, which could impact population fitness and alter plant

  12. Controle de Rhyzopertha dominica pela atmosfera controlada com CO2, em trigo Control of Rhyzopertha dominica using a controlled atmosphere with CO2, in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Amaro Gonçalves

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de gases inertes como fumigantes no controle de pragas é uma alternativa ao uso de fosfina. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de uma atmosfera com CO2 no controle de Rhyzoperta dominica (Fabr. (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae em grãos de trigo armazenado. O trabalho constou de cinco concentrações de CO2 (0, 30 , 40, 50 e 60%, completadas com N2, três períodos de exposição (5, 10, 15 dias, três populações de R. dominica (Fabr. (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae (Campo Mourão, PR, Sete Lagoas, MG e Santa Rosa, RS e sete fases de desenvolvimento do inseto (ovo, larva de 1º, 2º, 3º e 4º ínstar, pupa e adulto com três repetições. As diferentes fases da R. dominica foram acondicionadas em tecido organza e levadas para câmaras de expurgo de 200 litros com 75% deste volume repletos de grãos. As câmaras foram vedadas com borracha de silicone para garantir a hermeticidade. Após a vedação das câmaras injetavam-se os gases contendo diferentes teores de CO2. Os resultados mostraram que todos os teores de CO2 causaram 100% de mortalidade de adultos das três populações nos três períodos de exposição utilizados. Em pupas a mortalidade atingiu 100% no teor de 60% de CO2 para as três populações no período de 15 dias de exposição; porém, todos os teores de CO2 utilizados no período de 15 dias de exposição causaram 100% de mortalidade das pupas da população de Santa Rosa. Para o adequado controle de larvas de diferentes ínstares são necessários teores de CO2 iguais ou acima de 50%. Nos períodos de 10 e 15 dias de exposição, todos os teores de CO2 causaram 100% de mortalidade dos ovos das três populações avaliadas.Controlled atmosphere with inert gases offers an alternative to phosphine use to control stored grain pests. The objective of this research was to test a controlled atmosphere with CO2 to control Rhyzoperta dominica, (Fabr. (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae, an important pest of stored wheat

  13. Changing Amazon biomass and the role of atmospheric CO2 concentration, climate, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Castanho, Andrea D.; Galbraith, David; Zhang, Ke; Coe, Michael T.; Costa, Marcos H.; Moorcroft, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon tropical evergreen forest is an important component of the global carbon budget. Its forest floristic composition, structure, and function are sensitive to changes in climate, atmospheric composition, and land use. In this study biomass and productivity simulated by three dynamic global vegetation models (Integrated Biosphere Simulator, Ecosystem Demography Biosphere Model, and Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) for the period 1970-2008 are compared with observations from forest plots (Rede Amazónica de Inventarios Forestales). The spatial variability in biomass and productivity simulated by the DGVMs is low in comparison to the field observations in part because of poor representation of the heterogeneity of vegetation traits within the models. We find that over the last four decades the CO2 fertilization effect dominates a long-term increase in simulated biomass in undisturbed Amazonian forests, while land use change in the south and southeastern Amazonia dominates a reduction in Amazon aboveground biomass, of similar magnitude to the CO2 biomass gain. Climate extremes exert a strong effect on the observed biomass on short time scales, but the models are incapable of reproducing the observed impacts of extreme drought on forest biomass. We find that future improvements in the accuracy of DGVM predictions will require improved representation of four key elements: (1) spatially variable plant traits, (2) soil and nutrients mediated processes, (3) extreme event mortality, and (4) sensitivity to climatic variability. Finally, continued long-term observations and ecosystem-scale experiments (e.g. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiments) are essential for a better understanding of the changing dynamics of tropical forests.

  14. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  15. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Retrievals from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Solar Occultation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE satellite (SCISAT-1) was launched into an inclined orbit on 12 August 2003 and is now recording high signal-to-noise 0.02 per centimeter resolution solar absorption spectra covering 750-4400 per centimeter (2.3-13 micrometers). A procedure has been developed for retrieving average dry air CO2 mole fractions (X(sub CO2)) in the altitude range 7-10 kilometers from the SCISAT-1 spectra. Using the N2 continuum absorption in a window region near 2500 per centimeter, altitude shifts are applied to the tangent heights retrieved in version 2.2 SCISAT-1 processing, while cloudy or aerosol-impacted measurements are eliminated. Monthly-mean XCO2 covering 60 S to 60 N latitude for February 2004 to March 2008 has been analyzed with consistent trends inferred in both hemispheres. The ACE XCO2 time series have been compared with previously-reported surface network measurements, predictions based on upper tropospheric aircraft measurements, and space-based measurements. The retrieved X(sub CO2) from the ACE-FTS spectra are higher on average by a factor of 1.07 plus or minus 0.025 in the northern hemisphere and by a factor of 1.09 plus or minus 0.019 on average in the southern hemisphere compared to surface station measurements covering the same time span. The ACE derived trend is approximately 0.2% per year higher than measured at surface stations during the same observation period.

  16. Responses of soil Collembola to long-term atmospheric CO2 enrichment in a mature temperate forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responses of Collembola to 7 years of CO2 enrichment (550 ppm) in a Swiss free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment in a forest with 80- to 120-year-old trees were investigated in this study. Contrary to our expectations, increased CO2 caused a significant decrease in Collembola numbers, including a significant decrease in euedaphic Collembola. Increased CO2, however, did not affect community group richness. Collembola biomass was not significantly changed by CO2 enrichment, regardless of whether it was considered in terms of the total community, life-strategy groups, or individual species (with an exception of Mesaphorura krausbaueri). The reason for this is that CO2 enrichment caused a general increase in individual body size, which compensated for reduced abundances. The results are consistent with the idea that the rhizosphere is important for soil fauna, and the combination of reduced fine root growth and increased soil moisture might trigger a reduction in Collembola abundance. - Highlights: ► Increased CO2 caused a significant decrease in Collembola abundance. ► Increased CO2 caused a significant decrease in euedaphic Collembola. ► Collembola body size tended to be larger. ► A decrease in fine roots biomass might trigger the reduction in Collembola. - Seven years of CO2 enrichment caused a significant decrease in Collembola abundance, especially in euedaphic species.

  17. CO2-dominated Atmosphere in Equilibrium with NH3-H2O Ocean: Application to Early Titan and Ocean Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marounina, N.; Grasset, O.; Tobie, G.; Carpy, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the accretion of Titan, impact heating may have been sufficient to allow the global melting of water ice (Monteux et al. 2014) and the release of volatile compounds, with CO2 and NH3 as main constituents (Tobie et al. 2012). Thus, on primitive Titan, it is thought that a massive atmosphere was in contact with a global water ocean. Similar configurations may occur on temperate water-rich planets called ocean planets (Léger et al. 2004, Kitzmann et al. 2015).Due to its rather low solubility in liquid water, carbon dioxide is expected to be one of the major components in the atmosphere. The atmospheric amount of CO2 is a key parameter for assessing the thermal evolution of the planetary surface because of its strong greenhouse effect. However, ammonia significantly affects the solubility of CO2 in water and hence the atmosphere-ocean thermo-chemical equilibrium. For primitive Titan, estimating the mass, temperature and composition of the primitive atmosphere is important to determine mechanisms that led to the present-day N2-CH4 dominated atmosphere. Similarly, for ocean planets, the influence of ammonia on the atmospheric abundance in CO2 has consequences for the definition of the habitable zone.To investigate the atmospheric composition of the water-rich worlds for a wide range of initial compositions, we have developed a vapor-liquid equilibrium model of the NH3-CO2-H2O system, where we account for the non-ideal comportment of both vapor and liquid phases and the ion speciation of volatiles dissolved in the aqueous phase. We show that adding NH3 to the CO2-H2O binary system induces an efficient absorption of the CO2 in the liquid phase and thus a lower CO2 partial pressure in the vapor phase. Indeed, the CO2 partial pressure remains low for the CO2/NH3 ratio of liquid concentrations lower than 0.5.Assuming various initial compositions of Titan's global water ocean, we explore the thermal and compositional evolution of a massive primitive atmosphere using

  18. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  19. Lidar CO2 profiling in the atmosphere : from ground-based measurements and geophysical applications to spaceborne simulated performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Fabien; Edouard, Dimitri; Cénac, Claire; Pellegrino, Jessica; Dumas, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of climate prediction, it is necessary to understand the evolution of carbon cycle and particularly surface-atmosphere exchanges of carbon dioxide (CO2). In the carbon budget, the CO2 land sink study is definitively the main interest of CO2 lidar measurements ultimately from space. There is a need of ground-based, airborne and spaceborne observations that enable to address the patterns and the quantification of CO2 sources and sinks at local to regional scales (100 m to 100 km) and CO2 lidar is a well suited instrument to do so. In addition, the current fossil fuel emissions of CO2, that are only known from statistical data reported by emitting countries themselves, no longer have a small uncertainty. Lidar CO2 profiling has a role to play to assess how good or not is the current baseline of emissions and how are efficient the measures that are currently taken by cities and regions to reduce emissions. In this paper, we will present the current status of lidar CO2 profiling in the atmosphere from a ground-based instrument and the potential applications in the carbon cycle studies and we will conclude by the feasibility of a space mission with the recent technological advances.

  20. Impact of atmospheric CO2 on growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Eloísa; Ruano, David; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación

    2006-07-01

    Expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) and glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) were analysed in relation to the rate of CO(2) assimilation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves. Intact plants were exposed to different atmospheric CO(2) concentrations (100, 400 and 1200microLL(-1)) for 14 days. A correlation between the in vivo rates of net CO(2) assimilation and the atmospheric CO(2) concentrations was observed. Transpiration rate and stomatal conductance remained unaffected by CO(2) levels. The exposure of the cucumber plants to rising CO(2) concentrations led to a concomitant increase in the contents of starch and soluble sugars, and a decrease in the nitrate content in leaves. At very low CO(2), NR and GS expression decreased, in spite of high nitrate contents, whereas at normal and elevated CO(2) expression and activity were high although the nitrate content was very low. Thus, in cucumber, NR and GS expression appear to be dominated by sugar levels, rather than by nitrate contents.

  1. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-11-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  2. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-04-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  3. Transcriptional and metabolic insights into the differential physiological responses of arabidopsis to optimal and supraoptimal atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In tightly closed human habitats such as space stations, locations near volcano vents and closed culture vessels, atmospheric CO(2 concentration may be 10 to 20 times greater than Earth's current ambient levels. It is known that super-elevated (SE CO(2 (>1,200 µmol mol(-1 induces physiological responses different from that of moderately elevated CO(2 (up to 1,200 µmol mol(-1, but little is known about the molecular responses of plants to supra-optimal [CO(2]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the underlying molecular causes for differential physiological responses, metabolite and transcript profiles were analyzed in aerial tissue of Arabidopsis plants, which were grown under ambient atmospheric CO(2 (400 µmol mol(-1, elevated CO(2 (1,200 µmol mol(-1 and SE CO(2 (4,000 µmol mol(-1, at two developmental stages early and late vegetative stage. Transcript and metabolite profiling revealed very different responses to elevated versus SE [CO(2]. The transcript profiles of SE CO(2 treated plants were closer to that of the control. Development stage had a clear effect on plant molecular response to elevated and SE [CO(2]. Photosynthetic acclimation in terms of down-regulation of photosynthetic gene expression was observed in response to elevated [CO(2], but not that of SE [CO(2] providing the first molecular evidence that there appears to be a fundamental disparity in the way plants respond to elevated and SE [CO(2]. Although starch accumulation was induced by both elevated and SE [CO(2], the increase was less at the late vegetative stage and accompanied by higher soluble sugar content suggesting an increased starch breakdown to meet sink strength resulting from the rapid growth demand. Furthermore, many of the elevated and SE CO(2-responsive genes found in the present study are also regulated by plant hormone and stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new insights into plant acclimation to elevated and SE [CO

  4. Estimation of 14CO2 flux at soil-atmosphere interface and distribution of 14C in forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the dynamical behavior of 14C among exchangeable carbon reservoirs in terrestrial environment, a method for in situ determination of 14CO2 flux at soil-atmosphere interface and a high flow rate CO2 sampler were developed. This method allowed us to collect integrated quantity of CO2 for determining 14C activity over an extended time period under environmental conditions with minimal site disturbance. The 14CO2 flux from ground surface was estimated to be 1.59x10-5 Bq m-2 s-1 in a forest floor with the method. The specific activities of 14C in environmental materials such as some biological and air samples were also determined in the vicinity of the place, where the flux measurement was made, to discuss the behavior of 14C in the forest ecosystem. The results indicated that fresh pine needles had a similar 14C specific activity to the atmospheric CO2 at the same height due to its fairly rapid equilibrium, 14C specific activity in the atmospheric CO2 has a concentration gradient near the ground surface and, at least in this site, CO2 with high 14C specific activity was generated by decomposition of soil organic matter which may be accumulated in soil as a result of former nuclear weapons tests

  5. Automatic processing of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 mole fractions at the ICOS Atmosphere Thematic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Lynn; Tarniewicz, Jérôme; Ramonet, Michel; Laurent, Olivier; Abbaris, Amara

    2016-09-01

    The Integrated Carbon Observation System Atmosphere Thematic Centre (ICOS ATC) automatically processes atmospheric greenhouse gases mole fractions of data coming from sites of the ICOS network. Daily transferred raw data files are automatically processed and archived. Data are stored in the ICOS atmospheric database, the backbone of the system, which has been developed with an emphasis on the traceability of the data processing. Many data products, updated daily, explore the data through different angles to support the quality control of the dataset performed by the principal operators in charge of the instruments. The automatic processing includes calibration and water vapor corrections as described in the paper. The mole fractions calculated in near-real time (NRT) are automatically revaluated as soon as a new instrument calibration is processed or when the station supervisors perform quality control. By analyzing data from 11 sites, we determined that the average calibration corrections are equal to 1.7 ± 0.3 µmol mol-1 for CO2 and 2.8 ± 3 nmol mol-1 for CH4. These biases are important to correct to avoid artificial gradients between stations that could lead to error in flux estimates when using atmospheric inversion techniques. We also calculated that the average drift between two successive calibrations separated by 15 days amounts to ±0.05 µmol mol-1 and ±0.7 nmol mol-1 for CO2 and CH4, respectively. Outliers are generally due to errors in the instrument configuration and can be readily detected thanks to the data products provided by the ATC. Several developments are still ongoing to improve the processing, including automated spike detection and calculation of time-varying uncertainties.

  6. Ocean-Atmosphere coupling and CO2 exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, R.; Pezzi, L. P.; Carmargo, R.; Acevedo, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    The establishment of the INTERCONF Program (Air-Sea Interactions at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone) in 2004 and subsequent developing of projects such as the SIMTECO (Integrated System for Monitoring the Weather, the Climate and the Ocean in the South of Brazil) and ACEx (Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment) from 2010 in Brazil brought to light the importance of understanding the impact of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean's mesoscale variability on the modulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the synoptic scale. Recent results of all these projects showed that the ABL modulation, as well as the ocean-atmosphere turbulent (heat, momentum and CO2) fluxes are dependent on the behavior of the ocean's surface thermal gradients, especially those found in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and at the southern coast off Brazil during the winter. As expected, when atmospheric large scale systems are not present over the study area, stronger heat fluxes are found over regions of higher sea surface temperature (SST) including over warm core eddies shed towards the subantarctic (cold) environment. In the coastal region off southern Brazil, the wintertime propagation of the Brazilian Costal Current (La Plata Plume) acts rising the chlorophyll concentration over the continental shelf as well as diminishing considerably the SST - hence producing prominent across-shore SST gradients towards the offshore region dominated by the Brazil Current waters. Owing to that, heat fluxes are directed towards the ocean in coastal waters that are also responsible for the carbon sinking off Brazil in wintertime. All this description is dependent on the synoptic atmospheric cycle and strongly perturbed when transient systems (cold fronts, subtropical cyclones) are present in the area. However, remote sensing data used here suggest that the average condition of the atmosphere directly responding to the ocean's mesoscale variability appears to imprint a signal that extends from the

  7. Los Angeles megacity: a high-resolution land-atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sha; Lauvaux, Thomas; Newman, Sally; Rao, Preeti; Ahmadov, Ravan; Deng, Aijun; Díaz-Isaac, Liza I.; Duren, Riley M.; Fischer, Marc L.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gurney, Kevin R.; Huang, Jianhua; Jeong, Seongeun; Li, Zhijin; Miller, Charles E.; O'Keeffe, Darragh; Patarasuk, Risa; Sander, Stanley P.; Song, Yang; Wong, Kam W.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-07-01

    Megacities are major sources of anthropogenic fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions. The spatial extents of these large urban systems cover areas of 10 000 km2 or more with complex topography and changing landscapes. We present a high-resolution land-atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions over the Los Angeles (LA) megacity area. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Chem model was coupled to a very high-resolution FFCO2 emission product, Hestia-LA, to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations across the LA megacity at spatial resolutions as fine as ˜ 1 km. We evaluated multiple WRF configurations, selecting one that minimized errors in wind speed, wind direction, and boundary layer height as evaluated by its performance against meteorological data collected during the CalNex-LA campaign (May-June 2010). Our results show no significant difference between moderate-resolution (4 km) and high-resolution (1.3 km) simulations when evaluated against surface meteorological data, but the high-resolution configurations better resolved planetary boundary layer heights and vertical gradients in the horizontal mean winds. We coupled our WRF configuration with the Vulcan 2.2 (10 km resolution) and Hestia-LA (1.3 km resolution) fossil fuel CO2 emission products to evaluate the impact of the spatial resolution of the CO2 emission products and the meteorological transport model on the representation of spatiotemporal variability in simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that high spatial resolution in the fossil fuel CO2 emissions is more important than in the atmospheric model to capture CO2 concentration variability across the LA megacity. Finally, we present a novel approach that employs simultaneous correlations of the simulated atmospheric CO2 fields to qualitatively evaluate the greenhouse gas measurement network over the LA megacity. Spatial correlations in the atmospheric CO2 fields reflect the coverage of individual measurement sites when a

  8. Using a Tree Ring δ13C Annual Series to Reconstruct Atmospheric CO2 Concentration over the Past 300 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-Yun; QIAN Jun-Long; WANG Jian; HE Qing-Yan; WANG Zu-Liang; CHEN Cheng-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The annual series of δ13C were measured in tree rings of three Cryptomeria fortunei disks (CF-1, CF-2, and CF 3) collected from West Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang Province, China, according to cross-dating tree ring ages. There was no obvious decreasing trend of the δ13C annual time series of CF-2 before 1835. However, from 1835 to 1982 the three tree ring δ13C annual series exhibited similar decreasing trends that were significantly (P ≤ 0.001) correlated. The distribution characteristics of a scatter diagram between estimated δ13C series of CF-2 from modeling and the atmospheric CO2 concentration extracted from the Law Dome ice core from 1840 to 1978 were analyzed and a curvilinear regression equation for reconstructing atmospheric CO2 concentration was established with R2 = 0.98.Also, a test of independent samples indicated that between 1685 and 1839 the reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentration .using the δ13C series of CF-2 had a close relationship with the Law Dome and Siple ice cores, with a standard deviation of 1.98.The general increasing trend of the reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentration closely reflected the long-term variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration recorded both before and after the Industrial Revolution. Between 1685 and 1840 the evaluated atmospheric CO2 concentration was stable, but after 1840 it exhibited a rapid increase. Given a longer δ13C annual time series of tree rings, it was feasible to rebuild a representative time series to describe the atmospheric CO2 concentration for an earlier period and for years that were not in the ice core record.

  9. Interannual variability of the atmospheric CO2 growth rate: roles of precipitation and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zeng, Ning; Wang, Meirong

    2016-04-01

    The interannual variability (IAV) in atmospheric CO2 growth rate (CGR) is closely connected with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. However, sensitivities of CGR to temperature and precipitation remain largely uncertain. This paper analyzed the relationship between Mauna Loa CGR and tropical land climatic elements. We find that Mauna Loa CGR lags precipitation by 4 months with a correlation coefficient of -0.63, leads temperature by 1 month (0.77), and correlates with soil moisture (-0.65) with zero lag. Additionally, precipitation and temperature are highly correlated (-0.66), with precipitation leading by 4-5 months. Regression analysis shows that sensitivities of Mauna Loa CGR to temperature and precipitation are 2.92 ± 0.20 PgC yr-1 K-1 and -0.46 ± 0.07 PgC yr-1 100 mm-1, respectively. Unlike some recent suggestions, these empirical relationships favor neither temperature nor precipitation as the dominant factor of CGR IAV. We further analyzed seven terrestrial carbon cycle models, from the TRENDY project, to study the processes underlying CGR IAV. All models capture well the IAV of tropical land-atmosphere carbon flux (CFTA). Sensitivities of the ensemble mean CFTA to temperature and precipitation are 3.18 ± 0.11 PgC yr-1 K-1 and -0.67 ± 0.04 PgC yr-1 100 mm-1, close to Mauna Loa CGR. Importantly, the models consistently show the variability in net primary productivity (NPP) dominates CGR, rather than heterotrophic respiration. Because previous studies have proved that NPP is largely driven by precipitation in tropics, it suggests a key role of precipitation in CGR IAV despite the higher CGR correlation with temperature. Understanding the relative contribution of CO2 sensitivity to precipitation and temperature has important implications for future carbon-climate feedback using such ''emergent constraint''.

  10. Estimation of background CO2 concentrations at the high alpine station Schneefernerhaus by atmospheric observations and inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giemsa, Esther; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Ries, Ludwig; Frank, Gabriele; Hachinger, Stephan; Meyer-Arnek, Julian

    2016-04-01

    In order to estimate the influence of Central European CO2 emissions, a new method to retrieve background concentrations based on statistics of radon-222 and backward trajectories is developed and applied to the CO2 observations at the alpine high-altitude research station Schneefernerhaus (2670 m a.s.l.). The reliable identification of baseline conditions is important for perceiving changes in time as well as in the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and thereby assessing the efficiency of existing mitigation strategies. In the particular case of Central Europe, the analysis of background concentrations could add further insights on the question why background CO2 concentrations increased in the last few decades, despite a significant decrease in the reported emissions. Ongoing effort to define the baseline conditions has led to a variety of data selection techniques. In this diversity of data filtering concepts, a relatively recent data selection method effectively appropriates observations of radon-222 to reliably and unambiguously identify baseline air masses. Owing to its relatively constant emission rate from the ice-free land surface and its half-life of 3.8 days that is solely achieved through radioactive decay, the tropospheric background concentration of the inert radioactive gas is low and temporal variations caused by changes in atmospheric transport are precisely detectable. For defining the baseline air masses reaching the high alpine research station Schneefernerhaus, an objective analysis approach is applied to the two-hourly radon records. The CO2 values of days by the radon method associated with prevailing atmospheric background conditions result in the CO2 concentrations representing the least land influenced air masses. Additionally, three-dimensional back-trajectories were retrieved using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) FLEXPART driven by analysis fields of the Global Forecast System (GFS) produced by the National Centers

  11. Exploring the climatic impact of the continental vegetation on the Mezosoic atmospheric CO2 and climate history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bouttes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we continue our exploration of the factors defining the Mesozoic climatic history. We improve the Earth system model GEOCLIM designed for long term climate and geochemical reconstructions by adding the explicit calculation of the biome dynamics using the LPJ model. The coupled GEOCLIM-LPJ model thus allows the simultaneous calculation of the climate with a 2-D spatial resolution, the coeval atmospheric CO2, and the continental biome distribution. We found that accounting for the climatic role of the continental vegetation dynamics (albedo change, water cycle and surface roughness modulations strongly affects the reconstructed geological climate. Indeed the calculated partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 over the Mesozoic is twice the value calculated when assuming a uniform constant vegetation. This increase in CO2 is triggered by a global cooling of the continents, itself triggered by a general increase in continental albedo owing to the development of desertic surfaces. This cooling reduces the CO2 consumption through silicate weathering, and hence results in a compensating increase in the atmospheric CO2 pressure. This study demonstrates that the impact of land plants on climate and hence on atmospheric CO2 is as important as their geochemical effect through the enhancement of chemical weathering of the continental surface. Our GEOCLIM-LPJ simulations also define a climatic baseline for the Mesozoic, around which exceptionally cool and warm events can be identified.

  12. Variations of near-surface atmospheric CO2 and H2O concentrations during summer on Muztagata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Expeditions during the summers of 2002 and 2003 implemented continuous monitoring of near-surface (2 m height) atmospheric CO2 and H2O concentrations at the 4500 m elevation on Muztagata. The resultant data sets reveal a slight decrease of CO2 concentrations (of about 5μmol·mol-1) and changes in the diurnal variations from the end of June to the middle August. The daily maximum CO2 concentrations occur between 02:30―05:30 AM (local time) and the minimum levels occur between 12:00―15:30 PM. The atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the summer of 2002 were around 5μmol·mol-1 lower than those during the same period of 2003, whereas the diurnal amplitude was higher. In contrast, we found that the daily mean atmospheric H2O content in 2003 was much lower than that in 2002 and there exists a striking negative correlation between CO2 and H2O concentrations. We therefore suggest that the near-surface atmospheric CO2 concentration is affected not only by photosynthesis and respiration, but also by the air H2O content in the glaciated region around Muztagata.

  13. THE RESPONSE OF PLANT CARBOHYDRATES TO ELEVATED CO2: WHAT HAVE WE LEARNT FROM FACE STUDIES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROGERS,A.; AINSWORTH,E.A.; BERNACCHI,C.J.; GIBON,Y.; STITT,M.; LONG,S.P.

    2004-08-29

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration ([CO{sub 2}]) is expected to rise from a current level of 372 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} to about 550 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} by the middle of the century (Prentice 2001). Accumulation of foliar carbohydrates is one of the most pronounced and universal changes observed in the leaves of C{sub 3} plants grown at elevated [CO{sub 2}] (Drake et al 1997). Carbohydrates are the product of photosynthetic cells and the substrate for sink metabolism. However, carbohydrates are not just substrates, changes in the composition and pool size of foliar carbohydrates have the potential to communicate source-sink balance and a role for carbohydrates in the regulation of the expression of many plant genes is well established (Koch 1996). Importantly, carbohydrate feedback is thought to be the mechanism through which long-term exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] leads to a reduction in carboxylation capacity (Rogers et a1 199S, Long et al 2004). Foliar sugar content has recently been linked to an increased susceptibility of soybeans to insect herbivory (Hamilton et al submitted). In addition increases in the C:N ratio of leaf litter of plants grown at elevated [CO{sub 2}] has been implicated in negative feedbacks on ecosystem productivity (Oechel et al 1994). Understanding of the response of foliar carbohydrates will form an important part of our ability to understand and predict the effects of rising [CO{sub 2}] on plants and ecosystems. As Free-Air CO{sub 2} enrichment technology was emerging, understanding of the link between carbohydrates and plant responses to rising [CO{sub 2}] was increasing. However, there were concerns that the hypotheses generated using model system or from studies on mostly juvenile plants grown for relatively short periods of time in controlled environments may not translate to the field. Of particular concern was the effect of a limited rooting volume. Arp (1991) argued that photosynthetic acclimation to elevated [CO{sub 2

  14. Rapid atmospheric CO2 changes associated with the 8,200-years-B.P. cooling event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Friederike; Aaby, Bent; Visscher, Henk

    2002-09-17

    By applying the inverse relation between numbers of leaf stomata and atmospheric CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis of fossil birch leaves from lake deposits in Denmark reveals a century-scale CO2 change during the prominent Holocene cooling event that occurred in the North Atlantic region between 8,400 and 8,100 years B.P. In contrast to conventional CO2 reconstructions based on ice cores from Antarctica, quantification of the stomatal frequency signal corroborates a distinctive temperature-CO2 correlation. Results indicate a global CO2 decline of approximately 25 ppm by volume over approximately 300 years. This reduction is in harmony with observed and modeled lowering of North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures associated with a short-term weakening of thermohaline circulation. PMID:12202744

  15. Side-line tunable laser transmitter for differential absorption lidar measurements of CO2: design and application to atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Gibert, Fabien; Barnes, Bruce W.; Ismail, Syed; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Yu, Jirong; Modlin, Edward A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-03-01

    A 2 μm wavelength, 90 mJ, 5 Hz pulsed Ho laser is described with wavelength control to precisely tune and lock the wavelength at a desired offset up to 2.9 GHz from the center of a CO2 absorption line. Once detuned from the line center the laser wavelength is actively locked to keep the wavelength within 1.9 MHz standard deviation about the setpoint. This wavelength control allows optimization of the optical depth for a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The laser transmitter has been coupled with a coherent heterodyne receiver for measurements of CO2 concentration using aerosol backscatter; wind and aerosols are also measured with the same lidar and provide useful additional information on atmospheric structure. Range-resolved CO2 measurements were made with rolling average on the DIAL measurement.

  16. The counteracting effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and drought episodes: Studies of enchytraeid communities in a dry heathland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Kristine; Krogh, Paul Henning; Linden, Leon;

    2010-01-01

    The potential impacts of interactions of multiple climate change factors in soil ecosystems have received little attention. Most studies have addressed effects of single factors such as increased temperature or atmospheric CO2 but little is known about how such environmental factors will interact....... In the present study we investigate the effects of in situ exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperatures and prolonged drought episodes on field communities of Enchytraeidae (Oligochaeta) in a dry heathland (Brandbjerg, Denmark). Increased CO2 had a positive effect on enchytraeid...... biomass, whereas drought significantly reduced it. Elevated temperature did not result in any detectable effects. No interactions between the three factors were observed. Interestingly, the positive effect of increased CO2 and the negative effect of drought were cancelled out when applied in combination...

  17. The importance of geomagnetic field changes versus rising CO2 levels for long-term change in the upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cnossen Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s upper atmosphere has shown signs of cooling and contraction over the past decades. This is generally attributed to the increasing level of atmospheric CO2, a coolant in the upper atmosphere. However, especially the charged part of the upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, also responds to the Earth’s magnetic field, which has been weakening considerably over the past century, as well as changing in structure. The relative importance of the changing geomagnetic field compared to enhanced CO2 levels for long-term change in the upper atmosphere is still a matter of debate. Here we present a quantitative comparison of the effects of the increase in CO2 concentration and changes in the magnetic field from 1908 to 2008, based on simulations with the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM. This demonstrates that magnetic field changes contribute at least as much as the increase in CO2 concentration to changes in the height of the maximum electron density in the ionosphere, and much more to changes in the maximum electron density itself and to low-/mid-latitude ionospheric currents. Changes in the magnetic field even contribute to cooling of the thermosphere at ~300 km altitude, although the increase in CO2 concentration is still the dominant factor here. Both processes are roughly equally important for long-term changes in ion temperature.

  18. Impacts of 3 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 on rhizosphere carbon flow and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigo, Barbara; Kowalchuk, George A; Knapp, Brigitte A; Pijl, Agata S; Boschker, Henricus T S; van Veen, Johannes A

    2013-02-01

    Carbon (C) uptake by terrestrial ecosystems represents an important option for partially mitigating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Short-term atmospheric elevated CO2 exposure has been shown to create major shifts in C flow routes and diversity of the active soil-borne microbial community. Long-term increases in CO2 have been hypothesized to have subtle effects due to the potential adaptation of soil microorganism to the increased flow of organic C. Here, we studied the effects of prolonged elevated atmospheric CO2 exposure on microbial C flow and microbial communities in the rhizosphere. Carex arenaria (a nonmycorrhizal plant species) and Festuca rubra (a mycorrhizal plant species) were grown at defined atmospheric conditions differing in CO2 concentration (350 and 700 ppm) for 3 years. During this period, C flow was assessed repeatedly (after 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years) by (13) C pulse-chase experiments, and label was tracked through the rhizosphere bacterial, general fungal, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities. Fatty acid biomarker analyses and RNA-stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP), in combination with real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE, were used to examine microbial community dynamics and abundance. Throughout the experiment the influence of elevated CO2 was highly plant dependent, with the mycorrhizal plant exerting a greater influence on both bacterial and fungal communities. Biomarker data confirmed that rhizodeposited C was first processed by AMF and subsequently transferred to bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere soil. Over the course of 3 years, elevated CO2 caused a continuous increase in the (13) C enrichment retained in AMF and an increasing delay in the transfer of C to the bacterial community. These results show that, not only do elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions induce changes in rhizosphere C flow and dynamics but also continue to develop over multiple seasons, thereby affecting terrestrial ecosystems C utilization processes.

  19. Effect of the porous structure in carbon materials for CO2 capture at atmospheric and high-pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Casco, Mirian Elizabeth; Martínez Escandell, Manuel; Silvestre Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez Reinoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbons prepared from petroleum pitch and using KOH as activating agent exhibit an excellent behavior in CO2 capture both at atmospheric (∼168 mg CO2/g at 298 K) and high pressure (∼1500 mg CO2/g at 298 K and 4.5 MPa). However, an exhaustive evaluation of the adsorption process shows that the optimum carbon structure, in terms of adsorption capacity, depends on the final application. Whereas narrow micropores (pores below 0.6 nm) govern the sorption behavior at 0.1 MPa, large microp...

  20. A proposed potential role for increasing atmospheric CO2 as a promoter of weight gain and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Astrup, A

    2012-01-01

    Human obesity has evolved into a global epidemic. Interestingly, a similar trend has been observed in many animal species, although diet composition, food availability and physical activity have essentially remained unchanged. This suggests a common factor-potentially an environmental factor...... affecting all species. Coinciding with the increase in obesity, atmospheric CO2 concentration has increased more than 40%. Furthermore, in modern societies, we spend more time indoors, where CO2 often reaches even higher concentrations. Increased CO2 concentration in inhaled air decreases the pH of blood...

  1. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on gross nitrogen and carbon dynamics in a permanent grassland: A field pulse-labeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Keidel, Lisa; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Niall; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    To predict ecosystem reactions to elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) it is essential to understand the interactions between plant carbon input, microbial community composition and activity and associated nutrient dynamics. Long-term observations (> 14 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed next to an enhanced biomass production an unexpected strong positive feedback effect on ecosystem respiration and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. The overall goal of this study is to understand the long-term effects of eCO2 and carbon input on microbial community composition and activity as well as the associated nitrogen dynamics, N2O production and plant N uptake in the Giessen FACE study on permanent grassland. A combination of 13CO2 pulse labelling with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out in situ. Different fractions of soil organic matter (recalcitrant, labile SOM) and the various mineral N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-), gross N transformation rates, pool size dependent N2O and N2 emissions as well as N species dependent plant N uptake rates and the origin of the CO2 respiration have been quantified. Microbial analyses include exploring changes in the composition of microbial communities involved in the turnover of NH4+, NO3-, N2O and N2, i.e. ammonia oxidizing, denitrifying, and microbial communities involved in dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). mRNA based analyses will be employed to comparably evaluate the long-term effects of eCO2 on the structure and abundance of these communities, while transcripts of these genes will be used to target the fractions of the communities which actively contribute to N transformations. We quantified the contribution of mycorrhizae on N2O emissions and observed the phenological development of the mycorrhizae after the labeling.

  2. How does atmospheric elevated CO2 affect crop pests and their natural enemies? Case histories from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Cheng Sun; Jin Yin; Fa-Jun Chen; Gang Wu; Feng Ge

    2011-01-01

    Global atmospheric CO2 concentrations have risen rapidly since the Industrial Revolution and are considered as a primary factor in climate change.The effects of elevated CO2 on herbivore insects were found to be primarily through the CO2-induced changes occurring in their host plants,which then possibly affect the intensity and frequency of pest outbreaks on crops.This paper reviews several ongoing research models using primary pests of crops (cotton bollworm,whitefly,aphids) and their natural enemies (ladybeetles,parasitoids) in China to examine insect responses to elevated CO2.It is generally indicated that elevated CO2 prolonged the development of cotton bollworm,Helicoverpa armigera,a chewing insect,by decreasing the foliar nitrogen of host plants.In contrast,the phloemsucking aphid and whitefly insects had species-specific responses to elevated CO2 because of complex interactions that occur in the phloem sieve elements of plants.Some aphid species,such as cotton aphid,Aphis gossypii and wheat aphid,Sitobion avenae,were considered to represent the only feeding guild to respond positively to elevated CO2 conditions.Although whitefly,Bemisia tabaci,a major vector of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus,had neutral response to elevated CO2,the plants became less vulnerable to the virus infection under elevated CO2.The predator and parasitoid response to elevated CO2 were frequently idiosyncratic.These documents from Chinese scientists suggested that elevated CO2 initially affects the crop plant and then cascades to a higher trophic level through the food chain to encompass herbivores (pests),their natural enemies,pathogens and underground nematodes,which disrupt the natural balance observed previously in agricultural ecosystems.

  3. Effects of increasing UV-B radiation and atmospheric CO2 on photosynthesis and growth: implications for terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increases in UV-B radiation reaching the earth as a result of stratospheric ozone depletion will most likely accompany increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Many studies have examined the effects of each factor independently, but few have evaluated the combined effects of both UV-B radiation and elevated CO2. In general the results of such studies have shown independent effects on growth or seed yield. Although interspecific variation is large, high levels of UV-B radiation tends to reduce plant growth in sensitive species, while CO2 enrichment tends to promote growth in most C3 species. However, most previous studies have not looked at temporal effects or at the relationship between photosynthetic acclimation to CO2 and possible photosynthetic limitations imposed by UV-B radiation. Elevated CO2 may provide some protection against UV-B for some species. In contrast, UV-B radiation may limit the ability to exploit elevated CO2 in other species. Interactions between the effects of CO2 enrichment and UV-B radiation exposure have also been shown for biomass allocation. Effects on both biomass allocation and photosynthetic acclimation may be important to ecosystem structure in terms of seedling establishment, competition and reproductive output. Few studies have evaluated ecosystem processes such as decomposition or nutrient cycling. Interactive effects may be subtle and species specific but should not be ignored in the assessment of the potential impacts of increases in CO2 and UV-B radiation on plants. (author)

  4. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometer at 1.57 Micrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the earth's carbon cycle is essential for diagnosing current and predicting future climates, which requires precise global measurements of atmospheric CO2 through space missions. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission will provide accurate global atmospheric CO2 measurements to meet carbon science requirements. The joint team of NASA Langley Research Center and ITT Exelis, Inc. proposes to use the intensity-modulated, continuous-wave (IM-CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach for the ASCENDS mission. Prototype LAS instruments have been developed and used to demonstrate the power, signal-to-noise ratio, precision and accuracy, spectral purity, and stability of the measurement and the instrument needed for atmospheric CO2 observations from space. The ranging capability from laser platform to ground surfaces or intermediate backscatter layers is achieved by transmitted range-encoded IM laser signals. Based on the prototype instruments and current lidar technologies, space LAS systems and their CO2 column measurements are analyzed. These studies exhibit a great potential of using IM-CW LAS system for the active space CO2 mission ASCENDS.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar at 1.57 Micrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward; Meadows, Byron; Nehrir, Amin; Harrison, Wallace F.; Dobler, Jeremy; Obland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the earth's carbon cycle is essential for diagnosing current and predicting future climates, which requires precise global measurements of atmospheric CO2 through space missions. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission will provide accurate global atmospheric CO2 measurements to meet carbon science requirements. The joint team of NASA Langley Research Center and ITT Exelis, Inc proposes to use the intensity-modulated, continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar approach for the ASCENDS mission. Prototype instruments have been developed and used to demonstrate the power, signal-to-noise ratio, precision and accuracy, spectral purity, and stability of the measurement and the instrument needed for atmospheric CO2 observations from space. The ranging capability from laser platform to ground surfaces or intermediate backscatter layers is achieved by transmitted range-encoded IM laser signals. Based on the prototype instruments and current lidar technologies, space lidar systems and their CO2 column measurements are analyzed. These studies exhibit a great potential of using IM-CW lidar system for the active space CO2 mission ASCENDS.

  6. Nitrogen fertilization has a stronger effect on soil nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities than elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthrong, Sean T; Yeager, Chris M; Gallegos-Graves, Laverne; Steven, Blaire; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Jackson, Robert B; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is the primary supply of N to most ecosystems, yet there is considerable uncertainty about how N-fixing bacteria will respond to global change factors such as increasing atmospheric CO2 and N deposition. Using the nifH gene as a molecular marker, we studied how the community structure of N-fixing soil bacteria from temperate pine, aspen, and sweet gum stands and a brackish tidal marsh responded to multiyear elevated CO2 conditions. We also examined how N availability, specifically, N fertilization, interacted with elevated CO2 to affect these communities in the temperate pine forest. Based on data from Sanger sequencing and quantitative PCR, the soil nifH composition in the three forest systems was dominated by species in the Geobacteraceae and, to a lesser extent, Alphaproteobacteria. The N-fixing-bacterial-community structure was subtly altered after 10 or more years of elevated atmospheric CO2, and the observed shifts differed in each biome. In the pine forest, N fertilization had a stronger effect on nifH community structure than elevated CO2 and suppressed the diversity and abundance of N-fixing bacteria under elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions. These results indicate that N-fixing bacteria have complex, interacting responses that will be important for understanding ecosystem productivity in a changing climate.

  7. Soil and water warming accelerates phenology and down-regulation of leaf photosynthesis of rice plants grown under free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Minaco; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Matsunami, Toshinori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sameshima, Ryoji; Okada, Masumi

    2014-02-01

    To enable prediction of future rice production in a changing climate, we need to understand the interactive effects of temperature and elevated [CO2] (E[CO2]). We therefore examined if the effect of E[CO2] on the light-saturated leaf photosynthetic rate (Asat) was affected by soil and water temperature (NT, normal; ET, elevated) under open-field conditions at the rice free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Shizukuishi, Japan, in 2007 and 2008. Season-long E[CO2] (+200 µmol mol(-1)) increased Asat by 26%, when averaged over two years, temperature regimes and growth stages. The effect of ET (+2°C) on Asat was not significant at active tillering and heading, but became negative and significant at mid-grain filling; Asat in E[CO2]-ET was higher than in ambient [CO2] (A[CO2])-NT by only 4%. Photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2] also became apparent at mid-grain filling; Asat compared at the same [CO2] in the leaf cuvette was significantly lower in plants grown in E[CO2] than in those grown in A[CO2]. The additive effects of E[CO2] and ET decreased Asat by 23% compared with that of A[CO2]-NT plants. Although total crop nitrogen (N) uptake was increased by ET, N allocation to the leaves and to Rubisco was reduced under ET and E[CO2] at mid-grain filling, which resulted in a significant decrease (32%) in the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation on a leaf area basis. Because the change in N allocation was associated with the accelerated phenology in E[CO2]-ET plants, we conclude that soil and water warming accelerates photosynthetic down-regulation at E[CO2]. PMID:24406632

  8. Effect of photosynthesis on the abundance of 18O13C16O in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Pons, Thijs L.; Ziegler, Martin; Lourens, Lucas J.; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The abundance of the isotopologue 18O13C16O (Δ47) in atmospheric air is a promising new tracer for the atmospheric carbon cycle (Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al., 2007). The large gross fluxes in CO2 between the atmosphere and biosphere are supposed to play a major role in controlling its abundance. Eiler and Schauble (2004) set up a box model describing the effect of air-leaf interaction on the abundance of 18O13C16O in atmospheric air. The main assumption is that the exchange between CO2 and water within the mesophyll cells will imprint a Δ47 value on the back-diffusing CO2 that reflects the leaf temperature. Additionally, kinetic effects due to CO2 diffusion into and out of the stomata are thought to play a role. We investigated the effect of photosynthesis on the residual CO2 under controlled conditions using a leaf chamber set-up to quantitatively test the model assumptions suggested by Eiler and Schauble (2004). We studied the effect of photosynthesis on the residual CO2 using two C3 and one C4 plant species: (i) sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a C3 species with a high leaf conductance for CO2 diffusion, (ii) ivy (Hedera hibernica), a C3 species with a low conductance, and (iii), maize (Zea mays), a species with the C4 photosynthetic pathway. We also investigated the effect of different light intensities (photosynthetic photon flux density of 200, 700 and 1800 μmol m2s‑1), and thus, photosynthetic rate in sunflower and maize. A leaf was mounted in a cuvette with a transparent window and an adjustable light source. The air inside was thoroughly mixed, making the composition of the outgoing air equal to the air inside. A gas-mixing unit was attached at the entrance of the cuvette that mixed air with a high concentration of scrambled CO2 with a Δ47 value of 0 to 0.1‰ with CO2 free air to set the CO2 concentration of ingoing air at 500 ppm. The flow rate through the cuvette was adjusted to the photosynthetic activity of the

  9. Sensitivity of the air-sea CO2 exchange in the Baltic Sea and Danish inner waters to atmospheric short-term variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanso, A. S.; Bendtsen, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Sorensen, L. L.; Chen, Huilin; Meijer, H. A. J.; Geels, C.

    2015-01-01

    Minimising the uncertainties in estimates of air-sea CO2 exchange is an important step toward increasing the confidence in assessments of the CO2 cycle. Using an atmospheric transport model makes it possible to investigate the direct impact of atmospheric parameters on the air-sea CO2 flux along wit

  10. Capability of Raman lidar for monitoring the variation of atmospheric CO2 profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Pei-Tao; Zhang Yin-Chao; Wang Lian; Hu Shun-Xing; Su Jia; Cao Kai-Fa; Zhao Yue-Feng; Hu Huan-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Lidar (Light detection and ranging) has special capabilities for remote sensing of many different behaviours of the atmosphere.One of the techniques which show a great deal of promise for several applications is Raman scattering.The detecting capability,including maximum operation range and minimum detectable gas concentration is one of the most significant parameters for lidar remote sensing of pollutants.In this paper,based on the new method for evaluating the capabilities of a Raman lidar system,we present an evaluation of detecting capability of Raman lidar for monitoring atmospheric CO2 in Hefei.Numerical simulations about the influence of atmospheric conditions on lidar detecting capability were carried out,and a conclusion can be drawn that the maximum difference of the operation ranges caused by the weather conditions alone can reach about 0.4 to 0.5kin with a measuring precision within 30ppmv.The range of minimum detectable concentration caused by the weather conditions alone can reach about 20 to 35 ppmv in vertical direction for 20000 shots at a distance of 1 km on the assumption that other parameters are kept constant.The other corresponding parameters under different conditions are also given.The capability of Raman lidar operated in vertical direction was found to be superior to that operated in horizontal direction.During practical measurement with the Raman lidar whose hardware components were fixed,aerosol scattering extinction effect would be a significant factor that influenced the capability of Raman lidar.This work may be a valuable reference for lidar system designing,measurement accuracy improving and data processing.

  11. Fast adjustment of the climate system to changes in atmospheric CO2 and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.; Bala, G.

    2011-12-01

    A key issue in the study of global climate change is the climate response to external forcing. When radiative forcing is applied to the climate system, the climate system starts to respond, resulting in changes in temperature and other fields. A new quasi-equilibrium climate state is achieved when the global mean net energy balance at the top-of-atmosphere returns to zero. The adjustment of the climate system is governed by different processes on different timescales. Within days to months, the climate system adjusts mainly to the imposed forcing and the change of land surface temperature. On longer timescale of years to centuries, when the ocean temperature starts to respond, changes in sea surface temperature exert a strong control on the adjustment of the climate system. By performing ensemble simulations using Hadley Center climate model, HadCM3L, we investigate climate system response to the applied forcing in the forms of additional atmospheric carbon dioxide and an increase in solar insolation. Both carbon dioxide and solar forcing affects the Earth's radiation balance and carbon dioxide also affects the climate system through its impact on plant stomata. We focus on the daily evolution of climate response within a timescale of one month over land and oceans. We will provide a mechanistic understanding of why increasing atmospheric CO2 causes a reduction in global-mean precipitation in the absence of sea surface temperature change. We will also discuss the adjustment of radiative forcing and the usefulness in radiative forcing as a predictor of equilibrium climate change. A discussion of the climate response from daily to millennium timescale will also be presented.

  12. Capability of Raman lidar for monitoring the variation of atmospheric CO2 profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar (Light detection and ranging) has special capabilities for remote sensing of many different behaviours of the atmosphere. One of the techniques which show a great deal of promise for several applications is Raman scattering. The detecting capability, including maximum operation range and minimum detectable gas concentration is one of the most significant parameters for lidar remote sensing of pollutants. In this paper, based on the new method for evaluating the capabilities of a Raman lidar system, we present an evaluation of detecting capability of Raman lidar for monitoring atmospheric CO2 in Hefei. Numerical simulations about the influence of atmospheric conditions on lidar detecting capability were carried out, and a conclusion can be drawn that the maximum difference of the operation ranges caused by the weather conditions alone can reach about 0.4 to 0.5km with a measuring precision within 30ppmv. The range of minimum detectable concentration caused by the weather conditions alone can reach about 20 to 35 ppmv in vertical direction for 20000 shots at a distance of 1 km on the assumption that other parameters are kept constant. The other corresponding parameters under different conditions are also given. The capability of Raman lidar operated in vertical direction was found to be superior to that operated in horizontal direction. During practical measurement with the Raman lidar whose hardware components were fixed, aerosol scattering extinction effect would be a significant factor that influenced the capability of Raman lidar. This work may be a valuable reference for lidar system designing, measurement accuracy improving and data processing

  13. A multiscale and multidisciplinary investigation of ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange over the rocky mountains of colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Oncley, S.P.; Burns, Sean P.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; Campos, T.; Monson, Russell K.; Schimel, D.S.; Sacks, W.J.; De Wekker, S. F. J.; Lai, C.-T.; Lamb, B.; Ojima, D.; Ellsworth, P.Z.; Sternberg, L.S.L.; Zhong, S.; Clements, C.; Moore, D.J.P.; Anderson, D.E.; Watt, A.S.; Hu, Jiawen; Tschudi, M.; Aulenbach, S.; Allwine, E.; Coons, T.

    2010-01-01

    A field study combined with modeling investigation demonstrated that the organization of CO2 transport by mountain terrain strongly affects the regional CO2 budget. Atmospheric dynamics can lead to complicated flows generated by inhomogeneous landscapes, topography or synoptic weather systems. The field campaign conducted of a ground deployment, the Carbon in the Mountain Experiment (CME04), and an aircraft deployment of the national Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130, the Airborne Carbon in the Mountains Experiment (ACME04) over the period of spring to fall of 2004 to cover the seasonal variation of ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange. The role of the mountain circulation in CO2 transport can be played over seemingly flat terrain by mesoscale flows generated by various physical processes. The three dimensional observation strategy considered can also be applied over flat terrain.

  14. Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 and CH4 Variations Using Ground-Based High Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution Fourier transform near IR solar spectra are used to estimate the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction (DMF of CO2 and CH4 variations in the atmosphere. The preliminary retrieval results for CO2 and CH4 variations in the area of Hefei, China, are presented, and the underlying error sources are also analyzed. Both a forward analysis and an inversion algorithm are included in the retrieval. The forward analysis uses the modeled atmospheric transmittance to line-by-line (LBL convolute the instrument line shape function. The influences of the temperature, pressure, humidity, and a priori gases are considered in the atmospheric transmittance model. The inversion algorithm is based on the nonlinear iterative and nonlinear least squares spectral fitting, which is used to obtain VCDCO2 and VCDCH4 (which represent vertical column density of CO2 and CH4, resp.. Furthermore, the VCDO2 is also retrieved for converting the VCDs into DMFs. DMFs are final products of data analysis. The inversion results can clearly resolve the tiny variations of CO2 and CH4 under strong atmospheric background. Spectral fitting residuals for both VCDCO2 and VCDCH4 are less than 0.5%. Finally, CO2 and CH4 diurnal variations are investigated based on a typical observation. About 2 ppm amplitude for DMFCO2 diurnal variations and less than 15 ppb amplitude for DMFCH4 are observed.

  15. Coastal upwelling fluxes of O2, N2O, and CO2 assessed from continuous atmospheric observations at Trinidad, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Lueker

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous atmospheric records of O2/N2, CO2 and N2O obtained at Trinidad, California document the effects of air-sea exchange during coastal upwelling and plankton bloom events. The atmospheric records provide continuous observations of air-sea fluxes related to synoptic scale upwelling events over several upwelling seasons. Combined with satellite, buoy and local meteorology data, calculated anomalies in O2/N2 and N2O were utilized in a simple atmospheric transport model to compute air-sea fluxes during coastal upwelling. CO2 fluxes were linked to the oceanic component of the O2 fluxes through local hydrographic data and estimated as a function of upwelling intensity (surface ocean temperature and wind speed. Regional air-sea fluxes of O2/N2, N2O, and CO2 during coastal upwelling were estimated with the aid of satellite wind and SST data. Upwelling CO2 fluxes were found to represent ~10% of export production along the northwest coast of North America. Synoptic scale upwelling events impact the net exchange of atmospheric CO2 along the coastal margin, and will vary in response to the frequency and duration of alongshore winds that are subject to climate change.

  16. Shellfish Face Uncertain Future in High CO2 World: Influence of Acidification on Oyster Larvae Calcification and Growth in Estuaries

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, A. Whitman; Reynolds, Amanda C.; Sobrino, Cristina; Riedel, Gerhardt F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human activities have increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide by 36% during the past 200 years. One third of all anthropogenic CO2 has been absorbed by the oceans, reducing pH by about 0.1 of a unit and significantly altering their carbonate chemistry. There is widespread concern that these changes are altering marine habitats severely, but little or no attention has been given to the biota of estuarine and coastal settings, ecosystems that are less pH buffered becau...

  17. Comparing a FACE experiment with mechanistic ecohydrological modeling: which processes are reliably simulated under elevated CO2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, S.; Leuzinger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Scenarios for the future terrestrial carbon and water cycle rely on numerical tools that simulate the dynamics of vegetation from assimilation of carbon through stomata to long-term forest development at the global scale. However, these tools are rarely tested to perform well in conditions different from the historical climate and comparisons are mostly limited to carbon and energy fluxes. A combination of numerical modeling and observations is used here to investigate the capability of a mechanistic approach to simulate the hydrology and the vegetation behavior of a forest exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations. Specifically, we thoroughly compare data from a free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment in a mature deciduous forest in Switzerland with realizations from a state-of-the-art ecohydrological model (Tethys-Chloris). Model realizations compare favorably with field observations of photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, sap flow, leaf and fruit litter, as well as qualitative changes in soil moisture. The simulated differences between CO2 scenarios for both the carbon and water balance are generally very small (less than 10%) and fall within the uncertainty of experimental observations. More problematic is the simulation of stem growth which is significantly higher in the modeled scenario with elevated CO2 but not in the observations even though current accuracy of field measurements precludes robust conclusions. These results demonstrate that while ecohydrological models can be used to reliably simulate multi-year energy, water, and carbon fluxes, evaluating the modeled carbon allocation remains critical. However, experimental evidence suggests that the structure of current vegetation models which use the photosynthesized carbon to directly drive plant growth should be revised because plant tissue growth is very sensitive to direct controls of environmental variables, independently of the amount of assimilated carbon.

  18. Bacteria and fungi respond differently to multifactorial climate change in a temperate heathland, traced with 13C-glycine and FACE CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C Andresen

    Full Text Available It is vital to understand responses of soil microorganisms to predicted climate changes, as these directly control soil carbon (C dynamics. The rate of turnover of soil organic carbon is mediated by soil microorganisms whose activity may be affected by climate change. After one year of multifactorial climate change treatments, at an undisturbed temperate heathland, soil microbial community dynamics were investigated by injection of a very small concentration (5.12 µg C g(-1 soil of (13C-labeled glycine ((13C2, 99 atom % to soils in situ. Plots were treated with elevated temperature (+1°C, T, summer drought (D and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (510 ppm [CO2], as well as combined treatments (TD, TCO2, DCO2 and TDCO2. The (13C enrichment of respired CO2 and of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs was determined after 24 h. (13C-glycine incorporation into the biomarker PLFAs for specific microbial groups (Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, actinobacteria and fungi was quantified using gas chromatography-combustion-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS. Gram positive bacteria opportunistically utilized the freshly added glycine substrate, i.e. incorporated (13C in all treatments, whereas fungi had minor or no glycine derived (13C-enrichment, hence slowly reacting to a new substrate. The effects of elevated CO2 did suggest increased direct incorporation of glycine in microbial biomass, in particular in G(+ bacteria, in an ecosystem subjected to elevated CO2. Warming decreased the concentration of PLFAs in general. The FACE CO2 was (13C-depleted (δ(13C = 12.2‰ compared to ambient (δ(13C = ∼-8‰, and this enabled observation of the integrated longer term responses of soil microorganisms to the FACE over one year. All together, the bacterial (and not fungal utilization of glycine indicates substrate preference and resource partitioning in the microbial community, and therefore suggests a diversified response pattern to

  19. Searching for a Relationship Between Forest Water Use and Increasing Atmospheric CO2 Concentration with Long-Term Hydrologic Data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amthor, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Increases in atmospheric C02 concentration from mid-1956 through mid-1997 were compared with hydrologic records from five forested, gaged watersheds in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, U.S.A. The purpose of the comparison was to assess whether a relationship between increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and whole-ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET) could be determined. The HBEF is particularly well suited to this type of study because of the length of the hydrologic record and the physical properties of the watersheds. This analysis is based on HBEF water years (which begin 1 June and end the following 31 May) rather than calendar years. Hydrologic records from individual watersheds used in this analysis ranged from 28 to 41 water years. During the full 41-water-year period, it is estimated that water-year mean atmospheric CO2 concentration increased more than 15% (from about 314 to 363 ppm). In one south-facing watershed (i.e., HBEF watershed 3), there was a statistically significant negative relationship between atmospheric C02 concentration and ET. This translated into a nearly 77 rnndyear reduction in ET as a result of a 50 ppm increase in atmospheric C02 concentration, a result of practical significance. Evapotranspiration from the other watersheds was also negatively related to atmospheric CO2 concentration, but with smaller (and statistically insignificant) magnitudes. Evapotranspiration from the three south-facing (but not the two north-facing) watersheds included in the analysis was "abnormally" low during the most recent 2 years (i.e., water years beginning in 1995 and 1996), and this affected the trends in ET. This recent and abrupt, reduction in ET deserves further analysis, most importantly by an extension of the hydrologic record through continued long-term monitoring in the HBEF (which is ongoing). If ET remains relatively low during the coming years in south-facing watersheds, studies of the physical and/or biological

  20. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Scott W.; Johnson, Scott N.; Jones, T. Hefin; Ostle, Nick J.; Hails, Rosemary S.; Vanbergen, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  1. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Scott W; Johnson, Scott N; Jones, T Hefin; Ostle, Nick J; Hails, Rosemary S; Vanbergen, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  2. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land−atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land−atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y−1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y−1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m−2⋅y−1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  3. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-14

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  4. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land‑atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land‑atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy‑1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy‑1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm‑2ṡy‑1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  5. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy-1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy-1, equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm-2ṡy-1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  6. Ship-board report on atmospheric CO2 concentrations recorded on continuous from Mediterranean sea to Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results obtained from continuous measurements performed during two cruises with hemispherical courses. In this way, it has been obtained the latitudinal trend of CO2 in continuity of space and time along two hemispheric courses in 1994-95 and 1996-97 from Europe to Antarctica. The results are compared with measurements from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory (CMDL) cooperative air sampling network. The fitting of data recorded on board with the historical data sets recorded at Palmer Station is also presented, highlighting the current annual increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations

  7. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L. F. C.; Arenque, B. C.; Aidar, S. T.; Moura, M. S. B.; Von Randow, C.; Tourigny, E.; Menezes, R. S. C.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  8. Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin-Based Carbons for CO2 Separation at Sub-Atmospheric Pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Noelia Álvarez-Gutiérrez; María Victoria Gil; María Martínez; Fernando Rubiera; Covadonga Pevida

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of developing effective separation and purification technologies that leave much smaller energy footprints is greater for carbon dioxide (CO2) than for other gases. In addition to its involvement in climate change, CO2 is present as an impurity in biogas and bio-hydrogen (biological production by dark fermentation), in post-combustion processes (flue gas, CO2-N2) and many other gas streams. Selected phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbons prepared in our laboratory hav...

  9. Coupling between atmospheric CO2 and temperature during the onset of the Little Ice Age

    OpenAIRE

    Hoof, T.B. van

    2004-01-01

    Present day global warming is primarily caused by the greenhouse effect of the increased CO2 emissions since the onset of the industrial revolution. A coupling between temperature and the greenhouse gas CO2 has also been observed in several ice-core records on a glacial-interglacial timescale as well as on a millennial timescale during the glacials. In marked contrast, no significant ice-derived CO2 fluctuations occur on centennial time scales contemporaneously with well-documented cooling ev...

  10. Monitoring of leaked CO2 through sediment, water column and atmosphere in sub-seabed CCS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitashima, K.; Sakamoto, A.; Maea, Y.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 capture and storage in sub-seabed geological formations (sub-seabed CCS) is currently being studied as a feasible option to mitigate the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. In implementing sub-seabed CCS, detecting and monitoring the impact of the sequestered CO2 on the ocean environment is highly important. The first controlled CO2 release experiment, entitled 'Quantifying and Monitoring Potential Ecosystem Impacts of Geological Carbon Storage (QICS)', took place in Ardmucknish Bay, Oban, in May-July 2012. We applied the in-situ pH/pCO2/ORP sensor to the QICS experiment for detection and monitoring of leaked CO2, and carried out several observations. The on-line sensor that was connected by 400m of RS422 cable was deployed close to the CO2 leakage (bubbling) point, and the fluctuations of pH, pCO2 and ORP were monitored in real-time in a observation van on land. Three sets of off-line sensors were also placed on seafloor in respective points (release point, and two low impacted regions at 25m and 75m distant) for three months. The long-term monitoring of pH in sediment at 50cm depth under the seafloor was conducted. The spear type electrode was stabbed into sediment by diver near the CO2 leakage point. Wide-area mapping surveys of pH, pCO2 and ORP in seawater around the leakage point were carried out by AUV (REMUS-100) that some chemical sensors were installed in. The AUV cruised along the grid line in two layers of 4m and 2m above the seafloor during both of periods of low tide and high tide. Atmospheric CO2 in sea surface above the leakage point was observed by the LI-COR CO2 Analyzer. The analyzer was attached to the bow of ship, and the ship navigated a wide-area along a grid observation line during both of periods of low tide and high tide.

  11. Coal devolatilization and char conversion under suspension fired conditions in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    was burned at 1573 K and 1673 K a faster conversion was found in N2 suggesting that the lower molecular diffusion coefficient of O2 in CO2 lowers the char conversion rate when external mass transfer influences combustion. The reaction of char with CO2 was not observed to have an influence on char conversion......The aim of the present investigation is to examine differences between O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres during devolatilization and char conversion of a bituminous coal at conditions covering temperatures between 1173 K and 1673 K and inlet oxygen concentrations between 5 and 28 vol.%. The experiments...... indicates that a shift from air to oxy-fuel combustion does not influence the devolatilization process significantly. Char combustion experiments yielded similar char conversion profiles when N2 was replaced with CO2 under conditions where combustion was primarily controlled by chemical kinetics. When char...

  12. Fossil plants indicate that the most significant decrease in atmospheric CO2 happened prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany was utilized to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the stomatal proxy, which relies on the inverse relationship between pCO2 and leaf stomatal density, we show that a ~40% decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oliogocene climate transition. The results endorse the theory that pCO2 drawdown was the main forcer of the Eocene-Oligocene climate change, and a 'tipping point' was reached in the latest Eocene, triggering the plunge of the Earth System into icehouse conditions.

  13. Airborne & Ground-based measurements of atmospheric CO2 using the 1.57-μm laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaizawa, D.; Kawakami, S.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Asai, K.

    2009-12-01

    Greenhouse gases observing satellite (GOSAT) started the measurement of global CO2 abundances to reveal its continental inventory using two passive remote sensors. The goal that the sensor needs to be done is to achieve an 1% relative accuracy in order to reduce uncertainties of CO2 budget. Nevertheless, in the future global CO2 monitoring, more accurate measurement of global tropospheric CO2 abundances with the monthly regional scale are required to improve the knowledge of CO2 exchanges among the land, ocean, and atmosphere. In order to fulfill demands, a laser remote sensor, such as DIAL or laser absorption spectrometer (LAS), is a potential candidate of future space-based missions. Nowadays, those technologies are required to demonstrate an accuracy of the few-ppm level through airborne & ground-based measurements. We developed the prototype of the 1.57um LAS for a step of the next missions and perform it at the ground-based and airborne platform to show the properly validated performance in the framework of GOSAT validation. Our CO2 LAS is consisted of all optical fiber circuits & compact receiving /transmitting optics to achieve the portable, flexible and rigid system. The optical sources of on- and off-line are distributed feedback lasers, which are tuned at the strong and weak position of the R12 line in the (30012laptop computer. After that, we evaluated the atmospheric CO2 density using the meteorological parameters and ratio between the on- and off-line signals. The resultant of the ground-based measurement of 3km optical length indicated that the statistical error of the path averaged atmospheric CO2 density is less than 2.8ppm with 25 minutes averaging. The variation of the path averaged atmospheric CO2 is also quite consistent with that obtained from the in-situ measurement. Airborne measurements were also performed in the end of August, 2009. In the conference we will show some characteristics among signals from clouds, the surface of the land and

  14. Oxygen isotope fractionation during spin-forbidden photolysis of CO2: Relevance to the atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, J. R.; Stark, G.; Pack, A.; de Oliveira, N.; Nahon, L.

    2015-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of the Martian atmosphere is of interest for comparison with recent MSL SAM results, and to understand the origin of oxygen isotope anomalies (i.e., mass-independent fractionation or MIF) in secondary minerals in SNC meteorites. Our focus here is on spin-forbidden photolysis of CO2, CO2 + hv (>167 nm) → CO(X1S) + O(3P). The spin-forbidden photolysis of CO2 is unusual in the Martian atmosphere because of its high reaction rate from the upper atmosphere (80 km) all the way to the ground. This range of altitudes spans 4 orders of magnitude in atmospheric pressure, and occurs because of the gradual decrease in the CO2 cross sections from 167 to ~200 nm. Previous laboratory photolysis experiments on CO2 in the spin-allowed and spin-forbidden regions have yielded a remarkably large MIF signature (17O excess ~ 100 permil) in O2 product for photolysis at 185 nm. Recent theoretical cross sections for CO2 isotopologues argue for a much smaller MIF signature from spin-forbidden photolysis. Here, we report the results of photolysis experiments on CO2 at the Soleil synchrotron DESIRS beamline. High purity, natural isotope abundance CO2 was placed in a 20 cm photocell with MgF2 windows. Experiments were performed at 3 wavelengths (7% FWHM): 160 nm (spin-allowed), and at 175 nm and 185 nm (spin-forbidden). After VUV exposure, aliquots of the photolyzed CO2 were sent to the Department of Isotope Geology at the University of Goettingen for O isotope analysis. The isotope results show that the spin-allowed photolysis yields normal, mass-dependent fractionation in agreement with earlier work. Photolysis at 175 nm, which is mostly spin-forbidden, yields a small positive (or zero) MIF signature. Photolysis at 185 nm, which is entirely spin-forbidden, yields O2 with a negative MIF signature (D17O ~ -8 to -10 permil). The results at 185 nm disagree in magnitude and sign with the very large positive MIF signature previously reported, and provides support

  15. Interaction between Medicago truncatula and Pseudomonas fluorescens: evaluation of costs and benefits across an elevated atmospheric CO(2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Lepinay

    Full Text Available Soil microorganisms play a key role in both plants nutrition and health. Their relation with plant varies from mutualism to parasitism, according to the balance of costs and benefits for the two partners of the interaction. These interactions involved the liberation of plant organic compounds via rhizodeposition. Modification of atmospheric CO(2 concentration may affect rhizodeposition and as a consequence trophic interactions that bind plants and microorganisms. Positive effect of elevated CO(2 on plants are rather well known but consequences for micoorganisms and their interactions with plants are still poorly understood. A gnotobiotic system has been developed to study the interaction between Medicago truncatula Jemalong J5 and the mutualistic bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens strain C7R12 under two atmospheric CO(2 concentrations: ambient (365 ppm versus enriched (750 ppm. Costs and benefits for each partner have been determined over time by measuring plant development and growth, the C and N contents of the various plant parts and the density of the bacteria in rhizosphere compartments. Following the increase in CO(2, there was a beneficial effect of P. fluorescens C7R12 on development, vegetative growth, and C/N content of M. truncatula. Concerning plant reproduction, an early seed production was noticed in presence of the bacterial strain combined with increased atmospheric CO(2 conditions. Paradoxically, this transient increase in seed production was correlated with a decrease in bacterial density in the rhizosphere soil, revealing a cost of increased CO(2 for the bacterial strain. This shift of costs-benefits ratio disappeared later during the plant growth. In conclusion, the increase in CO(2 concentration modifies transiently the cost-benefit balance in favor of the plant. These results may be explained either by a competition between the two partners or a change in bacterial physiology. The ecosystem functioning depends on the

  16. Are microbial N transformation rates in a permanent grassland soil after 17 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 sensitive to soil temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Brenzinger, Kristof; Clough, Tim; Braker, Gesche; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Long-term observations (17 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed that the carbon fertilization caused significant changes in the ecosystem nitrogen cycle. These changes are responsible for a doubling of annual N2O emissions under elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) caused by increased emissions during the plant growing season. The goal of this lab study was to understand how soil temperature influences the long-term effects of eCO2 and plant carbon input on microbial N transformations in the Giessen FACE. Therefore, a pulse labelling study with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out with incubated soil samples from elevated and ambient CO2 FACE rings in climate chambers at two different temperatures (10°C and 19°C), while water filled pore space of the samples was adjusted to the same level. The various N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, soil organic matter), N2O emissions and simultaneous gross N transformation rates were quantified. The quantification of the gross N transformations are based on the turnover of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, 15NO2- and shall illuminate the interaction between carbon fertilization, temperature and changes in nitrogen cycle in this grassland soil. While the soil respiration after labelling was significantly increased at 19°C compared to 10°C, N2O emissions showed no significant differences. There were also no significant differences of N2O emissions between soil samples from control and elevated CO2 rings within each temperature level. As the soil temperature (within the range of 10-19°C) had no significant effects on N transformations responsible for the observed doubling of N2O emissions under eCO2, it seems most likely that other factors like direct carbon input by plants and/or soil moisture differences between ambient and elevated rings in the field are responsible for the observed increase in N2O emissions under eCO2.

  17. An inverse modeling approach for tree-ring-based climate reconstructions under changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, É.; Guiot, J.; Hatté, C.; Daux, V.; Danis, P.-A.; Dussouillez, P.

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decades, dendroclimatologists have relied upon linear transfer functions to reconstruct historical climate. Transfer functions need to be calibrated using recent data from periods where CO2 concentrations reached unprecedented levels (near 400 ppm). Based on these transfer functions, dendroclimatologists must then reconstruct a different past, a past where CO2 concentrations were much below 300 ppm. However, relying upon transfer functions calibrated in this way may introduce an unanticipated bias in the reconstruction of past climate, particularly if CO2 levels have had a noticeable fertilizing effect since the beginning of the industrial era. As an alternative to the transfer function approach, we run the MAIDENiso ecophysiological model in an inverse mode to link together climatic variables, atmospheric CO2 concentrations and tree growth parameters. Our approach endeavors to find the optimal combination of meteorological conditions that best simulate observed tree ring patterns. We test our approach in the Fontainebleau forest (France). By comparing two different CO2 scenarios, we present evidence that increasing CO2 concentrations have had a slight, yet significant, effect on reconstruction results. We demonstrate that higher CO2 concentrations augment the efficiency of water use by trees, therefore favoring the reconstruction of a warmer and drier climate. Under elevated CO2 concentrations, trees close their stomata and need less water to produce the same amount of wood. Inverse process-based modeling represents a powerful alternative to the transfer function technique, especially for the study of divergent tree-ring-to-climate relationships. The approach has several advantages, most notably its ability to distinguish between climatic effects and CO2 imprints on tree growth. Therefore our method produces reconstructions that are less biased by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and that are based on sound ecophysiological knowledge.

  18. Plant species, atmospheric CO2 and soil N interactively or additively control C allocation within plant-soil systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Shenglei; Howard Ferris

    2006-01-01

    Two plant species, Medicago truncatula (legume) and Avena sativa (non-legume), were grown in low- or high-N soils under two CO2 concentrations to test the hypothesis whether C allocation within plant-soil system is interactively or additively controlled by soil N and atmospheric CO2 is dependent upon plant species. The results showed the interaction between plant species and soil N had a significant impact on microbial activity and plant growth. The interaction between CO2 and soil N had a significant impact on soil soluble C and soil microbial biomass C under Madicago but not under Avena. Although both CO2 and soil N affected plant growth significantly, there was no interaction between CO2 and soil N on plant growth. In other words, the effects of CO2 and soil N on plant growth were additive. We considered that the interaction between N2 fixation trait of legume plant and elevated CO2 might have obscured the interaction between soil N and elevated CO2 on the growth of legume plant. In low-N soil, the shoot-to-root ratio of Avena dropped from 2.63±0.20 in the early growth stage to 1.47±0.03 in the late growth stage, indicating that Avena plant allocated more energy to roots to optimize nutrient uptake (i.e. N) when soil N was limiting. In high-N soil, the shoot-to-root ratio of Medicago increased significantly over time (from 2.45±0.30 to 5.43±0.10), suggesting that Medicago plants allocated more energy to shoots to optimize photosynthesis when N was not limiting.The shoot-to-root ratios were not significantly different between two CO2 levels.

  19. Carbonation of Artificial Silicate Minerals in Soils: Passive Removal of Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, C.; Renforth, P.; Manning, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in global soils is a widely recognised phenomenon, which is amenable to an environmental engineering approach. It is proposed that the use of direct soil engineering, promoting CO2 sequestration by accelerating the activity of reactive mineral substrates, has the potential to harness the significant carbon turnover of the global pedologic system (75 x 10^15 gC/yr [1]) [2][3][4]. Estimates of C capture potential through this process are 100-1000 MTa-1. This study focuses on the ambient carbonation of high-Ca residues as agents of mineral CCS. A synergy of contemporary field observations is presented, alongside data acquired from laboratory testing (acid digestion, optical petrography, SEM, IRMS) of carbonated material recovered from urban brown-field and former industrial sites in north east England. It is demonstrated that urban soils may accumulate ~30 kg/m2 (300 T/ha) of carbon over 10 years as inorganic calcium carbonate, approximately twice the typical organic C content of rural soils, ~17.5 kg/m2 in the UK. Stable isotope data (δ13C and δ18O) confirm that over 90% of the carbon is derived from the atmosphere. Economic and mechanical constraints on experimental performance in industrial batch reactor settings have strongly influenced the contemporary view on the efficacy of mineral CCS for large-scale environmental application [5][6][7]. Effective, low-energy field-scale implementation of mineral CCS through soil engineering would counter many of these concerns. Proof of principle for carbon capture efficacy of artificial silicates in soil engineering has been demonstrated [4]; proof of field scale feasibility will be demonstrated though continuing empirical field observation, engineered field cell construction and laboratory investigation. [1] Schlesinger, W. H., et al. (2000), Biogeochemistry, Vol. 48: 7-20. [2] Lal, R. (2003), Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, 22, pp. 151-184. [3] Manning, D. A. C., (2008), Mineralogical Magazine

  20. Coupling between atmospheric CO2 and temperature during the onset of the Little Ice Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, T.B. van

    2004-01-01

    Present day global warming is primarily caused by the greenhouse effect of the increased CO2 emissions since the onset of the industrial revolution. A coupling between temperature and the greenhouse gas CO2 has also been observed in several ice-core records on a glacial-interglacial timescale as we

  1. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3 on forests: phytochemistry, trophic interactions, and ecosystem dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Prominent among the many factors now affecting the sustainability of forest ecosystems are anthropogenically-generated carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3). CO2 is the substrate for photosynthesis and thus can accelerate tree growth, whereas O3 is a highly reactive oxygen species and interferes with basic physiological functions. This review summarizes the impacts of CO2 and O3 on tree chemical composition and highlights the consequences thereof for trophic interactions and ecosystem dynamics. CO2 and O3 influence phytochemical composition by altering substrate availability and biochemical/physiological processes such as photosynthesis and defense signaling pathways. Growth of trees under enriched CO2 generally leads to an increase in the C/N ratio, due to a decline in foliar nitrogen and concomitant increases in carbohydrates and phenolics. Terpenoid levels generally are not affected by atmospheric CO2 concentration. O3 triggers up-regulation of antioxidant defense pathways, leading to the production of simple phenolics and flavonoids (more so in angiosperms than gymnosperms). Tannins levels generally are unaffected, while terpenoids exhibit variable responses. In combination, CO2 and O3 exert both additive and interactive effects on tree chemical composition. CO2-and O3-mediated changes in plant chemistry influence host selection, individual performance (development, growth, reproduction), and population densities of herbivores (primarily phytophagous insects) and soil invertebrates. These changes can effect shifts in the amount and temporal pattern of forest canopy damage and organic substrate deposition. Decomposition rates of leaf litter produced under elevated CO2 and O3 may or may not be altered, and can respond to both the independent and interactive effects of the pollutants. Overall, however, CO2 and O3 effects on decomposition will be influenced more by their impacts on the quantity, rather than quality, of litter produced. A prominent theme to emerge

  2. An isotopomer strategy to detect plant acclimation to increasing atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusti, A.; Betson, T. R.; Schleucher, J.

    2009-04-01

    , but individual D isotopomer abundances are ultimately set by enzyme isotope effects. In tree-ring cellulose, abundance differences between exchanging and non-exchanging isotopomers reflect evaporative enrichment and may be exploited to reconstruct humidity. Finally, we have shown that abundance ratios of non-exchanging D isotopomers are wholly determined by biochemical isotope fractionations, independent of source water. Consequently, isotopomer ratios represent signals of leaf-level metabolic regulation, which are deposited in tree rings. For example, one isotopomer ratio responds to the CO2 concentration during photosynthesis. This effect reflects CO2-induced changes of the metabolic flux ratio of photosynthesis versus photorespiration. Photorespiration reduces the efficiency of photosynthesis, therefore this isotopomer ratio may reveal plant acclimation on time scales of decades, and associated trends in plant productivity. Combining signals reflecting metabolic regulation with climate signals opens the possibility to study acclimation of plants to increasing atmospheric CO2 and concomitant climatic changes, on time scales of decades and centuries.

  3. Low-dimensional models for the estimation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions from atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bloemen Waanders, B.; Ray, J.; McKenna, S. A.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The estimation of anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions using atmospheric observations of CO2 has recently attracted increasing interest due to its relevance to monitoring of CO2 mitigation treaties and programs. To date, techniques to perform large-scale inversions had primarily been developed within the context of understanding biospheric and oceanic fluxes. Such fluxes tend to vary relatively smoothly in space and time, making it possible to use multiGaussian models to parameterize and regularize such inversions, predicated on limited measurements of CO2 concentrations. However, the spatial distribution of anthropogenic emissions is non-stationary and multiscale, and therefore makes the use of multiGaussians models less suitable. Thus, a need exists to identify how anthropogenic emissions may be represented in a low-dimensional manner (i.e., with few parameters), for use in top-down estimation. Certain aspects of the spatial extent of anthropogenic emissions can be represented using easily measurable proxies such as nightlights, population density and GDP; in fact, fossil fuel inventories regularly use them to disaggregate regional emission budgets to finer spatial resolutions. However, such proxies can also be used to construct a priori models for anthropogenic emissions, which can then be updated, with data, through inverse modeling. In this presentation, we compare 3 low-dimensional parameterizations to characterize anthropogenic sources. The models are derived from images of nightlights over the continental USA, but adopt different arguments to achieve their dimensionality reduction. In the first model, we threshold nightlights and fit bivariate Gaussian kernels over clusters to represent emission sources; the emission field is modeled as a weighted sum of the kernels. The second approach models emissions as a weighted superposition of a filtered nightlight-distribution and a multiresolution defect, modeled with Haar wavelet. The nightlight-based methods

  4. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  5. Climate change goes underground: effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on microbial community structure and activities in the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drigo, B.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    General concern about climate change has led to growing interest in the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to elevated concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere. Experimentation during the last two to three decades using a large variety of approaches has provided sufficient information to conclude th

  6. ASSIMILATION, RESPIRATION AND ALLOCATION OF CARBON IN PLANTAGO MAJOR AS AFFECTED BY ATMOSPHERIC CO2 LEVELS - A CASE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHERTOG, J; STULEN, [No Value; LAMBERS, H

    1993-01-01

    The response of Plantago major ssp. pleiosperma plants, grown on nutrient solution in a climate chamber, to a doubling of the ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration was investigated. Total dry matter production was increased by 30 % after 3 weeks of exposure, due to a transient stimulation of the rel

  7. Baroclinic Waves and CO2 Snowfalls in Martian Winter Polar Atmosphere Simulated by a General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, T.; Medvedev, A. S.; Kasaba, Y.; Hartogh, P.

    2016-09-01

    The CO2 snowfalls in winter polar atmosphere have been simulated by a MGCM. Our results show that they are strongly modulated by the synoptic dynamical features such as baroclinic planetary waves, as well as by gravity waves in smaller scale.

  8. The use of forest stand age information in an atmospheric CO2 inversion applied to North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, F.; Chen, J.M.; Pan, Y.; Peters, W.; Birdsey, R.; McCullough, K.; Xiao, J.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric inversions have become an important tool in quantifying carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks and sources at a variety of spatiotemporal scales, but associated large uncertainties restrain the inversion research community from reaching agreement on many important subjects. We enhanced an atmospheri

  9. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes. PMID:27187527