WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmosphere model description

  1. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 1: Model description and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. CAFE integrates all key processes, including turbulent diffusion, emission, deposition and chemistry, throughout the forest canopy and mixed layer. CAFE utilizes the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM and is the first model of its kind to incorporate a suite of reactions for the oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, providing a more comprehensive description of the oxidative chemistry occurring within and above the forest. We use CAFE to simulate a young Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada, CA. Utilizing meteorological constraints from the BEARPEX-2007 field campaign, we assess the sensitivity of modeled fluxes to parameterizations of diffusion, laminar sublayer resistance and radiation extinction. To characterize the general chemical environment of this forest, we also present modeled mixing ratio profiles of biogenic hydrocarbons, hydrogen oxides and reactive nitrogen. The vertical profiles of these species demonstrate a range of structures and gradients that reflect the interplay of physical and chemical processes within the forest canopy, which can influence net exchange.

  2. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 1: Model description and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. CAFE integrates all key processes, including turbulent diffusion, emission, deposition and chemistry, throughout the forest canopy and mixed layer. It is the first model of its kind to incorporate the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM and a suite of reactions for the oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, providing a more comprehensive description of the oxidative chemistry occurring within and above the forest. We use CAFE to simulate a young Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada, CA. Utilizing meteorological constraints from the BEARPEX-2007 field campaign, we assess the sensitivity of modeled fluxes to parameterizations of diffusion, laminar sublayer resistance and radiation extinction. To characterize the general chemical environment of this forest, we also present modeled mixing ratio profiles of biogenic hydrocarbons, hydrogen oxides and reactive nitrogen. The vertical profiles of these species demonstrate a range of structures and gradients that reflect the interplay of physical and chemical processes within the forest canopy, which can influence net exchange.

  3. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  4. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  5. CRAC2 model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revised version of CRAC (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) which was developed for the Reactor Safety Study. This document provides an overview of the CRAC2 code and a description of each of the models used. Significant improvements incorporated into CRAC2 include an improved weather sequence sampling technique, a new evacuation model, and new output capabilities. In addition, refinements have been made to the atmospheric transport and deposition model. Details of the modeling differences between CRAC2 and CRAC are emphasized in the model descriptions

  6. Toward a minimal representation of aerosols in climate models: description and evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A modal aerosol module (MAM has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5, the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1. MAM is capable of simulating the aerosol size distribution and both internal and external mixing between aerosol components, treating numerous complicated aerosol processes and aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties in a physically-based manner. Two MAM versions were developed: a more complete version with seven lognormal modes (MAM7, and a version with three lognormal modes (MAM3 for the purpose of long-term (decades to centuries simulations. In this paper a description and evaluation of the aerosol module and its two representations are provided. Sensitivity of the aerosol lifecycle to simplifications in the representation of aerosol is discussed.

    Simulated sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass concentrations are remarkably similar between MAM3 and MAM7. Differences in primary organic matter (POM and black carbon (BC concentrations between MAM3 and MAM7 are also small (mostly within 10%. The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30–40% between MAM3 and MAM7, mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different standard deviations of the log-normal size distribution for sea salt modes between MAM3 and MAM7. The model is able to qualitatively capture the observed geographical and temporal variations of aerosol mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and aerosol optical properties. However, there are noticeable biases; e.g., simulated BC concentrations are significantly lower than measurements in the Arctic. There is a low bias in modeled aerosol optical depth on the global scale, especially in the developing countries. These biases in aerosol simulations clearly indicate the need for improvements of aerosol processes (e.g., emission fluxes of anthropogenic aerosols and

  7. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: overview and description of models, simulations and climate diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP consists of a series of timeslice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting radiative forcing and the associated composition changes. Here we introduce the various simulations performed under ACCMIP and the associated model output. The ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions lead to a significant range in emissions, mostly for ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to-model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results, but with outliers different enough to possibly affect their representation of climate impact on chemistry.

  8. MATCH–SALSA – Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andersson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry. The new model is called MATCH–SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at five measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at Northern and Central European sites and accumulation mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. On the other hand the model performs well for particle mass, including secondary inorganic aerosol components. Elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, both in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation, and for nitrogen gas-particle partitioning. Updating the biogenic SOA scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation. An improved nitrogen partitioning model may also improve the description of condensational growth.

  9. CRACUK model description (appendices to the CRAC2 model description)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CRACUK computer code is a revised version of the US consequence modelling code CRAC2, adapted to suit UK requirements. The revisions include modifications to the models for spatial interval representation, weather sequence sampling, atmospheric dispersion, dosimetry and countermeasures. This document describes, in the form of appendices to the CRAC2 model description, each of the revisions made to the original model which collectively distinguish CRACUK from CRAC2. (author)

  10. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Shi, Xiangjun; Lamarque, J.-F.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Vitt, Francis; Conley, Andrew; Park, S.; Neale, Richard; Hannay, Cecile; Ekman, A. M.; Hess, Peter; Mahowald, N.; Collins, William D.; Iacono, Michael J.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Flanner, M. G.; Mitchell, David

    2012-05-21

    A modal aerosol module (MAM) has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1). MAM is capable of simulating the aerosol size distribution and both internal and external mixing between aerosol components, treating numerous complicated aerosol processes and aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties in a physically based manner. Two MAM versions were developed: a more complete version with seven-lognormal modes (MAM7), and a three-lognormal mode version (MAM3) for the purpose of long-term (decades to centuries) simulations. Major approximations in MAM3 include assuming immediate mixing of primary organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) with other aerosol components, merging of the MAM7 fine dust and fine sea salt modes into the accumulation mode, merging of the MAM7 coarse dust and coarse sea salt modes into the single coarse mode, and neglecting the explicit treatment of ammonia and ammonium cycles. Simulated sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentrations are remarkably similar between MAM3 and MAM7 as most ({approx}90%) of these aerosol species are in the accumulation mode. Differences of POM and BC concentrations between MAM3 and MAM7 are also small (mostly within 10%) because of the assumed hygroscopic nature of POM, so that freshly emitted POM and BC are wet-removed before mixing internally with soluble aerosol species. Sensitivity tests with the POM assumed to be hydrophobic and with slower aging process increase the POM and BC concentrations, especially at high latitudes (by several times). The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30-40% between MAM3 and MAM7 mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different standard deviations of log-normal size distribution for sea salt modes between MAM3 and MAM7. The model is able to qualitatively capture the observed geographical and

  11. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Canopy Exchange Simulation System (ACCESS: model description and application to a temperate deciduous forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Saylor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopies are primary emission sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs and have the potential to significantly influence the formation and distribution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass. Biogenically-derived SOA formed as a result of emissions from the widespread forests across the globe may affect air quality in populated areas, degrade atmospheric visibility, and affect climate through direct and indirect forcings. In an effort to better understand the formation of SOA mass from forest emissions, a 1-D column model of the multiphase physical and chemical processes occurring within and just above a vegetative canopy is being developed. An initial, gas-phase-only version of this model, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Canopy Exchange Simulation System (ACCESS, includes processes accounting for the emission of BVOCs from the canopy, turbulent vertical transport within and above the canopy and throughout the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL, near-explicit representation of chemical transformations, mixing with the background atmosphere and bi-directional exchange between the atmosphere and canopy and the atmosphere and forest floor. The model formulation of ACCESS is described in detail and results are presented for an initial application of the modeling system to Walker Branch Watershed, an isoprene-emission-dominated forest canopy in the southeastern United States which has been the focal point for previous chemical and micrometeorological studies. Model results of isoprene profiles and fluxes are found to be consistent with previous measurements made at the simulated site and with other measurements made in and above mixed deciduous forests in the southeastern United States. Sensitivity experiments are presented which explore how canopy concentrations and fluxes of gas-phase precursors of SOA are affected by background anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NOx. Results from these experiments suggest that the

  12. MATCH–SALSA – Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; H. Kokkola

    2014-01-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH–SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size ...

  13. MATCH-SALSA – Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; H. Kokkola

    2015-01-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower c...

  14. The Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CATT-BRAMS – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CATT-BRAMS. CATT-BRAMS is an on-line transport model fully consistent with the simulated atmospheric dynamics. Emission sources from biomass burning and urban-industrial-vehicular activities for trace gases and from biomass burning aerosol particles are obtained from several published datasets and remote sensing information. The tracer and aerosol mass concentration prognostics include the effects of sub-grid scale turbulence in the planetary boundary layer, convective transport by shallow and deep moist convection, wet and dry deposition, and plume rise associated with vegetation fires in addition to the grid scale transport. The radiation parameterization takes into account the interaction between the simulated biomass burning aerosol particles and short and long wave radiation. The atmospheric model BRAMS is based on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, with several improvements associated with cumulus convection representation, soil moisture initialization and surface scheme tuned for the tropics, among others. In this paper the CATT-BRAMS model is used to simulate carbon monoxide and particulate material (PM2.5 surface fluxes and atmospheric transport during the 2002 LBA field campaigns, conducted during the transition from the dry to wet season in the southwest Amazon Basin. Model evaluation is addressed with comparisons between model results and near surface, radiosondes and airborne measurements performed during the field campaign, as well as remote sensing derived products. We show the matching of emissions strengths to observed carbon monoxide in the LBA campaign. A relatively good comparison to the MOPITT data, in spite of the fact that MOPITT a priori assumptions imply several difficulties, is also obtained.

  15. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0; ARTM. Atmosphaerisches Radionuklid-Transport-Modell mit Radon Postprozessor und SBG-Modul. Modellbeschreibung zu Version 2.8.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Cornelia; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald; Martens, Reinhard

    2015-04-20

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  16. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-02-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The modeled PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at four measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at northern and central European sites and accumulation-mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. The low nucleation rate coefficient used in this study is an important reason for the underestimation. On the other hand, the model performs well for particle mass (including secondary inorganic aerosol components), while elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation. Updating the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation.

  17. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model – Part 1: Model description, annual simulations and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Perlwitz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate the NMMB/BSC-Dust, a new dust aerosol cycle model embedded online within the NCEP Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Model (NMMB. NMMB is a further evolution of the operational Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM, which together with other upgrades has been extended from meso to global scales. Its unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core is prepared for regional and global simulation domains. The new NMMB/BSC-Dust is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales and represents a first step towards the development of a unified chemical-weather model. This paper describes the parameterizations used in the model to simulate the dust cycle including sources, transport, deposition and interaction with radiation. We evaluate monthly and annual means of the global configuration of the model against the AEROCOM dust benchmark dataset for year 2000 including surface concentration, deposition and aerosol optical depth (AOD, and we evaluate the daily AOD variability in a regional domain at high resolution covering Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe against AERONET AOD for year 2006. The NMMB/BSC-Dust provides a good description of the horizontal distribution and temporal variability of the dust. Daily AOD correlations at the regional scale are around 0.6–0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. At the global scale the model lies within the top range of AEROCOM dust models in terms of performance statistics for surface concentration, deposition and AOD. This paper discusses the current strengths and limitations of the modeling system and points towards future improvements.

  18. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model – Part 1: Model description, annual simulations and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pérez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate the NMMB/BSC-Dust, a new dust aerosol cycle model embedded online within the NCEP Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Model (NMMB. NMMB is a further evolution of the operational Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM, which together with other upgrades has been extended from meso to global scales. Its unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core is prepared for regional and global simulation domains. The new NMMB/BSC-Dust is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales and represents a first step towards the development of a unified chemical-weather model. This paper describes the parameterizations used in the model to simulate the dust cycle including sources, transport, deposition and interaction with radiation. We evaluate monthly and annual means of the global configuration of the model against the AEROCOM dust benchmark dataset for year 2000 including surface concentration, deposition and aerosol optical depth (AOD, and we evaluate the daily AOD variability in a regional domain at high resolution covering Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe against AERONET AOD for year 2006. The NMMB/BSC-Dust provides a good description of the horizontal distribution and temporal variability of the dust. Daily AOD correlations at the regional scale are around 0.6–0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. At the global scale the model lies within the top range of AEROCOM dust models in terms of performance statistics for surface concentration, deposition and AOD. This paper discusses the current strengths and limitations of the modeling system and points towards future improvements.

  19. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Canopy Exchange Simulation System (ACCESS): model description and application to a temperate deciduous forest canopy

    OpenAIRE

    R. D. Saylor

    2012-01-01

    Forest canopies are primary emission sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and have the potential to significantly influence the formation and distribution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. Biogenically-derived SOA formed as a result of emissions from the widespread forests across the globe may affect air quality in populated areas, degrade atmospheric visibility, and affect climate through direct and indirect forcings. In an effort to better understand the formati...

  20. A mechanistic model of H{sub 2}{sup 18}O and C{sup 18}OO fluxes between ecosystems and the atmosphere: Model description and sensitivity analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W.J.; Still, C.J.; Torn, M.S.; Berry, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The concentration of 18O in atmospheric CO2 and H2O is a potentially powerful tracer of ecosystem carbon and water fluxes. In this paper we describe the development of an isotope model (ISOLSM) that simulates the 18O content of canopy water vapor, leaf water, and vertically resolved soil water; leaf photosynthetic 18OC16O (hereafter C18OO) fluxes; CO2 oxygen isotope exchanges with soil and leaf water; soil CO2 and C18OO diffusive fluxes (including abiotic soil exchange); and ecosystem exchange of H218O and C18OO with the atmosphere. The isotope model is integrated into the land surface model LSM, but coupling with other models should be straightforward. We describe ISOLSM and apply it to evaluate (a) simplified methods of predicting the C18OO soil-surface flux; (b) the impacts on the C18OO soil-surface flux of the soil-gas diffusion coefficient formulation, soil CO2 source distribution, and rooting distribution; (c) the impacts on the C18OO fluxes of carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in soil and leaves; and (d) the sensitivity of model predictions to the d18O value of atmospheric water vapor and CO2. Previously published simplified models are unable to capture the seasonal and diurnal variations in the C18OO soil-surface fluxes simulated by ISOLSM. Differences in the assumed soil CO2 production and rooting depth profiles, carbonic anhydrase activity in soil and leaves, and the d18O value of atmospheric water vapor have substantial impacts on the ecosystem CO2 flux isotopic composition. We conclude that accurate prediction of C18OO ecosystem fluxes requires careful representation of H218O and C18OO exchanges and transport in soils and plants.

  1. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs

  2. Risk culture - a descriptive model

    OpenAIRE

    Paalanen, Anssi

    2013-01-01

    The term risk culture means how people in organisations understand risk. Risk culture influences all risk management related aspects. The term risk culture is relatively new. No comprehensive descriptive model of risk culture can be found in the literature. To understand risk culture better a descriptive model is needed. This thesis aims to answer the following research questions: How risk culture can be described, how different culture types can be classified, and what risk management me...

  3. AREST model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan (PNC) have supported the development of the Analytical Repository Source-Term (AREST) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. AREST is a computer model developed to evaluate radionuclide release from an underground geologic repository. The AREST code can be used to calculate/estimate the amount and rate of each radionuclide that is released from the engineered barrier system (EBS) of the repository. The EBS is the man-made or disrupted area of the repository. AREST was designed as a system-level models to simulate the behavior of the total repository by combining process-level models for the release from an individual waste package or container. AREST contains primarily analytical models for calculating the release/transport of radionuclides to the lost rock that surrounds each waste package. Analytical models were used because of the small computational overhead that allows all the input parameters to be derived from a statistical distribution. Recently, a one-dimensional numerical model was also incorporated into AREST, to allow for more detailed modeling of the transport process with arbitrary length decay chains. The next step in modeling the EBS, is to develop a model that couples the probabilistic capabilities of AREST with a more detailed process model. This model will need to look at the reactive coupling of the processes that are involved with the release process. Such coupling would include: (1) the dissolution of the waste form, (2) the geochemical modeling of the groundwater, (3) the corrosion of the container overpacking, and (4) the backfill material, just to name a few. Several of these coupled processes are already incorporated in the current version of AREST

  4. Description and Evaluation of a New Four-Mode Version of the Modal Aerosol Module (MAM4) within Version 5.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Ma, Po-Lun; Wang, Hailong; Tilmes, S.; Singh, Balwinder; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.

    2016-02-08

    Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in the climate system by influencing the Earth’s radiation budgets and modifying the cloud properties. Despite the importance, their representations in large-scale atmospheric models are still crude, which can influence model simulated burden, lifetime, physical, chemical and optical properties, and the climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study, we improve the current 3-mode version of modal aerosol module (MAM3) in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) by introducing a primary carbon mode to explicitly account for the aging process of primary carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere. Compared to MAM3, the 4-mode version of MAM (MAM4) significantly increases the column burdens of primary organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) by up to 40% in many remote regions away from the sources, where the in-cloud scavenging plays an important role in determining the aerosol concentrations. Changes of the column burdens for other types of aerosol (e.g., sulfate, secondary organic aerosols, mineral dust, sea salt) are less than 1%. We evaluated the MAM4 simulation against in situ surface and aircraft observations. MAM4 significantly improves the model simulation of seasonal variation of BC concentrations in the polar regions, by increasing the BC concentrations in all seasons and particularly in cold seasons. However, it exacerbates the overestimation of modeled BC concentrations in the upper troposphere in the Pacific regions. Future improvements of the representation of aerosol processes related to (1) in-cloud scavenging and vertical transport in convective clouds and (2) emissions of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols are needed to further reduce the model biases of POM and BC aerosols.

  5. Description and evaluation of a new 4-mode version of Modal Aerosol Module (MAM4 within version 5.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in the climate system by influencing the Earth's radiation budgets and modifying the cloud properties. Despite the importance, their representations in large-scale atmospheric models are still crude, which can influence model simulated burden, lifetime, physical, chemical and optical properties, and the climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study, we improve the current 3-mode version of modal aerosol module (MAM3 in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 by introducing an additional primary carbon mode to explicitly account for the microphysical ageing of primary carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere. Compared to MAM3, the 4-mode version of MAM (MAM4 significantly increases the column burdens of primary particulate organic matter (POM and black carbon (BC by up to 40 % in many remote regions, where in-cloud scavenging plays an important role in determining the aerosol concentrations. Differences in the column burdens for other types of aerosol (e.g., sulfate, secondary organic aerosols, mineral dust, sea salt are less than 1 %. Evaluating the MAM4 simulation against in situ surface and aircraft observations, we find that MAM4 significantly improves the simulation of seasonal variation of BC concentrations in the polar regions, by increasing the BC concentrations in all seasons and particularly in cold seasons. However, it exacerbates the overestimation of modeled BC concentrations in the upper troposphere in the Pacific regions. The comparisons suggest that, to address the remaining model POM and BC biases, future improvements are required related to (1 in-cloud scavenging and vertical transport in convective clouds and (2 emissions of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols.

  6. Middle Atmosphere Response to Different Descriptions of the 11-Year Solar Cycle in Spectral Irradiance in a Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L. D.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3-6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7) in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response 50 using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral response could allow for a better prediction of the

  7. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Swartz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOSCCM. The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3–6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7 in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units F10.7 – 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOSCCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. This is important in that it means that chemistry-transport models should simulate the solar cycle in ozone well, while general circulation models without coupled chemistry will underestimate the temperature response to the solar cycle significantly in the middle atmosphere. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm

  8. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L.D.; E. L. Fleming; C. H. Jackman

    2012-01-01

    The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOSCCM). The results are largely c...

  9. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    OpenAIRE

    W. H. Swartz; R. S. Stolarski; L. D. Oman; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOSCCM). The results are largely consistent with...

  10. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    OpenAIRE

    W. H. Swartz; R. S. Stolarski; L. D. Oman; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent wit...

  11. Description of the SAFRAN Model for Evaluation of Public Exposure Resulting from Accidental Release of Airborne Radioactive Materials into the Atmosphere and User’s Guide. Annex II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the method used in the SAFRAN tool for calculation of exposure arising from accidental release of airborne radioactive materials into the atmosphere. Model can be used for evaluation of public exposure to allow comparison with the relevant dose limiting criteria. The model is based on the public exposure evaluation concept as described in IAEA reports. While both these reports in primary addresses impacts arising from routine (e.g. long time permanent) releases, the concept employed can be adapted for assessment of impacts arising from accidental (e.g. short time) releases. Another source which has also been extensively used is the German Incident calculation bases

  12. Solar Atmosphere Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution honoring Kees de Jager's 80th birthday is a review of "one-dimensional" solar atmosphere modeling that followed on the initial "Utrecht Reference Photosphere" of Heintze, Hubenet & de Jager (1964). My starting point is the Bilderberg conference, convened by de Jager in 1967 at the time when NLTE radiative transfer theory became mature. The resulting Bilderberg model was quickly superseded by the HSRA and later by the VAL-FAL sequence of increasingly sophisticated NLTE continuum-fitting models from Harvard. They became the "standard models" of solar atmosphere physics, but Holweger's relatively simple LTE line-fitting model still persists as a favorite of solar abundance determiners. After a brief model inventory I discuss subsequent work on the major modeling issues (coherency, NLTE, dynamics) listed as to-do items by de Jager in 1968. The present conclusion is that one-dimensional modeling recovers Schwarzschild's (1906) finding that the lower solar atmosphere is grosso modo in radiative equilibrium. This is a boon for applications regarding the solar atmosphere as one-dimensional stellar example - but the real sun, including all the intricate phenomena that now constitute the mainstay of solar physics, is vastly more interesting.

  13. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Swartz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM. The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3–6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7 in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units F10.7 – 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral

  14. A mechanistic description of the global COS cycle consistent with atmospheric measurements and its potential to evaluate gross primary production of vegetation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launois, Thomas; Peylin, Philippe; Belviso, Sauveur; Bopp, Laurent; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Cuntz, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimates of the gross carbon fluxes - photosynthesis and respiration - are essential to predict the ecosystem carbon fluxes and stocks and their evolution in a changing climate. The gross primary productivity (GPP) in the current dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), however, shows large differences in terms of mean values, phase and amplitude. As large scale measurements of the GPP are not possible, their estimates are usually based on indirect tracers. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) has been proposed as a tracer of GPP since COS and CO2 are dominantly taken up by plants via the same enzyme during photosynthesis. Thus leaf uptakes of COS and CO2 are often found to be proportional, with a coefficient of proportionality (LRU) that is species-dependant according to laboratory measurements. However contrarily to CO2, atmospheric records of COS over the last decades show a strong seasonal cycle but with no significant trend, which implies roughly equilibrated sources and sinks of COS at the global scale. Most recent estimates of COS uptake by plants using this LRU concept led to larger sinks over land than initially estimated. In order to maintain a closed atmospheric budget, a compensatory COS source had to be found, with the ocean being suggested as the most likely candidate. In this work, we propose a new mechanistically-based parameterization of the major sources and sinks of COS, allowing to close the global atmospheric budget. For the ocean, we used the ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry model NEMO-PISCES to assess the marine source of COS. Using the simulated organic compounds at the surface, we derived a direct source of COS through the COS photo-production as well as an indirect source through the emissions of sulfur compounds (DMS). The resulting simulated global fluxes correspond to a net source of COS of around 800 GgS yr‑1, spatially and temporally consistent with the suggested missing source. For the land, we considered most anoxic

  15. Multilingual Image Description with Neural Sequence Models

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Desmond; Frank, Stella; Hasler, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach to multi-language image description bringing together insights from neural machine translation and neural image description. To create a description of an image for a given target language, our sequence generation models condition on feature vectors from the image, the description from the source language, and/or a multimodal vector computed over the image and a description in the source language. In image description experiments on the IAPR-TC12 dataset o...

  16. Atmospheric pollution. From processes to modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air quality, greenhouse effect, ozone hole, chemical or nuclear accidents.. All these phenomena are tightly linked to the chemical composition of atmosphere and to the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants. This book aims at supplying the main elements of understanding of 'atmospheric pollutions': stakes, physical processes involved, role of scientific expertise in decision making. Content: 1 - classifications and scales: chemical composition of the atmosphere, vertical structure, time scales (transport, residence); 2 - matter/light interaction: notions of radiative transfer, application to the Earth's atmosphere; 3 - some elements about the atmospheric boundary layer: notion of scales in meteorology, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), thermal stratification and stability, description of ABL turbulence, elements of atmospheric dynamics, some elements about the urban climate; 4 - notions of atmospheric chemistry: characteristics, ozone stratospheric chemistry, ozone tropospheric chemistry, brief introduction to indoor air quality; 5 - aerosols, clouds and rains: aerosols and particulates, aerosols and clouds, acid rains and leaching; 6 - towards numerical simulation: equation of reactive dispersion, numerical methods for chemistry-transport models, numerical resolution of the general equation of aerosols dynamics (GDE), modern simulation chains, perspectives. (J.S.)

  17. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Shulyak, D

    2004-01-01

    Model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed taking into account magnetic line blanketing. These calculations are based on the new stellar model atmosphere code LLModels which implements direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions and ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption. The anomalous Zeeman effect was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG and a field vector perpendicular to the line of sight. The model structure, high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors, metallic line spectra and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are discussed with respect to those of non-magnetic reference models. The magnetically enhanced line blanketing changes the atmospheric structure and leads to a redistribution of energy in the stellar spectrum. The most noticeable feature in the optical region is the appearance of the 5200 A depression. However, this effect is prominent only in ...

  18. Site descriptive modelling - strategy for integrated evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current document establishes the strategy to be used for achieving sufficient integration between disciplines in producing Site Descriptive Models during the Site Investigation stage. The Site Descriptive Model should be a multidisciplinary interpretation of geology, rock mechanics, thermal properties, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, transport properties and ecosystems using site investigation data from deep bore holes and from the surface as input. The modelling comprise the following iterative steps, evaluation of primary data, descriptive and quantitative modelling (in 3D), overall confidence evaluation. Data are first evaluated within each discipline and then the evaluations are checked between the disciplines. Three-dimensional modelling (i.e. estimating the distribution of parameter values in space and its uncertainty) is made in a sequence, where the geometrical framework is taken from the geological model and in turn used by the rock mechanics, thermal and hydrogeological modelling etc. The three-dimensional description should present the parameters with their spatial variability over a relevant and specified scale, with the uncertainty included in this description. Different alternative descriptions may be required. After the individual discipline modelling and uncertainty assessment a phase of overall confidence evaluation follows. Relevant parts of the different modelling teams assess the suggested uncertainties and evaluate the feedback. These discussions should assess overall confidence by, checking that all relevant data are used, checking that information in past model versions is considered, checking that the different kinds of uncertainty are addressed, checking if suggested alternatives make sense and if there is potential for additional alternatives, and by discussing, if appropriate, how additional measurements (i.e. more data) would affect confidence. The findings as well as the modelling results are to be documented in a Site Description

  19. Description of the Risoe puff diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark, atmospheric puff dispersion model is described. This three-dimensional model simulates the release of Gaussian pullutant puffs and predicts their concentration as they are diffused and advected downwind by a horizontally homogeneous, time-dependent wind. Atmospheric characteristics such as turbulence intensity, potential temperature gradient, buoyant heat flux and maximum mixing depth have been considered. (author)

  20. Modelling land surface - atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Højmark

    The study is investigates modelling of land surface – atmosphere interactions in context of fully coupled climatehydrological model. With a special focus of under what condition a fully coupled model system is needed. Regional climate model inter-comparison projects as ENSEMBLES have shown bias...

  1. Uncertainty and Its Description in Decision Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Various perspectives in uncertainty are briefly summarized in this paper, and the classification of uncertainties is discussed. The descriptions of different classes of uncertainty are also presented. Furthermore, a risk representation model for decision-making analysis is provided.

  2. Description of reference (model) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the workshop on Safeguards System design for a fuel fabrication plant, a generic example of a LEU bulk-handling facility that is based on the Exxon LWR fuel fabrication plants is used. The model plant information is given in the following separate sections: (1) process assumptions; (2) six-month material balance model; (3) measurements; (4) error parameters, measurements, and sigma MUF calculations; (5) material control areas; (6) accounting, records, and reports; (7) tamper-safing; and (8) measurement control program

  3. Titan atmospheric models intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, P.

    2008-09-01

    Several groups over the world have developed independently models of the photochemistry of Titan. The Cassini mission reveals daily that the chemical complexity is beyond our expectations e. g. observation of heavy positive and negative ions..., and the models are updated accordingly. At this stage, there is no consensus on the various input parameters, and it becomes increasingly difficult to compare outputs form different models. An ISSI team of experts of those models will be gathered shortly to proceed to an intercomparison, i.e. to assess how the models behave, given identical sets of inputs (collectively defined). Expected discrepancies will have to be elucidated and reduced. This intercomparison will also be an occasion to estimate explicitly the importance of various physicalchemical processes on model predictions versus observations. More robust and validated models are expected from this study for the interpretation of Titanrelated data.

  4. Towards reproducible descriptions of neuronal network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilen Nordlie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in science depends on the effective exchange of ideas among scientists. New ideas can be assessed and criticized in a meaningful manner only if they are formulated precisely. This applies to simulation studies as well as to experiments and theories. But after more than 50 years of neuronal network simulations, we still lack a clear and common understanding of the role of computational models in neuroscience as well as established practices for describing network models in publications. This hinders the critical evaluation of network models as well as their re-use. We analyze here 14 research papers proposing neuronal network models of different complexity and find widely varying approaches to model descriptions, with regard to both the means of description and the ordering and placement of material. We further observe great variation in the graphical representation of networks and the notation used in equations. Based on our observations, we propose a good model description practice, composed of guidelines for the organization of publications, a checklist for model descriptions, templates for tables presenting model structure, and guidelines for diagrams of networks. The main purpose of this good practice is to trigger a debate about the communication of neuronal network models in a manner comprehensible to humans, as opposed to machine-readable model description languages. We believe that the good model description practice proposed here, together with a number of other recent initiatives on data-, model-, and software-sharing, may lead to a deeper and more fruitful exchange of ideas among computational neuroscientists in years to come. We further hope that work on standardized ways of describing--and thinking about--complex neuronal networks will lead the scientific community to a clearer understanding of high-level concepts in network dynamics, and will thus lead to deeper insights into the function of the brain.

  5. Multiplicity description by gluon model

    CERN Document Server

    Kokoulina, E S

    2015-01-01

    Study of high multiplicity events in proton-proton interactions is carried out at the U-70 accelerator (IHEP, Protvino). These events are extremely rare. Usually, Monte Carlo codes underestimate topological cross sections in this region. The gluon dominance model (GDM) was offered to describe them. It is based on QCD and a phenomenological scheme of a hadronization stage. This model indicates a recombination mechanism of hadronization and a gluon fission. Future program of the SVD Collaboration is aimed at studying a long-standing puzzle of excess soft photon yield and its connection with high multiplicity at the U-70 and Nuclotron facility at JINR, Dubna.

  6. MARCS model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Plez, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    In this review presented at the Symposium A stellar journey in Uppsala, June 2008, I give my account of the historical development of the MARCS code from the first version published in 1975 and its premises to the 2008 grid. It is shown that the primary driver for the development team is the science that can be done with the models, and that they constantly strive to include the best possible physical data. A few preliminary comparisons of M star model spectra to spectrophotometric observations are presented. Particular results related to opacity effects are discussed. The size of errors in the spectral energy distribution (SED) and model thermal stratification are estimated for different densities of the wavelength sampling. The number of points used in the MARCS 2008 grid (108000) is large enough to ensure errors of only a few K in all models of the grid, except the optically very thin layers of metal-poor stars. Errors in SEDs may reach about 10% locally in the UV. The published sampled SEDs are thus appro...

  7. Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS): System description and user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, D. E., Jr.; Lee, T.

    1982-01-01

    This document presents the user's guide, system description, and mathematical specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS). It also includes a description of an optimal procedure for operational use of LAIRS. The primary objective of the LAIRS Program is to make it possible to obtain accurate estimates of atmospheric pressure, density, temperature, and winds along Shuttle reentry trajectories for use in postflight data reduction.

  8. Simulation of containment atmosphere stratification experiment using local instantaneous description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment on mixing and stratification in the atmosphere of a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions was simulated with the CFD code CFX4.4. The original experiment was performed in the TOSQAN experimental facility. Simulated nonhomogeneous temperature, species concentration and velocity fields are compared to experimental results. (author)

  9. Dynamic description logic model for data integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoshun HAO; Shilong MA; Yuefei SUI; Jianghua LV

    2008-01-01

    Data integration is the issue of retrieving and combining data residing at distributed and heterogeneous sources,and of providing users with transparent access without being aware of the details of the sources.Data integration is a very important issue because it deals with data infrastructure issues of coordinated computing systems.Despite its importance,the following key challenges make data integration one of the longest standing problems around:1) how to solve the system heterogeneity;2) how to build a global model;3) how to process queries automatically and correctly;and 4) how to solve semantic heterogeneity. This paper presents an extended dynamic description logic language to describe systems with dynamic actions.By this language,a-universal and unified model for relational database systems and a model for data integration are presented.This paper presents a universal and unified description logic model for relational databases.The model is universal because any relational database system can be automatically transformed to the model;it is unified because it integrates three essential components of relational databases together:description logic knowledge bases modeling the relational data,atomic modalities modeling the atomic relational operations,and combined modalities modeling the combined relational operations-queries. Furthermore,a description logic model for data integration is proposed which contains four layers of ontologies.Based on the model,a solution for each key challenge is proposed:a universal model eliminates system heterogeneity;a novel global model including three ontologies is proposed with some important benefits;a query process mechanism is provided by which user queries can be decomposed to queries over the sources;and for solving the semantic heterogeneity,this paper provides a framework under which semantic relations can be expressed and inferred. In summary,this paper presents a dynamic knowledge base framework by an extended

  10. ARTEAM - Advanced ray tracing with earth atmospheric models

    OpenAIRE

    Kunz, G.J.; Moerman, M. M.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Ray Tracing with Earth Atmospheric Models (ARTEAM) aims at a description of the electro-optical propagation environment in the marine atmospheric surface layer. For given meteorological conditions, the model evaluates height- and range-resolved transmission losses, refraction and turbulence effects. These results are subsequently applied to an electro-optical sensor with given specifications to evaluate the effective range and performance of the sensor under the prevailing meteor...

  11. Modeling of atmospheric pollutant transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling is today a common tool for the evaluation of the environmental impact of atmospheric pollution events, for the design of air monitoring networks or for the calculation of pollutant concentrations in the ambient air. It is even necessary for the a priori evaluation of the consequences of a pollution plume. A large choice of atmospheric transfer codes exist but no ideal tool is available which allows to model all kinds of situations. The present day approach consists in combining different types of modeling according to the requested results and simulations. The CEA has a solid experience in this domain and has developed independent tools for the impact and safety studies relative to industrial facilities and to the management of crisis situations. (J.S.)

  12. A Global Atmospheric Model of Meteoric Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Hoffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+ concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  13. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  14. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  15. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a...... eigenfunctions and estimates of the distributions of the corresponding expansion coefficients. The simulation method utilizes the eigenfunction expansion procedure to produce preliminary time histories of the three velocity components simultaneously. As a final step, a spectral shaping procedure is then applied....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence....

  16. Model description and evaluation of model performance: DOSDIM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOSDIM was developed to assess the impact to man from routine and accidental atmospheric releases. It is a compartmental, deterministic, radiological model. For an accidental release, dynamic transfer are used in opposition to a routine release for which equilibrium transfer factors are used. Parameters values were chosen to be conservative. Transfer between compartments are described by first-order differential equations. 2 figs

  17. Chiral Cosmological Models: Dark Sector Fields Description

    CERN Document Server

    Chervon, S V

    2014-01-01

    The present review is devoted to a Chiral Cosmological Model as the self-gravitating nonlinear sigma model with the potential of (self)interactions employed in cosmology. The chiral cosmological model has successive applications in descriptions of the inflationary epoch of the Universe evolution; the present accelerated expansion of the Universe also can be described by the chiral fields multiplet as the dark energy in wide sense. To be more illustrative we are often addressed to the two-component chiral cosmological model. Namely, the two-component chiral cosmological model describing the phantom field with interaction to a canonical scalar field is analyzed in details. New generalized model of quintom character is proposed and exact solutions are founded out. In the review we represented the perturbation theory for chiral cosmological model with the aim to describe the structure formation using the progress achieved in the inflation theory. It was shown that cosmological perturbations from chiral fields can...

  18. Transport properties site descriptive model. Guidelines for evaluation and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a strategy for the development of Transport Properties Site Descriptive Models within the SKB Site Investigation programme. Similar reports have been produced for the other disciplines in the site descriptive modelling (Geology, Hydrogeology, Hydrogeochemistry, Rock mechanics, Thermal properties, and Surface ecosystems). These reports are intended to guide the site descriptive modelling, but also to provide the authorities with an overview of modelling work that will be performed. The site descriptive modelling of transport properties is presented in this report and in the associated 'Strategy for the use of laboratory methods in the site investigations programme for the transport properties of the rock', which describes laboratory measurements and data evaluations. Specifically, the objectives of the present report are to: Present a description that gives an overview of the strategy for developing Site Descriptive Models, and which sets the transport modelling into this general context. Provide a structure for developing Transport Properties Site Descriptive Models that facilitates efficient modelling and comparisons between different sites. Provide guidelines on specific modelling issues where methodological consistency is judged to be of special importance, or where there is no general consensus on the modelling approach. The objectives of the site descriptive modelling process and the resulting Transport Properties Site Descriptive Models are to: Provide transport parameters for Safety Assessment. Describe the geoscientific basis for the transport model, including the qualitative and quantitative data that are of importance for the assessment of uncertainties and confidence in the transport description, and for the understanding of the processes at the sites. Provide transport parameters for use within other discipline-specific programmes. Contribute to the integrated evaluation of the investigated sites. The site descriptive modelling of

  19. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  20. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  1. Improving practical atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new generation of practical atmospheric dispersion model (for short range ≤ 30 km) are based on dispersion science and boundary layer meteorology which have widespread international acceptance. In addition, recent improvements in computer skills and the widespread availability of small powerful computers make it possible to have new regulatory models which are more complex than the previous generation which were based on charts and simple formulae. This paper describes the basis of these models and how they have developed. Such models are needed to satisfy the urgent public demand for sound, justifiable and consistent environmental decisions. For example, it is preferable that the same models are used to simulate dispersion in different industries; in many countries at present different models are used for emissions from nuclear and fossil fuel power stations. The models should not be so simple as to be suspect but neither should they be too complex for widespread use; for example, at public inquiries in Germany, where simple models are mandatory, it is becoming usual to cite the results from highly complex computational models because the simple models are not credible. This paper is written in a schematic style with an emphasis on tables and diagrams. (au) (22 refs.)

  2. Simpevarp - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    During 2002, SKB is starting detailed investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Simpevarp, which lies in the municipality of Oskarshamn, on the southeast coast of Sweden, about 250 kilometres south of Stockholm. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. SKB maintains two main databases at the present time, a site characterisation database called SICADA and a geographic information system called SKB GIS. The site descriptive model will be developed and presented with the aid of the SKB GIS capabilities, and with SKBs Rock Visualisation System (RVS), which is also linked to SICADA. The version 0 model forms an important framework for subsequent model versions, which are developed successively, as new information from the site investigations becomes available. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. In the case of Simpevarp, this is essentially the information which was compiled for the Oskarshamn feasibility study, which led to the choice of that area as a favourable object for further study, together with information collected since its completion. This information, with the exception of the extensive data base from the nearby Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. Against this background, the present report consists of the following components: an overview of the present content of the databases

  3. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Routine Releases from LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S R

    2006-09-27

    DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95% confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Groups of the International Atomic Energy Agency's programs, Biosphere Modeling and Assessment and Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

  4. Forsmark - site descriptive model version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    During 2002, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is starting investigations at two potential sites for a deep repository in the Precambrian basement of the Fennoscandian Shield. The present report concerns one of those sites, Forsmark, which lies in the municipality of Oesthammar, on the east coast of Sweden, about 150 kilometres north of Stockholm. The site description should present all collected data and interpreted parameters of importance for the overall scientific understanding of the site, for the technical design and environmental impact assessment of the deep repository, and for the assessment of long-term safety. The site description will have two main components: a written synthesis of the site, summarising the current state of knowledge, as documented in the databases containing the primary data from the site investigations, and one or several site descriptive models, in which the collected information is interpreted and presented in a form which can be used in numerical models for rock engineering, environmental impact and long-term safety assessments. The site descriptive models are devised and stepwise updated as the site investigations proceed. The point of departure for this process is the regional site descriptive model, version 0, which is the subject of the present report. Version 0 is developed out of the information available at the start of the site investigation. This information, with the exception of data from tunnels and drill holes at the sites of the Forsmark nuclear reactors and the underground low-middle active radioactive waste storage facility, SFR, is mainly 2D in nature (surface data), and is general and regional, rather than site-specific, in content. For this reason, the Forsmark site descriptive model, version 0, as detailed in the present report, has been developed at a regional scale. It covers a rectangular area, 15 km in a southwest-northeast and 11 km in a northwest-southeast direction, around the

  5. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Relesed to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Chronic Releases from LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2004-06-30

    DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95th percentile confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Biosphere Modeling and Assessment Programme. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

  6. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... variation by height is adopted. A particular problem for simulation studies with finite time steps is the construction of a reflection rule different from the rule of perfect reflection at the boundaries such that the rule complies with the imposed skewness of the velocity distribution for particle...... positions close to the boundaries. Different rules have been suggested in the literature with justifications based on simulation studies. Herein the relevant stochastic differential equation model is formulated in a particular way. The formulation is based on the marginal transformation of the position...

  7. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is Volume 3 of three volumes of documentation of the International Nuclear Model (INM). This volume presents the Program Description of the International Nuclear Model, which was developed for the Nuclear and Alternate Fuels Division (NAFD), Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decision based on an input set of technical economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. Companion volumes to Volume 3 are: Volume 1 - Model Overview, and Volume 2 - Data Base Relationships

  8. Description of atmospheric conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Arganda, E.; Arqueros Martínez, Fernando; García Pinto, Diego; Minaya Flores, Ignacio Andrés; Ortiz Ramis, Montserrat; Rosado Vélez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Au...

  9. Diffusive description of lattice gas models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated a lattice gas model consisting of repulsive particles following deterministic dynamics. Two versions of the model are studied. In one case a finite open system is considered in which particles can leave and enter the lattice over the edge. In the other case periodic boundary conditions are used. In both cases the density fluctuations exhibit a 1/f power spectrum. The individual particles behave asymptotically like ordinary random walkers. The collective behavior of these particles shows that due to the deterministic dynamics the particles behave as if they are correlated in time. The authors have numerically investigated the power spectrum of the density fluctuations, the lifetime distribution, and the spatial correlation function. The appropriate Langevin-like diffusion equation are discussed which can reproduce the numerical findings. The conclusion is that the deterministic lattice gases are described by a diffusion equation without any bulk noise. The open lattice gas exhibits a crossover behavior as the probability for introducing particles at the edge of the system becomes small. The power spectrum changes from a 1/f to a 1/f2 spectrum. The diffusive description, proven to be valid for a moderate boundary drive, fails altogether when the drive goes to zero. 25 refs., 13 figs

  10. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis. PMID:27505654

  11. Models of Pluto's upper atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best guesses as to the thermal structure and composition of Pluto's atmosphere have led to speculations of substantial loss rates (∼1028 s-1) of methane from the planet over cosmogonic time scales. Results from recent stellar occultation measurements, and using a Parker-type hydrodynamic calculation, show that the loss rates may actually be lower by as much as a factor ∼5, depending upon the efficiency of heating of the atmosphere via the absorption of solar EUV and upon the true atmospheric composition, if the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere is properly taken into account. The loss rate may even be less (by another factor ∼10) if there is minimal heating of the upper atmosphere

  12. ORACLE: a module for the description of ORganic Aerosol Composition and Evolution in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Tsimpidi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA partitioning and chemical aging has been developed and implemented into the EMAC atmospheric chemistry-climate model. The model simulates the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA from semi-volatile (SVOCs, intermediate-volatility (IVOCs and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The model distinguishes SVOCs from biomass burning and all other combustion sources using two surrogate species for each source category with an effective saturation concentration at 298 K of C* = 0.1 and 10 μg m−3. Two additional surrogate species with C* = 103 and 105 μg m−3 are used for the IVOCs emitted by the above two source categories. Gas-phase photochemical reactions that change the volatility of the organics are taken into account. The oxidation products (SOA-sv, SOA-iv, and SOA-v of each group of precursors (SVOCs, IVOCs, and VOCs are simulated separately in the module to keep track of their origin. ORACLE efficiently describes the OA composition and evolution in the atmosphere and can be used to (i estimate the relative contributions of SOA and primary organic aerosol (POA to total OA, (ii determine how SOA concentrations are affected by biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, and (iii evaluate the effects of photochemical aging and long-range transport on the OA budget. Here we estimate that the predicted domain-average global surface OA concentration is 1.5 μg m−3 and consists of 7% POA from fuel combustion, 11% POA from biomass burning, 2% SOA-sv from fuel combustion, 3% SOA-sv from biomass burning, 15% SOA-iv from fuel combustion, 28% SOA-iv from biomass burning, 19% biogenic SOA-v, and 15% anthropogenic SOA-v. The tropospheric burden of OA components is predicted to be 0.23 Tg POA, 0.16 Tg SOA-sv, 1.41 Tg SOA-iv, and 1.2 Tg SOA-v.

  13. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahlers, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Almela, A.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Nicolas /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  14. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F M; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Antičić, T; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badescu, A M; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Bardenet, R; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bäuml, J; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, B; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Diaz, J Chirinos; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; del Peral, L; del Río, M; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diep, P N; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Tapia, I Fajardo; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fratu, O; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Gaior, R; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Roca, S T Garcia; Garcia-Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gascon, A; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Guzman, A; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huber, D; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jarne, C; Jiraskova, S; Josebachuili, M; Kadija, K; Kampert, K H; Karhan, P; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kotera, K; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, J K; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; LaHurd, D; Latronico, L; Lauer, R; Lautridou, P; Coz, S Le; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, J; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurel, D; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Mertsch, P; Meurer, C; Mićanović, S; Micheletti, M I; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nhung, P T; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parra, A; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Porcelli, A; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivera, H; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santo, C E; Santos, E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F; Schulte, S; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Sigl, G; Lopez, H H Silva; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Srivastava, Y N; Stanic, S; Stapleton, J; Stasielak, J; Stephan, M; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Šuša, T; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Szuba, M; Tapia, A; Tartare, M; Taşcău, O; Ruiz, C G Tavera; Tcaciuc, R; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Toma, G; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weidenhaupt, K; Weindl, A; Werner, F; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Widom, A; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Williams, C; Winchen, T; Wommer, M; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Yapici, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zamorano, B; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Zhu, Y; Silva, M Zimbres; Ziolkowski, M; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2011.12.002

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malarg\\"ue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  15. San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model: Detailed model description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-03-01

    The San Joaquin - Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was originally developed for the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program to evaluate possible scenarios for long-term management of drainage and drainage - related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. A unique aspect of this model is its coupling of a surface water delivery and reservoir operations model with a regional groundwater model. The model also performs salinity balances along the tributaries and along the main stem of the San Joaquin River to allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. This document is a detailed description of the various subroutines, variables and parameters used in the model.

  16. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  17. Modelling the atmospheric chemistry of volcanic plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Surl, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Volcanoes are the principal way by which volatiles are transferred from the solid Earth to the atmosphere-hydrosphere system. Once released into the atmosphere, volcanic emissions rapidly undergo a complex series of chemical reactions. This thesis seeks to further the understanding of such processes by both observation and numerical modelling. I have adapted WRF-Chem to model passive degassing from Mount Etna, the chemistry of its plume, and its influence on the ...

  18. Chemical uncertainties in modeling hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebrard, Eric; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Most predictions and interpretations of observations in beyond our Solar System have occurred through the use of 1D photo-thermo-chemical models. Their predicted atmospheric compositions are highly dependent on model parameters. Chemical reactions are based on empirical parameters that must be known at temperatures ranging from 100 K to above 2500 K and at pressures from millibars to hundreds of bars. Obtained from experiments, calculations and educated-guessed estimations, these parameters are always evaluated with substantial uncertainties. However, although of practical use, few models of exoplanetary atmospheres have considered these underlying chemical uncertainties and their consequences. Recent progress has been made recently that allow us to (1) evaluate the accuracy and precision of 1D models of planetary atmospheres, with quantifiable uncertainties on their predictions for the atmospheric composition and associated spectral features, (2) identify the ‘key parameters’ that contribute the most to the models predictivity and should therefore require further experimental or theoretical analysis, (3) reduce and optimize complex chemical networks for their inclusion in multidimensional atmospheric models.First, a global sampling approach based on low discrepancy sequences has been applied in order to propose error bars on simulations of the atmospheres HD 209458b and HD 189733b, using a detailed kinetic model derived from applied combustion models that was methodically validated over a range of temperatures and pressures typical for these hot Jupiters. A two-parameters temperature-dependent uncertainty factor has been assigned to each considered rate constant. Second, a global sensitivity approach based on high dimensional model representations (HDMR) has been applied in order to identify those reactions which make the largest contributions to the overall uncertainty of the simulated results. The HDMR analysis has been restricted to the most important

  19. A contribution to the modelling of atmospheric corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of predicting the long term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of iron, the characteristics of the rust layer formed during this process and the mechanisms occurring inside the rust layer during a wet-dry cycle are considered. A first step in modelling the behaviour is proposed, based on the description of the cathodic reactions associated with iron oxidation: reduction of a part of the rust layer (lepidocrocite) and reduction of dissolved oxygen on the rust layer. The modelling, by including some composition and morphological data of the rust layer as parameters, is able to account for the metal damage after one Wet-Dry cycle. (authors)

  20. Adding Curvature to Minimum Description Length Shape Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling seeks a compact description of a set of shapes in terms of the coordinates of marks on the shapes. It has been shown that the mark positions resulting from this optimisation to a large extent solve the so-called point correspondence...

  1. Domain Endurants: An Analysis and Description Process Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørner, Dines

    2014-01-01

    We present a summary, Sect. 2, of a structure of domain analysis and description concepts: techniques and tools. And we link, in Sect. 3, these concepts, embodied in domain analysis prompts and domain description prompts, in a model of how a diligent domain analyser cum describer would use them. We...

  2. Scattering in Soliton Models and the Bosonic Exchange description

    OpenAIRE

    Coriano, Claudio; Parwani, Rajesh R.; YAMAGISHI, HIDENAGA; Zahed, Ismail

    1992-01-01

    We argue that the description of meson-nucleon dynamics based on the boson-exchange approach, is compatible with the description of the nucleon as a soliton in the nonrelativistic limit. Our arguments are based on an analysis of the meson-soliton form factor and the exact meson-soliton and soliton-soliton scattering amplitudes in the Sine-Gordon model.

  3. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year's work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals

  4. Description of atmospheric conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Nožka, Libor; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Schovánek, Petr; Šmída, R.; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 9 (2012), s. 591-607. ISSN 0927-6505 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002; GA AV ČR KJB100100904; GA AV ČR KJB300100801; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : cosmic rays * extensive air shower s * atmospheric monitoring * atmospheric models Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.777, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927650511002271

  5. Users of middle atmosphere models remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Joe

    1987-01-01

    The procedure followed for shuttle operations is to calculate descent trajectories for each potential shuttle landing site using the Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) to interactively compute density along the flight path 100 times to bound the statistics. The purpose is to analyze the flight dynamics, along with calculations of heat loads during reentry. The analysis program makes use of the modified version of the Jacchia-70 atmosphere, which includes He bulges over the poles and seasonal latitude variations at lower altitudes. For the troposphere, the 4-D Model is used up to 20 km, Groves from 30 km up to 90 km. It is extrapolated over the globe and faired into the Jacchia atmosphere between 90 and 115 km. Since data on the Southern Hemisphere was lacking, what was done was that the data was flipped over and lagged 6 months. Sometimes when winds are calculated from pressure data in the model there appear to be discontinuities. Modelers indicated that the GRAM was not designed to produce winds, but good wind data is needed for the landing phase of shuttle operations. Use of atmospheric models during reentry is one application where it is obvious that a single integrated atmosphere model is required.

  6. Diffusive description of lattice gas models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, T.; Jensen, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    boundary conditions. In both cases the density fluctuations exhibit a 1/f power spectrum. The individual particles behave asymptotically like ordinary random walkers. The collective behavior of these particles shows that due to the deterministic dynamics the particles behave as if they are correlated in...... time. We have numerically investigated the power spectrum of the density fluctuations, the lifetime distribution, and the spatial correlation function. We discuss the appropriate Langevin-like diffusion equation which can reproduce our numerical findings. Our conclusion is that the deterministic...... lattice gases are described by a diffusion equation without any bulk noise. The open lattice gas exhibits a crossover behavior as the probability for introducing particles at the edge of the system becomes small. The power spectrum changes from a 1/f to a 1/f2 spectrum. The diffusive description, proven...

  7. Local scale plume model for nitrogen oxides. Model description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, C.; Funkquist, L.

    1984-09-01

    A plume dispersion model on local scale (0 to approximately 20 km) including atmospheric chemistry for nitrogen is developed. The purpose of the study is to obtain a practical air quality model wich can be used in environmental planning for eg coal fired power plants. Problems concerning both high concentrations of NO/sub 2/ in the air and deposition of different nitrogen compounds to the ground is considered. The instantaneous plume dilution is described - assuming total mixing within the plume - as a function of emission parameters and meteorological conditions. The interplay of emissions, instantaneous plume dilution, entrainment of polluted ambient air, meteorological conditions and atmospheric chemistry processes determines production or loss of the different compounds. On a local scale only six chemical reactions need to be included. On a somewhat larger scale the number of reactions needed increases substantially. For the numerical solution we have used the method by Gear. In order to obtain hourly mean values of different nitrogen oxides and long-term deposition values conventional Gaussian respectively K-formulation procedures are used. Meteorological input data are obtained from climatological observations and also generated by a boundery layer model. From the results it is obvious that the meteorological conditions and the ambient ozone concentration are of great importance for the relative amount of NO/sub 2/ in the plume. On a local geographical scale the plume chemistry is diffusion controlled. (Author).

  8. STAMPI, Application to the Coupling of Atmosphere Model (MM5) and Land-surface Model (SOLVEG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of program or function: A new method to couple atmosphere and land-surface models using the message passing interface (MPI) was proposed to develop an atmosphere-land model for studies on heat, water, and material exchanges around the land surface. A non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamic model of Pennsylvania State University and National Center for Atmospheric Research (PUS/NCAR-MM5) and a detailed land surface model (SOLVEG) including the surface-layer atmosphere, soil, and vegetation developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) are used as the atmosphere and land-surface models, respectively. Concerning the MPI, a message passing library named STAMPI developed at JAERI that can be used between different parallel computers is used. The models are coupled by exchanging calculation results by using MPI on their independent parallel calculations. The modifications for this model coupling are easy, simply adding some modules for data exchanges to each model code without changing each model's original structure. Moreover, this coupling method is flexible and allows the use of independent time step and grid interval for each model

  9. New atmospheric model of Epsilon Eridani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieytes, Mariela; Fontenla, Juan; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    We present a new semi-empirical model of the atmosphere of the widely studied K-dwarf Epsilon Eridani (HD 22049). The model is build to reproduce the visible spectral observations from 3800 to 6800 Angstrom and the h and k Mg II lines profiles. The computations were carried out using the Solar-Stellar Radiation Physical Modeling (SSRPM) tools, which calculate non-LTE population for the most important species in the stellar atmosphere. We show a comparison between the synthetic and observed spectrum, obtaining a good agreement in all the studied spectral range.

  10. The FAMOUS climate model (versions XFXWB and XFHCC): description update to version XDBUA

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R S

    2012-01-01

    FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, based on version 4.5 of the UK MetOffice Unified Model. Here we update the model description to account for changes in the model as it is used in the CMIP5 EMIC model intercomparison project (EMICmip) and a number of other studies. Most of these changes correct errors found in the code. The EMICmip version of the model (XFXWB) has a better-conserved water budget and additional c...

  11. The FAMOUS climate model (versions XFXWB and XFHCC): description update to version XDBUA

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R S

    2011-01-01

    FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, based on version 4.5 of the UK MetOffice Unified Model. Here we update the model description to account for changes in the model as it is used in the CMIP5 EMIC model intercomparison project (EMICmip) and a number of other studies. Most of these changes correct errors found in the code. The EMICmip version of the model (XFXWB) has a better-conserved water budget and additional cooling in some high latitude areas,...

  12. The study of prescriptive and descriptive models of decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok A Divekar; Sunita Bangal; Sumangala D.

    2012-01-01

    The field of decision making can be loosely divided into two parts: the study of prescriptive models and the study of descriptive models. Prescriptive decision scientists are concerned with prescribing methods for making optimal decisions. Descriptive decision researchers are concerned with the bounded way in which the decisions are actually made. The statistics courses treat risk from a prescriptive, by suggesting rational methods. This paper brings out the work done by many researchers by e...

  13. Coupled atmosphere-wildland fire modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Henri Balbi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the interaction between fire and atmosphere is critical to the estimation of the rate of spread of the fire. Wildfire’s convection (i.e., entire plume can modify the local meteorology throughout the atmospheric boundary layer and consequently affect the fire propagation speed and behaviour. In this study, we use for the first time the Méso-NH meso-scale numerical model coupled to the point functional ForeFire simplified physical front-tracking wildfire model to investigate the differences introduced by the atmospheric feedback in propagation speed and behaviour. Both numerical models have been developed as research tools for operational models and are currently used to forecast localized extreme events. These models have been selected because they can be run coupled and support decisions in wildfire management in France and Europe. The main originalities of this combination reside in the fact that Méso-NH is run in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES configuration and that the rate of spread model used in ForeFire provides a physical formulation to take into account the effect of wind and slope. Simulations of typical experimental configurations show that the numerical atmospheric model is able to reproduce plausible convective effects of the heat produced by the fire. Numerical results are comparable to estimated values for fire-induced winds and present behaviour similar to other existing numerical approaches.

  14. Matrix model description of baryonic deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bena, Iosif; Murayama, Hitoshi; Roiban, Radu; Tatar, Radu

    2003-03-13

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} + 1 flavors using an extension of the recently proposed relation between gauge theories and matrix models.The impressive agreement between the two sides provides a beautiful confirmation of the extension of the gauge theory-matrix model relation to this case.

  15. Architecture Descriptions. A Contribution to Modeling of Production System Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Allan Dam; Hvam, Lars

    operational design and handling of production system architecture, research is conducted into the description of production system architecture, including what an architecture description contains in general and what it should describe for production systems specifically. The contribution in this area of...... research consists of three parts. First, a conceptual model of architecture descriptions is established based on the ISO/IEC/IEEE 42010 standard. Secondly, the stakeholders and architecture related concerns of relevance for descriptions of production system architectures are investigated, and requirements......The subject of this PhD dissertation is architecture-centric design and the description of production system architecture. Companies are facing demands for the development and production of new products at an ever increasing rate, as the market life of products decreases and the rate at which...

  16. Atmospheric neutrino flux calculation using the NRLMSISE00 atmospheric model

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, M; Kajita, T; Kasahara, K; Midorikawa, S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux~\\cite{hkkm2004,hkkms2006,hkkm2011} to the sites in polar and tropical regions. In our earliest full 3D-calculation~\\cite{hkkm2004}, we used DPMJET-III~\\cite{dpm} for the hadronic interaction model above 5~GeV, and NUCRIN~\\cite{nucrin} below 5~GeV. We modified DPMJET-III as in Ref.~\\cite{hkkms2006} to reproduce the experimental muon spectra better, mainly using the data observed by BESS group~\\cite{BESSTeVpHemu}. In a recent work~\\cite{hkkm2011}, we introduced JAM interaction model for the low energy hadronic interactions. JAM is a nuclear interaction model developed with PHITS (Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System)~\\cite{phits}. In Ref.~\\cite{hkkm2011}, we could reproduce the observed muon flux at the low energies at balloon altitude with DPMJET-III above 32 GeV and JAM below that better than the combination of DPMJET-III above 5~GeV and NUCRIN below that. Besides the interaction model, we have also improved the calculation sche...

  17. Portable University Model of the Atmosphere (PUMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraedrich, K.; Kirk, E.; Lunkeit, F. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.

    1998-10-01

    The Portable University Model of the Atmosphere (PUMA) is based on the Reading multi-level spectral model SGCM (Simple Global Circulation Model) described by Hoskins and Simmons (1975) and James and Gray (1986). Originally developed as a numerical prediction model, it was changed to perform as a circulation model. For example, James and Gray (1986) studied the influence of surface friction on the circulation of a baroclinic atmosphere, James and James (1992), and James et al. (1994) investigated ultra-low-frequency variability, and Mole and James (1990) analyzed the baroclinic adjustment in the context of a zonally varying flow. Frisius et al. (1998) simulated an idealized storm track by embedding a dipole structure in a zonally symmetric forcing field and Lunkeit et al. (1998) investigated the sensitivity of GCM (General Circulation Model) scenarios by an adaption technique applicapable to SGCMs. (orig.)

  18. Coupling approaches used in atmospheric entry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    While a planet orbits the Sun, it is subject to impact by smaller objects, ranging from tiny dust particles and space debris to much larger asteroids and comets. Such collisions have taken place frequently over geological time and played an important role in the evolution of planets and the development of life on the Earth. Though the search for near-Earth objects addresses one of the main points of the Asteroid and Comet Hazard, one should not underestimate the useful information to be gleaned from smaller atmospheric encounters, known as meteors or fireballs. Not only do these events help determine the linkages between meteorites and their parent bodies; due to their relative regularity they provide a good statistical basis for analysis. For successful cases with found meteorites, the detailed atmospheric path record is an excellent tool to test and improve existing entry models assuring the robustness of their implementation. There are many more important scientific questions meteoroids help us to answer, among them: Where do these objects come from, what are their origins, physical properties and chemical composition? What are the shapes and bulk densities of the space objects which fully ablate in an atmosphere and do not reach the planetary surface? Which values are directly measured and which are initially assumed as input to various models? How to couple both fragmentation and ablation effects in the model, taking real size distribution of fragments into account? How to specify and speed up the recovery of a recently fallen meteorites, not letting weathering to affect samples too much? How big is the pre-atmospheric projectile to terminal body ratio in terms of their mass/volume? Which exact parameters beside initial mass define this ratio? More generally, how entering object affects Earth's atmosphere and (if applicable) Earth's surface? How to predict these impact consequences based on atmospheric trajectory data? How to describe atmospheric entry

  19. Radiation environment models and the atmospheric cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradi, Andrei; Hardy, Alva C.; Atwell, William

    1987-01-01

    The limitations of radiation environment models are examined by applying the model to the South Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The local magnetic-field-intensity (in gauss) and McIlwain (1961) drift-shell-parameter contours in the SAA are analyzed. It is noted that it is necessary to decouple the atmospheric absorption effects from the trapped radiation models in order to obtain accurate radiation dose predictions. Two methods for obtaining more accurate results are proposed.

  20. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository

  1. ATMOSPHERIC HEALTH EFFECTS FRAMEWORK (AHEF) MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework (AHEF) is used to assess theglobal impacts of substitutes for ozone-depleting substances (ODS). The AHEF is a series of FORTRAN modeling modules that collectively form a simulation framework for (a) translating ODS production into emi...

  2. Description of the RIVM/KNMI PUFF dispersion model

    OpenAIRE

    Verver GHL; de Leeuw FAAM; van Rheineck Leyssius HJ

    1990-01-01

    In this report an atmospheric transport model (the RIVM/KNMI PUFF- model) is described. The model is intended for operational use at KNMI and RIVM in case of an accidental release of (toxic or radioactive) gases or particles into the atmosphere. In its operational version the model area will cover most of Europe. The main processes accounted for in the model are: relative diffusion by wind shear and turbulence, advection as a function of space and time, the diurnal cycle of boundary layer hei...

  3. The improved sequential puff model for atmospheric dispersion evaluation (SPADE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes the improved version of the Sequential Puff for Atmospheric Dispersion Evaluation Model (SPADE), developed at EKEA-DISP as a component of ARIES (Atmospheric Release Impact Evaluation System). SPADE has been originally designed for real time assessment of the consequences of a nuclear release into the atmosphere, but it is also suited for sensitivity studies, investigations, or routine applications. It can estimate ground-level air concentrations, deposition and cloud γ dose rate in flat or gently rolling terrain in the vicinity of a point source. During the last years several aspects of the modelling of dispersion processes have been improved, and new modules have been implemented in SPADE. In the first part of the report, a general description of the model is given, and the assumptions and parameterizations used to simulate the main physical processes are described. The second part concerns with the structure of the computer code and of input and output files, and can be regarded as a user's guide to the model. (author)

  4. Atmospheric statistical dynamic models. Model performance: the Lawrence Livermore Laboratoy Zonal Atmospheric Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from the zonal model indicate quite reasonable agreement with observation in terms of the parameters and processes that influence the radiation and energy balance calculations. The model produces zonal statistics similar to those from general circulation models, and has also been shown to produce similar responses in sensitivity studies. Further studies of model performance are planned, including: comparison with July data; comparison of temperature and moisture transport and wind fields for winter and summer months; and a tabulation of atmospheric energetics. Based on these preliminary performance studies, however, it appears that the zonal model can be used in conjunction with more complex models to help unravel the problems of understanding the processes governing present climate and climate change. As can be seen in the subsequent paper on model sensitivity studies, in addition to reduced cost of computation, the zonal model facilitates analysis of feedback mechanisms and simplifies analysis of the interactions between processes

  5. Fluctuation Theorem in an Atmospheric Circulation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Schalge, Bernd; Wouters, Jeroen; Fraedrich, Klaus; Lunkeit, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the validity of the Fluctuation Theorem (FT) in an atmospheric Global Circulation Model is found. The model is hydrostatic with variable numbers of vertical levels and different horizontal resolutions. For finite time intervals the largest local Lyapunov exponent (LLLE) is found to be negative consistent with predictions of the FT. The effect is present for resolutions up to wave numbers l=42 (~ 250km) and 10 levels.

  6. PENGARUH LIVE MODEL, SYMBOLIC MODEL, DAN VERBAL DESCRIPTION MODEL TERHADAP PEMAHAMAN SISWA SMA TENTANG KONSEP SOSIOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Suprijono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Influence Of Live Model, Symbolic Model, and Verbal Description Model On Senior High School Students’ Understanding of Sociological Concepts. This study was aimed at investigat­ing how live, symbolic, and verbal description models relate to students’ understanding of sociological concepts. Cor­relational research design, involving 43 students, was employed in the study. The results show the highly significant influence of live, symbolic, and verbal description models on the students’ under­standing of sociological concepts (F= 39.891, p=0.001. Furher computation of each variable, however, demonstrates that live model has stronger correlation to the students’ understanding of socio­logical concepts than the other models (live model, r = 0.544, symbolic model, r = 0.375, verbal decrip­tion model, r = 0.475.

  7. The study of prescriptive and descriptive models of decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok A Divekar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The field of decision making can be loosely divided into two parts: the study of prescriptive models and the study of descriptive models. Prescriptive decision scientists are concerned with prescribing methods for making optimal decisions. Descriptive decision researchers are concerned with the bounded way in which the decisions are actually made. The statistics courses treat risk from a prescriptive, by suggesting rational methods. This paper brings out the work done by many researchers by examining the psychological factors that explain how managers deviate from rationality in responding to uncertainty.

  8. Minimum Description Length Principle for Maximum Entropy Model Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    Model selection is central to statistics, and many learning problems can be formulated as model selection problems. In this paper, we treat the problem of selecting a maximum entropy model given various feature subsets and their moments, as a model selection problem, and present a minimum description length (MDL) formulation to solve this problem. For this, we derive normalized maximum likelihood (NML) codelength for these models. Furthermore, we prove that the minimax entropy principle is a special case of maximum entropy model selection, where one assumes that complexity of all the models are equal. We apply our approach to gene selection problem and present simulation results.

  9. Regional transport model of atmospheric sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) Design Project, a regional transport model of atmospheric sulfates has been developed. This quasi-Lagrangian three-dimensional grid numerical model uses a detailed SO2 emission inventory of major anthropogenic sources in the Eastern U.S. region, and observed meteorological data during an episode as inputs. The model accounts for advective transport and turbulent diffusion of the pollutants. The chemical transformation of SO2 and SO4/sup =/ and the deposition of the species at the earth's surface are assumed to be linear processes at specified constant rates. The numerical model can predict the daily average concentrations of SO2 and SO4/sup =/ at all receptor locations in the grid region during the episode. Because of the spatial resolution of the grid, this model is particularly suited to investigate the effect of tall stacks in reducing the ambient concentration levels of sulfur pollutants. This paper presents the formulations and assumptions of the regional sulfate transport model. The model inputs and results are discussed. Isopleths of predicted SO2 and SO4/sup =/ concentrations are compared with the observed ground level values. The bulk of the information in this paper is directed to air pollution meteorologists and environmental engineers interested in the atmospheric transport modeling studies of sulfur oxide pollutants

  10. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz; Amouroux, Charlotte; Schmitt, C.

    2015-01-01

    The GEF (" GEneral description of Fission observables ") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barrie...

  11. Quality Assurance Based on Descriptive and Parsimonious Appearance Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Kristensen, Rasmus Lyngby; Wilm, Jakob; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Conradsen, Knut; Aanæs, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this positional paper, we discuss the potential benefits of using appearance models in additive manufacturing, metal casting, wind turbine blade production, and 3D content acquisition. Current state of the art in acquisition and rendering of appearance cannot easily be used for quality assurance in these areas. The common denominator is the need for descriptive and parsimonious appearance models. By ‘parsimonious’ we mean with few parameters so that a model is useful both for fast acquisit...

  12. An alternative model for the description of computational estimation strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Hernández, Carlos de; Segovia Álex, Isidoro; Castro Martínez, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    In this study we have analyzed the estimation strategies employed by preservice elementary teachers. It has been used an alternative model for the description of computational estimation strategies. In this model, strategies are integrated by approximation skills, mental computation algorithms, cognitive processes (reformulation, translation and compensation) and metacognitive processes (as the assessment of the outcome). The adoption of this model allows making the identification and charact...

  13. Web Service Description and Discovery Based on Semantic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xuemei; XU Lizhen; DONG Yisheng; WANG Yongli

    2006-01-01

    A novel semantic model of Web service description and discovery was proposed through an extension for profile model of Web ontology language for services (OWL-S) in this paper.Similarity matching of Web services was implemented through computing weighted summation of semantic similarity value based on specific domain ontology and dynamical satisfy extent evaluation for quality of service (QoS).Experiments show that the provided semantic matching model is efficient.

  14. On the thermally stratified atmospheric flow modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládek, Ivo; Kozel, K.; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    Praha : Ústav termomechaniky, AV ČR, v. v. i., 2010 - (Příhoda, J.; Kozel, K.), s. 135-138 ISBN 978-80-87012-25-3. [Topical Problems of Fluid Mechanics 2010. Praha (CZ), 10.02.2010-11.02.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : atmospheric boundary layer * turbulence model * finite volume method Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  15. Centrifuge modeling of soil atmosphere interaction

    OpenAIRE

    CAICEDO, B; TRISTANCHO, J; THOREL, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Atmosphere process of infiltration or evaporation affect the behavior of geotechnical structures located near the soil surface. This paper focuses on the drying process of soils due to evaporation. The scaling laws are analyzed and afterwards the results on applying two cycles of heating and cooling on a soil mass are presented. Based on these results, conclusions about the feasibility of reproducing evaporation on centrifuge models are recommended.

  16. How realistic are solar model atmospheres?

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Tiago M D; Collet, Remo; Thaler, Irina; Trampedach, Regner; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2013-01-01

    Recently, new solar model atmospheres have been developed to replace classical 1D LTE hydrostatic models and used to for example derive the solar chemical composition. We aim to test various models against key observational constraints. In particular, a 3D model used to derive the solar abundances, a 3D MHD model (with an imposed 10 mT vertical magnetic field), 1D models from the PHOENIX project, the 1D MARCS model, and the 1D semi-empirical model of Holweger & M\\"uller. We confront the models with observational diagnostics of the temperature profile: continuum centre-to-limb variations (CLV), absolute continuum fluxes, and the wings of hydrogen lines. We also test the 3D models for the intensity distribution of the granulation and spectral line shapes. The predictions from the 3D model are in excellent agreement with the continuum CLV observations, performing even better than the Holweger & M\\"uller model (constructed largely to fulfil such observations). The predictions of the 1D theoretical models ...

  17. Observations and Modeling of Tropical Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraia, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is a comprised of three different projects within the topic of tropical atmospheric dynamics. First, I analyze observations of thermal radiation from Saturn's atmosphere and from them, determine the latitudinal distribution of ammonia vapor near the 1.5-bar pressure level. The most prominent feature of the observations is the high brightness temperature of Saturn's subtropical latitudes on either side of the equator. After comparing the observations to a microwave radiative transfer model, I find that these subtropical bands require very low ammonia relative humidity below the ammonia cloud layer in order to achieve the high brightness temperatures observed. We suggest that these bright subtropical bands represent dry zones created by a meridionally overturning circulation. Second, I use a dry atmospheric general circulation model to study equatorial superrotation in terrestrial atmospheres. A wide range of atmospheres are simulated by varying three parameters: the pole-equator radiative equilibrium temperature contrast, the convective lapse rate, and the planetary rotation rate. A scaling theory is developed that establishes conditions under which superrotation occurs in terrestrial atmospheres. The scaling arguments show that superrotation is favored when the off-equatorial baroclinicity and planetary rotation rates are low. Similarly, superrotation is favored when the convective heating strengthens, which may account for the superrotation seen in extreme global-warming simulations. Third, I use a moist slab-ocean general circulation model to study the impact of a zonally-symmetric continent on the distribution of monsoonal precipitation. I show that adding a hemispheric asymmetry in surface heat capacity is sufficient to cause symmetry breaking in both the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. This spatial symmetry breaking can be understood from a large-scale energetic perspective, while the temporal symmetry breaking requires

  18. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year's work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals

  19. Organization model and formalized description of nuclear enterprise information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organization model is one of the most important models of Nuclear Enterprise Information System (NEIS). Scientific and reasonable organization model is the prerequisite that NEIS has robustness and extendibility, and is also the foundation of the integration of heterogeneous system. Firstly, the paper describes the conceptual model of the NEIS on ontology chart, which provides a consistent semantic framework of organization. Then it discusses the relations between the concepts in detail. Finally, it gives the formalized description of the organization model of NEIS based on six-tuple array. (authors)

  20. Atmospheric dispersion modeling of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of a nuclear accident, which could lead to release of radioactive contaminants, fastest countermeasures are needed, relating to sheltering, iodine distribution, evacuation and interdiction of food and water consumption. All these decisions should be based either on estimation of inhaled dose and the dose due to external exposure for public or on the estimation of radioactive concentration in food (which will depend on the radioactive concentration in air and ground deposition). In order to perform any of these calculations of consequences in case of nuclear accident, which leads to release of radioactive contaminants in the atmosphere, we must start with atmospheric dispersion calculations. In the last few years, considerable efforts have been devoted in order to improve computer codes for dispersion in the atmosphere of the radioactive contaminants released in a nuclear accident. The paper presents the model used in computer codes for assessment of nuclear accident consequences and a special attention was paid to the dispersion model used in the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti. The values for the used parameters and the results for air and ground concentration are also presented. (authors)

  1. Gray-box modelling approach for description of storage tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul; Carstensen, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a storage tunnel is examined using a model based on on-line measured data and a combination of simple deterministic and black-box stochastic elements. This approach, called gray-box modeling, is a new promising methodology for giving an on-line state description of sewer systems. ...... and implemented in a SCADA system because the most important information on the specific system is provided on-line......The dynamics of a storage tunnel is examined using a model based on on-line measured data and a combination of simple deterministic and black-box stochastic elements. This approach, called gray-box modeling, is a new promising methodology for giving an on-line state description of sewer systems...

  2. Atmospheric corrosion: statistical validation of models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss two different methods for validation of regression models, applied to corrosion data. One of them is based on the correlation coefficient and the other one is the statistical test of lack of fit. Both methods are used here to analyse fitting of bi logarithmic model in order to predict corrosion for very low carbon steel substrates in rural and urban-industrial atmospheres in Uruguay. Results for parameters A and n of the bi logarithmic model are reported here. For this purpose, all repeated values were used instead of using average values as usual. Modelling is carried out using experimental data corresponding to steel substrates under the same initial meteorological conditions ( in fact, they are put in the rack at the same time). Results of correlation coefficient are compared with the lack of it tested at two different signification levels (α=0.01 and α=0.05). Unexpected differences between them are explained and finally, it is possible to conclude, at least in the studied atmospheres, that the bi logarithmic model does not fit properly the experimental data. (Author) 18 refs

  3. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  4. Application of data mining in beam status descriptive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cluster analysis is an effective method for describing colony character. However, as the size of mined databases increased, it is a complex problem in searching for the extremum of score function. The authors propose a novel technique and apply it in beam current descriptive modeling. Author's experiments show that the method is quick and efficient. As reproducibility is an important specific of a storage ring, the clustering model is helpful for machine study and decision-making. (authors)

  5. The FAMOUS climate model (versions XFXWB and XFHCC: description update to version XDBUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Smith

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, based on version 4.5 of the UK MetOffice Unified Model. Here we update the model description to account for changes in the model as it is used in the CMIP5 EMIC model intercomparison project (EMICmip and a number of other studies. Most of these changes correct errors found in the code. The EMICmip version of the model (XFXWB has a better-conserved water budget and additional cooling in some high latitude areas, but otherwise has a similar climatology to previous versions of FAMOUS. A variant of XFXWB is also described, with changes to the dynamics at the top of the model which improve the model climatology (XFHCC.

  6. CIDGA - Coupling of Interior Dynamic models with Global Atmosphere models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2010-05-01

    Atmosphere temperatures and in particular the surface temperatures mostly depend on the solar heat flux and the atmospheric composition. The latter can be influenced by interior processes of the planet, i.e. volcanism that releases greenhouse gases such as H2O, CO2 and methane into the atmosphere and plate tectonics through which atmospheric CO2 is recycled via carbonates into the mantle. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere results in an increase of the surface temperature. Changes in the surface temperature on the other hand may influence the cooling behaviour of the planet and hence influence its volcanic activity [Phillips et al., 2001]. This feedback relation between mantle convection and atmosphere is not very well understood, since until now mostly either the interior dynamic of a planet or its atmosphere was investigated separately. 2D or 3D mantle convection models to the authors' knowledge haven't been coupled to the atmosphere so far. We have used the 3D spherical simulation code GAIA [Hüttig et al., 2008] including partial melt production and coupled it with the atmosphere module CIDGA using a gray greenhouse model for varying H2O concentrations. This way, not only the influence of mantle dynamics on the atmosphere can be investigated, but also the recoupling effect, that the surface temperature has on the mantle dynamics. So far, we consider one-plate planets without crustal and thus volatile recycling. Phillips et al. [2001] already investigated the coupling effect of the surface temperature on mantle dynamics by using simple parameterized convection models for Venus. In their model a positive feedback mechanism has been observed, i.e., an increase of the surface temperature leads to an increase of partial melt and hence an increase of atmosphere density and surface temperature. Applying our model to Venus, we show that an increase of surface temperature leads not only to an increase of partial melt in the mantle; it also

  7. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana [Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, V Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Pop, Nicolina [Department of Physical Foundations of Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara, V Parvan 2, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Calinoiu, Delia [Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Politehnica University of Timisoara, Mihai Viteazu 1, 300222 Timisoara (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  8. Supermodeling With A Global Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerinck, Wim; Burgers, Willem; Selten, Frank

    2013-04-01

    In weather and climate prediction studies it often turns out to be the case that the multi-model ensemble mean prediction has the best prediction skill scores. One possible explanation is that the major part of the model error is random and is averaged out in the ensemble mean. In the standard multi-model ensemble approach, the models are integrated in time independently and the predicted states are combined a posteriori. Recently an alternative ensemble prediction approach has been proposed in which the models exchange information during the simulation and synchronize on a common solution that is closer to the truth than any of the individual model solutions in the standard multi-model ensemble approach or a weighted average of these. This approach is called the super modeling approach (SUMO). The potential of the SUMO approach has been demonstrated in the context of simple, low-order, chaotic dynamical systems. The information exchange takes the form of linear nudging terms in the dynamical equations that nudge the solution of each model to the solution of all other models in the ensemble. With a suitable choice of the connection strengths the models synchronize on a common solution that is indeed closer to the true system than any of the individual model solutions without nudging. This approach is called connected SUMO. An alternative approach is to integrate a weighted averaged model, weighted SUMO. At each time step all models in the ensemble calculate the tendency, these tendencies are weighted averaged and the state is integrated one time step into the future with this weighted averaged tendency. It was shown that in case the connected SUMO synchronizes perfectly, the connected SUMO follows the weighted averaged trajectory and both approaches yield the same solution. In this study we pioneer both approaches in the context of a global, quasi-geostrophic, three-level atmosphere model that is capable of simulating quite realistically the extra

  9. Confidence assessment. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Laxemar). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface-based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. Procedures for this assessment have been progressively refined during the course of the site descriptive modelling, and applied to all previous versions of the Forsmark and Laxemar site descriptive models. They include assessment of whether all relevant data have been considered and understood, identification of the main uncertainties and their causes, possible alternative models and their handling, and consistency between disciplines. The assessment then forms the basis for an overall confidence statement. The confidence in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface based site investigations, has been assessed by exploring: - Confidence in the site characterization data base, - remaining issues and their handling, - handling of alternatives, - consistency between disciplines and - main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. Generally, the site investigation database is of high quality, as assured by the quality procedures applied. It is judged that the Laxemar site descriptive model has an overall high level of confidence. Because of the relatively robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in the Laxemar Site Descriptive model is judged to be high, even though details of the spatial variability remain unknown. The overall reason for this confidence is the wide spatial distribution of the data and the consistency between

  10. Confidence assessment. Site-descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Laxemar). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface-based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. Procedures for this assessment have been progressively refined during the course of the site descriptive modelling, and applied to all previous versions of the Forsmark and Laxemar site descriptive models. They include assessment of whether all relevant data have been considered and understood, identification of the main uncertainties and their causes, possible alternative models and their handling, and consistency between disciplines. The assessment then forms the basis for an overall confidence statement. The confidence in the Laxemar site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface based site investigations, has been assessed by exploring: - Confidence in the site characterization data base, - remaining issues and their handling, - handling of alternatives, - consistency between disciplines and - main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. Generally, the site investigation database is of high quality, as assured by the quality procedures applied. It is judged that the Laxemar site descriptive model has an overall high level of confidence. Because of the relatively robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in the Laxemar Site Descriptive model is judged to be high, even though details of the spatial variability remain unknown. The overall reason for this confidence is the wide spatial distribution of the data and the consistency between

  11. The Risoe model for calculating the consequences of the release of radioactive material to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description is given of the model used at Risoe for calculating the consequences of releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere. The model is based on the Gaussian plume model, and it provides possibilities for calculation of: doses to individuals, collective doses, contamination of the ground, probability distribution of doses, and the consequences of doses for give dose-risk relationships. The model is implemented as a computer program PLUCON2, written in ALGOL for the Burroughs B6700 computer at Risoe. A short description of PLUCON2 is given. (author)

  12. Numerical modeling of atmospheric washout processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the washout of particles from the atmosphere by clouds and rain one has to distinguish between processes which work in the first phase of cloud development, when condensation nuclei build up in saturated air (Nucleation Aerosol Scavenging, NAS) and those processes which work at the following cloud development. In the second case particles are taken off by cloud droplets or by falling rain drops via collision (Collision Aerosol Scavenging, CAS). The physics of both processes is described. For the CAS process a numerical model is presented. The report contains a documentation of the mathematical equations and the computer programs (FORTRAN). (KW)

  13. Analysis of software for modeling atmospheric dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During last few years, a number software packages for microcomputes have appeared with the aim to simulate diffusion of atmospheric pollutants. These codes, simplifying the models used for safety analyses of industrial plants are becoming more useful, and are even used for post-accidental conditions. The report presents for the first time in a critical manner, principal models available up to this date. The problem arises in adapting the models to the demanded post-accidental interventions. In parallel to this action an analysis of performance was performed. It means, identifying the need of forecasting the most appropriate actions to be performed having in mind short available time and lack of information. Because of these difficulties, it is possible to simplify the software, which will not include all the options but could deal with a specific situation. This would enable minimisation of data to be collected on the site

  14. Description of transitional nuclei in the sdg boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the transitional nuclei in the framework of the sdg boson model was necessitated by recent measurements of E2 and E4 transitions in the Pt and Os isotopes which can not be explained in the sd boson models. It is shown how γ-unstable and triaxial shapes arise from special choices of sdg model Hamiltonians. Ways of limiting the number of free parameters through consistency and coherence conditions are also discussed. A satisfactory description of E2 and E4 properties is obtained for the Pt and Os nuclei, which also predicts dynamic shape transitions in these nuclei. 36 refs., 10 tabs., 12 figs

  15. Gray-box modelling approach for description of storage tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoës, Poul; Carstensen, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a storage tunnel is examined using a model based on on-line measured data and a combination of simple deterministic and black-box stochastic elements. This approach, called gray-box modeling, is a new promising methodology for giving an on-line state description of sewer systems...... inertia of the water in the overflow structures. The capacity of a pump draining the storage tunnel is estimated for two different rain events, revealing that the pump was malfunctioning during the first rain event. The proposed modeling approach can be used in automated online surveillance and control...

  16. The Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) - Validation of a long-term atmospheric dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Hans; Strobl, Christopher; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years, the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) has been developed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Society for Plant and Reactor Security (GRS). ARTM is an atmospheric dispersion model for continuous long-term releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere, based on the Lagrangian particle model. This model, developed in the first place as a more realistic replacement for the out-dated Gaussian plume models, is currently being optimised for further scientific purposes to study atmospheric dispersion in short-range scenarios. It includes a diagnostic wind field model, allows for the application of building structures and multiple sources (including linear, 2-and 3-dimensional source geometries), and considers orography and surface roughness. As an output it calculates the activity concentration, dry and wet deposition and can model also the radioactive decay of Rn-222. As such, ARTM requires to undergo an intense validation process. While for short-term and short-range models, which were mainly developed for examining nuclear accidents or explosions, a few measurement data-sets are available for validation, data-sets for validating long-term models are very sparse and the existing ones mostly prove to be not applicable for validation. Here we present a strategy for the validation of long-term Lagrangian particle models based on the work with ARTM. In our validation study, the first part we present is a comprehensive analysis of the model sensitivities on different parameters like e.g. (simulation grid size resolution, starting random number, amount of simulation particles, etc.). This study provides a good estimation for the uncertainties of the simulation results and consequently can be used to generate model outputs comparable to the available measurements data at various distances from the emission source. This comparison between measurement data from selected scenarios and simulation results

  17. An elemental diffusion description for LTE plasma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method to describe diffusive processes in plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) was developed, based on the transport of elements instead of individual species. This method combines the elegance of the LTE description of a chemical composition with the flexibility of explicit transport for each element. A simple model of a metal halide lamp containing Hg dosed with NaI is used to illustrate the method

  18. Description of Multiparticle Production by Gluon Dominance Model

    CERN Document Server

    Abesalashvili, L N

    2007-01-01

    The obtained $\\pi^{-}$ and charged multiplicity distribution parameters of Gluon Dominance Model explain the experimental data in nucleus-nucleus, p nucleus, pd, pp, p antip and $\\pi^{-}$(p,n) interactions. We have undertaken an attempt to give description in different processes of multiparticle production by means of a unifed approach based on quark-gluon picture using the phenomenological hadronization. We have obtained agreement of GDM with experimental data in a very wide energy range.

  19. Description of deformed nuclei in the sdg boson model

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Li; Kuyucak, S.

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of deformed nuclei in the framework of the sdg interacting boson model utilizing both numerical diagonalization and analytical $1/N$ expansion techniques. The focus is on description of high-spin states which have recently become computationally accessible through the use of computer algebra in the $1/N$ expansion formalism. A systematic study is made of high-spin states in rare-earth and actinide nuclei.

  20. Description of deformed nuclei in the sdg boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Li, S C

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of deformed nuclei in the framework of the sdg interacting boson model utilizing both numerical diagonalization and analytical 1/N expansion techniques. The focus is on description of high-spin states which have recently become computationally accessible through the use of computer algebra in the 1/N expansion formalism. A systematic study is made of high-spin states in rare-earth and actinide nuclei.

  1. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Carey L.; Selin, Noelle E

    2016-01-01

    We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for seven PCB congeners, and we demonstrate that c...

  2. Comparing the Degree of Land-Atmosphere Interaction in Four Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Ijpelaar, Ruben; Tyahla, Lori; Cox, Peter; Suarez, Max J.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Land-atmosphere feedback, by which (for example) precipitation-induced moisture anomalies at the land surface affect the overlying atmosphere and thereby the subsequent generation of precipitation, has been examined and quantified with many atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). Generally missing from such studies, however, is an indication of the extent to which the simulated feedback strength is model dependent. Four modeling groups have recently performed a highly controlled numerical experiment that allows an objective inter-model comparison of land-atmosphere feedback strength. The experiment essentially consists of an ensemble of simulations in which each member simulation artificially maintains the same time series of surface prognostic variables. Differences in atmospheric behavior between the ensemble members then indicates the degree to which the state of the land surface controls atmospheric processes in that model. A comparison of the four sets of experimental results shows that feedback strength does indeed vary significantly between the AGCMs.

  3. Aerial Radioactivity Monitoring Using Atmospheric Dispersion Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since North Korea announced the underground nuclear test on last October 9th, 2006, many countries including South Korea have worried about the atmospheric dispersion and pollution of radioactive material by nuclear test. To verify the existence of nuclear test by detecting radioactive materials such as xenon and krypton at the early stage, to locate the position of test site, and to chase the trajectory of radioactivity have been heavily issued. And radioactivity detection and radiation monitoring technology using an aircraft have been recently examined by an authority concerned in South Korea. Although various techniques of aerial radioactivity monitoring are developed and operated in the world such as United States of America, Japan, Germany, etc., the relevant technical development or research is wholly lacking in our country. In this study, we performed some case studies on North Korea's nuclear test and accidental releases from nuclear power plant (NPP) using HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of U.S. Department of Commerce. We also investigated a feasibility of HYSPLIT to the aerial radioactivity monitoring system in terms of deciding potential measuring location and time

  4. ISDTM:An Intrusion Signatures Description Temporal Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OuYangMing-guang; ZhouYang-bo

    2003-01-01

    ISDTM, based on an augmented Allen's interval temporal logic (ITL) and first-order predicate calculus, is a formal temporal model for representing intrusion signatures.It is augmented with some real time extensions which enhance the expressivity. Intrusion scenarios usually are the set of events and system states, wherethe temporal sequence is their basic relation. Intrusion signatures description, therefore, is to represent such temporal relations in a sense. While representing these signatures, ISDTM decomposes the intrusion process into the sequence of events according to their relevant intervals, and then specifies network states in these Intervals. The uncertain intrusion signatures as well as basic temporal modes of events, which consist of the parallel mode,the sequential mode and the hybrid mode, can be succinctly and naturally represented in ISDTM. Mode chart is the visualization of intrusion signatures in ISDTM, which makes the formulas more readable. The intrusion signatures descriptions in ISDTM have advantages of compact construct, concise syntax, scalability and easy implementation.

  5. Approaching the other: Investigation of a descriptive belief revision model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Stelios

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available When an individual—a hearer—is confronted with an opinion expressed by another individual—a speaker—differing from her only in terms of a degree of belief, how will she react? In trying to answer that question this paper reintroduces and investigates a descriptive belief revision model designed to measure approaches. Parameters of the model are the hearer’s credibility account of the speaker, the initial difference between the hearer’s and speaker’s degrees of belief, and the hearer’s resistance to change. Within an interdisciplinary framework, two empirical studies were conducted. A comparison was carried out between empirically recorded revisions and revisions according to the model. Results showed that the theoretical model is highly confirmed. An interesting finding is the measurement of an “unexplainable behaviour” that is not classified either as repulsion or as approach. At a second level of analysis, the model is compared to the Bayesian framework of inference. Structural differences and evidence for optimal descriptive adequacy of the former were highlighted.

  6. Development of a one-dimensional atmospheric model (PHYD1V3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-dimensional atmospheric model PHYD1V3 was developed in the study of high performance SPEEDI development. This report contains description of the model and methods of numerical solution as well as description and usage of the model code. The present model covers the atmospheric layer with the vertical spatial scale of several kilometers and the temporal scale of one day. The objective items of the model are the horizontal wind velocity, the potential temperature and turbulence quantities as well as the relative quantities such as the atmospheric stability and the turbulence diffusivity. The model consists f prognostic equations for the wind velocity and the potential temperature, a second-order turbulence closure model by Mellor-Yamada, a ground surface heat budget equation, a soil layer heat conduction equation and models of solar radiation and atmospheric radiation. The solution method employed for the prognostic equations is Crank-Nicolson implicit method. Model calculations can be performed only by setting relevant values to a parameter file. This usage has certain limitation. To perform calculations beyond the limitation, slight modification of the code is necessary. Explanations of code modification for possible model calculations were presented. (author)

  7. Confidence assessment. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Forsmark site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Forsmark). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. The confidence in the Forsmark site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface-based site investigations, have been assessed by exploring: Confidence in the site characterisation data base; Key remaining issues and their handling; Handling of alternative models; Consistency between disciplines; and, Main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. It is generally found that the key aspects of importance for safety assessment and repository engineering of the Forsmark site descriptive model are associated with a high degree of confidence. Because of the robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in Forsmark site descriptive model is judged to be high. While some aspects have lower confidence this lack of confidence is handled by providing wider uncertainty ranges, bounding estimates and/or alternative models. Most, but not all, of the low confidence aspects have little impact on repository engineering design or for long-term safety. Poor precision in the measured data are judged to have limited impact on uncertainties on the site descriptive model, with the exceptions of inaccuracy in determining the position of some boreholes at depth in 3-D space, as well as the poor precision of the orientation of BIPS images in some boreholes, and the poor precision of stress data determined by overcoring at the locations where the pre

  8. Confidence assessment. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this report is to assess the confidence that can be placed in the Forsmark site descriptive model, based on the information available at the conclusion of the surface-based investigations (SDM-Site Forsmark). In this exploration, an overriding question is whether remaining uncertainties are significant for repository engineering design or long-term safety assessment and could successfully be further reduced by more surface based investigations or more usefully by explorations underground made during construction of the repository. The confidence in the Forsmark site descriptive model, based on the data available at the conclusion of the surface-based site investigations, have been assessed by exploring: Confidence in the site characterisation data base; Key remaining issues and their handling; Handling of alternative models; Consistency between disciplines; and, Main reasons for confidence and lack of confidence in the model. It is generally found that the key aspects of importance for safety assessment and repository engineering of the Forsmark site descriptive model are associated with a high degree of confidence. Because of the robust geological model that describes the site, the overall confidence in Forsmark site descriptive model is judged to be high. While some aspects have lower confidence this lack of confidence is handled by providing wider uncertainty ranges, bounding estimates and/or alternative models. Most, but not all, of the low confidence aspects have little impact on repository engineering design or for long-term safety. Poor precision in the measured data are judged to have limited impact on uncertainties on the site descriptive model, with the exceptions of inaccuracy in determining the position of some boreholes at depth in 3-D space, as well as the poor precision of the orientation of BIPS images in some boreholes, and the poor precision of stress data determined by overcoring at the locations where the pre

  9. Indeterminate direction relation model based on fuzzy description framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The indetermination of direction relation is a hot topic for fuzzy GIS researchers. The existing models only study the effects of indetermination of spatial objects,but ignore the uncertainty of direction reference framework. In this paper,first a for-malized representation model of indeterminate spatial objects is designed based on quadruple (x,y,A,μ),then a fuzzy direction reference framework is constructed by revising the cone method,in which the partitions of direction tiles are smooth and continuous,and two neighboring sections are overlapped in the transitional zones with fuzzy method. Grounded on these,a fuzzy description model for indeterminate direction relation is proposed in which the uncertainty of all three parts (source object,reference object and reference frame) is taken into account simultaneously. In the end,case studies are implemented to test the rationality and validity of the model.

  10. Evaluating atmospheric methane inversion model results for Pallas, northern Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuruta, Aki; Aalto, Tuula; Backman, Leif; Peters, Wouter; Krol, Maarten; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; Hatakka, Juha; Heikkinen, Pauli; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Spahni, Renato; Paramonova, Nina N.

    2015-01-01

    A state-of-the-art inverse model, CarbonTracker Data Assimilation Shell (CTDAS), was used to optimize estimates of methane (CH4) surface fluxes using atmospheric observations of CH4 as a constraint. The model consists of the latest version of the TM5 atmospheric chemistry-transport model and an ensemble Kalman filter based data assimilation system. The model was constrained by atmospheric methane surface concentrations, obtained from the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). Pri...

  11. Critical review of hydraulic modeling on atmospheric heat dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives of this study were: to define the useful roles of hydraulic modeling in understanding the predicting atmospheric effects of heat dissipation systems; to assess the state-of-the-art of hydraulic modeling of atmospheric phenomena; to inventory potentially useful existing hydraulic modeling facilities both in the United States and abroad; and to scope hydraulic model studies to assist the assessment of atmospheric effects of nuclear energy centers

  12. Modeling RHIC using the standard machine formal accelerator description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standard Machine Format (SMF) is a structured description of accelerator lattices which supports both the hierarchy of beam lines and generic lattice objects as well as those deviations (field errors, alignment efforts, etc.) associated with each component of the as-installed machine. In this paper we discuss the use of SMF to describe the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as well as the ancillary data structures (such as field quality measurements) that are necessarily incorporated into the RHIC SMF model. Future applications of SMF are outlined, including its use in the RHIC operational environment

  13. Coarse-grained description of cosmic structure from Szekeres models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Roberto A.; Delgado Gaspar, I.; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We show that the full dynamical freedom of the well known Szekeres models allows for the description of elaborated 3-dimensional networks of cold dark matter structures (over-densities and/or density voids) undergoing ``pancake'' collapse. By reducing Einstein's field equations to a set of evolution equations, which themselves reduce in the linear limit to evolution equations for linear perturbations, we determine the dynamics of such structures, with the spatial comoving location of each structure uniquely specified by standard early Universe initial conditions. By means of a representative example we examine in detail the density contrast, the Hubble flow and peculiar velocities of structures that evolved, from linear initial data at the last scattering surface, to fully non-linear 10-20 Mpc scale configurations today. To motivate further research, we provide a qualitative discussion on the connection of Szekeres models with linear perturbations and the pancake collapse of the Zeldovich approximation. This type of structure modelling provides a coarse grained—but fully relativistic non-linear and non-perturbative —description of evolving large scale cosmic structures before their virialisation, and as such it has an enormous potential for applications in cosmological research.

  14. The natural emissions model (NEMO): Description, application and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liora, Natalia; Markakis, Konstantinos; Poupkou, Anastasia; Giannaros, Theodore M.; Melas, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is the application and evaluation of a new computer model used for the quantification of emissions coming from natural sources. The Natural Emissions Model (NEMO) is driven by the meteorological data of the mesoscale numerical Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and it estimates particulate matter (PM) emissions from windblown dust, sea salt aerosols (SSA) and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs). It also includes emissions from Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation; however, this study focuses only on particle emissions. An application and evaluation of NEMO at European scale are presented. NEMO and the modelling system consisted of WRF model and the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) were applied in a 30 km European domain for the year 2009. The computed domain-wide annual PM10 emissions from windblown dust, sea salt and PBAPs were 0.57 Tg, 20 Tg and 0.12 Tg, respectively. PM2.5 represented 6% and 33% of emitted windblown dust and sea salt, respectively. Natural emissions are characterized by high geographical and seasonal variations; windblown dust emissions were the highest during summer in the southern Europe and SSA production was the highest in Atlantic Ocean during the cold season while in Mediterranean Sea the highest SSA emissions were found over the Aegean Sea during summer. Modelled concentrations were compared with surface station measurements and showed that the model captured fairly well the contribution of the natural sources to PM levels over Europe. Dust concentrations correlated better when dust transport events from Sahara desert were absent while the simulation of sea salt episodes led to an improvement of model performance during the cold season.

  15. Model flames in a hydrostatic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres Calleja, Alvaro

    A model flame system based on the advection-diffusion-reaction method is defined and used to numerically study the problem of a flame propagating up an initially hydrostatic atmosphere, in 2-D. We identify and characterize the flame's steady states over a range of parameters, in the case where the gravitational scale height is much greater than the size of the flame, which itself is much greater than the flame's laminar width. We observe both laminar and turbulent steady flames and verify that, for strong enough gravity G, the turbulent flame speed is independent of the laminar flame speed and scales like the square root of GL, where L is the size of our domain. As this scaling law is commonly used to implement flame subgrid models, one of the aims of this thesis is to understand its robustness. We describe the flame geometry and discuss its relationship with the flame speed. The flow statistics inside turbulent flames are measured and found to be gaussian and isotropic, corresponding to strong mixing.

  16. Gamow shell model description of proton scattering on Ne18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganathen, Y.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2014-03-01

    Background: The structure of weakly bound/unbound nuclei close to particle drip lines is different from that around the valley of beta stability. A comprehensive description of these systems goes beyond the standard shell model (SM) and demands an open quantum system description of the nuclear many-body system. Purpose: For that purpose, we are using the Gamow shell model (GSM), which provides a fully microscopic description of bound and unbound nuclear states, nuclear decays, and reactions. We formulate the GSM in coupled-channel (GSM-CC) representation to describe low-energy elastic and inelastic scattering of protons on Ne18. Method: The GSM-CC formalism is applied to a translationally invariant Hamiltonian with an effective finite-range two-body interaction. We discuss in detail the GSM-CC formalism in coordinate space and give the description of the novel equivalent potential method for solving the GSM-CC system of integrodifferential equations. This method is then applied for the description of (p,p') reaction cross-sections. The reactions channels are built by GSM wave functions for the ground state 0+ and the first excited 2+ of Ne18 and a proton wave function expanded in different partial waves. The completeness of this basis is verified by comparing GSM and GSM-CC energies of low-energy resonant states in Na19. The differences between the two calculations provide a measure of the missing configurations in the GSM-CC calculation of low-energy states of Na19 due to the restriction on the number of excited states of Ne18. Results: We present the first application of the GSM-CC formalism for the calculation of excited states of Ne18 and Na19, the excitation function, and the elastic/inelastic differential cross-sections in the Ne18(p,p') reaction at different energies. This is the first unified description of the spectra and reaction cross-sections in the GSM formalism. The method is shown to be both feasible and accurate. The approximate equivalence of GSM

  17. ECOPATH: Model description and evaluation of model performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model is based upon compartment theory and it is run in combination with a statistical error propagation method (PRISM, Gardner et al. 1983). It is intended to be generic for application on other sites with simple changing of parameter values. It was constructed especially for this scenario. However, it is based upon an earlier designed model for calculating relations between released amount of radioactivity and doses to critical groups (used for Swedish regulations concerning annual reports of released radioactivity from routine operation of Swedish nuclear power plants (Bergstroem och Nordlinder, 1991)). The model handles exposure from deposition on terrestrial areas as well as deposition on lakes, starting with deposition values. 14 refs, 16 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Methodology for geometric modelling. Presentation and administration of site descriptive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a methodology to construct, visualise and present geoscientific descriptive models based on data from the site investigations, which the SKB currently performs, to build an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. It is designed for interaction with SICADA (SKB:s site characterisation database) and RVS (SKB:s Rock Visualisation System). However, the concepts of the methodology are general and can be used with other tools capable of handling 3D geometries and parameters. The descriptive model is intended to be an instrument where site investigation data from all disciplines are put together to form a comprehensive visual interpretation of the studied rock mass. The methodology has four main components: 1. Construction of a geometrical model of the interpreted main structures at the site. 2. Description of the geoscientific characteristics of the structures. 3. Description and geometrical implementation of the geometric uncertainties in the interpreted model structures. 4. Quality system for the handling of the geometrical model, its associated database and some aspects of the technical auditing. The geometrical model forms a basis for understanding the main elements and structures of the investigated site. Once the interpreted geometries are in place in the model, the system allows for adding descriptive and quantitative data to each modelled object through a system of intuitive menus. The associated database allows each geometrical object a complete quantitative description of all geoscientific disciplines, variabilities, uncertainties in interpretation and full version history. The complete geometrical model and its associated database of object descriptions are to be recorded in a central quality system. Official, new and old versions of the model are administered centrally in order to have complete quality assurance of each step in the interpretation process. The descriptive model is a cornerstone in the understanding of the

  19. FARMLAND: Model description and evaluation of model performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FARMLAND model was originally developed for use in connection with continuous, routine releases of radionuclides, but because it has many time-dependent features it has been developed further for a single accidental release. The most recent version of FARMLAND is flexible and can be used to predict activity concentrations in food as a function of time after both accidental and routine releases of radionuclides. The effect of deposition at different times of the year can be taken into account. FARMLAND contains a suite of models which simulate radionuclide transfer through different parts of the foodchain. The models can be used in different combinations and offer the flexibility to assess a variety of radiological situations. The main foods considered are green vegetables, grain products, root vegetables, milk, meat and offal from cattle, and meat and offal from sheep. A large variety of elements can be considered although the degree of complexity with which some are modelled is greater than others; isotopes of caesium, strontium and iodine are treated in greatest detail. 22 refs, 12 figs, 10 tabs

  20. A downscaling scheme for atmospheric variables to drive soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, A.; Venema, V.; Lindau, R.; Ament, F.; Simmer, C.

    2010-09-01

    For driving soil-vegetation-transfer models or hydrological models, high-resolution atmospheric forcing data is needed. For most applications the resolution of atmospheric model output is too coarse. To avoid biases due to the non-linear processes, a downscaling system should predict the unresolved variability of the atmospheric forcing. For this purpose we derived a disaggregation system consisting of three steps: (1) a bi-quadratic spline-interpolation of the low-resolution data, (2) a so-called `deterministic' part, based on statistical rules between high-resolution surface variables and the desired atmospheric near-surface variables and (3) an autoregressive noise-generation step. The disaggregation system has been developed and tested based on high-resolution model output (400m horizontal grid spacing). A novel automatic search-algorithm has been developed for deriving the deterministic downscaling rules of step 2. When applied to the atmospheric variables of the lowest layer of the atmospheric COSMO-model, the disaggregation is able to adequately reconstruct the reference fields. Applying downscaling step 1 and 2, root mean square errors are decreased. Step 3 finally leads to a close match of the subgrid variability and temporal autocorrelation with the reference fields. The scheme can be applied to the output of atmospheric models, both for stand-alone offline simulations, and a fully coupled model system.

  1. A descriptive ecosystem model - a strategy for model development during site investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Anders [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Botany; Lindborg, Tobias [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-09-01

    This report describes a strategy for the development of a site descriptive model for the surface ecosystem on the potential deep repository sites. The surface ecosystem embraces many disciplines, and these have to be identified, described and integrated in order to construct a descriptive ecosystem model that describes and quantifies biotic and abiotic patterns and processes of importance for the ecosystem on the site. The descriptive model includes both present day conditions and historical information. The descriptive ecosystem model will be used to supply input data for the safety assessment and to serve as the baseline model for devising a monitoring program to detect short-term disturbances caused first by the site investigations and later by the construction of the deep repository. Furthermore, it will serve as a reference for future comparisons to determine more long-term effects or changes caused by the deep repository. The report adopts a non-site-specific approach focusing on the following aims: 1. To present and define the properties that will constitute the descriptive ecosystem model. 2. To present a methodology for determining those properties. 3. To describe and develop the framework for the descriptive ecosystem model by integrating the different properties. 4. To present vital data from other site descriptive models such as those for geology or hydrogeology that interacts with and affects the descriptive ecosystem model. The properties are described under four different sections: general physical properties of the landscape, the terrestrial system, the limnic system and the marine system. These headings are further subdivided into entities that integrate properties in relation to processes.

  2. A descriptive ecosystem model - a strategy for model development during site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a strategy for the development of a site descriptive model for the surface ecosystem on the potential deep repository sites. The surface ecosystem embraces many disciplines, and these have to be identified, described and integrated in order to construct a descriptive ecosystem model that describes and quantifies biotic and abiotic patterns and processes of importance for the ecosystem on the site. The descriptive model includes both present day conditions and historical information. The descriptive ecosystem model will be used to supply input data for the safety assessment and to serve as the baseline model for devising a monitoring program to detect short-term disturbances caused first by the site investigations and later by the construction of the deep repository. Furthermore, it will serve as a reference for future comparisons to determine more long-term effects or changes caused by the deep repository. The report adopts a non-site-specific approach focusing on the following aims: 1. To present and define the properties that will constitute the descriptive ecosystem model. 2. To present a methodology for determining those properties. 3. To describe and develop the framework for the descriptive ecosystem model by integrating the different properties. 4. To present vital data from other site descriptive models such as those for geology or hydrogeology that interacts with and affects the descriptive ecosystem model. The properties are described under four different sections: general physical properties of the landscape, the terrestrial system, the limnic system and the marine system. These headings are further subdivided into entities that integrate properties in relation to processes

  3. DETRA: Model description and evaluation of model performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code DETRA is a generic tool for environmental transfer analyses of radioactive or stable substances. The code has been applied for various purposes, mainly problems related to the biospheric transfer of radionuclides both in safety analyses of disposal of nuclear wastes and in consideration of foodchain exposure pathways in the analyses of off-site consequences of reactor accidents. For each specific application an individually tailored conceptual model can be developed. The biospheric transfer analyses performed by the code are typically carried out for terrestrial, aquatic and food chain applications. 21 refs, 35 figs, 15 tabs

  4. ISDTM:An Intrusion Signatures Description Temporal Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ou Yang Ming-guang; Zhou Yang-bo

    2003-01-01

    ISDTM, based on an augmented Allen's interval temporal logic (IT1) and first-order predicate calculus, is a formal temporal model for representing intrusion signatures.It is augmented with some real time extensions which enhance the expressivity. Intrusion scenarios usually are the set of events and system states, wherethe temporal sequence is their basic relation. Intrusion signatures description, there-fore, is to represent such temporal relations in a sense. While representing these signatures, ISDTM decomposes the intru-sion process into the sequence of events according to their rel-evant intervals, and then specifies network states in these In-tervals. The uncertain intrusion signatures as well as basic temporal modes of events, which consist of the parallel mode,the sequential mode and the hybrid mode, can be succinctly and naturally represented in ISDTM. Mode chart is the visual-ization of intrusion signatures in ISDTM, which makes the formulas more readable. The intrusion signatures descriptions in ISDTM have advantages of compact construct, concise syn-tax, scalability and easy implementation.

  5. Bedrock hydrogeology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling, SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 concept. Site characterisation should provide all data required for an integrated evaluation of the suitability of the investigated site and an important component in the characterisation work is the development of a hydrogeological model. The hydrogeological model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It also provides input to the safety assessment. Another important use of the hydrogeological model is in the environmental impact assessment. This report presents the understanding of the hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at Forsmark reached following the completion of the surface-based investigations and provides a summary of the bedrock hydrogeological model and the underlying data supporting its development. It constitutes the main reference on bedrock hydrogeology for the site descriptive model concluding the surface-based investigations at Forsmark, SDM-site, and is intended to describe the hydraulic properties and hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at the site and to give the information essential for demonstrating understanding

  6. Bedrock hydrogeology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling, SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has conducted site investigations at two different locations, the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for spent nuclear fuel according to the KBS-3 concept. Site characterisation should provide all data required for an integrated evaluation of the suitability of the investigated site and an important component in the characterisation work is the development of a hydrogeological model. The hydrogeological model is used by repository engineering to design the underground facility and to develop a repository layout adapted to the site. It also provides input to the safety assessment. Another important use of the hydrogeological model is in the environmental impact assessment. This report presents the understanding of the hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at Forsmark reached following the completion of the surface-based investigations and provides a summary of the bedrock hydrogeological model and the underlying data supporting its development. It constitutes the main reference on bedrock hydrogeology for the site descriptive model concluding the surface-based investigations at Forsmark, SDM-site, and is intended to describe the hydraulic properties and hydrogeological conditions of the bedrock at the site and to give the information essential for demonstrating understanding

  7. Spatio-temporal statistical models with applications to atmospheric processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This doctoral dissertation is presented as three self-contained papers. An introductory chapter considers traditional spatio-temporal statistical methods used in the atmospheric sciences from a statistical perspective. Although this section is primarily a review, many of the statistical issues considered have not been considered in the context of these methods and several open questions are posed. The first paper attempts to determine a means of characterizing the semiannual oscillation (SAO) spatial variation in the northern hemisphere extratropical height field. It was discovered that the midlatitude SAO in 500hPa geopotential height could be explained almost entirely as a result of spatial and temporal asymmetries in the annual variation of stationary eddies. It was concluded that the mechanism for the SAO in the northern hemisphere is a result of land-sea contrasts. The second paper examines the seasonal variability of mixed Rossby-gravity waves (MRGW) in lower stratospheric over the equatorial Pacific. Advanced cyclostationary time series techniques were used for analysis. It was found that there are significant twice-yearly peaks in MRGW activity. Analyses also suggested a convergence of horizontal momentum flux associated with these waves. In the third paper, a new spatio-temporal statistical model is proposed that attempts to consider the influence of both temporal and spatial variability. This method is mainly concerned with prediction in space and time, and provides a spatially descriptive and temporally dynamic model

  8. Formulations of moist thermodynamics for atmospheric modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Internal energy, enthalpy and entropy are the key quantities to study thermodynamic properties of the moist atmosphere, because they correspond to the First (internal energy and enthalpy) and Second (entropy) Laws of thermodynamics. The aim of this chapter is to search for analytical formulas for the specific values of enthalpy and entropy and for the moist-air mixture composing the atmosphere. The Third Law of thermodynamics leads to the definition of absolute reference values for thermal enthalpies and entropies of all atmospheric species. It is shown in this Chapter 22 that it is possible to define and compute a general moist-air entropy potential temperature, which is really an equivalent of the moist-air specific entropy in all circumstances (saturated, or not saturated). Similarly, it is shown that it is possible to define and compute the moist-air specific enthalpy, which is different from the thermal part of what is called Moist-Static-Energy in atmospheric studies.

  9. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    OpenAIRE

    H. Riede; Jöckel, P.; Sander, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D) global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M), the photochemistry submodel...

  10. Geology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geological work during stage 2.2 has involved the development of deterministic models for rock domains (RFM) and deformation zones (ZFM), the identification and deterministic modelling of fracture domains (FFM) inside the candidate volume, i.e. the parts of rock domains that are not affected by deformation zones, and the development of statistical models for fractures and minor deformation zones (geological discrete fracture network modelling or geological DFN modelling). The geological DFN model addresses brittle structures at a scale of less than 1 km, which is the lower cut-off in the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. In order to take account of variability in data resolution, deterministic models for rock domains and deformation zones are presented in both regional and local model volumes, while the geological DFN model is valid within specific fracture domains inside the north-western part of the candidate volume, including the target volume. The geological modelling work has evaluated and made use of: A revised bedrock geological map at the ground surface. Geological and geophysical data from 21 cored boreholes and 33 percussion boreholes. Detailed mapping of fractures and rock units along nine excavations or large surface outcrops. Data bearing on the characterisation (including kinematics) of deformation zones. Complementary geochronological and other rock and fracture analytical data. Lineaments identified on the basis of airborne and high-resolution ground magnetic data. A reprocessing of both surface and borehole reflection seismic data. Seismic refraction data. The outputs of the deterministic modelling work are geometric models in RVS format and detailed property tables for rock domains and deformation zones, and a description of fracture domains. The outputs of the geological DFN modelling process are recommended parameters or statistical distributions that describe fracture set orientations, radius sizes, volumetric intensities

  11. Geology Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Michael B. [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden); Fox, Aaron; La Pointe, Paul [Golder Associates Inc (United States); Simeonov, Assen [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Isaksson, Hans [GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan; Oehman, Johan [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-10-15

    The geological work during stage 2.2 has involved the development of deterministic models for rock domains (RFM) and deformation zones (ZFM), the identification and deterministic modelling of fracture domains (FFM) inside the candidate volume, i.e. the parts of rock domains that are not affected by deformation zones, and the development of statistical models for fractures and minor deformation zones (geological discrete fracture network modelling or geological DFN modelling). The geological DFN model addresses brittle structures at a scale of less than 1 km, which is the lower cut-off in the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. In order to take account of variability in data resolution, deterministic models for rock domains and deformation zones are presented in both regional and local model volumes, while the geological DFN model is valid within specific fracture domains inside the north-western part of the candidate volume, including the target volume. The geological modelling work has evaluated and made use of: A revised bedrock geological map at the ground surface. Geological and geophysical data from 21 cored boreholes and 33 percussion boreholes. Detailed mapping of fractures and rock units along nine excavations or large surface outcrops. Data bearing on the characterisation (including kinematics) of deformation zones. Complementary geochronological and other rock and fracture analytical data. Lineaments identified on the basis of airborne and high-resolution ground magnetic data. A reprocessing of both surface and borehole reflection seismic data. Seismic refraction data. The outputs of the deterministic modelling work are geometric models in RVS format and detailed property tables for rock domains and deformation zones, and a description of fracture domains. The outputs of the geological DFN modelling process are recommended parameters or statistical distributions that describe fracture set orientations, radius sizes, volumetric intensities

  12. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  13. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; 10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries, (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunli...

  14. MAXDOSE-SR: A routine release atmospheric dose model used at SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2000-02-09

    MAXDOSE-SR is a PC version of the dosimetry code MAXIGASP, which was used to calculate doses to the maximally exposed offsite individual for routine atmospheric releases of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Complete code description, verification of models, and user's manual have been included in this report. Minimal input is required to run the program, and site specific parameters are used when possible.

  15. Coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling: effects on atmospheric boundary layer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, F. K.; Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Daniels, M. H.; Rihani, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Newly-developed coupled land-atmosphere models which incorporate both subsurface and atmospheric moisture dynamics have the potential to change our understanding of the hydrologic cycle. This presentation describes the effects of coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling on simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer. Both field observations and simulations indicate strong sensitivity of atmospheric dynamics to land-surface conditions, in particular surface soil moisture. Simulations of atmospheric flow in Owens Valley (California) and in the Riviera Valley (Switzerland) show strong sensitivity to land-surface conditions, thus motivating the need for more accurate representations of soil moisture. In addition to influences from weather and seasonal changes, soil moisture dynamics respond to diurnal heat fluxes on the land surface. Using our new fully-coupled groundwater-atmosphere model, we have demonstrated correlations of soil moisture and land-surface heat fluxes with groundwater fluctuations on short, diurnal time scales. By explicitly calculating groundwater dynamics for our domain of interest, we are able to produce realistic time- and space-varying soil moisture distributions that naturally correspond to variations in topography and surface evaporation. Simulations in idealized and real watersheds are shown to illustrate these effects. The observed variations in surface moisture distribution have large impacts on the moisture and temperature structure in the atmosphere, leading to changes in boundary layer depth and convective motions as compared to standard soil moisture representations. Our coupled model framework will allow detailed investigation of the complex cycle of land-atmosphere processes affecting moisture distributions in the subsurface and the atmosphere.

  16. How important are the descriptions of vegetation in distributed hydrologic models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Thober, Stephan; Zink, Matthias; Rakovec, Oldrich; Samaniego, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The land surface transforms incoming, absorbed radiation into other energy forms and radiation with longer wavelengths. The land surface emits long-wave radiation, stores energy in the soil, the biomass and the air in the boundary layer, and exchanges sensible and latent heat with the atmosphere. The latter, latent heat consists of evaporation from the soil and canopy and transpiration by plants. Plants enhance in this picture the absorption of incoming radiation and decrease the resistance for evaporation of deeper soil water. Transpiration by plants is therefore either energy-limited by low incoming radiation or water-limited by small soil moisture. In the extreme cases, all available energy will be used for evapotranspiration in cold regions and all available water will be used for evapotranspiration in arid regions. Very simple formulations of latent heat, which include plant processes only very indirectly, work well in hydrologic models for these limiting cases. These simple formulations seem to work also surprisingly well in temperate regions. Hydrologic models have, however, considerable problems in semi-arid regions where the vegetation influence on latent heat should be largest. But the models have to deal with much more problems in these regions. For example data scarcity in the Mediterranean leads to very large model uncertainty due to the forcing data. Water supply is also often very regulated in semi-arid regions. Variability in river discharge can hence be largely driven by the anthropogenic influence rather than natural meteorological variations in these regions. Here we will show for Europe the areas and times when the descriptions of plant processes are important for hydrologic models. We will compare differences in model uncertainties that come from 1. different formulations of evapotranspiration, 2. different descriptions of soil-plant interactions, and 3. uncertainty in the model's input data. It can be seen that model uncertainty stemming from

  17. Proposed reference models for atomic oxygen in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, E. J.; Mcdade, I. C.; Lockerbie, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    A provisional Atomic Oxygen Reference model was derived from average monthly ozone profiles and the MSIS-86 reference model atmosphere. The concentrations are presented in tabular form for the altitude range 40 to 130 km.

  18. Bedrock hydrogeochemistry Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus (Geopoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Partille (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica, Graabo (Sweden)); Gimeno, Maria (Univ. of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)); Hallbeck, Lotta (Microbial Analytics, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Molinero, Jorge (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain)); Waber, Nick (Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland))

    2008-12-15

    The overall objectives of the hydrogeochemical site description for Forsmark are to establish a detailed understanding of the hydrogeochemical conditions at the site, and to use this understanding to develop models that address the needs identified by the safety assessment groups during the site investigation phase. Issues of concern to safety assessment are radionuclide transport and technical barrier behaviour, both of which are dependent on the chemistry of groundwater and porewater and their evolution with time. The specific aims of the hydrogeochemical work were: To document the hydrogeochemistry at the Forsmark site with focus on the development of conceptual models to describe and visualise the site. To provide relevant parameter values to be used for safety assessment calculations. To provide the hydrogeochemical basis for the modelling work by other teams, in particular hydrogeology. To take account of the feedback from the SR-Can safety assessment work that bears relevance to the hydrogeochemical modelling work. The work has involved the development of descriptive and mathematical models for groundwaters in relation to rock domains, fracture domains and deformation zones. In this report, the groundwaters have been interpreted in relation to their origin, evolution and composition, which require close integration with geological, climatological and hydrogeological information. Past climate changes are one of the major driving forces for long-term hydrogeochemical changes (hundreds to thousands of years) and are, therefore, of fundamental importance for understanding the palaeohydrogeological, palaeohydrogeochemical and present evolution of groundwater in the Fennoscandian crystalline bedrock. In contrast, redox buffer capacity of the bedrock will minimise the effects on changes in alkalinity and redox at repository depths, therefore limiting the variations in pH and Eh significantly, regardless of major changes in groundwater composition. There is

  19. Bedrock hydrogeochemistry Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objectives of the hydrogeochemical site description for Forsmark are to establish a detailed understanding of the hydrogeochemical conditions at the site, and to use this understanding to develop models that address the needs identified by the safety assessment groups during the site investigation phase. Issues of concern to safety assessment are radionuclide transport and technical barrier behaviour, both of which are dependent on the chemistry of groundwater and porewater and their evolution with time. The specific aims of the hydrogeochemical work were: To document the hydrogeochemistry at the Forsmark site with focus on the development of conceptual models to describe and visualise the site. To provide relevant parameter values to be used for safety assessment calculations. To provide the hydrogeochemical basis for the modelling work by other teams, in particular hydrogeology. To take account of the feedback from the SR-Can safety assessment work that bears relevance to the hydrogeochemical modelling work. The work has involved the development of descriptive and mathematical models for groundwaters in relation to rock domains, fracture domains and deformation zones. In this report, the groundwaters have been interpreted in relation to their origin, evolution and composition, which require close integration with geological, climatological and hydrogeological information. Past climate changes are one of the major driving forces for long-term hydrogeochemical changes (hundreds to thousands of years) and are, therefore, of fundamental importance for understanding the palaeohydrogeological, palaeohydrogeochemical and present evolution of groundwater in the Fennoscandian crystalline bedrock. In contrast, redox buffer capacity of the bedrock will minimise the effects on changes in alkalinity and redox at repository depths, therefore limiting the variations in pH and Eh significantly, regardless of major changes in groundwater composition. There is

  20. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K.-H.; Jurado, B.; Amouroux, C.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The GEF ("GEneral description of Fission observables") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barriers, fission probabilities, fission-fragment mass- and nuclide distributions, isomeric ratios, total kinetic energies, and prompt-neutron and prompt-gamma yields and energy spectra from neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. Derived properties of delayed neutrons and decay heat are also considered. The GEF model is based on a general approach to nuclear fission that explains a great part of the complex appearance of fission observables on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and general properties of microscopic systems and mathematical objects. The topographic theorem is used to estimate the fission-barrier heights from theoretical macroscopic saddle-point and ground-state masses and experimental ground-state masses. Motivated by the theoretically predicted early localisation of nucleonic wave functions in a necked-in shape, the properties of the relevant fragment shells are extracted. These are used to determine the depths and the widths of the fission valleys corresponding to the different fission channels and to describe the fission-fragment distributions and deformations at scission by a statistical approach. A modified composite nuclear-level-density formula is proposed. It respects some features in the superfluid regime that are in accordance with new experimental findings and with theoretical expectations. These are a constant-temperature behaviour that is consistent with a considerably increased heat capacity and an increased pairing condensation energy that is

  1. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport

  2. Prompt atmospheric neutrino fluxes: perturbative QCD models and nuclear effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Atri; Jeong, Yu Seon; Kim, C S; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina; Stasto, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the prompt atmospheric neutrino flux at high energies using three different frameworks for calculating the heavy quark production cross section in QCD: NLO perturbative QCD, $k_T$ factorization including low-$x$ resummation, and the dipole model including parton saturation. We use QCD parameters, the value for the charm quark mass and the range for the factorization and renormalization scales that provide the best description of the total charm cross section measured at fixed target experiments, at RHIC and at LHC. Using these parameters we calculate differential cross sections for charm and bottom production and compare with the latest data on forward charm meson production from LHCb at $7$ TeV and at $13$ TeV, finding good agreement with the data. In addition, we investigate the role of nuclear shadowing by including nuclear parton distribution functions (PDF) for the target air nucleus using two different nuclear PDF schemes. Depending on the scheme used, we find the reduction of the flux due t...

  3. A Model of the Cosmic Ray Induced Atmospheric Neutron Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kole, Merlin; Pearce, Mark; Salinas, Maria Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    In order to optimise the design of space instruments making use of detection materials with low atomic numbers, an understanding of the atmospheric neutron environment and its dependencies on time and position is needed. To produce a simple equation based model, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the atmospheric neutron fluxes produced by charged galactic cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. Based on the simulation results the omnidirectional neutron environment was para...

  4. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and (σ·τ)(σ·τ). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, 'quasi'-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of β stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author)

  5. Surface system Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB has undertaken site characterization of two different areas, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, in order to find a suitable location for a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. This report focuses on the site descriptive modelling of the surface system at Forsmark. The characterization of the surface system at the site was primarily made by identifying and describing important properties in different parts of the surface system, properties concerning e.g. hydrology and climate, Quaternary deposits and soils, hydrochemistry, vegetation, ecosystem functions, but also current and historical land use. The report presents available input data, methodology for data evaluation and modelling, and resulting models for each of the different disciplines. Results from the modelling of the surface system are also integrated with results from modelling of the deep bedrock system. The Forsmark site is located within the municipality of Oesthammar, about 120 km north of Stockholm. The investigated area is located along the shoreline of Oeregrundsgrepen, a funnel-shaped bay of the Baltic Sea. The area is characterized by small-scale topographic variations and is almost entirely located at altitudes lower than 20 metres above sea level. The Quaternary deposits in the area are dominated by till, characterized by a rich content of calcite which was transported by the glacier ice to the area from the sedimentary bedrock of Gaevlebukten about 100 km north of Forsmark. As a result, the surface waters and shallow groundwater at Forsmark are characterized by high pH values and high concentrations of certain major constituents, especially calcium and bicarbonate. The annual precipitation and runoff are 560 and 150 mm, respectively. The lakes are small and shallow, with mean and maximum depths ranging from approximately 0.1 to 1 m and 0.4 to 2 m. Sea water flows into the most low-lying lakes during events giving rise to very high sea levels. Wetlands are frequent and cover 25 to 35

  6. Site investigations: Strategy for rock mechanics site descriptive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hudson, John [Rock Engineering Consultants, Welwyn Garden City (United Kingdom)

    2002-05-01

    As a part of the planning work for the Site Investigations, SKB has developed a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Modelling Strategy. Similar strategies are being developed for other disciplines. The objective of the strategy is that it should guide the practical implementation of evaluating site specific data during the Site Investigations. It is also understood that further development may be needed. This methodology enables the crystalline rock mass to be characterised in terms of the quality at different sites, for considering rock engineering constructability, and for providing the input to numerical models and performance assessment calculations. The model describes the initial stresses and the distribution of deformation and strength properties of the intact rock, of fractures and fracture zones, and of the rock mass. The rock mass mechanical properties are estimated by empirical relations and by numerical simulations. The methodology is based on estimation of mechanical properties using both empirical and heroretical/numerical approaches; and estimation of in situ rock stress using judgement and numerical modelling, including the influence of fracture zones. These approaches are initially used separately, and then combined to produce the required characterisation estimates. The methodology was evaluated with a Test Case at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The quality control aspects are an important feature of the methodology: these include Protocols to ensure the structure and coherence of the procedures used, regular meetings to enhance communication, feedback from internal and external reviewing, plus the recording of an audit trail of the development steps and decisions made. The strategy will be reviewed and, if required, updated as appropriate.

  7. Site investigations: Strategy for rock mechanics site descriptive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the planning work for the Site Investigations, SKB has developed a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Modelling Strategy. Similar strategies are being developed for other disciplines. The objective of the strategy is that it should guide the practical implementation of evaluating site specific data during the Site Investigations. It is also understood that further development may be needed. This methodology enables the crystalline rock mass to be characterised in terms of the quality at different sites, for considering rock engineering constructability, and for providing the input to numerical models and performance assessment calculations. The model describes the initial stresses and the distribution of deformation and strength properties of the intact rock, of fractures and fracture zones, and of the rock mass. The rock mass mechanical properties are estimated by empirical relations and by numerical simulations. The methodology is based on estimation of mechanical properties using both empirical and heroretical/numerical approaches; and estimation of in situ rock stress using judgement and numerical modelling, including the influence of fracture zones. These approaches are initially used separately, and then combined to produce the required characterisation estimates. The methodology was evaluated with a Test Case at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The quality control aspects are an important feature of the methodology: these include Protocols to ensure the structure and coherence of the procedures used, regular meetings to enhance communication, feedback from internal and external reviewing, plus the recording of an audit trail of the development steps and decisions made. The strategy will be reviewed and, if required, updated as appropriate

  8. Accident consequence assessments with different atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An essential aim of the improvements of the new program system UFOMOD for Accident Consequence Assessments (ACAs) was to substitute the straight-line Gaussian plume model conventionally used in ACA models by more realistic atmospheric dispersion models. To identify improved models which can be applied in ACA codes and to quantify the implications of different dispersion models on the results of an ACA, probabilistic comparative calculations with different atmospheric dispersion models have been performed. The study showed that there are trajectory models available which can be applied in ACAs and that they provide more realistic results of ACAs than straight-line Gaussian models. This led to a completely novel concept of atmospheric dispersion modelling in which two different distance ranges of validity are distinguished: the near range of some ten kilometres distance and the adjacent far range which are assigned to respective trajectory models. (orig.)

  9. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides. Model testing using Chernobyl data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resuspension can be an important secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The inhalation of resuspended radionuclides contributes to the overall dose received by exposed individuals. Based on measurements collected after the Chernobyl accident, Scenario R was developed to provide an opportunity to test existing mathematical models of contamination resuspension. In particular, this scenario provided the opportunity to examine data and test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides at several different locations from the release, to investigate resuspension processes on both local and regional scales, and to investigate the importance of seasonal variations of these processes. Participants in the test exercise were provided with information for three different types of locations: (1) within the 30-km zone, where local resuspension processes are expected to dominate; (2) a large urban location (Kiev) 120 km from the release site, where vehicular traffic is expected to be the dominant mechanism for resuspension; and (3) an agricultural area 40-60 km from the release site, where highly contaminated upwind 'hot spots' are expected to be important. Input information included characteristics of the ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Participants were requested to predict the average (quarterly and yearly) concentrations of 137 Cs in air at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout; predictions for 90 Sr and 239 + 240 Pu were also requested for one location and time point. Predictions for specified resuspension factors and rates were also requested. Most participants used empirical models for the resuspension factor as a function of time K(t), as opposed to process-based models. While many of these

  10. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES, model description – Part 2: Carbon fluxes and vegetation dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Clark

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES is a process-based model that simulates the fluxes of carbon, water, energy and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere. Many studies have demonstrated the important role of the land surface in the functioning of the Earth System. Different versions of JULES have been employed to quantify the effects on the land carbon sink of climate change, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, changing atmospheric aerosols and tropospheric ozone, and the response of methane emissions from wetlands to climate change.

    This paper describes the consolidation of these advances in the modelling of carbon fluxes and stores, in both the vegetation and soil, in version 2.2 of JULES. Features include a multi-layer canopy scheme for light interception, including a sunfleck penetration scheme, a coupled scheme of leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, representation of the effects of ozone on leaf physiology, and a description of methane emissions from wetlands. JULES represents the carbon allocation, growth and population dynamics of five plant functional types. The turnover of carbon from living plant tissues is fed into a 4-pool soil carbon model.

    The process-based descriptions of key ecological processes and trace gas fluxes in JULES mean that this community model is well-suited for use in carbon cycle, climate change and impacts studies, either in standalone mode or as the land component of a coupled Earth system model.

  11. On atmospheric stability in the dynamic wake meandering model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Lee, Sang; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2014-01-01

    parameters. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, simulations of neutral and unstable atmospheric boundary layers using large-eddy simulation are performed at the same streamwise turbulence intensity level. The turbulence intensity is kept constant by calibrating the surface roughness in......The present study investigates a new approach for capturing the effects of atmospheric stability on wind turbine wake evolution and wake meandering by using the dynamic wake meandering model. The most notable impact of atmospheric stability on the wind is the changes in length and velocity scales...... turbulence spectra and applied to the dynamic wake meandering model to capture the correct wake meandering behaviour. The ambient turbulence in all stability classes is generated using the Mann turbulence model, where the effects of non-neutral atmospheric stability are approximated by the selection of input...

  12. CSOIL 2000 an exposure model for human risk assessment of soil contamination. A model description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand E; Otte PF; Lijzen JPA; LER

    2007-01-01

    This RIVM description of the CSOIL 2000 model deals, for the first time, with all aspects of the model. CSOIL 2000 can be used to derive intervention values. Intervention values are calculated for contaminated soil and represent a measure for determining when contaminated soil needs to be remediated

  13. Estimate Total Number of the Earth Atmospheric Particle with Standard Atmosphere Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2001-01-01

    The total number of atmospheric particle (AP) is an important datum for planetary science and geoscience.Estimating entire AP number is also a familiar question in general physics.With standard atmosphere model,considering the number difference of AP caused by rough and uneven in the earth surface below,the sum of dry clean atmosphere particle is 1.06962 × 1044.So the whole number of AP including water vapor is 1.0740 × 1044.The rough estimation for the total number of AP on other planets (or satellites) in condensed state is also discussed on the base of it.

  14. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important to the...... atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented into...

  15. Propagation of cosmic rays through the atmosphere in the quark-gluon strings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Krutikova, N. P.; Shabelski, Y. M.

    1985-01-01

    The quark-gluon strings model succeeds in the description of multiple hadron production in the central rapidity region of nucleon-nucleon interctions. This model was developed for hadron-nucleus interactions and used for calculation of the cosmic ray propagation through the atmosphere. It is shown that at energies 10 to the 11th power to the 12th power eV, this model gives a satisfactory description of experimental data. But with the increase of the energy up to approximately 10 to the 14th power eV, results of calculations and of experiments begin to differ and this difference rises with the energy. It may indicate that the scaling violation in the fragmentation region of inclusive spectra for hadron-nucleus interactions is stronger than in the quark-gluon strings model.

  16. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  17. Modeling of uncertainty in atmospheric transport system using hybrid method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric dispersion models are routinely used at nuclear and chemical plants to estimate exposure to the members of the public and occupational workers due to release of hazardous contaminants into the atmosphere. Atmospheric dispersion is a stochastic phenomenon and in general, the concentration of the contaminant estimated at a given time and at a predetermined location downwind of a source cannot be predicted precisely. Uncertainty in atmospheric dispersion model predictions is associated with: 'data' or 'parameter' uncertainty resulting from errors in the data used to execute and evaluate the model, uncertainties in empirical model parameters, and initial and boundary conditions; 'model' or 'structural' uncertainty arising from inaccurate treatment of dynamical and chemical processes, approximate numerical solutions, and internal model errors; and 'stochastic' uncertainty, which results from the turbulent nature of the atmosphere as well as from unpredictability of human activities related to emissions, The possibility theory based on fuzzy measure has been proposed in recent years as an alternative approach to address knowledge uncertainty of a model in situations where available information is too vague to represent the parameters statistically. The paper presents a novel approach (called Hybrid Method) to model knowledge uncertainty in a physical system by a combination of probabilistic and possibilistic representation of parametric uncertainties. As a case study, the proposed approach is applied for estimating the ground level concentration of hazardous contaminant in air due to atmospheric releases through the stack (chimney) of a nuclear plant. The application illustrates the potential of the proposed approach. (author)

  18. Memory efficient atmospheric effects modeling for infrared scene generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, Çaǧlar; Özsaraç, Seçkin

    2015-05-01

    The infrared (IR) energy radiated from any source passes through the atmosphere before reaching the sensor. As a result, the total signature captured by the IR sensor is significantly modified by the atmospheric effects. The dominant physical quantities that constitute the mentioned atmospheric effects are the atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric path radiance. The incoming IR radiation is attenuated by the transmittance and path radiance is added on top of the attenuated radiation. In IR scene simulations OpenGL is widely used for rendering purposes. In the literature there are studies, which model the atmospheric effects in an IR band using OpenGLs exponential fog model as suggested by Beers law. In the standard pipeline of OpenGL, the related fog model needs single equivalent OpenGL variables for the transmittance and path radiance, which actually depend on both the distance between the source and the sensor and also on the wavelength of interest. However, in the conditions where the range dependency cannot be modeled as an exponential function, it is not accurate to replace the atmospheric quantities with a single parameter. The introduction of OpenGL Shading Language (GLSL) has enabled the developers to use the GPU more flexible. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the atmospheric effects modeling using the least squares estimation with polynomial fitting by programmable OpenGL shader programs built with GLSL. In this context, a radiative transfer model code is used to obtain the transmittance and path radiance data. Then, polynomial fits are computed for the range dependency of these variables. Hence, the atmospheric effects model data that will be uploaded in the GPU memory is significantly reduced. Moreover, the error because of fitting is negligible as long as narrow IR bands are used.

  19. The collaborative historical African rainfall model: description and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Chris; Michaelsen, Joel; Verdin, Jim; Artan, Guleid; Husak, Greg; Senay, Gabriel; Gadain, Hussein; Magadazire, Tamuka

    2003-01-01

    In Africa the variability of rainfall in space and time is high, and the general availability of historical gauge data is low. This makes many food security and hydrologic preparedness activities difficult. In order to help overcome this limitation, we have created the Collaborative Historical African Rainfall Model (CHARM). CHARM combines three sources of information: climatologically aided interpolated (CAI) rainfall grids (monthly/0.5° ), National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis precipitation fields (daily/1.875° ) and orographic enhancement estimates (daily/0.1° ). The first set of weights scales the daily reanalysis precipitation fields to match the gridded CAI monthly rainfall time series. This produces data with a daily/0.5° resolution. A diagnostic model of orographic precipitation, VDELB - based on the dot-product of the surface wind V and terrain gradient (DEL) and atmospheric buoyancy B - is then used to estimate the precipitation enhancement produced by complex terrain. Although the data are produced on 0.1° grids to facilitate integration with satellite-based rainfall estimates, the true resolution of the data will be less than this value, and varies with station density, topography, and precipitation dynamics. The CHARM is best suited, therefore, to applications that integrate rainfall or rainfall-driven model results over large regions.The CHARM time series is compared with three independent datasets: dekadal satellite-based rainfall estimates across the continent, dekadal interpolated gauge data in Mali, and daily interpolated gauge data in western Kenya. These comparisons suggest reasonable accuracies (standard errors of about half a standard deviation) when data are aggregated to regional scales, even at daily time steps. Thus constrained, numerical weather prediction precipitation fields do a reasonable job of representing large-scale diurnal variations. Published in 2003 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Revisiting the Carrington Event: Updated modeling of atmospheric effects

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Brian C; Snyder, Brock R

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial effects of major solar events such as the Carrington white-light flare and subsequent geomagnetic storm of August-September 1859 are of considerable interest, especially in light of recent predictions that such extreme events will be more likely over the coming decades. Here we present results of modeling the atmospheric effects, especially production of odd nitrogen compounds and subsequent depletion of ozone, by solar protons associated with the Carrington event. This study combines approaches from two previous studies of the atmospheric effect of this event. We investigate changes in NOy compounds as well as depletion of O3 using a two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry and dynamics model. Atmospheric ionization is computed using a range-energy relation with four different proxy proton spectra associated with more recent well-known solar proton events. We find that changes in atmospheric constituents are in reasonable agreement with previous studies, but effects of the four proxy spectra use...

  1. Geology Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , kinematics of brittle deformation in drill cores and outcrops, as well as studies with particular focus on minor deformation zones (MDZ) in both drill cores and in the field. Complementary geochronological and other rock and fracture analytical data. High resolution airborne laser scanning (LIDAR) leading to a new digital elevation model (DEM) together with high-resolution ground magnetic and resistivity data providing the basis for further lineament interpretations. Further seismic refraction surveys and reprocessing and re-evaluation of seismic reflection data. The outputs of the deterministic modelling work are geometric models in RVS format for rock domains, deformation zones and fracture domains, including detailed property tables for rock domains and deformation zones and a description of fracture domains. The outputs of the geological DFN modelling process are recommended parameters or statistical distributions that describe fracture set orientations, sizes, volumetric intensities, spatial correlations and models, and other parameters (lithology and scaling corrections, termination matrices) that are necessary for building stochastic models. The regional scale ductile deformation zones strike NNE-SSW and NE-SW, are subvertical and are characterised by sinistral strike-slip displacements, while E-W oriented zones, though more strongly overprinted by brittle deformation, display moderate to steep dips to the south or north. The kinematics of the latter are not resolved at Laxemar, but E-W ductile shear zones in the Simpevarp subarea show complex kinematics, including both reverse and normal dip-slip as well as sinistral and dextral strike-slip displacements. It should be noted that the regional and local major deformation zones, although the majority have a ductile precursor, are mainly brittle in character. The focussed volume is transected by a series of smaller deformation zones with a variety of orientations and with dips varying from sub-vertical to sub

  2. Advancing Solid Earth Science through Improved Atmosphere Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, A. E.

    2004-01-01

    We proposed to investigate and develop better models for the effect of the hydrostatic and water vapor components of the neutral atmosphere on delay for VLBI and GPS by using a Numerical Weather Model to better simulate realistic atmosphere conditions. By using a raytrace calculation through the model atmosphere at the times of actual VLBI observations, the potential improvement in geodetic results can be evaluated. Also, by calculating the actual variation of delays with elevation and azimuth, the errors in current mapping function models can be assessed. The VLBI data to be initially analyzed are the fifteen days of the CONT02 sessions of 2002 October which included eight stations. There are three segments to the research. 1) The PSU/NCAR fifth generation mesoscale numerical weather model (MM5) will be used to provide the state of the atmosphere with highest horizontal resolution of 3 km. 2) A three-dimensional raytrace program will be developed to determine the delays through the model atmosphere at the times and in the directions of the VLBI observations for each of the sites. 3) The VLBI data will be analyzed using both standard models for the atmosphere mapping functions and the mapping functions derived from the NWM raytracing.

  3. A New Titan Atmospheric Model for Mission Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Bell, J. M.; Lorenz, R.; Achterberg, R.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-03-01

    Titan’s polar regions and hydrocarbon lakes are of interest for future exploration. This paper describes a new engineering model of Titan’s atmospheric structure with particular reference to the proposed Titan Mare Explorer mission.

  4. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the...

  5. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the island of Guam at...

  6. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 3.5-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Hawaiian island of Oahu...

  7. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at...

  8. Revisions to Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutter, Joshua D.; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Solar and stellar flux incident on an atmosphere can cause molecules to dissociate into highly reactive species and allows for photochemical processes to play a fundamental role in atmospheric chemistry. While models have tried to simulate such processes, they are extremely sensitive to photoabsorption cross-sections and quantum yields: two parameters that are important in determining the photodissociation rate, and hence the lifetime, of atmospheric compounds. Obtaining high-resolution and current data for these parameters is therefore highly desirable. Due to this, database and literature searches for high-quality cross-sections and quantum yields were performed and compiled for KINETICS, a Caltech/JPL Chemical Transport Model that can be used in modeling planetary atmospheres. Furthermore, photodissociation rates determined by running a Titan 1-D model were used to verify the completeness of these latest revisions.

  9. Modelling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions by coupling the regional weather model WRF to mechanistic plant models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Priesack, E.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change causes altering distributions of meteorological factors influencing plant growth and its interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are also caused by lacking descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Therefore, we couple a mechanistic soil-plant model to a regional climate and forecast model. The detailed simulation of the water and energy exchanges, especially the transpiration of grassland and forests stands, are the key features of the modelling framework. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) (Skamarock 2008) is an open source mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. The WRF model was modified in a way, to either choose its native, static land surface model NOAH or the mechanistic eco-system model Expert-N 5.0 individually for every single grid point within the simulation domain. The Expert-N 5.0 modelling framework provides a highly modular structure, enabling the development and use of a large variety of different plant and soil models, including heat transfer, nitrogen uptake/turnover/transport as well as water uptake/transport and crop management. To represent the key landuse types grassland and forest, we selected two mechanistic plant models: The Hurley Pasture model (Thornley 1998) and a modified TREEDYN3 forest simulation model (Bossel 1996). The models simulate plant growth, water, nitrogen and carbon flows for grassland and forest stands. A mosaic approach enables Expert-N to use high resolution land use data e.g. CORINE Land Cover data (CLC, 2006) for the simulation, making it possible to simulate different land use distributions within a single grid cell. The coupling results are analyzed for plausibility and compared with the results of the default land surface model NOAH (Fei Chen and Jimy Dudhia 2010). We show differences between the mechanistic and the static model coupling, with focus on the feedback effects

  10. Geology Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlgren, Carl-Henric (Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)); Curtis, Philip; Hermanson, Jan; Forssberg, Ola; Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB (Sweden)); Fox, Aaron; La Pointe, Paul (Golder Associates Inc (United States)); Drake, Henrik (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Triumf, Carl-Axel; Mattsson, Haakan; Thunehed, Hans (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); Juhlin, Christopher (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    , kinematics of brittle deformation in drill cores and outcrops, as well as studies with particular focus on minor deformation zones (MDZ) in both drill cores and in the field. Complementary geochronological and other rock and fracture analytical data. High resolution airborne laser scanning (LIDAR) leading to a new digital elevation model (DEM) together with high-resolution ground magnetic and resistivity data providing the basis for further lineament interpretations. Further seismic refraction surveys and reprocessing and re-evaluation of seismic reflection data. The outputs of the deterministic modelling work are geometric models in RVS format for rock domains, deformation zones and fracture domains, including detailed property tables for rock domains and deformation zones and a description of fracture domains. The outputs of the geological DFN modelling process are recommended parameters or statistical distributions that describe fracture set orientations, sizes, volumetric intensities, spatial correlations and models, and other parameters (lithology and scaling corrections, termination matrices) that are necessary for building stochastic models. The regional scale ductile deformation zones strike NNE-SSW and NE-SW, are subvertical and are characterised by sinistral strike-slip displacements, while E-W oriented zones, though more strongly overprinted by brittle deformation, display moderate to steep dips to the south or north. The kinematics of the latter are not resolved at Laxemar, but E-W ductile shear zones in the Simpevarp subarea show complex kinematics, including both reverse and normal dip-slip as well as sinistral and dextral strike-slip displacements. It should be noted that the regional and local major deformation zones, although the majority have a ductile precursor, are mainly brittle in character. The focussed volume is transected by a series of smaller deformation zones with a variety of orientations and with dips varying from sub-vertical to sub

  11. Statistical modelling of collocation uncertainty in atmospheric thermodynamic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fassò; IGNACCOLO, R.; F. Madonna; B. B. Demoz

    2013-01-01

    The uncertainty of important atmospheric parameters is a key factor for assessing the uncertainty of global change estimates given by numerical prediction models. One of the critical points of the uncertainty budget is related to the collocation mismatch in space and time among different observations. This is particularly important for vertical atmospheric profiles obtained by radiosondes or LIDAR. In this paper we consider a statistical modelling approach to understand at which exte...

  12. Atmospheric & Oceanic Applications of Eulerian and Lagrangian Transport Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Kjellsson, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents several ways to understand transports of air and water masses in the atmosphere and ocean, and the transports of energy that they imply. It presents work using various kinds of observations as well as computer simulations of the atmosphere and oceans. One of the main focuses is to identify similarities and differences between models and observations, as well as between different models. The first half of the thesis applies Lagrangian methods to study flows in the atmosphe...

  13. Modeling the distribution of ammonia across Europe including bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Wichink Kruit

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A large shortcoming of current chemistry transport models for simulating the fate of ammonia in the atmosphere is the lack of a description of the bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange. In this paper, results of an update of the dry deposition module DEPAC in the LOTOS-EUROS model are discussed. It is shown that with the new description, which includes bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange, the modeled ammonia concentrations increase almost everywhere, in particular in agricultural source areas. The reason is that by using a compensation point the ammonia life time and transport distance is increased. As a consequence, deposition of ammonia and ammonium decreases in agricultural source areas, while it increases in large nature areas and remote regions especially in Southern Scandinavia. The inclusion of a compensation point for water reduces the dry deposition over sea and allows reproducing the observed marine background concentrations at coastal locations to a better extend. A comparison with measurements shows that the model results better represent the measured ammonia concentrations. The concentrations in nature areas are slightly overestimated, while the concentrations in agricultural source areas are still underestimated. Although the introduction of the compensation point improves the model performance, the modeling of ammonia remains challenging. Important aspects are emission patterns in space and time as well as a proper approach to deal with the high concentration gradients in relation to model resolution. In short, the inclusion of a bi-directional surface atmosphere exchange is a significant step forward for modeling ammonia.

  14. Atmospheric Rivers in a Hierarchy of High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemann, R.; Demory, M. E.; Lavers, D. A.; Mizielinski, M.; Vidale, P. L.; Roberts, M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers are long and narrow plumes that carry moisture over land along frontal zones associated with mid-latitude storms. They can account for 90% of the horizontal moisture transport in a given day and are responsible for major flooding, particularly along western coastal regions (western coasts of North America and Europe). It is therefore crucial to well simulate these events in climate models in order to improve predictions and attributions of heavy precipitation and flooding along western coastal regions. In this study, we investigate the ability of a state-of-the art climate model to represent the location, frequency and structure of atmospheric rivers affecting Western Europe and California. By making use of the UPSCALE (UK on PRACE: weather resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk) campaign, a traceable hierarchy of global atmospheric simulations (based on the Met Office Unified Model, GA3 formulation), with mesh sizes ranging from 130 km to 25 km, we study the impact of improved representation of small-scale processes on the mean climate, its variability and extremes in order to understand the processes underlying observed improvement with higher resolution. Five-member ensembles of 27-year, atmosphere-only integrations are available at these resolutions, using both present day forcing and a future climate scenario. Demory et al (2014) have already shown that a relatively coarse resolution limits the model's ability to simulate moisture transport from ocean to land. This is particularly true at mid-latitude, where the transport is dominated by eddies. Increasing horizontal resolution increases eddy transport of moisture at mid-latitudes. Here, we investigate the climatology of atmospheric rivers, in particular their frequency and associated precipitation, compared to reanalysis products. Some aspects of the relationship between the improved simulation of moisture transport in current climate conditions, and how this impacts

  15. An ion species model for positive ion sources - part I description of the model

    OpenAIRE

    Surrey, E; Holmes, A J T

    2014-01-01

    A one dimensional model of the magnetic multipole volume plasma source has been developed for use in intense ion/neutral atom beam injectors. The model uses plasma transport coefficients for particle and energy flow to create a detailed description of the plasma parameters along an axis parallel to that of the extracted beam. Primarily constructed for applications to neutral beam injection systems on fusion devices, the model concentrates on the hydrogenic isotopes but can be extended to any ...

  16. Translation of a High-Level Temporal Model into Lower Level Models: Impact of Modelling at Different Description Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Peter; Sørensen, Jens Otto

    2001-01-01

    The paper attempts theoretically to clarify the interrelation between various levels of descriptions used in the modelling and the programming of information systems. We suggest an analysis where we characterise the description levels with respect to how precisely they may handle information about...... relational and other textual models. We also consider the aptness of models that include procedural mechanisms such as active and object databases...

  17. Description and Rationale for the Planning, Monitoring, and Implementation (PMI) Model: Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Valeria A.

    The design of the Planning, Monitoring, and Implementation Model (PMI) and the aspects of the model that make it useful in public schools are the topics of this paper. After the objectives of a program or operation have been identified, the model specifies three additional pieces of information that are needed for an evaluation: inputs, processes,…

  18. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. I. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS VIA THE SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical, and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension, and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag, and magnetic drag), and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag acts non-uniformly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulations of atmospheric circulation. We also find that hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction have dissimilar phase signatures and affect the flow in fundamentally different ways, implying that using Rayleigh drag to mimic magnetic drag is inaccurate. We exhaustively lay down the theoretical formalism (dispersion relations, governing equations, and time-dependent wave solutions) for a broad suite of models. In all situations, we derive the steady state of an atmosphere, which is relevant to interpreting infrared phase and eclipse maps of exoplanetary atmospheres. We elucidate a pinching effect that confines the atmospheric structure to be near the equator. Our suite of analytical models may be used to develop decisively physical intuition and as a reference point for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric circulation

  19. Surface system Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindborg, Tobias (ed.)

    2008-12-15

    SKB has undertaken site characterization of two different areas, Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp, in order to find a suitable location for a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. This report focuses on the site descriptive modelling of the surface system at Forsmark. The characterization of the surface system at the site was primarily made by identifying and describing important properties in different parts of the surface system, properties concerning e.g. hydrology and climate, Quaternary deposits and soils, hydrochemistry, vegetation, ecosystem functions, but also current and historical land use. The report presents available input data, methodology for data evaluation and modelling, and resulting models for each of the different disciplines. Results from the modelling of the surface system are also integrated with results from modelling of the deep bedrock system. The Forsmark site is located within the municipality of Oesthammar, about 120 km north of Stockholm. The investigated area is located along the shoreline of Oeregrundsgrepen, a funnel-shaped bay of the Baltic Sea. The area is characterized by small-scale topographic variations and is almost entirely located at altitudes lower than 20 metres above sea level. The Quaternary deposits in the area are dominated by till, characterized by a rich content of calcite which was transported by the glacier ice to the area from the sedimentary bedrock of Gaevlebukten about 100 km north of Forsmark. As a result, the surface waters and shallow groundwater at Forsmark are characterized by high pH values and high concentrations of certain major constituents, especially calcium and bicarbonate. The annual precipitation and runoff are 560 and 150 mm, respectively. The lakes are small and shallow, with mean and maximum depths ranging from approximately 0.1 to 1 m and 0.4 to 2 m. Sea water flows into the most low-lying lakes during events giving rise to very high sea levels. Wetlands are frequent and cover 25 to 35

  20. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  1. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carey L.; Selin, Noelle E.

    2016-03-01

    We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for seven PCB congeners, and we demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that midlatitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  2. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Friedman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric PCB model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 7 PCBs, and demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently-described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that mid-latitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  3. Atmospheric corrosion model and monitor for low cost solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelble, D. H.; Mansfeld, F. B.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M.

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric corrosion model and corrosion monitoring system has been developed for low cost solar arrays (LSA). The corrosion model predicts that corrosion rate is the product of the surface condensation probability of water vapor and the diffusion controlled corrosion current. This corrosion model is verified by simultaneous monitoring of weather conditions and corrosion rates at the solar array test site at Mead, Nebraska.

  4. Information Flow in an Atmospheric Model and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-noh

    2011-01-01

    Weather forecasting consists of two processes, model integration and analysis (data assimilation). During the model integration, the state estimate produced by the analysis evolves to the next cycle time according to the atmospheric model to become the background estimate. The analysis then produces a new state estimate by combining the background…

  5. ETEX symposium on long-range atmospheric transport, model verification and emergency response. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience has shown that industrial accidents causing a release of harmful material to the atmosphere can have consequences extending to hundreds and even thousands of kilometres. A variety of long-range atmospheric transport models have been established in different countries for application in emergency management, but their quality can only be assessed with difficulty. The Chernobyl accident data have been used retrospectively for model validation, but the source term associated with it is uncertain and this limits the values for model evaluation purposes. For these reasons a follow-up study called European Tracer Experiment (ETEX), jointly organised by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EC JRC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Meteorology Organization (WMO), started in 1992. The objectives of ETEX were to conduct a long-range atmospheric tracer experiment; to test the capability of institutes responsible for emergency response to produce forecasts in real-time; to evaluate the validity of their forecasts and to assemble a database which allows the evaluation of long-range atmospheric dispersion models in general. The ETEX Symposium on Long-range Atmospheric Transport, Model Verification and Emergency Response was held in Vienna, 13 - 16 May 1997. World-wide interest in the topics was demonstrated by 90 participants coming from 24 European countries including Australia, Canada, Japan, Russia and the United States. The audience was made up of ETEX participants, International Agencies, Meteorological Services and the modelling community. The 56 presentations gave a summary of the state of the art of forecasting pollutant dispersion in case of a major accidental release to the atmosphere. The Proceedings of the Symposium summarises the results of this successful project and gives conclusions and recommendations. Detailed descriptions of the project, the experimental and modelling results will be published in separate

  6. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleimanov, V.F. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Poutanen, J. [University of Turku, Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Piikkioe (Finland); KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Klochkov, D.; Werner, K. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutron star radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1-4MK) and ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Measuring the basic parameters of neutron stars using model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Klochkov, D; Werner, K

    2015-01-01

    Model spectra of neutron star atmospheres are nowadays widely used to fit the observed thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars. This fitting is the key element in the method of the neutronstar radius determination. Here, we present the basic assumptions used for the neutron star atmosphere modeling as well as the main qualitative features of the stellar atmospheres leading to the deviations of the emergent model spectrum from blackbody. We describe the properties of two of our model atmosphere grids: (i) pure carbon atmospheres for relatively cool neutron stars (1--4 MK) and (ii) hot atmospheres with Compton scattering taken into account. The results obtained by applying these grids to model the X-ray spectra of the central compact object in supernova remnant HESS 1731-347, and two X-ray bursting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1724-307 and 4U 1608-52, are presented. Possible systematic uncertainties associated with the obtained neutron star radii are discussed.

  9. Observations, Thermochemical Calculations, and Modeling of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation as a whole aims to provide means to better understand hot-Jupiter planets through observing, performing thermochemical calculations, and modeling their atmospheres. We used Spitzer multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse observations and targets with high signal-to-noise ratios, as their deep eclipses allow us to detect signatures of spectral features and assess planetary atmospheric structure and composition with greater certainty. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction. Chapter 2 presents the Spitzer secondary-eclipse analysis and atmospheric characterization of WASP-14b. WASP-14b is a highly irradiated, transiting hot Jupiter. By applying a Bayesian approach in the atmospheric analysis, we found an absence of thermal inversion contrary to theoretical predictions. Chapter 3 describes the infrared observations of WASP-43b Spitzer secondary eclipses, data analysis, and atmospheric characterization. WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, orbiting one of the coolest stars with a hot Ju...

  10. High Resolution Global Modeling of the Atmospheric Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An informal review is presented of recent developments in numerical simulation of the global atmospheric circulation with very fine numerical resolution models. The focus is on results obtained recently with versions of the GFDL SKYHI model and the Atmospheric Model for the Earth Simulator (AFES) global atmospheric models. These models have been run with effective horizontal grid resolution of ~10-40 km and fine vertical resolution. The results presented demonstrate the utility of such models for the study of a diverse range of phenomena. Specifically the models are shown to simulate the development of tropical cyclones with peak winds and minimum central pressures comparable to those of the most intense hurricanes actually observed. More fundamentally, the spectrum of energy content in the mesoscale in the flow can be reproduced by these models down to near the smallest explicitly-resolved horizontal scales. In the middle atmosphere it is shown that increasing horizontal resolution can lead to significantly improved overall simulation of the global-scale circulation. The application of the models to two specific problems requiring very fine resolution global will be discussed. The spatial and temporal variability of the vertical eddy flux of zonal momentum associated with gravity waves near the tropopause is evaluated in the very fine resolution AFES model. This is a subject of great importance for understanding and modelling the flow in the middle atmosphere. Then the simulation of the small scale variations of the semidiurnal surface pressure oscillation is analyzed, and the signature of significant topographic modulation of the semidiurnal atmospheric tide is identified.

  11. CRUNCH, Dispersion Model for Continuous Dense Vapour Release in Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The situation modelled is as follows. A dense gas emerges from a source such that it can be considered to emerge through a rectangular area, placed in the vertical plane and perpendicular to the plume direction, which assumes that of the ambient wind. The gas flux at the source, and in every plane perpendicular to the plume direction, is constant in time and a stationary flow field has been attained. For this to apply, the characteristic time of release must be much larger than that for dispersal of the contaminant. The plume can be thought to consist of a number of rectangular elements or 'puffs' emerging from the source at regular time intervals. The model follows the development of these puffs at a series of downwind points. These puffs are immediately assumed to advect with the ambient wind at their half-height. The plume also slumps due to the action of gravity and is allowed to entrain air through its sides and top surface. Spreading of a fluid element is caused by pressure differences across this element and since the pressure gradient in the wind direction is small, the resulting pressure differences and slumping velocities are small also, thus permitting this convenient approximation. Initially, as the plume slumps, its vertical dimension decreases and with it the slumping velocity and advection velocity. Thus the plume advection velocity varies as a function of downwind distance. With the present steady state modelling, and to satisfy continuity constraints, there must be consequent adjustment of plume height. Calculation of this parameter from the volume flux ensures this occurs. As the cloud height begins to grow, the advection velocity increases and the plume height decreases accordingly. With advection downwind, the cloud gains buoyancy by entraining air and, if the cloud is cold, by absorbing heat from the ground. Eventually the plume begins to disperse as would a passive pollutant, through the action of

  12. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-Like Circumbinary Planets

    CERN Document Server

    May, E M

    2016-01-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional Energy Balance Model and a three-dimensional General Circulation Model, we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the General Circulation Model, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling effor...

  13. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  14. Atmospheric aerosol dispersion models and their applications to environmental risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Mazur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Numerical models of dispersion of atmospheric pollutants are widely used to forecast the spread of contaminants in the air and to analyze the effects of this phenomenon. The aim of the study is to investigate the possibilities and the quality of diagnosis and prediction of atmospheric transport of aerosols in the air using the dispersion model of atmospheric pollutants, developed at the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMWM in Warsaw. Material and methods. A model of the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants, linked with meteorological models in a diagnostic mode, was used to simulate the transport of the cloud of aerosols released during the crash near the town of Ożydiw (Ukraine and of volcanic ash – during the volcanic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. Results. Possible directions of dispersion of pollutants in the air and its concentration in the atmosphere and deposition to the soil were assessed. The analysis of temporal variability of concentrations of aerosols in the atmosphere confirmed that the model developed at IMWM is an effective tool for diagnosis of air quality in the area of Poland as well as for determination of exposure duration to the aerosol clouds for different weather scenarios. Conclusions. The results are a confirmation of the thesis, that because in the environmental risk assessment, an important element is not only current information on the level of pollution concentrations, but also the time of exposure to pollution and forecast of these elements, and consequently the predicted effects on man or the environment in general; so it is necessary to use forecasting tools, similar to presented application. The dispersion model described in the paper is an operational tool for description, analysis and forecasting of emergency situations in case of emissions of hazardous substances.

  15. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R; Yao, J Q; Xu, D G; Wang, J L; Wang, P, E-mail: wangran19861014@163.com [College of Precision Instrument and Opto-electronics Engineering, Institute of Laser and Opto-electronics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  16. A zonally symmetric model for volcanic influence upon atmospheric circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of volcanic activity upon zonal wind flow in a model atmosphere are considered. A low latitude volcanic eruption could lower the tropospheric pole to equator temperature difference and thereby affect the atmospheric motions. When the temperature contrast decreases, the zonal wind velocities at high altitudes are reduced. To conserve angular momentum, the velocities in the lower atmosphere near the surface must increase, thus providing a momentum source for ocean currents. It is suggested that this momentum source may have played a role as a trigger for inducing the 1982-83 anomalous El Nino and possibly other climate changes.

  17. Risk methodology for geologic disposal of radioactive waste: model description and user manual for Pathways model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the environmental movement and human uptake of radionuclides is presented. This model is designated the Pathways-to-Man Model and was developed as part of a project funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to design a methodology to assess the risk associated with the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Pathways-to-Man Model is divided into two submodels. One of these, the Environmental Transport Model, represents the long-term distribution and accumulation of radionuclides in the environment. This model is based on a mixed-cell approach and describes radionuclide movement with a system of linear differential equations. The other, the Transport-to-Man Model, represents the movement of radionuclides from the environment to man. This model is based on concentration ratios. General descriptions of these models are provided in this report. Further, documentation is provided for the computer program which implements the Pathways Model

  18. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  19. INTRA/Mod3.2. Manual and Code Description. Volume I - Physical Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INTRA Manual consists of two volumes. Volume I of the manual is a thorough description of the code INTRA, the Physical modelling of INTRA and the ruling numerical methods and volume II, the User's Manual is an input description. This document, the Physical modelling of INTRA, contains code characteristics, integration methods and applications

  20. National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume III of III: software description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This volume contains a description of the software comprising the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the third of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC-01-79EI-10579. The three volumes are entitled: model overview and description, user's guide, and software guide.

  1. Statistical modelling of collocation uncertainty in atmospheric thermodynamic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fassò; IGNACCOLO, R.; F. Madonna; B. B. Demoz; Franco-Villoria, M.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of measurement uncertainty of atmospheric parameters is a key factor in assessing the uncertainty of global change estimates given by numerical prediction models. One of the critical contributions to the uncertainty budget is related to the collocation mismatch in space and time among observations made at different locations. This is particularly important for vertical atmospheric profiles obtained by radiosondes or lidar. In this paper we propose a st...

  2. Complex source rate estimation for atmospheric transport and dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy associated with assessing the environmental consequences of an accidental atmospheric release of radioactivity is highly dependent on our knowledge of the source release rate which is generally poorly known. This paper reports on a technique that integrates the radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling for more accurate source term estimation. We construct a minimum least squares methodology for solving the inverse problem with no a priori information about the source rate

  3. Medicanes in an ocean–atmosphere coupled regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Akhtar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available So-called medicanes (Mediterranean hurricanes are meso-scale, marine, and warm-core Mediterranean cyclones that exhibit some similarities to tropical cyclones. The strong cyclonic winds associated with medicanes threaten the highly populated coastal areas around the Mediterranean basin. To reduce the risk of casualties and overall negative impacts, it is important to improve the understanding of medicanes with the use of numerical models. In this study, we employ an atmospheric limited-area model (COSMO-CLM coupled with a one-dimensional ocean model (1-D NEMO-MED12 to simulate medicanes. The aim of this study is to assess the robustness of the coupled model in simulating these extreme events. For this purpose, 11 historical medicane events are simulated using the atmosphere-only model, COSMO-CLM, and coupled model, with different setups (horizontal atmospheric grid-spacings of 0.44°, 0.22°, and 0.08°; with/without spectral nudging, and an ocean grid-spacing of 1/12°. The results show that at high-resolution, the coupled model is able to not only simulate most of medicane events but also improve the track length, core temperature, and wind speed of simulated medicanes compared to the atmosphere-only simulations. The results suggest that the coupled model is more proficient for systemic and detailed studies of historical medicane events, and that this model can be an effective tool for future projections.

  4. The Role of Atmospheric Measurements in Wind Power Statistical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, S.; Bulaevskaya, V.; Irons, Z.; Newman, J. F.; Clifton, A.

    2015-12-01

    The simplest wind power generation curves model power only as a function of the wind speed at turbine hub-height. While the latter is an essential predictor of power output, it is widely accepted that wind speed information in other parts of the vertical profile, as well as additional atmospheric variables including atmospheric stability, wind veer, and hub-height turbulence are also important factors. The goal of this work is to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding additional atmospheric measurements to the power prediction model. In particular, we are interested in quantifying any gain in predictive ability afforded by measurements taken from a laser detection and ranging (lidar) instrument, as lidar provides high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of wind speed and direction at 10 or more levels throughout the rotor-disk and at heights well above. Co-located lidar and meteorological tower data as well as SCADA power data from a wind farm in Northern Oklahoma will be used to train a set of statistical models. In practice, most wind farms continue to rely on atmospheric measurements taken from less expensive, in situ instruments mounted on meteorological towers to assess turbine power response to a changing atmospheric environment. Here, we compare a large suite of atmospheric variables derived from tower measurements to those taken from lidar to determine if remote sensing devices add any competitive advantage over tower measurements alone to predict turbine power response.

  5. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-like Circumbinary Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, E. M.; Rauscher, E.

    2016-08-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time-varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM) and a three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM), we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the GCM, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling efforts.

  6. Atmospheric multidecadal variations in the North Atlantic realm: proxy data, observations, and atmospheric circulation model studies

    OpenAIRE

    Grosfeld, K.; G. Lohmann; N. Rimbu; Fraedrich, K.; F. Lunkeit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of multidecadal climate variability in the North Atlantic realm, using observational data, proxy data and model results. The dominant pattern of multidecadal variability of SST depicts a monopolar structure in the North Atlantic during the instrumental period with cold (warm) phases during 1900–1925 and 1970–1990 (1870–1890 and 1940–1960). Two atmospheric general circulation models of different com...

  7. Atmospheric dispersion models for application in relation to radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this document, a state-of-art review of dispersion models relevant to local, regional and global scales and applicable to radionuclide discharges of a continuous and discontinuous nature is presented. The theoretical basis of the models is described in chapter 2, while the uncertainty inherent in model predictions is considered in chapter 6. Chapters 3 to 5 of this report describe a number of models for calculating atmospheric dispersion on local, regional and global scales respectively

  8. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  9. Atmospheric monitoring and model applications at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keilhauer Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pierre Auger Observatory detects high-energy cosmic rays with energies above ∼1017 eV. It is built as a multi-hybrid detector measuring extensive air showers with different techniques. For the reconstruction of extensive air showers, the atmospheric conditions at the site of the Observatory have to be known quite well. This is particularly true for reconstructions based on data obtained by the fluorescence technique. For these data, not only the weather conditions near ground are relevant, most important are altitude-dependent atmospheric profiles. The Pierre Auger Observatory has set up a dedicated atmospheric monitoring programme at the site in the Mendoza province, Argentina. Beyond this, exploratory studies were performed in Colorado, USA, for possible installations in the northern hemisphere. In recent years, the atmospheric monitoring programme at the Pierre Auger Observatory was supplemented by applying data from atmospheric models. Both GDAS and HYSPLIT are developments by the US weather department NOAA and the data are freely available. GDAS is a global model of the atmospheric state parameters on a 1 degree geographical grid, based on real-time measurements and numeric weather predictions, providing a full altitude-dependent data set every 3 hours. HYSPLIT is a powerful tool to track the movement of air masses at various heights, and with it the aerosols. Combining local measurements of the atmospheric state variables and aerosol scattering with the given model data, advanced studies about atmospheric conditions can be performed and high precision air shower reconstructions are achieved.

  10. Hydrogeological Site Descriptive Model - a strategy for its development during Site Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is to present a strategy for the development of the Site Descriptive Hydrogeological Model within the SKB Site Investigation Programme. The report, and similar reports from the Geology, Rock Mechanics, Thermal properties, Hydrogeochemistry, Transport Properties and Surface Ecosystem disciplines are intended to guide SKB Site Descriptive Modelling but also to provide the authorities with an overview of how the modelling should be performed. Thus the objectives of this report are to: provide guidelines for the modelling of different sites resulting in consistent handling of modelling issues during the Site Investigations, provide a structure for the modelling sequence that is suitable for the establishment of a Site Descriptive model and provide some necessary details that should be considered in a Site Descriptive model

  11. Thermodynamical description of the ghost dark energy model

    OpenAIRE

    Honarvaryan, M.; Sheykhi, A.; Moradpour, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we point out thermodynamical description of ghost dark energy and its generalization to the early universe. Thereinafter, we find expressions for the entropy changes of these dark energy candidates. In addition, considering thermal fluctuations, thermodynamics of the dark energy component interacting with a dark matter sector is addressed. {We will also find the effects of considering the coincidence problem on the mutual interaction between the dark sectors, and thus the equat...

  12. Description of regolith at Laxemar-Simpevarp. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report compiles all known available information regarding the regolith in the Laxemar-Simpevarp regional model area. Regolith refers to the loose deposits overlying the bedrock. In the Laxemar-Simpevarp area, all known regolith was deposited during the Quaternary period and is consequently often referred to as Quaternary deposits (QD). In the terrestrial areas the uppermost part of the regolith, which has been affected by climate and vegetation, is referred to as soil. The geographical and stratigraphical distributions of the regolith have been used to construct a model showing the distribution of regolith depths in the whole model area. The stratigraphical units shown in the regolith depth and stratigraphy model have been characterised with respect to physical and chemical properties. Most of the data used for that characterisation have been obtained from the site investigation but some data were taken from the literature. All QD in the Laxemar area have most probably been deposited during or after the latest deglaciation. The ice sheet in the area moved from the north-west during the latest ice age. The Baltic Sea completely covered the investigated area after the latest deglaciation c 12,000 BC. Land uplift was fastest during the first few thousand years following the deglaciation and has subsequently decreased to the present value of 1 mm/year. Older QD have been eroded in areas exposed to waves and currents and the material has later been redeposited. Fine-grained sediments have been deposited on the floor of bays and in other sheltered positions. Peat has accumulated in many of the wetlands situated in topographically low positions. The groundwater table in many of the former wetlands has been artificially lowered to obtain land for forestry and agriculture, which has caused the peat to partly or completely oxidise. As land uplift proceeds, some new areas are being subjected to erosion at the same time as other new areas are becoming lakes and sheltered

  13. Description of regolith at Laxemar-Simpevarp. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohlenius, Gustav; Hedenstroem, Anna (Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    This report compiles all known available information regarding the regolith in the Laxemar-Simpevarp regional model area. Regolith refers to the loose deposits overlying the bedrock. In the Laxemar-Simpevarp area, all known regolith was deposited during the Quaternary period and is consequently often referred to as Quaternary deposits (QD). In the terrestrial areas the uppermost part of the regolith, which has been affected by climate and vegetation, is referred to as soil. The geographical and stratigraphical distributions of the regolith have been used to construct a model showing the distribution of regolith depths in the whole model area. The stratigraphical units shown in the regolith depth and stratigraphy model have been characterised with respect to physical and chemical properties. Most of the data used for that characterisation have been obtained from the site investigation but some data were taken from the literature. All QD in the Laxemar area have most probably been deposited during or after the latest deglaciation. The ice sheet in the area moved from the north-west during the latest ice age. The Baltic Sea completely covered the investigated area after the latest deglaciation c 12,000 BC. Land uplift was fastest during the first few thousand years following the deglaciation and has subsequently decreased to the present value of 1 mm/year. Older QD have been eroded in areas exposed to waves and currents and the material has later been redeposited. Fine-grained sediments have been deposited on the floor of bays and in other sheltered positions. Peat has accumulated in many of the wetlands situated in topographically low positions. The groundwater table in many of the former wetlands has been artificially lowered to obtain land for forestry and agriculture, which has caused the peat to partly or completely oxidise. As land uplift proceeds, some new areas are being subjected to erosion at the same time as other new areas are becoming lakes and sheltered

  14. Challenges in Modeling of the Global Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Zavisa; Djurdjevic, Vladimir; Vasic, Ratko; Black, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The massively parallel computer architectures require that some widely adopted modeling paradigms be reconsidered in order to utilize more productively the power of parallel processing. For high computational efficiency with distributed memory, each core should work on a small subdomain of the full integration domain, and exchange only few rows of halo data with the neighbouring cores. However, the described scenario implies that the discretization used in the model is horizontally local. The spherical geometry further complicates the problem. Various grid topologies will be discussed and examples will be shown. The latitude-longitude grid with local in space and explicit in time differencing has been an early choice and remained in use ever since. The problem with this method is that the grid size in the longitudinal direction tends to zero as the poles are approached. So, in addition to having unnecessarily high resolution near the poles, polar filtering has to be applied in order to use a time step of decent size. However, the polar filtering requires transpositions involving extra communications. The spectral transform method and the semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian schemes opened the way for a wide application of the spectral representation. With some variations, these techniques are used in most major centers. However, the horizontal non-locality is inherent to the spectral representation and implicit time differencing, which inhibits scaling on a large number of cores. In this respect the lat-lon grid with a fast Fourier transform represents a significant step in the right direction, particularly at high resolutions where the Legendre transforms become increasingly expensive. Other grids with reduced variability of grid distances such as various versions of the cubed sphere and the hexagonal/pentagonal ("soccer ball") grids were proposed almost fifty years ago. However, on these grids, large-scale (wavenumber 4 and 5) fictitious solutions ("grid imprinting

  15. Formalizing geographical models using specification and description language: the wildfire example

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca Casas, Pau; Casanovas Garcia, Josep; Figueras Jové, Jaume; Guasch Petit, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore how we can use Specification and Description Language, to represent simulation models that make an intensive use of geographical information, like environmental simulation models. The purpose is to perform a complete unambiguous, graphical and formal representation of a wildfire simulation model. Specification and Description Language is a modern object oriented language that al- lows the definition of distributed systems. It has focused on the modeling of...

  16. Onboard Atmospheric Modeling and Prediction for Autonomous Aerobraking Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Robert H.; Prince, Jill L. H.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has proven to be an effective means of increasing the science payload for planetary orbiting missions and/or for enabling the use of less expensive launch vehicles. Though aerobraking has numerous benefits, large operations cost have been required to maintain the aerobraking time line without violating aerodynamic heating or other constraints. Two operations functions have been performed on an orbit by orbit basis to estimate atmospheric properties relevant to aerobraking. The Navigation team typically solves for an atmospheric density scale factor using DSN tracking data and the atmospheric modeling team uses telemetric accelerometer data to recover atmospheric density profiles. After some effort, decisions are made about the need for orbit trim maneuvers to adjust periapsis altitude to stay within the aerobraking corridor. Autonomous aerobraking would reduce the need for many ground based tasks. To be successful, atmospheric modeling must be performed on the vehicle in near real time. This paper discusses the issues associated with estimating the planetary atmosphere onboard and evaluates a number of the options for Mars, Venus and Titan aerobraking missions.

  17. Interfacing the Urban Land-Atmosphere System Through Coupled Urban Canopy and Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyun; Wang, Zhi-Hua

    2015-03-01

    We couple a single column model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single-layer urban canopy model (SLUCM) with realistic representation of urban hydrological processes. The land-surface transport of energy and moisture parametrized by the SLUCM provides lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface layer, as well as vertical profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. The model is then used to simulate urban land-atmosphere interactions by changing urban geometry, surface albedo, vegetation fraction and aerodynamic roughness. Results show that changes of landscape characteristics have a significant impact on the growth of the boundary layer as well as on the distributions of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer. Overall, the proposed numerical framework provides a useful stand-alone modelling tool, with which the impact of urban land-surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology can be assessed via land-atmosphere interactions.

  18. Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System Modeling, Calibration, and Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; VanNorman, John; Siemers, Paul M.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Munk, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI)/Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) project installed seven pressure ports through the MSL Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield to measure heatshield surface pressures during entry. These measured surface pressures are used to generate estimates of atmospheric quantities based on modeled surface pressure distributions. In particular, the quantities to be estimated from the MEADS pressure measurements include the dynamic pressure, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip. This report describes the calibration of the pressure transducers utilized to reconstruct the atmospheric data and associated uncertainty models, pressure modeling and uncertainty analysis, and system performance results. The results indicate that the MEADS pressure measurement system hardware meets the project requirements.

  19. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: thin window model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina A.; Fedoruk, Mikhail P.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. The area of applicability of the proposed “thin window” model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing.

  20. A Model of the Cosmic Ray Induced Atmospheric Neutron Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Salinas, Maria Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    In order to optimise the design of space instruments making use of detection materials with low atomic numbers, an understanding of the atmospheric neutron environment and its dependencies on time and position is needed. To produce a simple equation based model, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the atmospheric neutron fluxes produced by charged galactic cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. Based on the simulation results the omnidirectional neutron environment was parametrised including dependencies on altitude, magnetic latitude and solar activity. The upward- and downward-moving component of the atmospheric neutron flux are considered separately. The energy spectra calculated using these equations were found to be in good agreement with data from a purpose built balloon-borne neutron detector, high altitude aircraft data and previously published simulation based spectra.

  1. Light self-focusing in the atmosphere: thin window model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina A; Fedoruk, Mikhail P; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-high power (exceeding the self-focusing threshold by more than three orders of magnitude) light beams from ground-based laser systems may find applications in space-debris cleaning. The propagation of such powerful laser beams through the atmosphere reveals many novel interesting features compared to traditional light self-focusing. It is demonstrated here that for the relevant laser parameters, when the thickness of the atmosphere is much shorter than the focusing length (that is, of the orbit scale), the beam transit through the atmosphere in lowest order produces phase distortion only. This means that by using adaptive optics it may be possible to eliminate the impact of self-focusing in the atmosphere on the laser beam. The area of applicability of the proposed "thin window" model is broader than the specific physical problem considered here. For instance, it might find applications in femtosecond laser material processing. PMID:27480220

  2. Chemico-physical models of cometary atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublimation (vaporization) of the icy component of a cometary nucleus determines the initial composition of the coma gas as it streams outward and escapes. Photolytic reactions in the inner coma, escape of fast, light species such as atomic and molecular hydrogen, and solar wind interaction in the outer coma alter the chemical composition and the physical nature of the coma gas. Models that describe these interactions must include (1) chemical kinetics, (2) coma energy balance, (3) multifluid flow for the rapidly escaping light components, the heavier bulk fluid, and the plasma with separate temperatures for electrons and the remainder of the gas, (4) transition from a collision dominated inner region to free molecular flow of neutrals in the outer region, (5) pickup of cometary ions by the solar wind, (6) counter and cross streaming of neutrals with respect to the plasma which outside of the contact surface also contains solar wind ions, and (7) magnetic fields carried by the solar wind. Progress on such models is described and results including velocity, temperature, and number density profiles for important chemical species are presented and compared with observations

  3. The limitations of time in atmospheric transfer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric transfer models must be specific to the modelling situation, and the timescale of the problem is important in deriving the model. In the nuclear industry, radionuclides could be released to the atmosphere over a large range of times, depending on the source. These timescales range from seconds, in the case of a puff of radionuclides accidently emitted from a reactor, to many thousands of years in the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The half-life of the radionuclide partially determines the timescale of its importance, but practical considerations also determine the timescales that must be considered in the transfer models. Here, we give an overview of some of the processes and timescales that need to be considered in four radionuclide release scenarios: an emergency release from a reactor (minutes to hours), routine reactor release (annual average), suspension from an area contaminated previously by a reactor release or groundwater plume (years to decades) and disposal of nuclear fuel wastes (thousands of years). In all cases, atmospheric turbulence is an important driving force. However, detailed turbulence information is not helpful in the assessment of long-term releases, and simpler parameterizations must be used. For very long times, statistical and probabilistic models incorporate averaging, uncertainty and variability, and are superior to physically based models of atmospheric motions. (author)

  4. Conservative modelling of the moisture and heat transfer in building components under atmospheric excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Blocken, Bert; Carmeliet, Jan

    conditions, emphasising wind-driven rain and vapour exchange, the main moisture supply and removal mechanism, respectively. In the second part the numerical implementation is tackled, with specific attention to the monotony of the spatial discretisation, and to the mass and energy conservation of the......While the transfer equations for moisture and heat in building components are currently undergoing standardisation, atmospheric boundary conditions, conservative modelling and numerical efficiency are not addressed. In a first part, this paper adds a comprehensive description of those boundary...

  5. Atmospheric multidecadal variations in the North Atlantic realm: proxy data, observations, and atmospheric circulation model studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Grosfeld

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of multidecadal climate variability in the North Atlantic realm, using observational data, proxy data and model results. The dominant pattern of multidecadal variability of SST depicts a monopolar structure in the North Atlantic during the instrumental period with cold (warm phases during 1900–1925 and 1970–1990 (1870–1890 and 1940–1960. Two atmospheric general circulation models of different complexity forced with global SST over the last century show SLP anomaly patterns from the warm and cold phases of the North Atlantic similar to the corresponding observed patterns. The analysis of a sediment core from Cariaco Basin, a coral record from the northern Red Sea, and a long-term sea level pressure (SLP reconstruction reveals that the multidecadal mode of the atmospheric circulation characterizes climate variability also in the pre-industrial era. The analyses of SLP reconstruction and proxy data depict a persistent atmospheric mode at least over the last 300 years, where SLP shows a dipolar structure in response to monopolar North Atlantic SST, in a similar way as the models' responses do. The combined analysis of observational and proxy data with model experiments provides an understanding of multidecadal climate modes during the late Holocene. The related patterns are useful for the interpretation of proxy data in the North Atlantic realm.

  6. Atmospheric multidecadal variations in the North Atlantic realm: proxy data, observations, and atmospheric circulation model studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Grosfeld

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of multidecadal climate variability in the North Atlantic realm, using observational data, proxy data and model results. The dominant pattern of multidecadal variability of SST depicts a monopolar structure in the North Atlantic during the instrumental period with cold (warm phases during 1900–1925 and 1970–1990 (1870–1890 and 1940–1960. Two atmospheric general circulation models of different complexity forced with global SST over the last century show SLP anomaly patterns from the warm and cold phases of the North Atlantic similar to the corresponding observed patterns. The analysis of a sediment core from Cariaco Basin, a coral record from the northern Red Sea, and a long-term sea level pressure (SLP reconstruction reveals that the multidecadal mode of the atmospheric circulation characterizes climate variability also in the pre-industrial era. The analyses of SLP reconstruction and proxy data depict a persistent atmospheric mode at least over the last 300 years, where SLP shows a dipolar structure in response to monopolar North Atlantic SST, in a similar way as the models' responses do. The combined analysis of observational and proxy data with model experiments provides an understanding of multidecadal climate modes during the late Holocene. The related patterns are useful for the interpretation of proxy data in the North Atlantic realm.

  7. Gamow shell model description of proton scattering on $^{18}$Ne

    OpenAIRE

    Jaganathen, Y.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2014-01-01

    We formulate the GSM in coupled-channel (GSM-CC) representation to describe low-energy elastic and inelastic scattering of protons on $^{18}$Ne. The GSM-CC formalism is applied to a translationally-invariant Hamiltonian with an effective finite-range two-body interaction. We discuss in details the GSM-CC formalism in coordinate space and give the description of the novel equivalent potential method for solving the GSM-CC system of integro-differential equations. We present the first applicati...

  8. Using Soft Constraints To Learn Semantic Models Of Descriptions Of Shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Guadarrama, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is to provide a semantic model (using soft constraints) of the words used by web-users to describe objects in a language game; a game in which one user describes a selected object of those composing the scene, and another user has to guess which object has been described. The given description needs to be non ambiguous and accurate enough to allow other users to guess the described shape correctly. To build these semantic models the descriptions need to be analyzed to extract the syntax and words' classes used. We have modeled the meaning of these descriptions using soft constraints as a way for grounding the meaning. The descriptions generated by the system took into account the context of the object to avoid ambiguous descriptions, and allowed users to guess the described object correctly 72% of the times.

  9. Performance examination of atmospheric model at seacoast region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional numerical atmospheric model (PHYSIC) was developed to apply it to atmospheric transport and diffusion evaluation. The main frame of PHYSIC is made up of momentum equations with the hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximation, the second-order turbulence closure model level 2.5 and other basic equations of physical process in the atmosphere. A terrain following z* coordinate system is used. The calculation results at a coastal plain were examined using meteorological data observed during atmospheric diffusion experiments at Tokai in 1983. The present model successfully predicts the temporal change of wind field within 20 h from evening to next noon and the occurrence and structure of sea breeze are simulated satisfactorily. The model performance concerning the structure of sea breeze and the distribution of eddy diffusivities is thought to be reasonable, although the direct comparison between calculation and observation is restricted to wind and temperature profiles by limited observation data. Further examination of model performance relating to above items, and over mountainous region, will be needed. (author)

  10. Sensitivity of Air-sea Exchange In A Regional Scale Coupled Ice/ocean/atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, C.; Hübner, U.; Jacob, D.; Podzun, R.

    The sub-systems ice, ocean and atmosphere are coupled on the global as well as the regional scale. However, regional coupled modeling is only in the beginning, full cou- pled models which are able to describe the interaction on the regional scale and the feedback mechanism are rare at the moment. For the North Sea and the Baltic Sea such a coupled model has been developed and exemplary integrated over a full seasonal cy- cle. By comparison of different regionalization studies the impact of the regional at- mospheric modeling and coupling on the air sea fluxes have been investigated. It was shown that the regionalization as well as the coupling show strong influence on the air/sea fluxes and thus on the oceanic conditions. Further problems in regional mod- eling like the description of storm track variability and its influence on the regional ocean model were identified.

  11. Stellar model atmospheres with magnetic line blanketing. II. Introduction of polarized radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, S A

    2006-01-01

    The technique of model atmosphere calculation for magnetic Ap and Bp stars with polarized radiative transfer and magnetic line blanketing is presented. A grid of model atmospheres of A and B stars are computed. These calculations are based on direct treatment of the opacities due to the bound-bound transitions that ensures an accurate and detailed description of the line absorption and anomalous Zeeman splitting. The set of model atmospheres was calculated for the field strengths between 1 and 40 kG. The high-resolution energy distribution, photometric colors and the hydrogen Balmer line profiles are computed for magnetic stars with different metallicities and are compared to those of non-magnetic reference models and to the previous paper of this series. The results of modelling confirmed the main outcomes of the previous study: energy redistribution from UV to the visual region and flux depression at 5200A. However, we found that effects of enhanced line blanketing when transfer for polarized radiation take...

  12. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  13. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  14. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  15. Evaluation of atmospheric density models and preliminary functional specifications for the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.; Boland, D. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This document presents the results of an extensive survey and comparative evaluation of current atmosphere and wind models for inclusion in the Langley Atmospheric Information Retrieval System (LAIRS). It includes recommended models for use in LAIRS, estimated accuracies for the recommended models, and functional specifications for the development of LAIRS.

  16. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Ecohydrodynamic model of the Baltic Sea. Part 1. Description of the ProDeMo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Ołdakowski

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The ProDeMo (Production and Destruction of Organic Matter Model, a 3D coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model, was formulated and applied to the whole Baltic Sea and the subregion of the Gulf of Gdansk. It describes nutrient cycles (phosphorus, nitrogen, silicon through the food web with 15 state variables, oxygen conditions and the parameterisation of water-sediment interactions. The present version of the model takes two groups of phytoplankton - diatoms and non-diatoms - as well as zooplankton into consideration. It covers the flow of matter and energy in the sea, including river discharges and atmospheric deposition. Numerical applications are embedded on a 1 NM grid for the Gulf of Gdansk and a 5 NM grid for the Baltic Sea.     Since the model results largely concur with observations, the model can be regarded as a reliable tool for analysing the behaviour of the Baltic ecosystem. Some examples of the spatial-temporal variability of the most important biological and chemical parameters are presented. The model results are compared with those of other modelling research in the Baltic Sea.     Both the ProDeMo model algorithm and its computing procedures need to be further developed. The next version should therefore enable more phytoplankton groups to be defined, for example cyanobacteria, which are able to take up molecular nitrogen from the atmosphere (nitrogen fixation. Additionally, the sediment phase should be divided into active and non-active layers.

  18. Description Model of Warehouse Architecture for Clinical Test at the Molecular Immunology Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Rafael Sotolongo León

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and detailed description of the architecture of computer systems is very important to achieve success in their development. As informatic solutions, data warehouses and software support decision-making in institutions that need to implement a detailed description of the architecture. Ralph Kimball proposes the aspects to be considered of the description and explains how it is done. There are specific models used to describe the architecture such as Kruchten 4 +1 views of meta-model or the Common Warehouse Metamodel (CWM however these models do not meet the need of the description that requires a data warehouse that integrates information from clinical trials of the Molecular Immunology Centre (CIM. In this paper we propose a model for describing the data warehouse architecture that fits the needs of the Molecular Immunology Center following the Kimball framework and using as UML 2.0 modeling language.

  19. Empirical corrections for atmospheric neutral density derived from thermospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen; Börger, Klaus; Henze, Christina; Löcher, Anno; Eickmans, Marius; Agena, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Accurately predicting satellite positions is a prerequisite for various applications from space situational awareness to precise orbit determination (POD). Given the fact that atmospheric drag represents a dominant influence on the position of low-Earth orbit objects, an accurate evaluation of thermospheric mass density is of great importance to low Earth orbital prediction. Over decades, various empirical atmospheric models have been developed to support computation of density changes within the atmosphere. The quality of these models is, however, restricted mainly due to the complexity of atmospheric density changes and the limited resolution of indices used to account for atmospheric temperature and neutral density changes caused by solar and geomagnetic activity. Satellite missions, such as Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), provide a direct measurement of non-conservative accelerations, acting on the surface of satellites. These measurements provide valuable data for improving our knowledge of thermosphere density and winds. In this paper we present two empirical frameworks to correct model-derived neutral density simulations by the along-track thermospheric density measurements of CHAMP and GRACE. First, empirical scale factors are estimated by analyzing daily CHAMP and GRACE acceleration measurements and are used to correct the density simulation of Jacchia and MSIS (Mass-Spectrometer-Incoherent-Scatter) thermospheric models. The evolution of daily scale factors is then related to solar and magnetic activity enabling their prediction in time. In the second approach, principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to extract the dominant modes of differences between CHAMP/GRACE observations and thermospheric model simulations. Afterwards an adaptive correction procedure is used to account for long-term and high-frequency differences. We conclude the study by providing recommendations on possible

  20. Evaluation of the WIND System atmospheric models: An analytic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytic approach was used in this study to test the logic, coding, and the theoretical limits of the WIND System atmospheric models for the Savannah River Plant. In this method, dose or concentration estimates predicted by the models were compared to the analytic solutions to evaluate their performance. The results from AREA EVACUATION and PLTFF/PLUME were very nearly identical to the analytic solutions they are based on and the evaluation procedure demonstrated that these models were able to reproduce the theoretical characteristics of a puff or a plume. The dose or concentration predicted by PLTFF/PLUME was always within 1% of the analytic solution. Differences between the dose predicted by 2DPUF and its analytic solution were substantially greater than those associated with PUFF/PLUME, but were usually smaller than 6%. This behavior was expected because PUFF/PLUME solves a form of the analytic solution for a single puff, and 2DPUF performs an integration over a period of time for several puffs to obtain the dose. Relatively large differences between the dose predicted by 2DPUF and its analytic solution were found to occur close to the source under stable atmospheric conditions. WIND System users should be aware of these situations in which the assumptions of the System atmospheric models may be violated so that dose predictions can be interpreted correctly. The WIND System atmospheric models are similar to many other dispersion codes used by the EPA, NRC, and DOE. If the quality of the source term and meteorological data is high, relatively accurate and timely forecasts for emergency response situations can be made by the WIND System atmospheric models

  1. An Exercise in Modelling Using the US Standard Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Jacobs, Diane A.

    2007-01-01

    In this exercise the US Standard Atmosphere is used as "data" that a student is asked to model by deriving equations to reproduce it with the help of spreadsheet and graphing software. The exercise can be used as a laboratory or an independent study for a student of introductory physics to provide an introduction to scientific research methods…

  2. Normal seasonal variations for atmospheric radon concentration: a sinusoidal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous radon readings in air have been reported before an earthquake activity. However, careful measurements of atmospheric radon concentrations during a normal period are required to identify anomalous variations in a precursor period. In this study, we obtained radon concentration data for 5 years (2003–2007) that can be considered a normal period and compared it with data from the precursory period of 2008 until March 2011, when the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake occurred. Then, we established a model for seasonal variation by fitting a sinusoidal model to the radon concentration data during the normal period, considering that the seasonal variation was affected by atmospheric turbulence. By determining the amplitude in the sinusoidal model, the normal variation of the radon concentration can be estimated. Thus, the results of this method can be applied to identify anomalous radon variations before an earthquake. - Highlights: • Normal seasonal variation of the atmospheric radon concentration was determined by accurately fitting with a sinusoidal model. • The seasonal variation in data was affected by atmospheric turbulence. • The normal radon pattern was used to extract precursory changes before earthquakes

  3. Gamow shell model description of proton scattering on $^{18}$Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Jaganathen, Y; Płoszajczak, M

    2014-01-01

    We formulate the GSM in coupled-channel (GSM-CC) representation to describe low-energy elastic and inelastic scattering of protons on $^{18}$Ne. The GSM-CC formalism is applied to a translationally-invariant Hamiltonian with an effective finite-range two-body interaction. We discuss in details the GSM-CC formalism in coordinate space and give the description of the novel equivalent potential method for solving the GSM-CC system of integro-differential equations. We present the first application of the GSM-CC formalism for the calculation of excited states of $^{18}$Ne and $^{19}$Na, excitation function and the elastic/inelastic differential cross-sections in the $^{18}$Ne$(p,p')$ reaction at different energies.

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERIC FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a three-dimensional hot Jupiter model, extending from 200 bar to 1 mbar, using the Intermediate General Circulation Model from the University of Reading. Our horizontal spectral resolution is T31 (equivalent to a grid of 48 x 96), with 33 logarithmically spaced vertical levels. A simplified (Newtonian) scheme is employed for the radiative forcing. We adopt a physical setup nearly identical to the model of HD 209458b by Cooper and Showman to facilitate a direct model inter-comparison. Our results are broadly consistent with theirs but significant differences also emerge. The atmospheric flow is characterized by a super-rotating equatorial jet, transonic wind speeds, and eastward advection of heat away from the dayside. We identify a dynamically induced temperature inversion ('stratosphere') on the planetary dayside and find that temperatures at the planetary limb differ systematically from local radiative equilibrium values, a potential source of bias for transit spectroscopic interpretations. While our model atmosphere is quasi-identical to that of Cooper and Showman and we solve the same meteorological equations, we use different algorithmic methods, spectral-implicit versus grid-explicit, which are known to yield fully consistent results in the Earth modeling context. The model discrepancies identified here indicate that one or both numerical methods do not faithfully capture all of the atmospheric dynamics at work in the hot Jupiter context. We highlight the emergence of a shock-like feature in our model, much like that reported recently by Showman et al., and suggest that improved representations of energy conservation may be needed in hot Jupiter atmospheric models, as emphasized by Goodman.

  5. Global Deep Convection Models of Saturn's Atmospheric Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Cuff, Keith; Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini mission, along with previous missions and ground-based observations, has revealed a rich variety of atmospheric phenomena and time variability on Saturn. Some examples of dynamical features are: zonal flows with multiple jet streams, turbulent tilted shear flows that seem to power the jets, the north polar hexagon, the south polar cyclone, large anticyclones in "storm alley", numerous convective storms (white spots) of various sizes, and the 2010/2011 great storm, which destroyed an array of vortices dubbed the "string of pearls". Here we use the anelastic dynamo code MagIC, in non-magnetic mode, to study rotating convection in a spherical shell. The thickness of the shell is set to approximate the depth of the low electrical conductivity deep atmosphere of Saturn, and the convective forcing is set to yield zonal flows of similar velocity (Rossby number) to those of Saturn. Internal heating and the outer entropy boundary conditions allow simple modelling of atmospheric layers with neutral stability or stable stratification. In these simulations we can identify several saturnian and jovian atmospheric features, with some variations. We find that large anticyclonic vortices tend to form in the first anticyclonic shear zones away from the equatorial jet. Cyclones form at the poles, and polar polygonal jet streams, comparable to Saturn's hexagon, may or may not form, depending on the model conditions. Strings of small scale vortical structures arise as convective plumes near boundaries of shear zones. They typically precede larger scale convective storms that spawn propagating shear flow disturbances and anticyclonic vortices, which tend to drift across anticyclonic shear zones, toward the equator (opposite the drift direction of Saturn's 2010/2011 storm). Our model results indicate that many identifiable dynamical atmospheric features seen on Jupiter and Saturn arise from deep convection, shaped by planetary rotation, underlying and interacting with stably

  6. Statistical modelling of collocation uncertainty in atmospheric thermodynamic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fassò

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainty of important atmospheric parameters is a key factor for assessing the uncertainty of global change estimates given by numerical prediction models. One of the critical points of the uncertainty budget is related to the collocation mismatch in space and time among different observations. This is particularly important for vertical atmospheric profiles obtained by radiosondes or LIDAR. In this paper we consider a statistical modelling approach to understand at which extent collocation uncertainty is related to environmental factors, height and distance between the trajectories. To do this we introduce a new statistical approach, based on the heteroskedastic functional regression (HFR model which extends the standard functional regression approach and allows us a natural definition of uncertainty profiles. Moreover, using this modelling approach, a five-folded uncertainty decomposition is proposed. Eventually, the HFR approach is illustrated by the collocation uncertainty analysis of relative humidity from two stations involved in GCOS reference upper-air network (GRUAN.

  7. Description of Success: A Four-Teacher Instructional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Dianne

    This study described a four-teacher instructional model in operation at an elementary school, noting the perceptions of fourth grade students, parents, and teachers regarding the model. The model encompassed teaming, block scheduling, departmentalization of subjects, integrated/interdisciplinary instruction, and in-depth instruction in each…

  8. A descriptive model of information problem solving while using internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Wopereis, Iwan; Walraven, Amber

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the IPS-I-model: a model that describes the process of information problem solving (IPS) in which the Internet (I) is used to search information. The IPS-I-model is based on three studies, in which students in secondary and (post) higher education were asked to solve information

  9. Atmospheric Absorption Models for the Millimeter Wave Range

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with absorption models of water vapor, oxygen and nitrogen which are part of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer System, ARTS, which is a joint development of the Department of Radio and Space Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg and the Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen. ARTS is designed to be used in remotely sensed data analysis. Since the absorption models are embedded in the broader frame of the radiative transfer equation, the main...

  10. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  11. Description and validation of realistic and structured endourology training model

    OpenAIRE

    Soria, Federico; Morcillo, Esther; Sanz, Juan Luis; Budia, Alberto; Serrano, Alvaro; Sanchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to validate a model of training, which combines the use of non-biological and ex vivo biological bench models, as well as the modelling of urological injuries for endourological treatment in a porcine animal model. Material and Methods: A total of 40 participants took part in this study. The duration of the activity was 16 hours. The model of training was divided into 3 levels: level I, concerning the acquisition of basic theoretical knowledge; level ...

  12. Descriptive and predictive evaluation of high resolution Markov chain precipitation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Hjalte Jomo Danielsen; Madsen, Henrik; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    first‐order Markov model seems to capture most of the properties of precipitation, but inclusion of seasonal and diurnal variation improves the model. Including a second‐order Markov Chain component does improve the descriptive capabilities of the model, but is very expensive in its parameter use...... and necessary tools when evaluating model fit and performance. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  13. RELAP5 Model Description and Validation for the BR2 Loss-of-Flow Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Koonen, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a description of the RELAP5 model, the calibration method used to obtain the minor loss coefficients from the available hydraulic data and the LOFA simulation results compared to the 1963 experimental tests for HEU fuel.

  14. Optimizing the calculation grid for atmospheric dispersion modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents three approaches to find optimized grids for atmospheric dispersion measurements and calculations in emergency planning. This can be useful for deriving optimal positions for mobile monitoring stations, or help to reduce discretization errors and improve recommendations. Indeed, threshold-based recommendations or conclusions may differ strongly on the shape and size of the grid on which atmospheric dispersion measurements or calculations of pollutants are based. Therefore, relatively sparse grids that retain as much information as possible, are required. The grid optimization procedure proposed here is first demonstrated with a simple Gaussian plume model as adopted in atmospheric dispersion calculations, which provides fast calculations. The optimized grids are compared to the Noodplan grid, currently used for emergency planning in Belgium, and to the exact solution. We then demonstrate how it can be used in more realistic dispersion models. - Highlights: • Grid points for atmospheric dispersion calculations are optimized. • Using heuristics the optimization problem results into different grid shapes. • Comparison between optimized models and the Noodplan grid is performed

  15. Atmospheric Climate Model Experiments Performed at Multiple Horizontal Resolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T; Bala, G; Gleckler, P; Lobell, D; Mirin, A; Maxwell, R; Rotman, D

    2007-12-21

    This report documents salient features of version 3.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.3) and of three climate simulations in which the resolution of its latitude-longitude grid was systematically increased. For all these simulations of global atmospheric climate during the period 1980-1999, observed monthly ocean surface temperatures and sea ice extents were prescribed according to standard Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) values. These CAM3.3 resolution experiments served as control runs for subsequent simulations of the climatic effects of agricultural irrigation, the focus of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The CAM3.3 model was able to replicate basic features of the historical climate, although biases in a number of atmospheric variables were evident. Increasing horizontal resolution also generally failed to ameliorate the large-scale errors in most of the climate variables that could be compared with observations. A notable exception was the simulation of precipitation, which incrementally improved with increasing resolution, especially in regions where orography plays a central role in determining the local hydroclimate.

  16. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≅ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number

  17. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron—ion pair, electron—neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≈ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W—the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  18. A comparison of Gaussian and diffusivity models of atmospheric dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gaussian plume diffusion model of Smith and a diffusivity model by Maul are compared over the full range of atmospheric stability. The models' predictions for ground level concentration are found to agree well a) for ground level releases of materials, and b) for elevated releases of material at distances comparable to or greater than the distance of maximum ground level concentration. Surface layer, ground roughness, and dry deposition effects are examined and a simple ground deposition model used in the Gaussian plume model is found to be adequate over most of the stability range. Uncertainties due to the models themselves and the meteorological input data are estimated and the advantages and limitations of both types of model are discussed. It is concluded that the models are suitable for a variety of applications and that they are fast and inexpensive to run as computer models. (author)

  19. Bioenergy crop models: Descriptions, data requirements and future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, S. Surendran [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Zhang, Xuesong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miguez, Fernando [Iowa State University; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Field studies that address the production of lignocellulosic biomass as a source of renewable energy provide critical data for the development of bioenergy crop models. A literature survey revealed that 14 models have been used for simulating bioenergy crops including herbaceous and woody bioenergy crops, and for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) crops. These models simulate field-scale production of biomass for switchgrass (ALMANAC, EPIC, and Agro-BGC), miscanthus (MISCANFOR, MISCANMOD, and WIMOVAC), sugarcane (APSIM, AUSCANE, and CANEGRO), and poplar and willow (SECRETS and 3PG). Two models are adaptations of dynamic global vegetation models and simulate biomass yields of miscanthus and sugarcane at regional scales (Agro-IBIS and LPJmL). Although it lacks the complexity of other bioenergy crop models, the environmental productivity index (EPI) is the only model used to estimate biomass production of CAM (Agave and Opuntia) plants. Except for the EPI model, all models include representations of leaf area dynamics, phenology, radiation interception and utilization, biomass production, and partitioning of biomass to roots and shoots. A few models simulate soil water, nutrient, and carbon cycle dynamics, making them especially useful for assessing the environmental consequences (e.g., erosion and nutrient losses) associated with the large-scale deployment of bioenergy crops. The rapid increase in use of models for energy crop simulation is encouraging; however, detailed information on the influence of climate, soils, and crop management practices on biomass production is scarce. Thus considerable work remains regarding the parameterization and validation of process-based models for bioenergy crops; generation and distribution of high-quality field data for model development and validation; and implementation of an integrated framework for efficient, high-resolution simulations of biomass production for use in planning sustainable bioenergy systems.

  20. Coupled atmosphere-wildland fire modeling with WRF-Fire

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Jan; Kochanski, Adam K

    2011-01-01

    We describe the physical model, numerical algorithms, and software structure of WRF-Fire. WRF-Fire consists of a fire-spread model, implemented by the level-set method, coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. In every time step, the fire model inputs the surface wind, which drives the fire, and outputs the heat flux from the fire into the atmosphere, which in turn influences the weather. The level-set method allows submesh representation of the burning region and flexible implementation of various ignition modes. WRF-Fire is distributed as a part of WRF and it uses the WRF parallel infrastructure for parallel computing.

  1. Physically-Derived Dynamical Cores in Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.; Lin, Shian-Kiann

    1999-01-01

    The algorithm chosen to represent the advection in atmospheric models is often used as the primary attribute to classify the model. Meteorological models are generally classified as spectral or grid point, with the term grid point implying discretization using finite differences. These traditional approaches have a number of shortcomings that render them non-physical. That is, they provide approximate solutions to the conservation equations that do not obey the fundamental laws of physics. The most commonly discussed shortcomings are overshoots and undershoots which manifest themselves most overtly in the constituent continuity equation. For this reason many climate models have special algorithms to model water vapor advection. This talk focuses on the development of an atmospheric general circulation model which uses a consistent physically-based advection algorithm in all aspects of the model formulation. The shallow-water model of Lin and Rood (QJRMS, 1997) is generalized to three dimensions and combined with the physics parameterizations of NCAR's Community Climate Model. The scientific motivation for the development is to increase the integrity of the underlying fluid dynamics so that the physics terms can be more effectively isolated, examined, and improved. The expected benefits of the new model are discussed and results from the initial integrations will be presented.

  2. Charter for the ARM Atmospheric Modeling Advisory Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advisory Group, ARM Atmospheric Modeling

    2016-05-01

    The Atmospheric Modeling Advisory Group of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is guided by the following: 1. The group will provide feedback on the overall project plan including input on how to address priorities and trade-offs in the modeling and analysis workflow, making sure the modeling follows general best practices, and reviewing the recommendations provided to ARM for the workflow implementation. 2. The group will consist of approximately 6 members plus the PI and co-PI of the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) pilot project. The ARM Technical Director, or his designee, serves as an ex-officio member. This size is chosen based on the ability to efficiently conduct teleconferences and to span the general needs for input to the LASSO pilot project.

  3. The Description of the Open Model in College English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐林

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve the current problems in the college English teaching and meet the demands of the "College English Curriculum Requirements", the Open Model in College English teaching is proposed in the thesis.The thesis describes the model from the five components.

  4. Pattern formation in flocking models: A hydrodynamic description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solon, Alexandre P.; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Bartolo, Denis; Chaté, Hugues; Tailleur, Julien

    2015-12-01

    We study in detail the hydrodynamic theories describing the transition to collective motion in polar active matter, exemplified by the Vicsek and active Ising models. Using a simple phenomenological theory, we show the existence of an infinity of propagative solutions, describing both phase and microphase separation, that we fully characterize. We also show that the same results hold specifically in the hydrodynamic equations derived in the literature for the active Ising model and for a simplified version of the Vicsek model. We then study numerically the linear stability of these solutions. We show that stable ones constitute only a small fraction of them, which, however, includes all existing types. We further argue that, in practice, a coarsening mechanism leads towards phase-separated solutions. Finally, we construct the phase diagrams of the hydrodynamic equations proposed to qualitatively describe the Vicsek and active Ising models and connect our results to the phenomenology of the corresponding microscopic models.

  5. Advancing reservoir operation description in physically based hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Giudici, Federico; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Last decades have seen significant advances in our capacity of characterizing and reproducing hydrological processes within physically based models. Yet, when the human component is considered (e.g. reservoirs, water distribution systems), the associated decisions are generally modeled with very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the actual operators' behaviour on a daily or sub-daily basis. For example, reservoir operations are usually described by a target-level rule curve, which represents the level that the reservoir should track during normal operating conditions. The associated release decision is determined by the current state of the reservoir relative to the rule curve. This modeling approach can reasonably reproduce the seasonal water volume shift due to reservoir operation. Still, it cannot capture more complex decision making processes in response, e.g., to the fluctuations of energy prices and demands, the temporal unavailability of power plants or varying amount of snow accumulated in the basin. In this work, we link a physically explicit hydrological model with detailed hydropower behavioural models describing the decision making process by the dam operator. In particular, we consider two categories of behavioural models: explicit or rule-based behavioural models, where reservoir operating rules are empirically inferred from observational data, and implicit or optimization based behavioural models, where, following a normative economic approach, the decision maker is represented as a rational agent maximising a utility function. We compare these two alternate modelling approaches on the real-world water system of Lake Como catchment in the Italian Alps. The water system is characterized by the presence of 18 artificial hydropower reservoirs generating almost 13% of the Italian hydropower production. Results show to which extent the hydrological regime in the catchment is affected by different behavioural models and reservoir

  6. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  7. Thermal site descriptive model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations - version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    This report presents a strategy for describing, predicting and visualising the thermal aspects of the site descriptive model. The strategy is an updated version of an earlier strategy applied in all SDM versions during the initial site investigation phase at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The previous methodology for thermal modelling did not take the spatial correlation fully into account during simulation. The result was that the variability of thermal conductivity in the rock mass was not sufficiently well described. Experience from earlier thermal SDMs indicated that development of the methodology was required in order describe the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity in the rock mass in a sufficiently reliable way, taking both variability within rock types and between rock types into account. A good description of the thermal conductivity distribution is especially important for the lower tail. This tail is important for the design of a repository because it affects the canister spacing. The presented approach is developed to be used for final SDM regarding thermal properties, primarily thermal conductivity. Specific objectives for the strategy of thermal stochastic modelling are: Description: statistical description of the thermal conductivity of a rock domain. Prediction: prediction of thermal conductivity in a specific rock volume. Visualisation: visualisation of the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity. The thermal site descriptive model should include the temperature distribution and thermal properties of the rock mass. The temperature is the result of the thermal processes in the repository area. Determination of thermal transport properties can be made using different methods, such as laboratory investigations, field measurements, modelling from mineralogical composition and distribution, modelling from density logging and modelling from temperature logging. The different types of data represent different scales, which has to be

  8. Integrating cognitive process and descriptive models of attitudes and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Guy E; Marley, A A J; Heathcote, Andrew; Flynn, Terry N; Louviere, Jordan J; Brown, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Discrete choice experiments--selecting the best and/or worst from a set of options--are increasingly used to provide more efficient and valid measurement of attitudes or preferences than conventional methods such as Likert scales. Discrete choice data have traditionally been analyzed with random utility models that have good measurement properties but provide limited insight into cognitive processes. We extend a well-established cognitive model, which has successfully explained both choices and response times for simple decision tasks, to complex, multi-attribute discrete choice data. The fits, and parameters, of the extended model for two sets of choice data (involving patient preferences for dermatology appointments, and consumer attitudes toward mobile phones) agree with those of standard choice models. The extended model also accounts for choice and response time data in a perceptual judgment task designed in a manner analogous to best-worst discrete choice experiments. We conclude that several research fields might benefit from discrete choice experiments, and that the particular accumulator-based models of decision making used in response time research can also provide process-level instantiations for random utility models. PMID:24124986

  9. The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, F.P. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the O{sub x}, HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

  10. Atmospheric mercury dispersion modelling from two nearest hypothetical point sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandakar Md Habib Al Razi, Moritomi Hiroshi, Kambara Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Japan coastal areas are still environmentally friendly, though there are multiple air emission sources originating as a consequence of several developmental activities such as automobile industries, operation of thermal power plants, and mobile-source pollution. Mercury is known to be a potential air pollutant in the region apart from SOX, NOX, CO and Ozone. Mercury contamination in water bodies and other ecosystems due to deposition of atmospheric mercury is considered a serious environmental concern. Identification of sources contributing to the high atmospheric mercury levels will be useful for formulating pollution control and mitigation strategies in the region. In Japan, mercury and its compounds were categorized as hazardous air pollutants in 1996 and are on the list of "Substances Requiring Priority Action" published by the Central Environmental Council of Japan. The Air Quality Management Division of the Environmental Bureau, Ministry of the Environment, Japan, selected the current annual mean environmental air quality standard for mercury and its compounds of 0.04 μg/m3. Long-term exposure to mercury and its compounds can have a carcinogenic effect, inducing eg, Minamata disease. This study evaluates the impact of mercury emissions on air quality in the coastal area of Japan. Average yearly emission of mercury from an elevated point source in this area with background concentration and one-year meteorological data were used to predict the ground level concentration of mercury. To estimate the concentration of mercury and its compounds in air of the local area, two different simulation models have been used. The first is the National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology Atmospheric Dispersion Model for Exposure and Risk Assessment (AIST-ADMER that estimates regional atmospheric concentration and distribution. The second is the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated trajectory Model (HYSPLIT that estimates the

  11. Decadal Periodicities in a Venus Atmosphere General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Helen; Schubert, G.; Covey, C.; Walterscheid, R.; Grossman, A.; Lebonnois, S.

    2010-10-01

    We have modified a 3-dimensional Earth-based climate model, CAM (Community Atmosphere Model), to simulate the dynamics of Venus' atmosphere. We have removed Earth-related processes and introduced parameters appropriate for Venus. We use a simplified Newtonian cooling approximation for the radiation scheme, without seasonal or diurnal cycles or topography. We use a high resolution (1 degree in latitude and longitude) to take account of small-scale dynamical processes that might be important on Venus. Rayleigh friction is used to represent surface drag and to prevent upper boundary wave reflection. The simulations generate superrotation at cloud heights with wind velocities comparable to those found in measurements. We find a significant decadal oscillation in the zonal winds at cloud top heights and below. A vacillation cycle is seen in the cloud top mid-latitude zonal jets which wax and wane on an approximate 10 year cycle. The decadal oscillations we find may be excited by an instability near the surface, possibly a symmetric instability. Analyses of angular momentum transport show that the jets are built up by poleward transport by a meridional circulation while angular momentum is redistributed to lower latitudes primarily by transient eddies. Observations suggest that a cyclic variation similar to that found in the model might occur in the real Venus atmosphere. Observations by Mariner 10, Pioneer Venus, and Venus Express reveal variability in cloud top wind magnitudes and in the structure of Venus' cloud level mid-latitude jets with timescales of 5 to 10 years. Oscillations in CO composition and in temperature above the cloud tops also exhibit a periodicity around 10 years and changes in the atmospheric SO2 content over 40 years show a periodicity around 20 to 25 years. Venus' atmosphere must be observed over multi-year time scales and below the clouds if we are to understand its dynamics.

  12. Report on the Standardized Description of Instructional Models

    OpenAIRE

    Derntl, M; Neumann, S.; Oberhuemer, P

    2009-01-01

    The report is exploring how instructional models could be described in a standardised way. How could good teaching practice in instructional modelling be captured and evaluated; and what are the potentials of standard as IMS Learning Design to support these activities? The report presents a Framework for Good Teaching Practice that uses an Educational Taxonomy to classify Teaching Methods and Units of Learning (which are contextualised examples of good teaching practice).

  13. Nucleation model for the description of glass formation

    OpenAIRE

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    1998-01-01

    We present in this letter a model of glass formation using energy barriers and a crystal nucleation process. We then analyze the corresponding dynamical equation in the vicinity of the stationary solutions. The occurence of a pure amorphous solution (i.e. glass) is due to the contribution of a ratio $\\Lambda$ depending on the cooling rate and the crystal nucleation frequency. We also construct time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves in order to relate the model with the kinetic treatment...

  14. Linking Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences in Continental Water Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C. H.; Gochis, D. J.; Maidment, D. R.; Wilhelmi, O.

    2006-12-01

    Atmospheric observation and model output datasets as well as hydrologic datasets are increasingly becoming available on a continental scale. Although the availability of these datasets could allow large-scale water dynamics modeling, the different objects and semantics used in atmospheric science and hydrology set barriers to their interoperability. Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility for modeling terrestrial water dynamics for the continental United States of America. Continental water dynamics defines the interaction of the hydrosphere, the land surface and subsurface at spatial scales ranging from point to continent. The improved version of the National Hydrographic Dataset (NHDPlus, an integrated suite of geospatial datasets stored in a vector and raster GIS format) was used as hydrologic and elevation data input to the Noah community Land Surface Model, developed at NCAR. Noah was successfully run on a watershed in the Ohio River Basin with NHDPlus inputs. The use of NHDPlus as input data for Noah is a crucial improvement for community modeling efforts allowing users to by-pass much of the time consumed in Digital Elevation Model and hydrological network processing. Furthermore, the community Noah land surface model, in its hydrologically-enhanced configuration, is capable of providing flow inputs for a river dynamics model. Continued enhancement of Noah will, as a consequence, be beneficial to the atmospheric science community as well as to the hydrologic community. Ongoing research foci include using a diversity of weather drivers as an input to Noah, and investigation of how to use land surface model outputs for river forecasting, using both the ArcHydro and OpenMI frameworks.

  15. Comparison between empirical and physically based models of atmospheric correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandanici, E.; Franci, F.; Bitelli, G.; Agapiou, A.; Alexakis, D.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    A number of methods have been proposed for the atmospheric correction of the multispectral satellite images, based on either atmosphere modelling or images themselves. Full radiative transfer models require a lot of ancillary information about the atmospheric conditions at the acquisition time. Whereas, image based methods cannot account for all the involved phenomena. Therefore, the aim of this paper is the comparison of different atmospheric correction methods for multispectral satellite images. The experimentation was carried out on a study area located in the catchment area of Yialias river, 20 km South of Nicosia, the Cyprus capital. The following models were tested, both empirical and physically based: Dark object subtraction, QUAC, Empirical line, 6SV, and FLAASH. They were applied on a Landsat 8 multispectral image. The spectral signatures of ten different land cover types were measured during a field campaign in 2013 and 15 samples were collected for laboratory measurements in a second campaign in 2014. GER 1500 spectroradiometer was used; this instrument can record electromagnetic radiation from 350 up to 1050 nm, includes 512 different channels and each channel covers about 1.5 nm. The spectral signatures measured were used to simulate the reflectance values for the multispectral sensor bands by applying relative spectral response filters. These data were considered as ground truth to assess the accuracy of the different image correction models. Results do not allow to establish which method is the most accurate. The physics-based methods describe better the shape of the signatures, whereas the image-based models perform better regarding the overall albedo.

  16. Comparative calculations and validation studies with atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an intercomparison of different mesoscale dispersion models and measured data of tracer experiments. The types of models taking part in the intercomparison are Gaussian-type, numerical Eulerian, and Lagrangian dispersion models. They are suited for the calculation of the atmospherical transport of radionuclides released from a nuclear installation. For the model intercomparison artificial meteorological situations were defined and corresponding arithmetical problems were formulated. For the purpose of model validation real dispersion situations of tracer experiments were used as input data for model calculations; in these cases calculated and measured time-integrated concentrations close to the ground are compared. Finally a valuation of the models concerning their efficiency in solving the problems is carried out by the aid of objective methods. (orig./HP)

  17. Behaviour of tracer diffusion in simple atmospheric boundary layer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available 1-D profiles and time series from an idealised atmospheric boundary layer model are presented, which show agreement with measurements of polar photogenic NO and NO2. Diffusion models are increasingly being used as the framework for studying tropospheric air chemistry dynamics. Models based on standard boundary layer diffusivity profiles have an intrinsic behaviour that is not necessarily intuitive, due to the variation of turbulent diffusivity with height. The relatively simple model provides both a programming and a conceptual tool in the analysis of observed trace gas evolution. A time scale inherent in the model can be tuned by fitting model time series to observations. This scale is then applicable to the more physically simple but chemically complex zeroth order or box models of chemical interactions.

  18. Behaviour of tracer diffusion in simple atmospheric boundary layer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available 1-D profiles and time series from an idealised atmospheric boundary layer model are presented, which show agreement with boundary layer measurements of polar NOx. Diffusion models are increasingly being used as the framework for studying tropospheric air chemistry dynamics. Models based on standard boundary layer diffusivity profiles have an intrinsic behaviour that is not necessarily intuitive, due to the variation of turbulent diffusivity with height. The simple model presented captures the essence of the evolution of a trace gas released at the surface, and thereby provides both a programming and a conceptual tool in the analysis of observed trace gas evolution. A time scale inherent in the model can be tuned by fitting model time series to observations. This scale is then applicable to the more physically simple but chemically complex zeroth order or box models of chemical interactions.

  19. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) model development and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes model development and evaluation efforts of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NARAC is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) operational system, which provides detailed predictions of the consequences of atmospheric releases of hazardous materials for real-time emergency response, preplanning, and post-incident assessments. Automated predictions of plume exposure limits and protective action guidelines for emergency responders and managers are available in 5-10 minutes. These can be followed immediately by increasingly refined, quality-assured analyses performed by NARAC's 24 x 7 on-duty / on-call operational staff as additional information and/or data become available. NARAC provides an all-hazards modeling system for assessments of chemical, biological, radiological/nuclear, and natural airborne hazards. The system employs a hierarchy of simulation tools, appropriate for different release types, distance and time scales, and/or response times. Source terms models are available for fires, explosions, hazardous material spills, sprayers, and momentum and buoyancy driven sources. The NARAC models are supported by extensive geographical, material, and health effects databases, as well as real-time access to worldwide meteorological observations and forecasts provided via redundant communications links to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. (orig.)

  20. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Zeebe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  1. Description and status of BWR water radiolysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water radiolysis model for boiling water reactor primary coolant circuits has been developed jointly with Harwell Laboratories. Hydrogen water chemistry plant tests, on which the model is based, started in 1982. Since then, ten plant tests have been completed. Test results indicate that: (1) oxygen concentrations in the steam from plant to plant decreases fairly uniformly with increasing hydrogen concentration; (2) oxygen concentrations in the recirculating water varies widely with increasing hydrogen concentration in the feedwater; and (3) copper significantly suppresses the reduction of oxygen. The radiolysis model was developed to provide predictive conditions in the BWR primary circuit including the core. The objectives of the work are: (1) to develop and calibrate the model against experimental data; (2) to predict the concentration of various radiolytic species and oxygen suppression in various parts of the primary system under hydrogen water chemistry conditions; and (3) to define the role of copper on the reactions. The model considers the thermodynamics and kinetics of homogeneous chemical reactions in eight regions of the reactor and its external circuit. From initial concentrations, the model constructs a set of simultaneous equations to calculate hydrogen, hydrogen peroxide, and oxygen concentrations in various regions. Pilgrim data were used for the initial calibration. The model includes neutron and gamma dose rates in the core region and gamma dose rates in the other various regions, as well as temperature, power levels, heat transfer, steam quality, and gas/liquid transport in the core region, etc. The results of calculations for the oxygen concentrations in the recirculation water as a function of hydrogen concentration in the feedwater show good agreement with the experimental data obtained in a number of reactor tests

  2. Evaluation of atmospheric dispersion/consequence models supporting safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two DOE Working Groups have completed evaluation of accident phenomenology and consequence methodologies used to support DOE facility safety documentation. The independent evaluations each concluded that no one computer model adequately addresses all accident and atmospheric release conditions. MACCS2, MATHEW/ADPIC, TRAC RA/HA, and COSYMA are adequate for most radiological dispersion and consequence needs. ALOHA, DEGADIS, HGSYSTEM, TSCREEN, and SLAB are recommended for chemical dispersion and consequence applications. Additional work is suggested, principally in evaluation of new models, targeting certain models for continued development, training, and establishing a Web page for guidance to safety analysts

  3. ATMOS: a model of radionuclide migration in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For use with scenarios involving airborne contamination, an atmospheric transport model called ATMOS has been developed for the safety assessment code COSMOS-S/D. It is a one-wind Gaussian plume model, made more general using wind-rose information that calculates ground-level air concentration factors at a common receptor point for each of a number of sources. These multiply a source strength, calculated elsewhere, to obtain the actual airborne radionuclide concentrations. The model presented in this report is an improved version of the original. Accounting is now made of area of the source region, and plume depletion by both wet and dry deposition mechanisms

  4. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at improving the simulation of wind and waves during storms in connection with wind turbine design and operations in coastal areas. For this particular purpose, we investigated the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System which couples the Weather...... for the coastal condition. With the current model setup, using high spatial resolution gives better results for strong winds both for the open ocean and coastal sites. The signicant wave height (Hm0) is very sensitive to the model resolution and bathymetry data for the coastal zone. In addition, using...

  5. Atmospheric turbulence parameters for modeling wind turbine dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, W. E.; Thresher, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    A model which can be used to predict the response of wind turbines to atmospheric turbulence is given. The model was developed using linearized aerodynamics for a three-bladed rotor and accounts for three turbulent velocity components as well as velocity gradients across the rotor disk. Typical response power spectral densities are shown. The system response depends critically on three wind and turbulence parameters, and models are presented to predict desired response statistics. An equation error method, which can be used to estimate the required parameters from field data, is also presented.

  6. Detailed Atmosphere Model Fits to Disk-Dominated ULX Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Y; Krolik, Julian H.

    2008-01-01

    We have chosen 6 Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources from the {\\it XMM-Newton} archive whose spectra have high signal-to-noise and can be fitted solely with a disk model without requiring any power-law component. To estimate systematic errors in the inferred parameters, we fit every spectrum to two different disk models, one based on local blackbody emission (KERRBB) and one based on detailed atmosphere modelling (BHSPEC). Both incorporate full general relativistic treatment of the disk surface brig...

  7. A wavenumber-frequency spectral model for atmospheric boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the need to characterize power fluctuations in wind farms, we study spatio-temporal correlations of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer in terms of the joint wavenumber-frequency spectrum of the streamwise velocity fluctuations. To this end, we perform a theoretical analysis of a simple advection model featuring the advection of small- scale velocity fluctuations by the mean flow and large-scale velocity fluctuations. The model is compared to data from large-eddy simulations (LES). We find that the model captures the trends observed in LES, specifically a Doppler shift of frequencies due to the mean flow as well as a Doppler broadening due to random sweeping effects

  8. Mathematical modelling of the atmospheric distribution of cooling tower plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3 D model KASTEL is presented which gives a realistic description of the physical processes in cooling tower plumes. Partial differential equations are used as balances of mass, momentum, and energy. The flow field is calculated using the eddy transport equation and Poisson's current function equation. The Reynolds shear stresses and turbulent flows of enthalpy and moisture are described by a complex turbulence model which solves differential equations for turbulence energy, its dissipation rate, and the covariances of enthalpy and moisture. (orig./HP)

  9. Semantic description of three-dimensional models of Bologna porches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ballabeni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study is part of a broader search coordinated by the Department of Architecture of the University of Bologna, the Cineca and the city of Bologna for the nomination of the city porticoes in the UNESCO World Heritage Site. The study describes, first, the problems and the methods adopted for the survey, the numerical modeling and visualization of the arcades models. In addition, the paper aims to describe a method for the semantic studying of the porticoes architecture and the segmentation of the models. The goal is also to establish an integrated approach to the semantic cataloguing of the Bologna arcades based on historical, material, formal, dimensional and theoretical data, and to make this information easily readable and communicable.

  10. Perspective: Polarizable continuum models for quantum-mechanical descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipparini, Filippo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-28

    Polarizable continuum solvation models are nowadays the most popular approach to describe solvent effects in the context of quantum mechanical calculations. Unexpectedly, despite their widespread use in all branches of quantum chemistry and beyond, important aspects of both their theoretical formulation and numerical implementation are still not completely understood. In particular, in this perspective we focus on the numerical issues of their implementation when applied to large systems and on the theoretical framework needed to treat time dependent problems and excited states or to deal with electronic correlation. Possible extensions beyond a purely electrostatic model and generalizations to environments beyond common solvents are also critically presented and discussed. Finally, some possible new theoretical approaches and numerical strategies are suggested to overcome the obstacles which still prevent a full exploitation of these models. PMID:27131518

  11. Biomass Scenario Model Scenario Library: Definitions, Construction, and Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inman, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the development of the biofuels industry in the United States is important to policymakers and industry. The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model of the biomass-to-biofuels system that can be used to explore policy effects on biofuels development. Because of the complexity of the model, as well as the wide range of possible future conditions that affect biofuels industry development, we have not developed a single reference case but instead developed a set of specific scenarios that provide various contexts for our analyses. The purpose of this report is to describe the scenarios that comprise the BSM scenario library. At present, we have the following policy-focused scenarios in our library: minimal policies, ethanol-focused policies, equal access to policies, output-focused policies, technological diversity focused, and the point-of-production- focused. This report describes each scenario, its policy settings, and general insights gained through use of the scenarios in analytic studies.

  12. Assessing the five-factor model of personality description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, S R

    1992-06-01

    Several approaches to assessing the dimensions of the five-factor model are reviewed and evaluated. The items in the assessment instrument may be adjectives or phrases, and the instrument itself may have been developed specifically to measure the five factors or may have been reinterpreted in terms of the five-factor model. Data are presented comparing an adjective-based measure of the model (Goldberg, 1990) with two phrase-based measures (Costa & McCrae, 1985; Hogan, 1986), and recommendations are made for the choice of an instrument in different research contexts. Allport's (1937) distinctions between the structure of the trait lexicon and the structure of personality in individuals are reiterated. PMID:1635044

  13. Atmosphere expansion and mass loss of close-orbit giant exoplanets heated by stellar XUV. I. Modeling of hydrodynamic escape of upper atmospheric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F. [Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khodachenko, M. L.; Sasunov, Yu. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Acad. Sci., Graz (Austria); Erkaev, N. V., E-mail: maxim.khodachenko@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Computational Modelling, SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-10

    In the present series of papers we propose a consistent description of the mass loss process. To study in a comprehensive way the effects of the intrinsic magnetic field of a close-orbit giant exoplanet (a so-called hot Jupiter) on atmospheric material escape and the formation of a planetary inner magnetosphere, we start with a hydrodynamic model of an upper atmosphere expansion in this paper. While considering a simple hydrogen atmosphere model, we focus on the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas with its consequent expansion in the outer space. Primary attention is paid to an investigation of the role of the specific conditions at the inner and outer boundaries of the simulation domain, under which different regimes of material escape (free and restricted flow) are formed. A comparative study is performed of different processes, such as X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) heating, material ionization and recombination, H{sub 3}{sup +} cooling, adiabatic and Lyα cooling, and Lyα reabsorption. We confirm the basic consistency of the outcomes of our modeling with the results of other hydrodynamic models of expanding planetary atmospheres. In particular, we determine that, under the typical conditions of an orbital distance of 0.05 AU around a Sun-type star, a hot Jupiter plasma envelope may reach maximum temperatures up to ∼9000 K with a hydrodynamic escape speed of ∼9 km s{sup –1}, resulting in mass loss rates of ∼(4-7) · 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1}. In the range of the considered stellar-planetary parameters and XUV fluxes, that is close to the mass loss in the energy-limited case. The inclusion of planetary intrinsic magnetic fields in the model is a subject of the follow-up paper (Paper II).

  14. A Real-Time Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new 3-D multi-scale atmospheric dispersion modeling system and its on-going evaluation. This system is being developed for both real-time operational applications and detailed assessments of events involving atmospheric releases of hazardous material. It is part of a new, modernized Department of Energy (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) emergency response computer system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system contains coupled meteorological data assimilation and dispersion models, initial versions of which were described by Sugiyama and Chan (1998) and Leone et al. (1997). Section 2 describes the current versions of these models, emphasizing new features. This modeling system supports cases involving both simple and complex terrain, and multiple space and time scales from the microscale to mesoscale. Therefore, several levels of verification and evaluation are required. The meteorological data assimilation and interpolation algorithms have been previously evaluated by comparison to observational data (Sugiyama and Chan, 1998). The non-divergence adjustment algorithm was tested against potential flow solutions and wind tunnel data (Chan and Sugiyama, 1997). Initial dispersion model results for a field experiment case study were shown by Leone et al. (1997). A study in which an early, prototype version of the new modeling system was evaluated and compared to the current NARAC operational models showed that the new system provides improved results (Foster et al., 1999). In Section 3, we show example results from the current versions of the models, including verification using analytic solutions to the advection-diffusion equation as well as on-going evaluation using microscale and mesoscale dispersion field experiments

  15. Description of Model Tests Carried Out by Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Schlütter, F.; Andersen, H.

    1996-01-01

    As associated partner, Aalborg University (AU) have participated in different aspects of "the Zeebrugge project". AU has carried out an extensive number of small-scale model tests (1:65) with the Zeebrugge breakwater with the aim of investigating scale-effects.......As associated partner, Aalborg University (AU) have participated in different aspects of "the Zeebrugge project". AU has carried out an extensive number of small-scale model tests (1:65) with the Zeebrugge breakwater with the aim of investigating scale-effects....

  16. Contingency contractor optimization. phase 3, model description and formulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Jones, Katherine A.; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Durfee, Justin D.; Jones, Dean A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Nanco, Alan Stewart; Nozick, Linda Karen

    2013-06-01

    The goal of Phase 3 the OSD ATL Contingency Contractor Optimization (CCO) project is to create an engineering prototype of a tool for the contingency contractor element of total force planning during the Support for Strategic Analysis (SSA). An optimization model was developed to determine the optimal mix of military, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, and contractors that accomplishes a set of user defined mission requirements at the lowest possible cost while honoring resource limitations and manpower use rules. An additional feature allows the model to understand the variability of the Total Force Mix when there is uncertainty in mission requirements.

  17. Contingency contractor optimization. Phase 3, model description and formulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee; Adair, Kristin Lynn; Jones, Katherine A.; Bandlow, Alisa; Durfee, Justin D.; Jones, Dean A.; Martin, Nathaniel; Detry, Richard Joseph; Nanco, Alan Stewart; Nozick, Linda Karen [Cornell University

    2013-10-01

    The goal of Phase 3 the OSD ATL Contingency Contractor Optimization (CCO) project is to create an engineering prototype of a tool for the contingency contractor element of total force planning during the Support for Strategic Analysis (SSA). An optimization model was developed to determine the optimal mix of military, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, and contractors that accomplishes a set of user defined mission requirements at the lowest possible cost while honoring resource limitations and manpower use rules. An additional feature allows the model to understand the variability of the Total Force Mix when there is uncertainty in mission requirements.

  18. Shell Model Description of Neutron-Deficient Sn Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Dikmen

    2009-01-01

    The shell model calculations in the sdgh major shell for the neutron-deficient 106,107,108,109Sn isotopes have been carried out by using CD-Bonn and Nijmegenl two-body effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. The single-shell states and the corresponding matrix elements needed for describing Sn isotopes are reconstructed to calculate the coefficient of fractional parantage by reducing the calculation requirements. This reconstruction allows us to do the shell model calculations of the neutron deficient Sn isotopes in very reasonable time. The results are compared to the recent high-resolution experimental data and found to be in good agreement with experiments.

  19. An analytical model for soil-atmosphere feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schaefli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil-atmosphere feedback is a key for understanding the hydrological cycle and the direction of potential system changes. This paper presents an analytical framework to study the interplay between soil and atmospheric moisture, using as input only the boundary conditions at the upstream end of trajectory, assuming advective moisture transport with average wind speed along this trajectory and vertical moisture exchange with the soil compartment of uniform vertical properties. Precipitation, evaporation from interception and runoff are assumed to depend through simple functional relationships on the soil moisture or the atmospheric moisture. Evaporation from soil moisture (including transpiration depends on both state variables, which introduces a nonlinear relationship between the two compartments. This nonlinear relationship can explain some apparently paradoxical phenomena such as a local decrease of precipitation accompanied by a runoff increase.

    The solutions of the resulting water balance equations correspond to two different spatial moisture regimes showing either an increasing or a decreasing atmospheric moisture content along a trajectory starting at the coast, depending on boundary conditions and parameters. The paper discusses how different model parameters (e.g. time scales of precipitation, evaporation or runoff influence these regimes and how they can create regime switches. Such an analysis has potential to anticipate the range of possible land use and climate changes or to interpret the results of complex land-atmosphere interaction models. Based on derived analytical expressions for the Horton index, the Budyko curve and a precipitation recycling ratio, the analytical framework opens new perspectives for the classification of hydrological systems.

  20. An analytical model for soil-atmosphere feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schaefli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil-atmosphere feedback is a key for understanding the hydrological cycle and the direction of potential system changes. This paper presents an analytical framework to study the interplay between soil and atmospheric moisture, using as input only the boundary conditions at the upstream end of an atmospheric moisture stream line. The underlying Eulerian-Langrangean approach assumes advective moisture transport with average wind speed along the stream line and vertical moisture exchange with the soil compartment of uniform vertical properties. Precipitation, evaporation from interception and runoff are assumed to depend through simple functional relationships on the soil moisture or the atmospheric moisture. Evaporation from soil moisture (including transpiration depends on both state variables, which introduces a nonlinear relationship between the two compartments. This nonlinear relationship can explain some apparently paradoxical phenomena such as a local decrease of precipitation accompanied by a runoff increase.

    The solutions of the resulting water balance equations correspond to two different moisture regimes along a stream line, either monotonically increasing or decreasing when traveling inland, depending on boundary conditions and parameters. The paper discusses how different model parameters (e.g. time scales of precipitation, evaporation or runoff influence these regimes and how they can create regime switches. Such an analysis has potential to anticipate the range of possible land use and climate changes or to interpret the results of complex land-atmosphere interaction models. Based on derived analytical expressions for the Horton index, the Budyko curve and a precipitation recycling ratio, the analytical framework opens new perspectives for the classification of hydrological systems.

  1. An Efficient Explicit-time Description Method for Timed Model Checking

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hao; 10.4204/EPTCS.14.6

    2009-01-01

    Timed model checking, the method to formally verify real-time systems, is attracting increasing attention from both the model checking community and the real-time community. Explicit-time description methods verify real-time systems using general model constructs found in standard un-timed model checkers. Lamport proposed an explicit-time description method using a clock-ticking process (Tick) to simulate the passage of time together with a group of global variables to model time requirements. Two methods, the Sync-based Explicit-time Description Method using rendezvous synchronization steps and the Semaphore-based Explicit-time Description Method using only one global variable were proposed; they both achieve better modularity than Lamport's method in modeling the real-time systems. In contrast to timed automata based model checkers like UPPAAL, explicit-time description methods can access and store the current time instant for future calculations necessary for many real-time systems, especially those with p...

  2. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements

  3. Models of Teaching. Description of Teacher Inservice Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Project on Utilization of Inservice Education R & D Outcomes.

    The teacher program described here provides a framework in which teachers may identify and understand their own theories and styles of teaching and may become familiar and competent with a variety of teaching strategies. The seven models studied are: concept formation, concept attainment, role playing, inquiry training. synectics, simulation, and…

  4. Quality Assurance Based on Descriptive and Parsimonious Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Kristensen, Rasmus Lyngby;

    2015-01-01

    In this positional paper, we discuss the potential benefits of using appearance models in additive manufacturing, metal casting, wind turbine blade production, and 3D content acquisition. Current state of the art in acquisition and rendering of appearance cannot easily be used for quality assurance...

  5. General Description of Fission Observables - JEFF Report 24. GEF Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project is a collaborative effort among the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank to develop a reference nuclear data library. The JEFF library contains sets of evaluated nuclear data, mainly for fission and fusion applications; it contains a number of different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, radioactive decay data, fission yield data and thermal scattering law data. The General fission (GEF) model is based on novel theoretical concepts and ideas developed to model low energy nuclear fission. The GEF code calculates fission-fragment yields and associated quantities (e.g. prompt neutron and gamma) for a large range of nuclei and excitation energy. This opens up the possibility of a qualitative step forward to improve further the JEFF fission yields sub-library. This report describes the GEF model which explains the complex appearance of fission observables by universal principles of theoretical models and considerations on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and mathematics. The approach reveals a high degree of regularity and provides a considerable insight into the physics of the fission process. Fission observables can be calculated with a precision that comply with the needs for applications in nuclear technology. The relevance of the approach for examining the consistency of experimental results and for evaluating nuclear data is demonstrated. (authors)

  6. Shell Model Description of $^{102-108}$Sn Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Trivedi, T; Negi, D; Mehrotra, I

    2012-01-01

    We have performed shell model calculations for neutron deficient even $^{102-108}$Sn and odd $^{103-107}$Sn isotopes in $sdg_{7/2}h_{11/2}$ model space using two different interactions. The first set of interaction is due to Brown {\\it et al.} and second is due to Hoska {\\it et al}. The calculations have been performed using doubly magic $^{100}$Sn as core and valence neutrons are distributed over the single particle orbits 1$g_{7/2}$, 2$d_{5/2}$, 2$d_{3/2}$, 3$s_{1/2}$ and 1$h_{11/2}$. In more recent experimental work for $^{101}$Sn [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 105} (2010) 162502], the g.s. is predicted as 5/2$^+$ with excited 7/2$^+$ at 172 keV. We have also performed another two set of calculations by taking difference in single particle energies of 2$d_{5/2}$ and 1$g_{7/2}$ orbitals by 172 keV. The present state-of-the-art shell model calculations predicts fair agreements with the experimental data. These calculations serve as a test of nuclear shell model in the region far from stability for unstable Sn isotop...

  7. Thermal properties. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Wrafter, John; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden); Rosen, L ars [Sweco Viak AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    The lithological data acquired from boreholes and mapping of the rock surface need to be reclassified into thermal rock classes, TRCs. The main reason is to simplify the simulations. The lithological data are used to construct models of the transition between different TRCs, thus describing the spatial statistical structure of each TRC. The result is a set of transition probability models that are used in the simulation of TRCs. The intermediate result of this first stochastic simulation is a number of realisations of the geology, each one equally probable. Based on the thermal data, a spatial statistical thermal model is constructed for each TRC. It consists of a statistical distribution and a variogram for each TRC. These are used in the stochastic simulation of thermal conductivity and the result is a number of equally probable realisations of thermal conductivity for the domain. In the next step, the realisations of TRCs (lithology) and thermal conductivity are merged, i.e. each realisation of geology is filled with simulated thermal conductivity values. The result is a set of realisations of thermal conductivity that considers both the difference in thermal properties between different TRCs, and the variability within each TRC. If the result is desired in a scale different from the simulation scale, i.e. the canister scale, upscaling of the realisations can be performed. The result is a set of equally probable realisations of thermal properties. The presented methodology was applied to rock domain RFM029 and RFM045. The main results are sets of realisations of thermal properties that can be used for further processing, most importantly for statistical analysis and numerical temperature simulations for the design of repository layout (distances between deposition holes). The main conclusions of the thermal modelling are: The choice of scale has a profound influence on the distribution of thermal conductivity values. The variance decreases and the lower tail

  8. Thermal properties. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lithological data acquired from boreholes and mapping of the rock surface need to be reclassified into thermal rock classes, TRCs. The main reason is to simplify the simulations. The lithological data are used to construct models of the transition between different TRCs, thus describing the spatial statistical structure of each TRC. The result is a set of transition probability models that are used in the simulation of TRCs. The intermediate result of this first stochastic simulation is a number of realisations of the geology, each one equally probable. Based on the thermal data, a spatial statistical thermal model is constructed for each TRC. It consists of a statistical distribution and a variogram for each TRC. These are used in the stochastic simulation of thermal conductivity and the result is a number of equally probable realisations of thermal conductivity for the domain. In the next step, the realisations of TRCs (lithology) and thermal conductivity are merged, i.e. each realisation of geology is filled with simulated thermal conductivity values. The result is a set of realisations of thermal conductivity that considers both the difference in thermal properties between different TRCs, and the variability within each TRC. If the result is desired in a scale different from the simulation scale, i.e. the canister scale, upscaling of the realisations can be performed. The result is a set of equally probable realisations of thermal properties. The presented methodology was applied to rock domain RFM029 and RFM045. The main results are sets of realisations of thermal properties that can be used for further processing, most importantly for statistical analysis and numerical temperature simulations for the design of repository layout (distances between deposition holes). The main conclusions of the thermal modelling are: The choice of scale has a profound influence on the distribution of thermal conductivity values. The variance decreases and the lower tail

  9. DWPF melter feed system: Model description and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The melter feed system is the last leg in the DWPF process. Slurry from the melter feed tank (MFT) is fed continuously to the melter by two parallel feed systems, each system having a nomina feed rate of 0.45 gpm. Each feed system can provide flow rates between 0.2 and 0.9 gprn. The acceptance criteria for the melter feed controllers is a maximum deviation from the desires fee flow rate of +0.25 and -0.10 gpm. Some recent tests of the DWPF melter feed systems have failed this criterion. Steady-state hydraulic models of the melter feed systems have been developed to help understand the hydraulic behaviors of the two systems. Test results and model results indicate that entrained air in the feed systems is probably the cause of control problems with the systems. This cannot be stated categorically since the models are single-phase, and the dynamic behavior is not modelled, but a compelling case can be made that there is entrained air in the systems, and it affects system performance. There are the operating characteristics of the two melter feed systems. System No. 1 return flow at the bottom of the tank through a dip tube, and system No. 2 return flow at the top of the tank. The dip tube on system No. 1 is the major geometric difference between the two systems. Model results indicate that there is a pocket in the dip tube, and therefore the dip tube serves to carry entrained air in the melter feed loop down to the bottom of the MFT. This hypothesis is supported by a simple drift-flux analysis of the flow in the dip tube, and the logical conclusion is in the balance the impact of the dip tube on melter feed system performance is adverse

  10. Centrifuge modeling of soil atmosphere interaction using climatic chamber

    OpenAIRE

    CAICEDO, B; TRISTANCHO, J; THOREL, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Soil-atmospheric interaction processes such as infiltration or evaporation can have a significant effect on the behavior of geotechnical structures located near the soil surface. This paper focuses on the drying process of soils due to evaporation. The scaling laws are analyzed and the results of the application of two cycles of heating and cooling on a soil mass are presented. Based on these results, conclusions about the feasibility of reproducing evaporation on centrifuge models are recomm...

  11. Meteorological fluid dynamics asymptotic modelling, stability and chaotic atmospheric motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zeytounian, Radyadour K

    1991-01-01

    The author considers meteorology as a part of fluid dynamics. He tries to derive the properties of atmospheric flows from a rational analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, at the same time analyzing various types of initial and boundary problems. This approach to simulate nature by models from fluid dynamics will be of interest to both scientists and students of physics and theoretical meteorology.

  12. Atmospheric dispersion modeling near a roadway under calm meteorological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Fallah Shorshani, Masoud; Seigneur, Christian; POLO REHN, Lucie; CHANUT, Hervé; PELLAN, Yann; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; CHARRON, Aurélie; Andre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutant dispersion near sources is typically simulated by Gaussian models because of their efficient compromise between reasonable accuracy and manageable com- putational time. However, the standard Gaussian dispersion formula applies downwind of a source under advective conditions with a well-defined wind direction and cannot calculate air pollutant concentrations under calm conditions with fluctuating wind direction and/or upwind of the emission source. Attempts have been made...

  13. Revisiting the Carrington Event: Updated modeling of atmospheric effects

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Brian C.; Arkenberg, Keith R.; Snyder II, Brock R.

    2011-01-01

    The terrestrial effects of major solar events such as the Carrington white-light flare and subsequent geomagnetic storm of August-September 1859 are of considerable interest, especially in light of recent predictions that such extreme events will be more likely over the coming decades. Here we present results of modeling the atmospheric effects, especially production of odd nitrogen compounds and subsequent depletion of ozone, by solar protons associated with the Carrington event. This study ...

  14. Spectral classification of stars using synthetic model atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    E. Bertone; Buzzoni, A.

    2001-01-01

    We devised a straightforward procedure to derive the atmosphere fundamental parameters of stars across the different MK spectral types by comparing mid-resolution spectroscopic observations with theoretical grids of synthetic spectra.The results of a preliminary experiment, by matching the Gunn and Stryker and Jacoby et al. spectrophotometric atlases with the Kurucz models, are briefly discussed. For stars in the A-K spectral range, effective temperature is obtained within a 1-2% relative unc...

  15. Rock mechanics site descriptive model-theoretical approach. Preliminary site description Forsmark area - version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarises the theoretical approach to estimate the mechanical properties of the rock mass in relation to the Preliminary Site Descriptive Modelling, version 1.2 Forsmark. The theoretical approach is based on a discrete fracture network (DFN) description of the fracture system in the rock mass and on the results of mechanical testing of intact rock and on rock fractures. To estimate the mechanical properties of the rock mass a load test on a rock block with fractures is simulated with the numerical code 3DEC. The location and size of the fractures are given by DFN-realisations. The rock block was loaded in plain strain condition. From the calculated relationship between stresses and deformations the mechanical properties of the rock mass were determined. The influence of the geometrical properties of the fracture system on the mechanical properties of the rock mass was analysed by loading 20 blocks based on different DFN-realisations. The material properties of the intact rock and the fractures were kept constant. The properties are set equal to the mean value of each measured material property. The influence of the variation of the properties of the intact rock and variation of the mechanical properties of the fractures are estimated by analysing numerical load tests on one specific block (one DFN-realisation) with combinations of properties for intact rock and fractures. Each parameter varies from its lowest values to its highest values while the rest of the parameters are held constant, equal to the mean value. The resulting distribution was expressed as a variation around the value determined with mean values on all parameters. To estimate the resulting distribution of the mechanical properties of the rock mass a Monte-Carlo simulation was performed by generating values from the two distributions independent of each other. The two values were added and the statistical properties of the resulting distribution were determined

  16. PERFORMANCE-BASED INTELLIGENT RESOURCE DESCRIPTION MODEL FOR INTERNET-BASED PRODUCT DESIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Issues on intelligent resource description and multiple intelligent resources integration for Internet-based collaborative design are analyzed. A performance-based intelligent resource description model for Internet-based product design is proposed, which can help to create, store,manipulate and exchange intelligent resource description information for applications, tools and systems in Internet-based product design. A method to integrate multiple intelligent resources to fulfill a complex product design and analysis via Internet is also proposed. A real project for improving the bearing system design of a turbo-expander with many intelligent resources in prominent universities is presented as a case study.

  17. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Laxemar site. Site Descriptive Modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Pointe, Paul; Fox, Aaron (Golder Associates Inc (United States)); Hermanson, Jan; Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is performing site characterization at two different locations, Forsmark and Laxemar, in order to locate a site for a final geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. The program is built upon the development of Site Descriptive Models (SDMs) at specific timed data freezes. Each SDM is formed from discipline-specific reports from across the scientific spectrum. This report describes the methods, analyses, and conclusions of the modelling team in the production of the SDM-Site Laxemar geological discrete-fracture network (DFN) model. The DFN builds upon the work of other geological models, including the deformation zone and rock domain models. The geological DFN is a statistical model for stochastically simulating rock fractures and minor deformation zones at a scale of less than 1,000 m (the lower cut-off of the DZ models). The geological DFN is valid within six distinct fracture domains inside the Laxemar local model subarea: FSM{sub C}, FSM{sub E}W007, FSM{sub N}, FSM{sub N}E005, FSM{sub S}, and FSM{sub W}. The models are built using data from detailed surface outcrop maps, geophysical lineament maps, and the cored borehole record at Laxemar. The conceptual model for the SDM-Site Laxemar geological DFN model revolves around the identification of fracture domains based on relative fracture set intensities, orientation clustering, and the regional tectonic framework (including deformation zones). A single coupled fracture size/fracture intensity concept (the Base Model) based on a Pareto (power-law) distribution for fracture sizes was chosen as the recommended parameterisation. A slew of alternative size-intensity models were also carried through the fracture analyses and into the uncertainty and model verification analyses. Uncertainty is modelled by analysing the effects on fracture intensity (P32) that alternative model cases can have. Uncertainty is parameterised as a ratio between the P32 of the

  18. Geological discrete fracture network model for the Laxemar site. Site Descriptive Modelling. SDM-Site Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is performing site characterization at two different locations, Forsmark and Laxemar, in order to locate a site for a final geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel. The program is built upon the development of Site Descriptive Models (SDMs) at specific timed data freezes. Each SDM is formed from discipline-specific reports from across the scientific spectrum. This report describes the methods, analyses, and conclusions of the modelling team in the production of the SDM-Site Laxemar geological discrete-fracture network (DFN) model. The DFN builds upon the work of other geological models, including the deformation zone and rock domain models. The geological DFN is a statistical model for stochastically simulating rock fractures and minor deformation zones at a scale of less than 1,000 m (the lower cut-off of the DZ models). The geological DFN is valid within six distinct fracture domains inside the Laxemar local model subarea: FSMC, FSMEW007, FSMN, FSMNE005, FSMS, and FSMW. The models are built using data from detailed surface outcrop maps, geophysical lineament maps, and the cored borehole record at Laxemar. The conceptual model for the SDM-Site Laxemar geological DFN model revolves around the identification of fracture domains based on relative fracture set intensities, orientation clustering, and the regional tectonic framework (including deformation zones). A single coupled fracture size/fracture intensity concept (the Base Model) based on a Pareto (power-law) distribution for fracture sizes was chosen as the recommended parameterisation. A slew of alternative size-intensity models were also carried through the fracture analyses and into the uncertainty and model verification analyses. Uncertainty is modelled by analysing the effects on fracture intensity (P32) that alternative model cases can have. Uncertainty is parameterised as a ratio between the P32 of the alternative model and the P32 of the

  19. Statistical modelling of collocation uncertainty in atmospheric thermodynamic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassò, A.; Ignaccolo, R.; Madonna, F.; Demoz, B. B.; Franco-Villoria, M.

    2014-06-01

    The quantification of measurement uncertainty of atmospheric parameters is a key factor in assessing the uncertainty of global change estimates given by numerical prediction models. One of the critical contributions to the uncertainty budget is related to the collocation mismatch in space and time among observations made at different locations. This is particularly important for vertical atmospheric profiles obtained by radiosondes or lidar. In this paper we propose a statistical modelling approach capable of explaining the relationship between collocation uncertainty and a set of environmental factors, height and distance between imperfectly collocated trajectories. The new statistical approach is based on the heteroskedastic functional regression (HFR) model which extends the standard functional regression approach and allows a natural definition of uncertainty profiles. Along this line, a five-fold decomposition of the total collocation uncertainty is proposed, giving both a profile budget and an integrated column budget. HFR is a data-driven approach valid for any atmospheric parameter, which can be assumed smooth. It is illustrated here by means of the collocation uncertainty analysis of relative humidity from two stations involved in the GCOS reference upper-air network (GRUAN). In this case, 85% of the total collocation uncertainty is ascribed to reducible environmental error, 11% to irreducible environmental error, 3.4% to adjustable bias, 0.1% to sampling error and 0.2% to measurement error.

  20. Transmission Spectra of Three-Dimensional Hot Jupiter Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Fortney, J J; Showman, A P; Lian, Y; Freedman, R S; Marley, M S; Lewis, N K

    2009-01-01

    We compute models of the transmission spectra of planets HD 209458b, HD 189733b, and generic hot Jupiters. We examine the effects of temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity for the generic planets as a guide to understanding transmission spectra in general. We find that carbon dioxide absorption at 4.4 and 15 microns is prominent at high metallicity, and is a clear metallicity indicator. For HD 209458b and HD 189733b, we compute spectra for both one-dimensional and three-dimensional model atmospheres and examine the differences between them. The differences are usually small, but can be large if atmospheric temperatures are near important chemical abundance boundaries. The calculations for the 3D atmospheres, and their comparison with data, serve as constraints on these dynamical models that complement the secondary eclipse and light curve data sets. For HD 209458b, even if TiO and VO gases are abundant on the day side, their abundances can be considerably reduced on the cooler planetary limb. However, ...

  1. Modeling the (upper) solar atmosphere including the magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Peter, H

    2007-01-01

    The atmosphere of the Sun is highly structured and dynamic in nature. From the photosphere and chromosphere into the transition region and the corona plasma-$\\beta$ changes from above to below one, i.e. while in the lower atmosphere the energy density of the plasma dominates, in the upper atmosphere the magnetic field plays the governing role -- one might speak of a ``magnetic transition''. Therefore the dynamics of the overshooting convection in the photosphere, the granulation, is shuffling the magnetic field around in the photosphere. This leads not only to a (re-)structuring of the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere, but induces also the dynamic reaction of the coronal plasma e.g. due to reconnection events. Therefore the (complex) structure and the interaction of various magnetic patches is crucial to understand the structure, dynamics and heating of coronal plasma as well as its acceleration into the solar wind. The present article will emphasize the need for three-dimensional modeling accounting fo...

  2. Atmospheric mirage and distortion modeling for IR target injection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Steven R.

    1996-06-01

    Atmospheric effects at low elevation angles can complicate shipboard infrared search and tracking (SIRST) of distant low altitude targets, such as sea skimming cruise missiles. Here we focus upon the effects of ray refraction and atmospheric distortion. For constant-flux surface layer conditions we discuss target magnification and demagnification and atmospheric distortions. For sufficiently negative air-sea temperature differences (ASTD), the maximum intervision range (MIVR) of low altitude targets is reduced, but the target is significantly magnified compared to no-refraction predictions. Negative ASTD can give rise to an inferior mirage which we discuss with a model-data comparison. Positive ASTD extends a target MIVR, but the target image is severely demagnified, closer to the horizon, and more degraded by atmospheric turbulence. We discuss environments that are likely to violate constant-flux conditions and include an example of a superior mirage. Although horizontal inhomogeneity may well influence superior mirage formation, we show that inhomogeneity is not necessary to explain features such as numerous mirages or multiple (three) horizons.

  3. Geological Site Descriptive Model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond; Stenberg, Leif [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Stanfors, Roy [Roy Stanfors Consulting, Lund (Sweden); Milnes, Allan Geoffrey [GEA Consulting, Uppsala (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates, Stockholm (Sweden); Triumf, Carl-Axel [Geovista, Luleaa (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is at present conducting site investigations as a preliminary to building an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. This report presents a methodology for constructing, visualising and presenting 3-dimensional geological models, based on data from the site investigations. The methodology integrates with the overall work-flow of the site investigations, from the collection of raw data to the complete site description, as proposed in several earlier technical reports. Further, it is specifically designed for interaction with SICADA - SKB's Site Characterisation Database - and RVS - SKB's Rock Visualisation System. This report is one in a series of strategy documents intended to demonstrate how modelling is to be performed within each discipline. However, it also has a wider purpose, since the geological site descriptive model provides the basic geometrical framework for all the other disciplines. Hence, the wider aim is to present a practical and clear methodology for the analysis and interpretation of input data for use in the construction of the geology-based 3D geometrical model. In addition to the various aspects of modelling described above, the methodology presented here should therefore also provide: guidelines and directives on how systematic interpretation and integration of geo-scientific data from the different investigation methods should be carried out; guidelines on how different geometries should be created in the geological models; guidelines on how the assignment of parameters to the different geological units in RVS should be accomplished; guidelines on the handling of uncertainty at different points in the interpretation process. In addition, it should clarify the relation between the geological model and other models used in the processes of site characterisation, repository layout and safety analysis. In particular, integration and transparency should be

  4. Geological Site Descriptive Model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is at present conducting site investigations as a preliminary to building an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. This report presents a methodology for constructing, visualising and presenting 3-dimensional geological models, based on data from the site investigations. The methodology integrates with the overall work-flow of the site investigations, from the collection of raw data to the complete site description, as proposed in several earlier technical reports. Further, it is specifically designed for interaction with SICADA - SKB's Site Characterisation Database - and RVS - SKB's Rock Visualisation System. This report is one in a series of strategy documents intended to demonstrate how modelling is to be performed within each discipline. However, it also has a wider purpose, since the geological site descriptive model provides the basic geometrical framework for all the other disciplines. Hence, the wider aim is to present a practical and clear methodology for the analysis and interpretation of input data for use in the construction of the geology-based 3D geometrical model. In addition to the various aspects of modelling described above, the methodology presented here should therefore also provide: guidelines and directives on how systematic interpretation and integration of geo-scientific data from the different investigation methods should be carried out; guidelines on how different geometries should be created in the geological models; guidelines on how the assignment of parameters to the different geological units in RVS should be accomplished; guidelines on the handling of uncertainty at different points in the interpretation process. In addition, it should clarify the relation between the geological model and other models used in the processes of site characterisation, repository layout and safety analysis. In particular, integration and transparency should be promoted. The

  5. TWO-LAYER MODEL DESCRIPTION OF POLYMER THIN FILM DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-dong Peng; Ran-xing Nancy Li; Chi-hang Lam; Ophelia K.C.Tsui

    2013-01-01

    Experiments in the past two decades have shown that the glass transition temperature of polymer films can become noticeably different from that of the bulk when the film thickness is decreased below ca.100 nm.It is broadly believed that these observations are caused by a nanometer interfacial layer with dynamics faster or slower than that of the bulk.In this paper,we examine how this idea may be realized by using a two-layer model assuming a hydrodynamic coupling between the interfacial layer and the remaining,bulk-like layer in the film.Illustrative examples will be given showing how the two-layer model is applied to the viscosity measurements of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate films supported by silicon oxide,where divergent thickness dependences are observed.

  6. Pointwise Description for the Linearized Fokker-Planck-Boltzmann Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kung-Chien

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the pointwise (in the space variable) behavior of the linearized Fokker-Planck-Boltzmann model for nonsmooth initial perturbations. The result reveals both the fluid and kinetic aspects of this model. The fluid-like waves are constructed as the long-wave expansion in the spectrum of the Fourier modes for the space variable, and it has polynomial time decay rate. We design a Picard-type iteration for constructing the increasingly regular kinetic-like waves, which are carried by the transport equations and have exponential time decay rate. The Mixture Lemma plays an important role in constructing the kinetic-like waves, this lemma was originally introduced by Liu-Yu (Commun Pure Appl Math 57:1543-1608, 2004) for Boltzmann equation, but the Fokker-Planck term in this paper creates some technical difficulties.

  7. Thermal Model Description of Collisions of Small Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Cleymans, J; Oeschler, H; Redlich, K; Sharma, N

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of particle production on the size of the colliding nuclei is analyzed in terms of the thermal model using the canonical ensemble. The concept of strangeness correlation in clusters of sub-volume $V_c$ is used to account for the suppression of strangeness. A systematic analysis is presented of the predictions of the thermal model for particle production in collisions of small nuclei. The pattern of the maxima in particle ratios of strange particles to pions as a function of beam energy is quite special, as they do not occur at the same beam energy and are sensitive to system size. In particular, the $\\Lambda/\\pi^+$ ratio shows a clear maximum even for the smallest systems while the maximum in the K$^+/\\pi^+$ ratio disappears in small systems.

  8. Towards robust regional estimates of CO_2 sources and sinks using atmospheric transport models

    OpenAIRE

    Gurney, Kevin Robert; Randerson, James

    2002-01-01

    Information about regional carbon sources and sinks can be derived from variations in observed atmospheric CO_2 concentrations via inverse modelling with atmospheric tracer transport models. A consensus has not yet been reached regarding the size and distribution of regional carbon fluxes obtained using this approach, partly owing to the use of several different atmospheric transport models. Here we report estimates of surface–atmosphere CO_2 fluxes from an intercomparison of atmospheric CO_2...

  9. Towards robust regional estimates of CO2 sources and sinks using atmospheric transport models

    OpenAIRE

    Randerson, JT; Gurney, KR; Law, RM; Denning, AS; Rayner, PJ; Baker, D.; Bousquet, P.; Bruhwiler, L.; Chen, YH; Ciais, P.; Fan, S.; Fung, IY; Gloor, M.; Heimann, M.; Higuchi, K

    2002-01-01

    Information about regional carbon sources and sinks can be derived from variations in observed atmospheric CO2 concentrations via inverse modelling with atmospheric tracer transport models. A consensus has not yet been reached regarding the size and distribution of regional carbon fluxes obtained using this approach, partly owing to the use of several different atmospheric transport models(1-9). Here we report estimates of surface- atmosphere CO2 fluxes from an intercomparison of atmospheric ...

  10. System Advisor Model, SAM 2011.12.2: General Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2011.12.2, released on December 2, 2011. SAM is software that models the cost and performance of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financing structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). Advanced analysis options facilitate parametric, sensitivity, and statistical analyses, and allow for interfacing SAM with Microsoft Excel or with other computer programs. SAM is available as a free download at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  11. Data model description for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. One of the major objectives of the HEDR Project is to develop several computer codes to model the airborne releases. transport and envirorunental accumulation of radionuclides resulting from Hanford operations from 1944 through 1972. In July 1992, the HEDR Project Manager determined that the computer codes being developed (DESCARTES, calculation of environmental accumulation from airborne releases, and CIDER, dose calculations from environmental accumulation) were not sufficient to create accurate models. A team of HEDR staff members developed a plan to assure that computer codes would meet HEDR Project goals. The plan consists of five tasks: (1) code requirements definition. (2) scoping studies, (3) design specifications, (4) benchmarking, and (5) data modeling. This report defines the data requirements for the DESCARTES and CIDER codes

  12. System Advisor Model, SAM 2014.1.14: General Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.; Freeman, J.; Neises, T.; Wagner, M.; Ferguson, T.; Gilman, P.; Janzou, S.

    2014-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2013.9.20, released on September 9, 2013. SAM is a computer model that calculates performance and financial metrics of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of photovoltaic, concentrating solar power, solar water heating, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financial structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). SAM's advanced simulation options facilitate parametric and sensitivity analyses, and statistical analysis capabilities are available for Monte Carlo simulation and weather variability (P50/P90) studies. SAM can also read input variables from Microsoft Excel worksheets. For software developers, the SAM software development kit (SDK) makes it possible to use SAM simulation modules in their applications written in C/C++, C#, Java, Python, and MATLAB. NREL provides both SAM and the SDK as free downloads at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  13. Model-based description of environment interaction for mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Carlo; Pagello, Enrico; Vianello, Marco

    1999-01-01

    We consider a mobile robot that attempts to accomplish a task by reaching a given goal, and interacts with its environment through a finite set of actions and observations. The interaction between robot and environment is modeled by Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP). The robot takes its decisions in presence of uncertainty about the current state, by maximizing its reward gained during interactions with the environment. It is able to self-locate into the environment by collecting actions and perception histories during the navigation. To make the state estimation more reliable, we introduce an additional information in the model without adding new states and without discretizing the considered measures. Thus, we associate to the state transition probabilities also a continuous metric given through the mean and the variance of some significant sensor measurements suitable to be kept under continuous form, such as odometric measurements, showing that also such unreliable data can supply a great deal of information to the robot. The overall control system of the robot is structured as a two-levels layered architecture, where the low level implements several collision avoidance algorithms, while the upper level takes care of the navigation problem. In this paper, we concentrate on how to use POMDP models at the upper level.

  14. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage

  15. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to the bedrock

  16. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to

  17. Modeling Daily Rainfall Conditional on Atmospheric Predictors: An application to Western Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langousis, Andreas; Kaleris, Vassilios

    2013-04-01

    Due to its intermittent and highly variable character, daily precipitation is the least well reproduced hydrologic variable by both General Circulation Models (GCMs) and Limited Area Models (LAMs). To that extent, several statistical procedures (usually referred to as downscaling schemes) have been suggested to generate synthetic rainfall time series conditional on predictor variables that are descriptive of the atmospheric circulation at the mesoscale. In addition to be more accurately simulated by GCMs and LAMs, large-scale atmospheric predictors are important indicators of the local weather. Currently used downscaling methods simulate rainfall series using either stable statistical relationships (usually referred to as transfer functions) between certain characteristics of the rainfall process and mesoscale atmospheric predictor variables, or simple stochastic schemes (e.g. properly transformed autoregressive models) with parameters that depend on the large-scale atmospheric conditions. The latter are determined by classifying large-scale circulation patterns into broad categories of weather states, using empirical or theoretically based classification schemes, and modeled by resampling from those categories; a process usually referred to as weather generation. In this work we propose a statistical framework to generate synthetic rainfall timeseries at a daily level, conditional on large scale atmospheric predictors. The latter include the mean sea level pressure (MSLP), the magnitude and direction of upper level geostrophic winds, and the 500 hPa geopotential height, relative vorticity and divergence. The suggested framework operates in continuous time, avoiding the use of transfer functions, and weather classification schemes. The suggested downscaling approach is validated using atmospheric data from the ERA-Interim archive (see http://www.ecmwf.int/research/era/do/get/index), and daily rainfall data from Western Greece, for the 14-year period from 01 October

  18. Cross comparisons of land surface process descriptions in land surface models using multiple sources of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi Hyeon

    2006-12-01

    Land surface-atmospheric interactions influence climate and weather varying spatial scales from local to mesoscale, and even to global. This dissertation deals with several topics: (1) evaluation of various sources of incoming solar radiations, (2) evaluation of land surface process descriptions in the land surface models in both basin-scale and point scale offline model simulations, and (3) inverse estimation of radiation components using net radiation and other meteorological variables. Incoming solar radiations from various sources were evaluated. This study identified the two sources of errors in the North American Data Assimilation system (NLDAS) solar radiation: One is related to bias inherited from the ETA Data Assimilation System (EDAS) during 2001 and 2003, and the other is software error at NESDIS operational system during 2002. Land surface processes are treated quite differently in the land surface models used in this study. Over the state of Oklahoma, Common Land Model 2.1 (CLM2.1) estimates more evaporation but less transpiration than the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC3L) model. This is due to the difference in the runoff algorithm, which results in more infiltration down to the soil layer and then providing more available water to plant roots in VIC3L. CLM2.1 overestimates ground heat flux in Point scale simulation. CoLM, which employs two stream radiative transfer scheme, shows better agreements to adjusted ground observations (using Bowen-ration closure method) in offline simulations than CLM2.1. CoLM, in addition, shows various model behaviors depending on vegetation cover types. Inverse radiation estimation methods were developed and evaluated at four AmeriFlux sites. Analysis of observed radiations showed a triangle shape relationship among net radiation, net solar radiation and cloud factor (defined in this study). Clear-sky downward longwave radiation is needed to be calibrated for each site. SCE-UA method was used to calibrate an

  19. Definition of Virtual Reality simulation models using Specification and Description Language Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca Casas, Pau; Pi Palomés, Xavier; Casanovas Garcia, Josep; Jové, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    A full representation of a simulation model encompasses the behavior of the elements that define the model, the definition of the probability distributions that define the delays of the events that control the model, the experimental framework needed for execution, and the graphical representation of certain model elements. This paper aims to use specification and description language to achieve a full model rep- resentation by adding two extensions to the language, which al...

  20. A comparison of models fos dispersion of atmospheric contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a stack emission in actual atmospheric conditions was modeled with AERMOD, HPDM, PCCOSYMA and HYSPLIT codes. The first two have Gaussian stationary plume models and they were developed to calculate environmental impact produced by chemical contaminants. PCCOSYMA has a Gaussian-type segmented plume model, developed for assessing radiological impact of nuclear accidents. HYSPLIT has a hybrid code that uses a Lagrangian reference system to describe the transport of a puff mass center and an Eulerian system to describe the dispersion within the puff. The emission was fixed in 0.3 g.s-1, 284 K and 0 m.s-1, that is in equilibrium with the environment, in order to compare the different codes results. Flat terrain with fixed 0.1 m surface rough was considered. Meteorological and topographic data used were obtained from runs of the prognostic code RAMS, provided by NOAA. The main contribution of this work is to provide recommendations about the validity range of each code depending on the model used. For Gaussian models the distance in which the atmospheric condition can be considered homogeneous determines the validity range. On the other hand the validity range of HYSPLIT model is determined by the availability of the meteorological data spatial extension. There was a significant difference between the dispersion parameters used by the Gaussian codes. (author)

  1. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  2. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  3. A summary of extreme scattering events and a descriptive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, R.; Dennison, B.; Johnston, K. J.; Waltman, E. B.; Simon, R. S.

    1994-08-01

    An ongoing monitoring program of compact extragalactic radio sources over the past 11 years has revealed many instances of unusual variations that cannot be explained using the standard models for intrinsic variability or normal refractive interstellar scintillation. The observations included simultaneous daily measurements at 2.695 and 8.085 GHz of 40 to 150 sources using the Green Bank interferometer over the period 1979 to 1989. Approximately 330 sources were also monitored with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 300 foot radio telescope at 3.25 and 4.675 GHz over the 6 month period 1987 December to 1988 May. In total, 594 source-years of observations have been obtained, of which 4.8 yr constitutes the total time span of unusual variability. The unusual variations, denoted as extreme scattering events (ESEs), are summarized here. The most striking property of ESEs is their frequency dependence, in which departures from the quiescent flux density (by as much as 50% at 2.7 GHz) have no counterpart at 8.1 GHz. The single exception occurred in the 8.1 GHz light curve of 0954+658, which showed spiky variations during the 2.7 GHz event. To date,10 ESEs have been tentatively identified in the 2.7 GHz light curves of nine quasars. These ESEs appear to occur preferentially near loops in the Galactic foreground brightness distribution. A simple model based on diffraction or refraction through Galactic regions of unusually high electron density turbulence is presented.

  4. Model description of surface dielectric barrier discharges for flow control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagmich, Y; Callegari, Th; Pitchford, L C; Boeuf, J P [LAPLACE, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-05-07

    This paper presents a study of the development of a surface dielectric barrier discharge in air under conditions similar to those of plasma actuators for flow control. The study is based on results from a 2D fluid model of the discharge in air that provides the space and time evolution of the charged particle densities, electric field and surface charges. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) force associated with the momentum transfer from charged particles to neutral molecules in the volume above the dielectric layer is also deduced from the model. Results show that the EHD force is important not only during the positive part of the sinusoidal voltage cycle (i.e. when the electrode on top of the dielectric layer plays the role of the anode) but also during the negative part of the cycle (cathode on top of the dielectric layer). During the positive part of the cycle, the EHD force is due to the formation of a positive ion cloud that is periodically interrupted by high current breakdown. The EHD force during the negative part of the cycle is due to the development of a negative ion cloud that continuously grows during the successive high frequency current pulses that form in this regime.

  5. Modeling Wood Encroachment in Abandoned Grasslands in the Eifel National Park - Model Description and Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Hudjetz

    Full Text Available The degradation of natural and semi-natural landscapes has become a matter of global concern. In Germany, semi-natural grasslands belong to the most species-rich habitat types but have suffered heavily from changes in land use. After abandonment, the course of succession at a specific site is often difficult to predict because many processes interact. In order to support decision making when managing semi-natural grasslands in the Eifel National Park, we built the WoodS-Model (Woodland Succession Model. A multimodeling approach was used to integrate vegetation dynamics in both the herbaceous and shrub/tree layer. The cover of grasses and herbs was simulated in a compartment model, whereas bushes and trees were modelled in an individual-based manner. Both models worked and interacted in a spatially explicit, raster-based landscape. We present here the model description, parameterization and testing. We show highly detailed projections of the succession of a semi-natural grassland including the influence of initial vegetation composition, neighborhood interactions and ungulate browsing. We carefully weighted the single processes against each other and their relevance for landscape development under different scenarios, while explicitly considering specific site conditions. Model evaluation revealed that the model is able to emulate successional patterns as observed in the field as well as plausible results for different population densities of red deer. Important neighborhood interactions such as seed dispersal, the protection of seedlings from browsing ungulates by thorny bushes, and the inhibition of wood encroachment by the herbaceous layer, have been successfully reproduced. Therefore, not only a detailed model but also detailed initialization turned out to be important for spatially explicit projections of a given site. The advantage of the WoodS-Model is that it integrates these many mutually interacting processes of succession.

  6. Chemical Abundances from Inversions of Stellar Spectra Analysis of Solar-Type Stars with Homogeneous and Static Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Allende-Prieto, C; Asplund, M; Cobo, B R; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Barklem, Paul S.; Asplund, Martin; Cobo, Basilio Ruiz

    2001-01-01

    Spectra of late-type stars are usually analyzed with static model atmospheres in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and a homogeneous plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometry. The energy balance requires particular attention, as two elements which are particularly difficult to model play an important role: line blanketing and convection. Inversion techniques are able to bypass the difficulties of a detailed description of the energy balance. Assuming that the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and LTE, it is possible to constrain its structure from spectroscopic observations. Among the most serious approximations still implicit in the method is a static and homogeneous geometry. In this paper, we take advantage of a realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the solar surface to check the systematic errors incurred by an inversion assuming a plane-parallel horizontally-homogeneous atmosphere. The thermal structure recovered resembles the spatial and time average of the...

  7. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik;

    uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble of...... meteorological forecasts is produced from which uncertainties in the various meteorological parameters are estimated, e.g. probabilities for rain. Corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion can now be computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns can be...

  8. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the project was to conduct model simulations for past and future climate change with respect to the proposed Yucca Mtn. repository. The authors report on three main topics, one of which is boundary conditions for paleo-hindcast studies. These conditions are necessary for the conduction of three to four model simulations. The boundary conditions have been prepared for future runs. The second topic is (a) comparing the atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) with observations and other GCMs; and (b) development of a better precipitation data base for the Yucca Mtn. region for comparisons with models. These tasks have been completed. The third topic is preliminary assessments of future climate change. Energy balance model (EBM) simulations suggest that the greenhouse effect will likely dominate climate change at Yucca Mtn. for the next 10,000 years. The EBM study should improve rational choice of GCM CO{sub 2} scenarios for future climate change.

  9. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Third year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Applied Research Corporation (ARC), College Station, Texas, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate studies task. The task supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and is part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work is under the overall direction of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), US Department of Energy Headquarters, Washington, DC. The scope of the report is to present the results of the third year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain several studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  10. A tool model for predicting atmospheric kinetics with sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A package( a tool model) for program of predicting atmospheric chemical kinetics with sensitivity analysis is presented. The new direct method of calculating the first order sensitivity coefficients using sparse matrix technology to chemical kinetics is included in the tool model, it is only necessary to triangularize the matrix related to the Jacobian matrix of the model equation. The Gear type procedure is used to integrate amodel equation and its coupled auxiliary sensitivity coefficient equations. The FORTRAN subroutines of the model equation, the sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian analytical expressions are generated automatically from a chemical mechanism. The kinetic representation for the model equation and its sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian matrix is presented. Various FORTRAN subroutines in packages, such as SLODE, modified MA28, Gear package, with which the program runs in conjunction are recommended.The photo-oxidation of dimethyl disulfide is used for illustration.

  11. Hydrogeochemical site descriptive model - a strategy for the model development during site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2002, SKB commenced site characterisation investigations using deep boreholes at different sites. As an integral part of the planning work SKB has prepared a strategy to develop a Hydrogeochemical Site Descriptive Model; similar strategies have been developed for the other major geoscience disciplines. The main objectives of the Hydrogeochemical Site Descriptive Model are to describe the chemistry and distribution of the groundwater in the bedrock and overburden and the hydrogeochemical processes involved in its origin and evolution. This description is based primarily on measurements of the groundwater composition but incorporates the use of available geological and hydrogeological site descriptive models. The SKB hydrogeochemistry programme is planned to fulfil two basic requirements: 1) to provide representative and quality assured data for use as input parameter values in calculating long-term repository safety, and 2) to understand the present undisturbed hydrogeochemical conditions and how these conditions will change in the future. Parameter values for safety analysis include pH, Eh, S, SO4, HCO3, HPO4 and TDS (mainly cations), together with colloids, fulvic and humic acids, other organics, bacteria and nitrogen. These values will be used to characterise the groundwater environment at, above and below repository depths. In the hydrogeochemical site investigation programme the number and location of the sampling points will be constrained by: a) geology (e.g. topography, overburden types, bedrock structures etc), b) hydrogeology (e.g. groundwater recharge/discharge areas, residence times), c) reliability (e.g. undisturbed vs disturbed groundwater chemical conditions), and d) resources (e.g. number and type of samples, and also available personnel, may be restricted by budgetary and schedule concerns). Naturally a balance is required between these constraints and the scientific aims of the programme. The constraints should never detrimentally affect the

  12. Generalized Sigma Model Description of the Light J=0 Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Fariborz, A H; Schechter, J; Fariborz, Amir H.; Jora, Renata; Schechter, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Within a linear sigma model framework, possible mixing between two chiral nonets (a two quark nonet, and a four quark nonet) below 2 GeV is studied. Incorporating the U(1)$_A$ behavior of the underlying QCD, and working in the isospin invariant limit, the mass spectra of the I=0, $I=1/2$ and I=1 pseudoscalars, and the $I=1/2$ scalars are studied, and estimates of their quark content are presented. It is found, as expected, that the ordinary and the excited pseudoscalars generally have much less two and four quark admixtures compared to the respective scalars. As by-products, several quantities such as the four quark vacuum condensate, and the decay constant of excited states are predicted.

  13. Solitonic description of interface profiles in competition models

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, T; Menezes, J

    2014-01-01

    We consider the spatial patterns provided by mean field numerical simulations for two competing species. As all individuals have the same rate of mobility, reproduction and competition, interfaces of empty spaces separating domains of single species are formed by a spontaneous process of symmetry breaking. We construct a Lagrangian formalism for studying the static profile of such interfaces by means of a scalar field theory framework. We identify the number density of empty spaces created by the competition interactions with a function of the energy density in scalar field systems. We then present a potential with $Z_2$ symmetry, which leads to differential equations whose solitonic solutions describe interface profile. Finally, we compare the theoretical results with data from one-dimensional numerical simulation of the Lotka-Volterra equations and show that our model fits well the properties of interfaces.

  14. Shell Model and Mean-Field Description of Band Termination

    CERN Document Server

    Zalewski, M; Nazarewicz, W; Stoitcheva, G; Zdunczuk, H

    2007-01-01

    We study nuclear high-spin states undergoing the transition to the fully stretched configuration with maximum angular momentum I_max within the space of valence nucleons. To this end, we perform a systematic theoretical analysis of non-fully-stretched I_max-2 and I_max-1 f_{7/2}^n seniority isomers and d_{3/2}^{-1} f_{7/2}^{n+1} intruder states in the A~44 nuclei from the lower-fp shell. We employ two theoretical approaches: (i) the density functional theory based on the cranked self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method, and (ii) the nuclear shell model in the full sdfp configuration space allowing for 1p-1h cross-shell excitations. We emphasize the importance of restoration of broken angular momentum symmetry inherently obscuring the mean-field treatment of high-spin states. Overall good agreement with experimental data is obtained.

  15. Parallel community climate model: Description and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, J.B.; Flanery, R.E.; Semeraro, B.D.; Worley, P.H. [and others

    1996-07-15

    This report gives an overview of a parallel version of the NCAR Community Climate Model, CCM2, implemented for MIMD massively parallel computers using a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallel implementation was developed on an Intel iPSC/860 with 128 processors and on the Intel Delta with 512 processors, and the initial target platform for the production version of the code is the Intel Paragon with 2048 processors. Because the implementation uses a standard, portable message-passing libraries, the code has been easily ported to other multiprocessors supporting a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallelization strategy used is to decompose the problem domain into geographical patches and assign each processor the computation associated with a distinct subset of the patches. With this decomposition, the physics calculations involve only grid points and data local to a processor and are performed in parallel. Using parallel algorithms developed for the semi-Lagrangian transport, the fast Fourier transform and the Legendre transform, both physics and dynamics are computed in parallel with minimal data movement and modest change to the original CCM2 source code. Sequential or parallel history tapes are written and input files (in history tape format) are read sequentially by the parallel code to promote compatibility with production use of the model on other computer systems. A validation exercise has been performed with the parallel code and is detailed along with some performance numbers on the Intel Paragon and the IBM SP2. A discussion of reproducibility of results is included. A user`s guide for the PCCM2 version 2.1 on the various parallel machines completes the report. Procedures for compilation, setup and execution are given. A discussion of code internals is included for those who may wish to modify and use the program in their own research.

  16. A Simple Model for the Calculation of Plasma Impedance in Atmospheric Radio Frequency Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In atmospheric radio-frequency (rf) discharges, the plasma parameters, such as electron density, sheath thickness and sheath voltage, are not easy to be probed experimentally, while the electrical characteristics, such as impedance, resistance and reactance, are relatively convenient to be measured. In this paper we presented a simple theoretical model derived from the fluid description of generated plasmas without considering the circuit model, to investigate the relationship between the plasma impedance and plasma parameters. By introducing a relaxation frequency, the plasma impedance could be predicted by formulas presented in this study, and the mean electron density and sheath thickness can also be calculated from the measured or simulated impedance and reactance, respectively. (low temperature plasma)

  17. Modeling of transport in the two-dimensional atmospheric transport and kinetics codes SPHERNEW and TRACER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, A.

    1976-07-23

    The report describes how transport by the wind is modeled in the 2-D atmospheric transport and chemical kinetics codes SPHERNEW and TRACER. The description includes the equations for transport by a specified velocity field, the eddy diffusion approximation for short-term fluctuations in the velocity, other simplifying approximations, the geometric grid, the difference equations, and the coefficient matrix of the grid. The assumption of a constant vertical density distribution was used to derive mass-consistent forms of the difference equations. These forms eliminate the instabilities and unrealistic solutions associated with specified wind fields which are not exactly mass-consistent. An option is allowed for variable weighting between central (second-order) and upstream (first-order) forms of the spatial differencing of the advection terms, to modulate phase and amplitude errors in the advection model.

  18. Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model in Microwave Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yuanyuan; LI Zhaoliang

    2008-01-01

    The radiative transfer is one of the significant theories that describe the processes of scattering,emission,and absorption of electromagnetic radiant intensity through scattering medium.It is the basis of the study on the quantitative remote sensing.In this paper,the radiative characteristics of soil,vegetation,and atmosphere were described respectively.The numerical solution of radiative transfer was accomplished by Successive Orders of Scattering (SOS).A radiative transfer model for simulating microwave brightness temperature over land surfaces was constructed,designed,and implemented.Analyzing the database generated from soil-vegetation-atmosphere radiative transfer model under Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) configuration showed that the atmospheric effects on microwave brightness temperature should not be neglected,particularly for higher frequency,and can be parameterized.At the same time,the relationship between the emissivities of the different channels was developed.The study results will promote the development of algorithm to retrieve geophysical parameters from microwave remotely sensed data.

  19. Understanding atmospheric peroxyformic acid chemistry: observation, modeling and implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(OO2 and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(OO2 radical from HC(O + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  20. Modeling low elevation GPS signal propagation in maritime atmospheric ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinpeng; Wu, Zhensen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Hongguang; Zhu, Qinglin

    2012-05-01

    Using the parabolic wave equation (PWE) method, we model low elevation GPS L1 signal propagation in maritime atmospheric ducts. To consider sea surface impedance, roughness, and the effects of earth's curvature, we propose a new initial field model for the GPS PWE split-step solution. On the basis of the comparison between the proposed model and the conventional initial field model for a smooth, perfectly conducting sea surface on a planar earth, we conclude that both the amplitude and phase of the initial field are influenced by surface impedance and roughness, and that the interference behavior between direct and reflected GPS rays is affected by earth's curvature. The performance of the proposed model is illustrated with examples of low elevation GPS L1 signal propagation in three types of ducts: an evaporation duct, a surface-based duct, and an elevated duct. The GPS PWE is numerically implemented using the split-step discrete mixed Fourier transform algorithm to enforce impedance-type boundary conditions at the rough sea surface. Because the GPS signal is right hand circularly polarized, we calculate its power strength by combining the propagation predictions of the horizontally and the vertically polarized components. The effects of the maritime atmospheric ducts on low elevation GPS signal propagation are demonstrated according to the presented examples, and the potential applications of the GPS signals affected by ducts are discussed.

  1. A High Resolution Nonhydrostatic Tropical Atmospheric Model and Its Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xueshun; Akimasa SUMI

    2005-01-01

    A high resolution nonhydrostatic tropical atmospheric model is developed by using a ready-made regional atmospheric modeling system. The motivation is to investigate the convective activities associated with the tropical intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) through a cloud resolving calculation. Due to limitations in computing resources, a 2000 km×2000 km region covering the forefront of an ISO-related westerly is selected as the model domain, in which a cloud-resolving integration with a 5-km horizontal resolution is conducted. The results indicate the importance of stratus-cumulus interactions in the organization of the cloud clusters embedded in the ISO. In addition, comparative integrations with 2-km and 5-km grid sizes are conducted, which suggest no distinctive differences between the two cases although some finer structures of convections are discernible in the 2-km case. The significance of this study resides in supplying a powerful tool for investigating tropical cloud activities without the controversy of cloud parameterizations. The parallel computing method applied in this model allows sufficient usage of computer memory, which is different from the usual method used when parallelizing regional model. Further simulation for the global tropics with a resolution around 5 km is being prepared.

  2. Modelling the impact of aircraft emissions on atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiuk, D. K.; Lowenberg, M. H.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Emissions of the trace gases CO2, CO, H2O, HC, NOx, and SOx that have the potential to perturb large scale atmospheric composition are accumulating in the atmosphere at an unprecedented rate as the demand for air traffic continues to grow. We investigate the global and regional effects of aircraft emissions on the atmosphere and climate using mathematical modelling, sensitivity simulations, and perturbation simulations and present historical and spatial distribution evolution of the global and regional number of departures, fuel burn and emissions. A comprehensive aircraft movement database spanning years 2005 - 2012, covering 225 countries and over 223 million departures on approximately 41000 unique routes serves as a basis for our investigation. We combine air traffic data with output from an aircraft performance model (fuel burn and emissions) including 80 distinct aircraft types, representing 216 of all the aircraft flown in the world in 2005 - 2012. This accounts for fuel burn and emissions for 99.5% of the total number of departures during that time. Simulations are being performed using a state of the art 3D Lagrangian global chemical transport model (CTM) CRI-STOCHEM for simulation of tropospheric chemistry. The model is applied with the CRI (Common Representative Intermediates) chemistry scheme with 220 chemical species, and 609 reactions. This allows us to study in detail the chemical cycles driven by NOx, governing the rate of formation of O3 which controls the production of OH and indirectly determines the lifetime of other greenhouse gases. We also investigate the impact of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption on the European air traffic and present a model response to the perturbation of NOx emissions that followed.

  3. An ion species model for positive ion sources: I. Description of the model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrey, E.; Holmes, A. J. T.

    2015-02-01

    A one-dimensional model of the magnetic multipole volume plasma source has been developed for use in intense ion/neutral atom beam injectors. The model uses plasma transport coefficients for particle and energy flow to create a detailed description of the plasma parameters along an axis parallel to that of the extracted beam. Primarily constructed for applications to neutral beam injection systems on fusion devices, the model concentrates on the hydrogenic isotopes but can be extended to any gas by substitution of the relevant masses, cross-sections and rate coefficients. The model considers the flow of fast ionizing electrons that create the ratios of the three hydrogenic isotope ion species, H+, H2+ , H3+ (and similarly for deuterium and tritium) as they flow towards the beam extraction electrode, together with the production of negative hydrogenic ions through volume processes. The use of detailed energy balance in the discharge allows the determination of the fraction of the gas density that is in an atomic state and also the gas temperature as well as the electron temperatures and plasma potential. Comparisons are made between the results of the model and experimental measurements in deuterium from a number of different filament driven sources used on beam heating facilities.

  4. The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H[2]Sim) technical description.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Scott A.; Kamery, William; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.; Lutz, Andrew E.; Rosthal, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to become an integral part of our energy transportation and heat and power sectors in the coming decades and offers a possible solution to many of the problems associated with a heavy reliance on oil and other fossil fuels. The Hydrogen Futures Simulation Model (H2Sim) was developed to provide a high level, internally consistent, strategic tool for evaluating the economic and environmental trade offs of alternative hydrogen production, storage, transport and end use options in the year 2020. Based on the model's default assumptions, estimated hydrogen production costs range from 0.68 $/kg for coal gasification to as high as 5.64 $/kg for centralized electrolysis using solar PV. Coal gasification remains the least cost option if carbon capture and sequestration costs ($0.16/kg) are added. This result is fairly robust; for example, assumed coal prices would have to more than triple or the assumed capital cost would have to increase by more than 2.5 times for natural gas reformation to become the cheaper option. Alternatively, assumed natural gas prices would have to fall below $2/MBtu to compete with coal gasification. The electrolysis results are highly sensitive to electricity costs, but electrolysis only becomes cost competitive with other options when electricity drops below 1 cent/kWhr. Delivered 2020 hydrogen costs are likely to be double the estimated production costs due to the inherent difficulties associated with storing, transporting, and dispensing hydrogen due to its low volumetric density. H2Sim estimates distribution costs ranging from 1.37 $/kg (low distance, low production) to 3.23 $/kg (long distance, high production volumes, carbon sequestration). Distributed hydrogen production options, such as on site natural gas, would avoid some of these costs. H2Sim compares the expected 2020 per mile driving costs (fuel, capital, maintenance, license, and registration) of current technology internal combustion engine (ICE

  5. Characterizing uniform discharge in atmospheric helium by numerical modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Bo; Wang Xin-Xin; Luo Hai-Yun; Liang Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional fluid model of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in helium at atmospheric pressure was estab-lished and the discharge was numerically simulated. It was found that not only the spatial distributions of the internal parameters such as the electric field, the electron density and ion density are similar to those in a low-pressure glow discharge, but also the visually apparent attribute (light emission) is exactly the same as the observable feature of a low-pressure glow discharge. This confirms that the uniform DBD in atmosphcric helium is a glow type discharge. The fact that the thickness of the cathode fall layer is about 0.5 ram, much longer than that of a normal glow dischargc in helium at atmospheric pressure, indicates the discharge being a sub-normal glow discharge close to normal one. The multipulse phenomenon was reproduced in the simulation and a much less complicated explanation for this phenomenon was given.

  6. Data Assimilation and Transport Modeling in Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Howard C.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Data assimilation is a blanket term used to describe a number of techniques for retrieving important physical parameters from observational data, subject to constraints imposed by prior knowledge (such as, in the case of meteorology, the primitive equations that govern atmospheric motion). Since these newly developed methods make efficient use of computational resources, they are of great importance in the interpretation of the voluminous datasets that are now produced by satellite missions. As proposed, these techniques have been applied to the study of the Martian and terrestrial atmospheres based on available satellite observations. In addition, a sophisticated hydrodynamic model (non-hydrostatic, and therefore applicable to the study of the interiors of the giant planets) has also been developed and successfully applied to the study of tidally induced motions in Jupiter.

  7. Models of atmosphere-ecosystem-hydrology interactions: Approaches and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, David S.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions among the atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, and the hydrological cycle have been the subject of investigation for many years, although most of the research has had a regional focus. The topic is broad, including the effects of climate and hydrology on vegetation, the effects of vegetation on hydrology, the effects of the hydrological cycle on the atmosphere, and interactions of the cycles via material flux such as solutes and trace gases. The intent of this paper is to identify areas of critical uncertainty, discuss modeling approaches to resolving those problems, and then propose techniques for testing. I consider several interactions specifically to illustrate the range of problems. These areas are as follows: (1) cloud parameterizations and the land surface, (2) soil moisture, and (3) the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  8. Lattice Models for Granular-Like Velocity Fields: Hydrodynamic Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manacorda, Alessandro; Plata, Carlos A.; Lasanta, Antonio; Puglisi, Andrea; Prados, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A recently introduced model describing—on a 1d lattice—the velocity field of a granular fluid is discussed in detail. The dynamics of the velocity field occurs through next-neighbours inelastic collisions which conserve momentum but dissipate energy. The dynamics is described through the corresponding Master Equation for the time evolution of the probability distribution. In the continuum limit, equations for the average velocity and temperature fields with fluctuating currents are derived, which are analogous to hydrodynamic equations of granular fluids when restricted to the shear modes. Therefore, the homogeneous cooling state, with its linear instability, and other relevant regimes such as the uniform shear flow and the Couette flow states are described. The evolution in time and space of the single particle probability distribution, in all those regimes, is also discussed, showing that the local equilibrium is not valid in general. The noise for the momentum and energy currents, which are correlated, are white and Gaussian. The same is true for the noise of the energy sink, which is usually negligible.

  9. Meridional thermal field of a coupled ocean-atmosphere system: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang

    2006-05-01

    This paper constitutes the author's continuing effort in the construction of a minimal theory of the earth's climate. In an earlier paper published in the Journal of Climate in 2001, this author has derived the global-mean fields of an aquatic planet forced by the solar insolation, which provide the necessary constraints for the present derivation of the meridional thermal field. The model closure invokes maximized entropy production (MEP), a thermodynamic principle widely used in turbulence and climate studies. Based on differing convective regimes of the ocean and atmosphere, both fluids are first reduced two thermal masses with aligned fronts, consistent with a minimal description of the observed field. Subjected to natural bounds, a robust solution is then found, characterized by an ice-free ocean, near-freezing cold fluid masses, mid-latitude fronts, and comparable ocean and atmosphere heat transports. The presence of polar continents, however, sharply reduces the ocean heat transport outside the tropics, but leaves the thermal field largely unchanged. Given the limitation of an extremely crude model, the deduced thermal field nonetheless seems sensible, suggesting that the model has captured the physics for a minimal account of the observed field. Together with the above-mentioned paper, the model reinforces the pre-eminent role of the triple point of water in stabilizing the surface temperature - against changing external condition. Such internal control is made possible by the turbulent nature of the climate fluids, which necessitates a selection rule based on extremization.

  10. Models and methods applicable to the description operation of payment cards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruznyaev Mikhail Mikhailovich

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an analysis of existing models and methods applicable to the description of the functioning of payment cards in the future - the PC. Proposed and developed new approaches to modeling modification relationship indicators of income, savings, demand and supply. The analysis models of savings, the development of which, in three phases, reflecting the transition from a simple, single-factor models to more complex - multifactorial.

  11. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented

  12. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrova, Ts [Berkeley Research Associate, Inc., Beltsville MD 20705 (United States); Benova, E [Department of Language Learning, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-07-15

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  13. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Petrova, Ts; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  14. Testing the methodology for site descriptive modelling. Application for the Laxemar area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special project has been conducted where the currently available data from the Laxemar area, which is part of the Simpevarp site, have been evaluated and interpreted into a Site Descriptive Model covering: geology, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and rock mechanics. Description of the surface ecosystem has been omitted, since it was re-characterised in another, parallel, project. Furthermore, there has been no evaluation of transport properties. The project is primarily a methodology test. The lessons learnt will be implemented in the Site Descriptive Modelling during the coming site investigation. The intent of the project has been to explore whether available methodology for Site Descriptive Modelling based on surface and borehole data is adequate and to identify potential needs for development and improvement in the methodology. The project has developed, with limitations in scope, a Site Descriptive Model in local scale, corresponding to the situation after completion of the Initial Site Investigations for the Laxemar area (i.e. 'version 1.2' using the vocabulary of the general execution program for the site investigations). The Site Descriptive Model should be reasonable, but should not be regarded as a 'real' model. There are limitations both in input data and in the scope of the analysis. The measured (primary) data constitute a wide range of different measurement results including data from two deep core drilled boreholes. These data both need to be checked for consistency and to be interpreted into a format more amenable for three-dimensional modelling. Examples of such evaluations are estimation of surface geology, lineament interpretation, geological single hole interpretation, hydrogeological single hole interpretation and assessment of hydrogeochemical data. Furthermore, while cross discipline interpretation is encouraged there is also a need for transparency. This means that the evaluations first are made within each discipline and after this

  15. Development, description and validation of a Tritium Environmental Release Model (TERM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is a radioisotope of hydrogen that exists naturally in the environment and may also be released through anthropogenic activities. It bonds readily with hydrogen and oxygen atoms to form tritiated water, which then cycles through the hydrosphere. This paper seeks to model the migration of tritiated species throughout the environment – including atmospheric, river and coastal systems – more comprehensively and more consistently across release scenarios than is currently in the literature. A review of the features and underlying conceptual models of some existing tritium release models was conducted, and an underlying aggregated conceptual process model defined, which is presented. The new model, dubbed ‘Tritium Environmental Release Model’ (TERM), was then tested against multiple validation sets from literature, including experimental data and reference tests for tritium models. TERM has been shown to be capable of providing reasonable results which are broadly comparable with atmospheric HTO release models from the literature, spanning both continuous and discrete release conditions. TERM also performed well when compared with atmospheric data. TERM is believed to be a useful tool for examining discrete and continuous atmospheric releases or combinations thereof. TERM also includes further capabilities (e.g. river and coastal release scenarios) that may be applicable to certain scenarios that atmospheric models alone may not handle well. -- Highlights: • A short review of existing tritium models from literature is presented. • A new model for tritium release and transfer in the environment is presented. • The model is freely available and extensively documented. • The model intent is to supplement and bridge the capabilities of existing models. • The model is compared and validated to published data sets and other models

  16. Experiment on the Vernov satellite: Transient energetic processes in the Earth's atmosphere and magnetosphere. Part I: Description of the experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Svertilov, S. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Garipov, G. K.; Barinova, V. O.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Veden'kin, N. N.; Golovanov, I. A.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Klimov, P. A.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Morozenko, V. S.; Morozov, O. V.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. L.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Rozhkov, G. V.; Sigaeva, E. A.; Khrenov, B. A.; Yashin, I. V.; Klimov, S. I.; Vavilov, D. I.; Grushin, V. A.; Grechko, T. V.; Khartov, V. V.; Kudryashov, V. A.; Bortnikov, S. V.; Mzhel'skiy, P. V.; Papkov, A. P.; Krasnopeev, S. V.; Krug, V. V.; Korepanov, V. E.; Belyaev, S.; Demidov, A.; Ferenz, Ch.; Bodnar, L.; Szegedi, P.; Rotkel, H.; Moravskiy, M.; Park, Il; Jeon, Jin-A.; Kim, Ji-In; Lee, Jik

    2016-07-01

    The program of physical studies on the Vernov satellite launched on July 8, 2014 into a polar (640 × 830 km) solar-synchronous orbit with an inclination of 98.4° is presented. We described the complex of scientific equipment on this satellite in detail, including multidirectional gamma-ray detectors, electron spectrometers, red and ultra-violet detectors, and wave probes. The experiment on the Vernov satellite is mainly aimed at a comprehensive study of the processes of generation of transient phenomena in the optical and gamma-ray ranges in the Earth's atmosphere (such as high-altitude breakdown on runaway relativistic electrons), the study of the action on the atmosphere of electrons precipitated from the radiation belts, and low- and high-frequency electromagnetic waves of both space and atmospheric origin.

  17. Nonlinear lumped circuit modeling of an atmospheric pressure rf discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapke, M.; Ziegler, D.; Mussenbrock, T.; Gans, T.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2006-10-01

    The subject of our modeling approach is a specifically modified version of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ, originally proposed by Selwyn and coworkers^1) with reduced discharge volume, the micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ). The μ-APPJ is a homogeneous nonequilibrium discharge operated with Argon or Helium as the feedstock gas and a percentage volume admixture of a molecular gas (O2, H2, N2). The efficiency of the discharge is mainly due to the dissociated and activated molecules in the effluent that can be selected depending on the application. A variety of applications in surface treatment have already been demonstrated, e.g., in semiconductor technology, restoration and bio-medicine. In this contribution we present and analyze a nonlinear lumped circuit model of the μ-APPJ. We apply a two-scale formalism. The bulk is modeled by a generalized Ohm's law, whereas the sheath is described on a considerably higher level of mathematical sophistication. The main focus lies on the spectrum of the discharge current in order to support the characterization of the discharge via model-based diagnostics, i.e., the estimation of the spatially averaged electron density from the frequency of certain self-excitated collective resonance modes. J. Park et al., Appl. Phy. Lett. 76, 288 (2000)

  18. An ion species model for positive ion sources - part I description of the model

    CERN Document Server

    Surrey, E

    2014-01-01

    A one dimensional model of the magnetic multipole volume plasma source has been developed for use in intense ion/neutral atom beam injectors. The model uses plasma transport coefficients for particle and energy flow to create a detailed description of the plasma parameters along an axis parallel to that of the extracted beam. Primarily constructed for applications to neutral beam injection systems on fusion devices, the model concentrates on the hydrogenic isotopes but can be extended to any gas by substitution of the relevant masses, cross sections and rate coefficients. The model considers the flow of fast ionizing electrons that create the ratios of the three hydrogenic isotope ion species, H+, H2 +, H3 + (and similarly for deuterium and tritium) as they flow towards the beam extraction electrode, together with the production of negative hydrogenic ions through volume processes. The use of detailed energy balance in the discharge allows the determination of the fraction of the gas density that is in an ato...

  19. Methodology for geometric modelling. Presentation and administration of site descriptive models; Metodik foer geometrisk modellering. Presentation och administration av platsbeskrivande modeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This report presents a methodology to construct, visualise and present geoscientific descriptive models based on data from the site investigations, which the SKB currently performs, to build an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. It is designed for interaction with SICADA (SKB:s site characterisation database) and RVS (SKB:s Rock Visualisation System). However, the concepts of the methodology are general and can be used with other tools capable of handling 3D geometries and parameters. The descriptive model is intended to be an instrument where site investigation data from all disciplines are put together to form a comprehensive visual interpretation of the studied rock mass. The methodology has four main components: 1. Construction of a geometrical model of the interpreted main structures at the site. 2. Description of the geoscientific characteristics of the structures. 3. Description and geometrical implementation of the geometric uncertainties in the interpreted model structures. 4. Quality system for the handling of the geometrical model, its associated database and some aspects of the technical auditing. The geometrical model forms a basis for understanding the main elements and structures of the investigated site. Once the interpreted geometries are in place in the model, the system allows for adding descriptive and quantitative data to each modelled object through a system of intuitive menus. The associated database allows each geometrical object a complete quantitative description of all geoscientific disciplines, variabilities, uncertainties in interpretation and full version history. The complete geometrical model and its associated database of object descriptions are to be recorded in a central quality system. Official, new and old versions of the model are administered centrally in order to have complete quality assurance of each step in the interpretation process. The descriptive model is a cornerstone in the understanding of the

  20. Modeling of atmospheric and ionospheric disturbances from shallow seismic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Bruce; Archambeau, Charles B.

    Earthquake sources, as well as contained underground explosions and volcanic explosions, initiate atmospheric waves at the air-ground interface which propagate upward and outward. The propagating atmospheric waves produced are of two types: a high-frequency acoustic wave and a low-frequency gravity wave with horizontal wavelength much longer than its vertical wavelength. Because of the exponential decrease of atmospheric density with height, the acoustic and particularly the gravity waves can grow to significant amplitude in the upper atmosphere, where they can affect the ionosphere causing changes in the distribution of neutral and charged particles. The coherent fluctuations of electron densities and ionization layer boundaries produced by these waves can be detected by electromagnetic sounding methods and hence the occurrence and character of the disturbances can be inferred. A particular application of interest is the detection and discrimination of underground and near surface chemical explosions in a nuclear test monitoring context. Specifically, identification of the different source types is enhanced by combining seismic detection methods with detection of the ionospheric disturbances caused by explosion and earthquake sources. In this study, numerical models of non-linear gravity controlled atmospheric disturbances produced by seismic sources near the surface of the Earth are investigated in order to obtain quantitative predictions that might be used in evaluating detection methods based on gravity wave excitation. Explicit numerical integration of the non-linear finite difference equations is used to simulate the transient flows produced in a three-dimensional ARDC atmosphere. Results from the simulations agree with many results from linear theory approximations and also show non-linear characteristics similar to important gravity wave observations. Electron density changes in the ionosphere are predicted with their spatial and temporal behavior found to

  1. Chemical transport modeling of potential atmospheric CO2 sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration via engineered chemical sinks is investigated using a three dimensional chemical transport model (CTM). Meteorological and chemical constraints for flat or vertical systems that would absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, as well as an example chemical system of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) proposed by Elliott et al. [Compensation of atmospheric CO2 buildup through engineered chemical sinkage, Geophys. Res. Lett. 28 (2001) 1235] are reviewed. The CTM examines land based deposition sinks, with 4ox5o latitude/longitude resolution at various locations, and deposition velocities (v). A maximum uptake of ∼20 Gton (1015 g) C yr-1 is attainable with v>5 cm s -1 at a mid-latitude site. The atmospheric increase of CO2 (3 Gton yr-1) can be balanced by an engineered sink with an area of no more than 75,000 km2 at v of 1 cm s-1. By building the sink upwards or splitting this area into narrow elements can reduce the active area by more than an order of magnitude as discussed in Dubey at el. [31]. (author)

  2. Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release

  3. Modeling Modern Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands. 1; Model Description and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Bernadette P.; Heimann, Martin; Matthews, Elaine

    2001-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which contributes about 22 percent to the present greenhouse effect. Natural wetlands currently constitute the biggest methane source and were the major source in preindustrial times. Wetland emissions depend highly on the climate, i.e., on soil temperature and water table. To investigate the response of methane emissions from natural wetlands to climate variations, a process-based model that derives methane emissions from natural wetlands as a function of soil temperature, water table, and net primary productivity is used. For its application on the global scale, global data sets for all model parameters are generated. In addition, a simple hydrologic model is developed in order to simulate the position of the water table in wetlands. The hydrologic model is tested against data from different wetland sites, and the sensitivity of the hydrologic model to changes in precipitation is examined. The global methane­ hydrology model constitutes a tool to study temporal and spatial variations in methane emissions from natural wetlands. The model is applied using high-frequency atmospheric forcing fields from European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analyses of the period from 1982 to 1993. We calculate global annual methane emissions from wetlands to be 260 teragrams per year. Twenty-five percent of these methane emissions originate from wetlands north of 30 degrees North Latitude. Only 60 percent of the produced methane is emitted, while the rest is re-oxidized. A comparison of zonal integrals of simulated global wetland emissions and results obtained by an inverse modeling approach shows good agreement. In a test with data from two wetlands the seasonality of simulated and observed methane emissions agrees well.

  4. Atmospheric statistical dynamic models. Climate experiments: albedo experiments with a zonal atmospheric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zonal model experiments with modified surface boundary conditions suggest an initial chain of feedback processes that is largest at the site of the perturbation: deforestation and/or desertification → increased surface albedo → reduced surface absorption of solar radiation → surface cooling and reduced evaporation → reduced convective activity → reduced precipitation and latent heat release → cooling of upper troposphere and increased tropospheric lapse rates → general global cooling and reduced precipitation. As indicated above, although the two experiments give similar overall global results, the location of the perturbation plays an important role in determining the response of the global circulation. These two-dimensional model results are also consistent with three-dimensional model experiments. These results have tempted us to consider the possibility that self-induced growth of the subtropical deserts could serve as a possible mechanism to cause the initial global cooling that then initiates a glacial advance thus activating the positive feedback loop involving ice-albedo feedback (also self-perpetuating). Reversal of the cycle sets in when the advancing ice cover forces the wave-cyclone tracks far enough equatorward to quench (revegetate) the subtropical deserts

  5. Development of web-based environment for atmospheric dispersion modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofman, Radek; Pecha, Petr

    La Garde Park, Illinois, USA : American Nuclear Society, 2013. ISBN 978-0-89448-702-6. [International Topical Meeting on Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Analysis . Columbia, SC (US), 22.09.2013-27.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA MV(CZ) VG20102013018 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : distributed computing * atmoshepric dispersion * web environment Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/AS/hofman-development of web -based environment for atmospheric dispersion modeling.pdf

  6. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected are valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential, individual off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04% of the natural background radiation dose to the population in the path of the release

  7. Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence Effect on Terrestrial FSO Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbulence results in many effects causing fluctuation in the received optical power. Terrestrial laser beam communication is affected above all by scintillations. The paper deals with modeling the influence of scintillation on link performance, using the modified Rytov theory. The probability of correct signal detection in direct detection system in dependence on many parameters such as link distance, power link margin, refractive-index structure parameter, etc. is discussed and different approaches to the evaluation of scintillation effect are compared. The simulations are performed for a horizontal-path propagation of the Gaussian-beam wave.

  8. An atmospheric tritium release database for model comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database of vegetation, soil, and air tritium concentrations at gridded coordinate locations following nine accidental atmospheric releases is described. While none of the releases caused a significant dose to the public, the data collected is valuable for comparison with the results of tritium transport models used for risk assessment. The largest, potential, individual off-site dose from any of the releases was calculated to be 1.6 mrem. The population dose from this same release was 46 person-rem which represents 0.04% of the natural background radiation dose to the population in the path of the release

  9. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  10. Fingering convection and cloudless models for cool brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblin, P; Mourier, P; Baraffe, I; Chabrier, G; Drummond, B; Homeier, D; Venot, O

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to improve the current understanding of the atmospheres of brown dwarfs, especially cold ones with spectral type T and Y, whose modeling is a current challenge. Silicate and iron clouds are believed to disappear at the photosphere at the L/T transition, but cloudless models fail to reproduce correctly the spectra of T dwarfs, advocating for the addition of more physics, e.g. other types of clouds or internal energy transport mechanisms. We use a one-dimensional (1D) radiative/convective equilibrium code ATMO to investigate this issue. This code includes both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium chemistry and solves consistently the PT structure. Included opacity sources are H2-H2, H2-He, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, NH3, K, Na, and TiO, VO if they are present in the atmosphere. We show that the spectra of Y dwarfs can be accurately reproduced with a cloudless model if vertical mixing and NH3 quenching are taken into account. T dwarf spectra still have some reddening in e.g. J - H compared to cloudless mode...

  11. Dynamical modeling of long-period variable star atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a new flexible computer program, numerical calculations were performed to investigate the dynamical structure and behavior of a spherical model atmosphere for cool pulsating Mira-like stars with masses from 0.8 to 2.0 solar masses and fundamental-mode pulsation periods from 175 to 1000 days. In particular, the response of the model to periodic driving at its inner boundary was examined for a considerable range of stellar parameters for both fundamental and overtone modes, various driving amplitudes, and various assumptions about the physical processes involved; radiation pressure on dust and time-dependent temperature relaxation were included. Stable steady state models with periodic shocks were obtained in all cases. Both shocks and dust were found to be essential for rapid mass loss. The shocks increase the density and thus greatly increase the amount of dust formed in the cool outer atmosphere. Radiation pressure accelerates the grains, which drive a slow cool wind. Calculated mass-loss rates appear to be of the right order of magnitude to agree with observations and show how mass loss can be expected to depend on the stellar parameters. 42 references

  12. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  13. First Analysis Of A Coupled Mediterranean - Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somot, S.; Sevault, F.; Béranger, K.; Déqué, M.; Crépon, M.

    A regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been developed to study the climate of the Mediterranean Region in a joint research between Météo-France-CNRM and CNRS-IPSL. This model is based on a variable resolution version of the global spectral AGCM Arpège-Climat with an horizontal grid mesh of 50 km over the mediterranean area and a limited area version of the OGCM OPA with an horizontal grid mesh of 10 km. The two models are coupled with the OASIS coupler developed by CERFACS. Outside the Mediterranean Sea, the sea surface temperature is prescribed from interannual observed data. A ten year coupled simulation has been done without relaxation nor correction. Sea- sonal averages as well as interannual variability have been compared with available observations and with uncoupled simulations.

  14. Puff models for simulation of fugitive radioactive emissions in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A puff model for the dispersion of material from fugitive radioactive emissions is presented. For vertical diffusion the model is based on general techniques for solving time dependent advection-diffusion equation: the ADMM (Advection Diffusion Multilayer Method) and GILTT (Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique) techniques. The first one is an analytical solution based on a discretization of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in sub-layers where the advection-diffusion equation is solved by the Laplace transform technique. The solution is given in integral form. The second one is a well-known hybrid method that had solved a wide class of direct and inverse problems mainly in the area of Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics and the solution is given in series form. Comparisons between values predicted by the models against experimental ground-level concentrations are shown. (author)

  15. Atmospheric Probe Model: Construction and Wind Tunnel Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Jerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The material contained in this document represents a summary of the results of a low speed wind tunnel test program to determine the performance of an atmospheric probe at low speed. The probe configuration tested consists of a 2/3 scale model constructed from a combination of hard maple wood and aluminum stock. The model design includes approximately 130 surface static pressure taps. Additional hardware incorporated in the baseline model provides a mechanism for simulating external and internal trailing edge split flaps for probe flow control. Test matrix parameters include probe side slip angle, external/internal split flap deflection angle, and trip strip applications. Test output database includes surface pressure distributions on both inner and outer annular wings and probe center line velocity distributions from forward probe to aft probe locations.

  16. 3D Servicescape Model: Atmospheric Qualities of Virtual Reality Retailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasim Munir Dad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a 3D servicescape conceptual model which explores the potential effect of 3D virtual reality retail stores’ environment on shoppers' behaviour. Extensive review of literature within two different domains, namely: servicescape models, and retail atmospherics, was carried out in order to propose a conceptual model. Further, eight detailed interviews were conducted to confirm the stimulus dimension of the conceptual model. A 3D servicescape conceptual model is offered on the basis of stimulus-organism-dimension, which proposes that a 3D virtual reality retail (VRR store environment consists of physical, social, socially symbolic and natural dimensions. These dimensions are proposed to affect shoppers’ behaviour through the mediating variables of emotions (pleasure and arousal. An interrelationship between pleasure and arousal, as mediating variables, is also proposed. This research opens a number of new avenues for further research through the proposed model of shoppers’ behaviour in a VRR store environment. Further, a systematic taxonomy development of VRR store environment is attempted through this proposed model that may prove to be an important step in theory building. A comprehensive 3D service scape model along with a large number of propositions is made to define a 3D VRR store environment.

  17. The chemistry CATT–BRAMS model (CCATT–BRAMS 4.5: a regional atmospheric model system for integrated air quality and weather forecasting and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Longo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Coupled Chemistry Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT–BRAMS, version 4.5 is an online regional chemical transport model designed for local and regional studies of atmospheric chemistry from surface to the lower stratosphere suitable both for operational and research purposes. It includes gaseous/aqueous chemistry, photochemistry, scavenging and dry deposition. The CCATT–BRAMS model takes advantages of the BRAMS specific development for the tropics/subtropics and of the recent availability of preprocessing tools for chemical mechanisms and of fast codes for photolysis rates. BRAMS includes state-of-the-art physical parameterizations and dynamic formulations to simulate atmospheric circulations of scales down to meters. The online coupling between meteorology and chemistry allows the system to be used for simultaneous atmospheric weather and chemical composition forecasts as well as potential feedbacks between them. The entire system comprises three preprocessing software tools for chemical mechanism (which are user defined, aerosol and trace gases emission fields and atmospheric and chemistry fields for initial and boundary conditions. In this paper, the model description is provided along evaluations performed using observational data obtained from ground-based stations, instruments aboard of aircrafts and retrieval from space remote sensing. The evaluation takes into account model application on different scales from megacities and Amazon Basin up to intercontinental region of the Southern Hemisphere.

  18. ATTILA - Atmospheric Tracer Transport In a Langrangian Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reithmeier, C.; Sausen, R.

    2000-07-01

    The Lagrangian model ATTILA (atmospheric tracer transport in a Lagrangian model) has been developed to treat the global-scale transport of passive trace species in the atmosphere within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM). ATTILA runs online within the GCM ECHAM4 and uses the GCM produced wind field to advect the centrois of 80.000 to 180.000 constant mass air parcels into which the model atmosphere is divided. Each trace constituent is thereby represented by a mass mixing ratio in each parcel. ATTILA contains state-of-the-art parameterizations of convection, turbulent boundary layer mixing, and interparcel transport and provides an algorithm to map the tracer concentrations from the trajectories to the ECHAM model grid. We use two experiments to evaluate the transport characteristics of ATTILA against observations and the standard semiLagrangian transport scheme of ECHAM. In the first experiment we simulate the distribution of the short-lived tracer Radon ({sup 222}Rn) in order to examine fast vertical transport over continents, and long-range transport from the continents to remote areas. In the second experiment, we simulate the distribution of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) that was injected into the northern stratosphere during the nuclear weapon tests in the early 60ties, in order to examine upper tropospheric and stratospheric transport characteristics. ATTILA compares well to the observations and in many respects to the semiLagrangian scheme. However, contrary to the semiLagrangian scheme, ATTILA shows a greatly reduced meridional transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and a reduced downward flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere, especially in midlatitudes. Since both transport schemes use the same model meteorology, we conclude that the often cited enhanced meridional transport and overestimated downward flux in ECHAM as described above is rather due to the numerical properties of the semiLagrangian scheme than due to an

  19. Thermal Site Descriptive Model. A strategy for the model development during site investigations. Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site investigations are in progress for the siting of a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. As part of the planning work, strategies are developed for site descriptive modelling regarding different disciplines, amongst them the thermal conditions. The objective of the strategy for a thermal site descriptive model is to guide the practical implementation of evaluating site specific data during the site investigations. It is understood that further development may be needed. The model describes the thermal properties and other thermal parameters of intact rock, fractures and fracture zones, and of the rock mass. The methodology is based on estimation of thermal properties of intact rock and discontinuities, using both empirical and theoretical/numerical approaches, and estimation of thermal processes using mathematical modelling. The methodology will be used and evaluated for the thermal site descriptive modelling at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

  20. Contested collaboration: A descriptive model of intergroup communication in information system design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of ''contested collaboration.'' It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help...

  1. Description of the atmospheric circulation in the boundary layer over a tropical island: Case study of Guadeloupe Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocoste, Thomas; Dorville, Jean-François; Jacoby-Koaly, Sandra; Roussas, André

    2016-04-01

    Over past two decades the use of atmospheric sounding methods as Sodars, Lidar equipped drones increased sharply. Compare to weather balloon, these modern methods allow measure of profile at constant heights during long period. There are few studies using this type of equipment in tropical climates and lesser on small island. Wind regime on island of diameter less than 50 km are mostly considered as oceanic. Many author consider that thermal effect are negligible in land. But recent observations and simulations show importance of the thermal circulation at small- and meso- scales particularly in atmospheric pollution process. Up to 2009 no wind profile data were available continuously to study atmospheric circulation in Guadeloupe Archipelago (GA) which is one of the islands of the Lesser Antilles Arc. In first approximation wind was evaluated based on measures done at the most upwind island of the GA for many application as wind power and atmospheric pollution. From 2009 to 2012 a measurement campaign of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) have been performed by the University of Antilles (UA) in GA. To assess effects of dynamic of ABL on air quality in sub urban area, particularly during the sunset and sunrise, UA monitored two sites with a weather station and a doppler sodar (REMTECH PAO). Both sites are close to the sea with one in a coastal area and the other in an open landfill surrounded by densely populated building and a mangrove swamp. Thermal and chemical measurements with a portable mass spectrometer were made in the vicinity of the landfill and showed the existence of urban heat islands. This study presents the first Doppler Sodar long measurements campaign in GA. Statistical analysis of the three year of doppler sodar data (i.e. wind components and its fluctuations) allow to identified and characterized the complex circulations on the two sites in the ABL between 25 and 500m above the sea level. Orographic and thermal effects due to urban area were

  2. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with parametrization model

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A A; Usoskin, I G

    2016-01-01

    A new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. The propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with atmospheric molecules is carried out with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE 00 atmospheric model. The ionization yields is compared with an analytical parametrization for various energies of incident precipitating electron, using a flux of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved. Subsequently, on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons at 30.10.2002 and 07.01....

  3. Examining the exobase approximation: DSMC models of Titan's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.; Waalkes, William; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Johnson, Robert E.; Bieler, Andre; Combi, Michael R.; Nagy, Andrew F.

    2016-07-01

    Chamberlain ([1963] Planet. Space Sci., 11, 901-960) described the use of the exobase layer to determine escape from planetary atmospheres, below which it is assumed that molecular collisions maintain thermal equilibrium and above which collisions are deemed negligible. De La Haye et al. ([2007] Icarus., 191, 236-250) used this approximation to extract the energy deposition and non-thermal escape rates for Titan's atmosphere by fitting the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) density data. De La Haye et al. assumed the gas distributions were composed of an enhanced population of super-thermal molecules (E >> kT) that could be described by a kappa energy distribution function (EDF), and they fit the data using the Liouville theorem. Here we fitted the data again, but we used the conventional form of the kappa EDF. The extracted kappa EDFs were then used with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique (Bird [1994] Molecular Gas Dynamics and the Direct Simulation of Gas Flows) to evaluate the effect of collisions on the exospheric profiles. The INMS density data can be fit reasonably well with thermal and various non-thermal EDFs. However, the extracted energy deposition and escape rates are shown to depend significantly on the assumed exobase altitude, and the usefulness of such fits without directly modeling the collisions is unclear. Our DSMC results indicate that the kappa EDFs used in the Chamberlain approximation can lead to errors in determining the atmospheric temperature profiles and escape rates. Gas kinetic simulations are needed to accurately model measured exospheric density profiles, and to determine the altitude ranges where the Liouville method might be applicable.

  4. Testing the methodology for site descriptive modelling. Application for the Laxemar area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Berglund, Johan [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Follin, Sven [SF Geologic AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Hakami, Eva [Itasca Geomekanik AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Halvarson, Jan [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint (Sweden); Rhen, Ingvar [Sweco VBB/VIAK, Stockholm (Sweden); Wahlgren, C.H. [Sveriges Geologiska Undersoekning, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    A special project has been conducted where the currently available data from the Laxemar area, which is part of the Simpevarp site, have been evaluated and interpreted into a Site Descriptive Model covering: geology, hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and rock mechanics. Description of the surface ecosystem has been omitted, since it was re-characterised in another, parallel, project. Furthermore, there has been no evaluation of transport properties. The project is primarily a methodology test. The lessons learnt will be implemented in the Site Descriptive Modelling during the coming site investigation. The intent of the project has been to explore whether available methodology for Site Descriptive Modelling based on surface and borehole data is adequate and to identify potential needs for development and improvement in the methodology. The project has developed, with limitations in scope, a Site Descriptive Model in local scale, corresponding to the situation after completion of the Initial Site Investigations for the Laxemar area (i.e. 'version 1.2' using the vocabulary of the general execution program for the site investigations). The Site Descriptive Model should be reasonable, but should not be regarded as a 'real' model. There are limitations both in input data and in the scope of the analysis. The measured (primary) data constitute a wide range of different measurement results including data from two deep core drilled boreholes. These data both need to be checked for consistency and to be interpreted into a format more amenable for three-dimensional modelling. Examples of such evaluations are estimation of surface geology, lineament interpretation, geological single hole interpretation, hydrogeological single hole interpretation and assessment of hydrogeochemical data. Furthermore, while cross discipline interpretation is encouraged there is also a need for transparency. This means that the evaluations first are made within each discipline

  5. Description and Results of Five Years' Operation of Atmospheric Monitoring Equipment in Installations for Uranium Metallurgy and Radiometallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental study of the processes by which atmospheric contamination is produced in metallurgical operations, using assemblies characteristic of the different operations, cannot faithfully reproduce the actual working conditions (human factors, exact mode of operation, environment, etc.). Similarly, the choice of atmospheric monitoring equipment and the theoretical study of their positioning and response are often subject to uncertainty owing to the variety of the parameters involved in the different modes of operation. The purpose of this paper is to present and interpret the results of routine measurements carried out over a period of several years in different metallurgical plants. In the first part of the paper, the working conditions in an irradiated fuels inspection laboratory are discussed and various criteria for assessing atmospheric contamination are defined. The .various zones within the laboratory are then classified according to these criteria. The radionuclides studied are 235U fission products. In the second part of the paper, an analogous procedure is developed for a metallurgical plant in which the vacuum melting of natural uranium ingots is carried out. Finally, the authors consider the case of a fuel-element fabrication plant, classifying the various working areas. The validity of the classification criteria is discussed. (author)

  6. A Descriptive Decision Process Model for Hierarchical Management of Interconnected Reservoir Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adigüzel, R. Ä.°Lker; CoşKunoǧLu, Osman

    1984-07-01

    A significant limitation of prescriptive optimization models is that their formulation is disassociated from the behavioral and organizational attributes of the problem addressed. In an attempt to alleviate this limitation a decision process model is formulated directly within a framework of decision agents involved in integrated long- and short-term planning and management of multipurpose and multireservoir system operations. The resulting model is ierarchical, multilevel, multilayer, and decentralized. As such it is descriptive of a reservoir system managed and operated by geographically separated multiple agents with different authorities and responsibilities. Robustness and performance of the model is investigated by using the Shasta-Trinity system of California as an example. Results are encouraging for the descriptive as well as prescriptive relevance of the model.

  7. Wind Turbine Blockset in Saber. General Overview and Description of the Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Timbus, Adrian Vasile; Hansen, A. D.;

    This report presents a new developed Saber Toolbox for wind turbine applications. This toolbox has been developed during the research project ?Simulation Platform to model, optimize and design wind turbines?. The report provides a quick overview of the Saber and then explains the structure of this...... simulation package, which is different than other tools e.g. Matlab/Simulink. Then the structure of the toolbox is shown as well as the description of the developed models. The main focus here is to underline the special structure of the models, which are a mixture of Saber built-in blocks and new developed...... blocks. Since the developed models are based on Saber built-in blocks, a description of the libraries from Saber is given. Then some simulation results using the developed models are shown. Finally some general conclusions regarding this new developed Toolbox as well as some directions for future work...

  8. A new astrobiological model of the atmosphere of Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Willacy, Karen; Yung, Yuk

    2016-01-01

    We present results of an investigation into the formation of nitrogen-bearing molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. We extend a previous model (Li et al. 2015, 2016) to cover the region below the tropopause, so the new model treats the atmosphere from Titan's surface to an altitude of 1500 km. We consider the effects of condensation and sublimation using a continuous, numerically stable method. This is coupled with parameterized treatments of the sedimentation of the aerosols and their condensates, and the formation of haze particles. These processes affect the abundances of heavier species such as the nitrogen-bearing molecules, but have less effect on the abundances of lighter molecules. Removal of molecules to form aerosols also plays a role in determining the mixing ratios, in particular of HNC, HC3N and HCN. We find good agreement with the recently detected mixing ratios of C2H5CN, with condensation playing an important role in determining the abundance of this molecule below 500 km. Of particular intere...

  9. Hydrogeochemical site descriptive model - a strategy for the model development during site investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, John [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Laaksoharju, Marcus [GeoPoint AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    In 2002, SKB commenced site characterisation investigations using deep boreholes at different sites. As an integral part of the planning work SKB has prepared a strategy to develop a Hydrogeochemical Site Descriptive Model; similar strategies have been developed for the other major geoscience disciplines. The main objectives of the Hydrogeochemical Site Descriptive Model are to describe the chemistry and distribution of the groundwater in the bedrock and overburden and the hydrogeochemical processes involved in its origin and evolution. This description is based primarily on measurements of the groundwater composition but incorporates the use of available geological and hydrogeological site descriptive models. The SKB hydrogeochemistry programme is planned to fulfil two basic requirements: 1) to provide representative and quality assured data for use as input parameter values in calculating long-term repository safety, and 2) to understand the present undisturbed hydrogeochemical conditions and how these conditions will change in the future. Parameter values for safety analysis include pH, Eh, S, SO{sub 4}, HCO{sub 3}, HPO{sub 4} and TDS (mainly cations), together with colloids, fulvic and humic acids, other organics, bacteria and nitrogen. These values will be used to characterise the groundwater environment at, above and below repository depths. In the hydrogeochemical site investigation programme the number and location of the sampling points will be constrained by: a) geology (e.g. topography, overburden types, bedrock structures etc), b) hydrogeology (e.g. groundwater recharge/discharge areas, residence times), c) reliability (e.g. undisturbed vs disturbed groundwater chemical conditions), and d) resources (e.g. number and type of samples, and also available personnel, may be restricted by budgetary and schedule concerns). Naturally a balance is required between these constraints and the scientific aims of the programme. The constraints should never

  10. Modeling of High-altitude Atmospheric Dispersion Using Climate and Meteorological Forecast Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, L G; Chin, H S

    2005-03-30

    meteorological and climatological data for NARAC models. Import both high altitude meteorological forecasts and high altitude climatological data provided by NRL into the NARAC system. (2) Run ADAPT and LODI transport/dispersion codes for one scenario on imported meteorological forecast and climatological data. (3) Provide documentation of the effort. The following tasking description gives both the context and manner in which the goals listed above were accomplished: (A) We had discussions with NRL personnel, notably Stefan Thonnard and Doug Drob, to confirm the data compatibility of the data that we will be importing for use. Data up to 100km in altitude was provided and imported into the NARAC modeling system. (B) The ADAPT atmospheric data assimilation model was used to take data from NRL and provide mass-consistent three-dimensional time-varying wind fields for the NARAC Langrangian particle tracking code, LODI. A test version of LODI, developed to consider rarefied conditions, higher altitude turbulence, and high initial particle speeds, was used run on the ADAPT output. (C) The results of the proof-of-concept simulations under time-varying meteorological forecasts and under climatological wind fields are compared and documented in this brief report discussing the capability of the NARAC modeling system for importing and using the high altitude datasets from NRL. A limited assessment of the difference between dispersion results on the different data sets is made.

  11. Coincidence of the Universe Description Stemming from D-branes Theory and ENU Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sima, Jozef; Sukenik, Miroslav

    2001-01-01

    The contribution provides a comparison of consequences stemming from D-brane theories and Expansive Nondecelerative Universe model, and calls attention to coincidence of the results arising from the mentioned approaches to a description of the Universe. It follows from the comparison that the effects of quantum gravitation should appear at the energy near to 2 TeV.

  12. Effects of Modeling Instruction on Descriptive Writing and Observational Skills in Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Do-Yong; Logsdon, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Before science can be completely understood, one of the fundamental skills that must be developed is observation. Improving descriptive writing and investigating students' observational skills in the classroom is the purpose of this study. The study was designed to determine if such skills, practiced through modeling activities, serve as a…

  13. The Relationship between BIBFRAME and OCLC's Linked-Data Model of Bibliographic Description: A Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godby, Carol Jean

    2013-01-01

    This document describes a proposed alignment between BIBFRAME (Bibliographic Framework) and a model being explored by the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) with extensions proposed by the Schema Bib Extend project, a Worldwide Web Consortium sponsored (W3C-sponsored) community group tasked with enhancing Schema.org to the description of…

  14. Wind Turbine Blockset in Matlab/Simulink. General Overview and Description of the Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Hansen, A. D.; Soerensen, P.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    : Saber, DIgSILENT, HAWC. The report provides first a quick overview over Matlab issues and then explains the structure of the developed toolbox. The attention in the report is mainly drawn to the description of the most important mathematical models, which have been developed in the Toolbox. Then, some...

  15. Test of existing mathematical models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides can be a secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. A test scenario based on measurements collected after the Chernobyl accident was used to evaluate existing mathematical models for contaminant resuspension from soil, to examine resuspension processes on both local and regional scales, and to investigate the importance of seasonal variations of these processes. Model predictions from 15 participants were compared with measured air concentrations and resuspension factors to investigate and explain the discrepancies both among model predictions and between model predictions and observations and thus to evaluate the predictive capabilities and drawbacks of commonly used generic resuspension models. The empirical models tested can give predictions within an order of magnitude of observations or better if adequately calibrated for site-specific conditions, but they do not describe the process-level events or account for spatial heterogeneity or temporal variations. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. RETADDII: modeling long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A versatile model is described which estimates atmospheric dispersion based on plume trajectories calculated for the mixed layer. This model allows the treatment of the dispersal from a source at an arbitrary height while taking account of plume depletion by dry and wet deposition together with the decay of material to successor species. The plume depletion, decay and growth equations are solved in an efficient manner which can accommodate up to eight pollutants (i.e. a parent and seven serial decay products). The code is particularly suitable for applications involving radioactive chain decay or for cases involving chemical species with successor decay products. Arbitrary emission rates can be specified for the members of the chain or, as is commonly the case, a sole emission rate can be specified for the first member. The code, in its current configuration, uses readily available upper-air wind data for the North American continent

  17. Spectral classification of stars using synthetic model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, E

    2001-01-01

    We devised a straightforward procedure to derive the atmosphere fundamental parameters of stars across the different MK spectral types by comparing mid-resolution spectroscopic observations with theoretical grids of synthetic spectra.The results of a preliminary experiment, by matching the Gunn and Stryker and Jacoby et al. spectrophotometric atlases with the Kurucz models, are briefly discussed. For stars in the A-K spectral range, effective temperature is obtained within a 1-2% relative uncertainty (at 2 sigma confidence level). This value raises to 4-5% for the hottest stars in the samples (O-B spectral types). A poorer fit is obtained throughout for stars cooler than 4000 K mainly due to the limiting input physics in the Kurucz models.

  18. Data Needs for Stellar Atmosphere and Spectrum Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, C. I.

    2006-01-01

    The main data need for stellar atmosphere and spectrum modeling remains atomic and molecular transition data, particularly energy levels and transition cross-sections. We emphasize that data is needed for bound-free (b - f) as well as bound-bound (b - b), and collisional as well as radiative transitions. Data is now needed for polyatomic molecules as well as atoms, ions, and diatomic molecules. In addition, data for the formation of, and extinction due to, liquid and solid phase dust grains is needed. A prioritization of species and data types is presented, and gives emphasis to Fe group elements, and elements important for the investigation of nucleosynthesis and Galactic chemical evolution, such as the -elements and n-capture elements. Special data needs for topical problems in the modeling of cool stars and brown dwarfs are described.

  19. Radiative characteristics for atmospheric models from lidar sounding and AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunov, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Anatoly; Efremenko, Dmitry; Bochalov, Valentin; Melnikova, Irina; Samulenkov, Dimity; Vasilyev, Alexander; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Frantsuzova, Inna

    2016-04-01

    Optical models of atmospheric aerosols above of St. Petersburg are constraint on the base of the results of lidar sounding. The lidar system of the Resource Center "Observatory of environmental safety" of the St. Petersburg University Research Park is situated the city center, Vasilievsky Island. The measurements of the vertical profile of velocity and wind direction in the center of St. Petersburg for 2014 -2015 are fulfilled in addition. Height of laser sounding of aerosols is up to 25 km and wind up to 12 km. Observations are accomplished in the daytime and at night and mapped to vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and pressure obtained from radiosounding in Voeikovo (St. Petersburg suburb). Results of wind observations are compared with those of upper-air measurements of meteorological service in Voeikovo. The distance between the points of observation is 25 km. Statistics of wind directions at different heights are identified. The comparison is based on the assumption of homogeneity of the wind field on such a scale. In most cases, good agreement between the observed vertical profiles of wind, obtained by both methods is appeared. However, there were several cases, when the results differ sharply or at high altitudes, or, on the contrary, in the surface layer. The analysis of the impact of wind, temperature, and humidity profiles in the atmosphere on the properties and dynamics of solid impurities is implemented. Comparison with AOT results from AERONET observations in St. Petersburg suburb Peterhof is done. It is shown that diurnal and seasonal variations of optical and morphological parameters of atmospheric aerosols in the pollution cap over the city to a large extent determined by the variability of meteorological parameters. The results of the comparison are presented and possible explanation of the differences is proposed. Optical models of the atmosphere in day and night time in different seasons are constructed from lidar and AERONET

  20. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy also eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.

  1. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Sofen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971–2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8, SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452. We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  2. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  3. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  4. Site descriptive modelling and use of the rock visualisation system tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) has started site investigations for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel at two different sites in Sweden. To support the site investigations, data need to be interpreted and assessed into Site Descriptive Models. The models should be multidisciplinary interpretations of geology, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, hydro-geochemistry, transport properties and ecosystems using site investigation data from deep bore holes and the surface. The modelling comprises identification of data, evaluation of primary data, three dimensional modelling and overall confidence evaluation. In the current presentation, the methodology is exemplified for geological modelling. (author)

  5. Coherent description of transport across the water interface: From nanodroplets to climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T.; Lervik, Anders; Badam, Vijay Kumar; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-03-01

    Transport of mass and energy across the vapor-liquid interface of water is of central importance in a variety of contexts such as climate models, weather forecasts, and power plants. We provide a complete description of the transport properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water with the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Transport across the planar interface is then described by 3 interface transfer coefficients where 9 more coefficients extend the description to curved interfaces. We obtain all coefficients in the range 260-560 K by taking advantage of water evaporation experiments at low temperatures, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005 rigid-water-molecule model at high temperatures, and square gradient theory to represent the whole range. Square gradient theory is used to link the region where experiments are possible (low vapor pressures) to the region where nonequilibrium molecular dynamics can be done (high vapor pressures). This enables a description of transport across the planar water interface, interfaces of bubbles, and droplets, as well as interfaces of water structures with complex geometries. The results are likely to improve the description of evaporation and condensation of water at widely different scales; they open a route to improve the understanding of nanodroplets on a small scale and the precision of climate models on a large scale.

  6. Description of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in a field theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of studying high energy heavy-ion collisions a self-consistent theory of relativistic nuclear fluid-dynamics coupled to classical meson fields is developed. The essential difference to the conventional fluid dynamic description arises from the coupling of meson fields to the nuclear fluid and from the non-linear relation for the effective baryon mass leading to a relativistic self-consistent description for the nuclear equation of state. The effects of different equations of state resulting from linear and nonlinear mean field approaches are studied in the event-by-event kinetic flow analysis of heavy ion collisions. The predictions for the symmetrical system Nb(Esub(Lab)=400 MeV/N)Nb are in good agreement with the experimental 4π-data. Investigating the phase structure in the linear mean field approach a phase transition occuring at Tapprox.=200 MeV for chemical potential μ=0 was found in this model. This transition is similar to recent QCD predictions. The model indicates a further phase transition at Tapprox.=20 MeV (baryon fluid to gas). There is, however, no correct description of the compressibility of nuclear matter in the linear mean field model. The extension to nonlinear scalar meson interaction allows for a correct description of the bulk properties of nuclear matter. It was found though that the phase transition is always present for reasonable values of the coupling constants. (orig./HSI)

  7. Description and evaluation of tropospheric chemistry and aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tilmes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, version 5, is now coupled to extensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, called CAM5-chem, and is available in addition to CAM4-chem in the Community Earth System Model (CESM version 1.2. Both configurations are well suited as tools for atmospheric-chemistry modeling studies in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, whether with internally derived "free running" (FR meteorology, or "specified dynamics" (SD. The main focus of this paper is to compare the performance of these configurations against observations from surface, aircraft, and satellite, as well as understand the origin of the identified differences. We particularly focus on comparing present-day methane lifetime estimates within the different model configurations, which range between 7.8 years in the SD configuration of CAM5-chem and 8.8 years in the FR configuration of CAM4-chem. We find that tropospheric surface area density is an important factor in controlling the burden of the hydroxyl radical (OH, which causes differences in tropical methane lifetime of about half a year between CAM4-chem and CAM5-chem. In addition, different distributions of nitrogen oxides (NOx produced from lightning production explain about half of the difference between SD and FR model versions in both CAM4-chem and CAM5-chem. Remaining differences in the tropical OH burden are due to enhanced tropical ozone burden in SD configurations compared to the FR versions, which are not only caused by differences in chemical production or loss, but also by transport and mixing. For future studies, we recommend the use of CAM5-chem, due to improved aerosol description and inclusion of aerosol-cloud interactions. However, smaller tropospheric surface area density in the current version of CAM5-chem compared to CAM4-chem results in larger oxidizing capacity in the troposphere and therefore a shorter methane lifetime.

  8. Large regional groundwater modeling - a sensitivity study of some selected conceptual descriptions and simplifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary aim of this report is: - To present a supplementary, in-depth evaluation of certain conceptual simplifications, descriptions and model uncertainties in conjunction with regional groundwater simulation, which in the first instance refer to model depth, topography, groundwater table level and boundary conditions. Implementation was based on geo-scientifically available data compilations from the Smaaland region but different conceptual assumptions have been analysed

  9. System Design Description and Requirements for Modeling the Off-Gas Systems for Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl R. Haefner; Jack D. Law; Troy J. Tranter

    2010-08-01

    This document provides descriptions of the off-gases evolved during spent nuclear fuel processing and the systems used to capture the gases of concern. Two reprocessing techniques are discussed, namely aqueous separations and electrochemical (pyrochemical) processing. The unit operations associated with each process are described in enough detail so that computer models to mimic their behavior can be developed. The document also lists the general requirements for the desired computer models.

  10. A Descriptive Model of Robot Team and the Dynamic Evolution of Robot Team Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen-min Tang; Xian-yi Cheng; Lan Shuai; Shu-qin Li; Jing-yu Yang

    2006-01-01

    At present, the research on robot team cooperation is still in qualitative analysis phase and lacks the description model that can quantitatively describe the dynamical evolution of team cooperative relationships with constantly changeable task demand in Multi-robot field. First this paper whole and static describes organization model HWROM of robot team, then uses Markov course and Bayesian theorem for reference, dynamical describes the team cooperative relationships building. Finally from c...

  11. Toward unification of the multiscale modeling of the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arakawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests two possible routes to achieve the unification of model physics in coarse- and fine-resolution atmospheric models. As far as representation of deep moist convection is concerned, only two kinds of model physics are used at present: highly parameterized as in the conventional general circulation models (GCMs and explicitly simulated as in the cloud-resolving models (CRMs. Ideally, these two kinds of model physics should be unified so that a continuous transition of model physics from one kind to the other takes place as the resolution changes. With such unification, the GCM can converge to a global CRM (GCRM as the grid size is refined. ROUTE I for unification continues to follow the parameterization approach, but uses a unified parameterization that is applicable to any horizontal resolutions between those typically used by GCMs and CRMs. It is shown that a key to construct such a unified parameterization is to eliminate the assumption of small fractional area covered by convective clouds, which is commonly used in the conventional cumulus parameterizations either explicitly or implicitly. A preliminary design of the unified parameterization is presented, which demonstrates that such an assumption can be eliminated through a relatively minor modification of the existing mass-flux based parameterizations. Partial evaluations of the unified parameterization are also presented. ROUTE II for unification follows the "multi-scale modeling framework (MMF" approach, which takes advantage of explicit representation of deep moist convection and associated cloud-scale processes by CRMs. The Quasi-3-D (Q3-D MMF is an attempt to broaden the applicability of MMF without necessarily using a fully three-dimensional CRM. This is accomplished using a network of cloud-resolving grids with gaps. An outline of the Q3-D algorithm and highlights of preliminary results are reviewed.

  12. Cloud condensation nuclei properties of model and atmospheric HULIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dinar

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Humic like substances (HULIS have been identified as a major fraction of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols. These large multifunctional compounds of both primary and secondary sources are surface active and water soluble. Hence, it is expected that they could affect activation of organic aerosols into cloud droplets. We have compared the activation of aerosols containing atmospheric HULIS extracted from fresh and slightly aged smoke particles and from daily pollution particles to activation of size fractionated fulvic acid from an aquatic source (Suwannee River fulvic acid, and correlated it to the estimated molecular weight and measured surface tension. A correlation was found between CCN-activation diameter of SRFA fractions and number average molecular weight of the fraction. The lower molecular weight fractions activated at lower critical diameters, which is explained by the greater number of solute species in the droplet with decreasing molecular weight. The three aerosol-extracted HULIS samples activated at lower diameters than any of the size-fractionated or bulk SRFA. By considering estimated number average molecular weight (MN, measured surface tension (ST and activation diameters, the Köhler model was found to account for activation diameters, provided that accurate physico-chemical parameters are known.

  13. Cloud Condensation Nuclei properties of model and atmospheric HULIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dinar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic like substances (HULIS have been identified as a major fraction of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols. These large multifunctional compounds of both primary and secondary sources are surface active and water soluble. Hence, it is expected that they could affect activation of organic aerosols into cloud droplets. We have compared the activation of aerosols containing atmospheric HULIS extracted from fresh, aged and pollution particles to activation of size fractionated fulvic acid from an aquatic source (Suwannee River Fulvic Acid, and correlated it to the estimated molecular weight and measured surface tension. A correlation was found between CCN-activation diameter of SRFA fractions and number average molecular weight of the fraction. The lower molecular weight fractions activated at lower critical diameters, which is explained by the greater number of solute species in the droplet with decreasing molecular weight. The three aerosol-extracted HULIS samples activated at lower diameters than any of the size-fractionated or bulk SRFA. The Köhler model was found to account for activation diameters, provided that accurate physico-chemical parameters are known.

  14. Synoptic solar radio observations as proxies for upper atmosphere modelling

    CERN Document Server

    de Wit, Thierry Dudok; Shibasaki, Kiyoto

    2014-01-01

    The specification of the upper atmosphere strongly relies on solar proxies that can properly reproduce the solar energetic input in the UV. Whilst the microwave flux at 10.7 cm (also called F10.7 index) has been routinely used as a solar proxy, we show that the radio flux at other wavelengths provides valuable complementary information that enhances their value for upper atmospheric modelling. We merged daily observations from various observatories into a single homogeneous data set of fluxes at wavelengths of 30, 15, 10.7, 8 and 3.2 cm, spanning from 1957 to today. Using blind source separation (BSS), we show that their rotational modulation contains three contributions, which can be interpreted in terms of thermal bremsstrahlung and gyro-resonance emissions. The latter account for 90% of the rotational variability in the F10.7 index. Most solar proxies, such as the MgII index, are remarkably well reconstructed by simple linear combination of radio fluxes at various wavelengths. The flux at 30 cm stands out ...

  15. On the attribution of contributions of atmospheric trace gases to emissions in atmospheric model applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Grewe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised tagging method, which describes the combined effect of emissions of various species from individual emission categories, e.g. the impact of both, nitrogen oxides and non-methane hydrocarbon emissions on ozone. This method is applied to two simplified chemistry schemes, which represent the main characteristics of atmospheric ozone chemistry. Analytical solutions are presented for this tagging approach. In the past, besides tagging approaches, sensitivity methods were used, which estimate the contributions from individual sources based on differences in two simulations, a base case and a simulation with a perturbation in the respective emission category. We apply both methods to our simplified chemical systems and demonstrate that potentially large errors (factor of 2 occur with the sensitivity method, which depend on the degree of linearity of the chemical system. For some chemical regimes this error can be minimised by employing only small perturbations of the respective emission, e.g. 5%. Since a complete tagging algorithm for global chemistry models is difficult to achieve, we present two error metrics, which can be applied for sensitivity methods in order to estimate the potential error of this approach for a specific application.

  16. Gravity Waves in Polar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Revealed in a Whole-atmospheric Global Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, I. S.; Jee, G.; Kim, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale gravity waves are simulated by carrying out the specified chemistry whole atmosphere community climate model (SC-WACCM) at the horizontal resolution of about 25 km to understand the origin of gravity waves in the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) and their propagation properties throughout the whole atmosphere. Modeled gravity waves are also compared with gravity-wave activities estimated from meteor radar observations made in Antarctica by Korea Polar Research Institute. For this comparison, SC-WACCM is initialized at a specific date and time using atmospheric state variables from the ground to the thermosphere obtained from various data sets such as operational analyses and empirical wind and temperature model results. Model initial conditions are corrected for mass and dynamical balance to reduce spurious waves due to initial shocks. At conference, preliminary results of the mesoscale SC-WACCM simulation and its comparison with observations will be presented.

  17. NOAA/NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) Atmospheric Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System (GFS) numerical weather...

  18. Atmospheric Prognostic and Dispersion Model Design for use in the European Ensemble Modeling Exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) of the Department of Energy (DOE)Savannah River Site (SRS) has been involved with predicting the transport and dispersion of hazardous atmospheric releases for many years. The SRS utilizes an automated, real-time capability for consequence assessment during emergency response to local releases. The emphasis during these situations is to provide accurate guidance as quickly as possible. Consequently, atmospheric transport and dispersion models of a simple physical nature (such as Gaussian plume models) have typically been used in an effort to provide timely responses. However, use of one or two-dimensional (steady-state) winds are inadequate in conditions of high spatial and temporal variability (such as during frontal passage). Increased computing capabilities have led to the use of more sophisticated three dimensional prognostic models that may capture some of these higher resolution phenomena. In an ideal situation, the decision-maker would want to use the best model each time an accident occurred. Unfortunately, due to the nonunique nature of solutions to the nonlinear equations governing the atmosphere, model A may perform better than models B and C in one type of weather scenario, and worse during a different situation.Therefore, it is not always possible to distinguish which model is best, especially during a forecast situation. The use of an ensemble approach of averaging results from a variety of model solutions is beneficial to the modeler in providing the DM guidance on model uncertainties. Meteorological forecasts generated by numerical models provide individual realizations of the atmosphere. The resulting wind and turbulence fields are then used to drive atmospheric dispersion (transport and diffusion) models. Although many modeling agencies utilize ensemble-modeling techniques to determine atmospheric model sensitivities of prognostic fields (i.e. wind, temperature, radiation, etc.), the European Union has

  19. Atmosphere-soil-vegetation model including CO2 exchange processes: SOLVEG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new atmosphere-soil-vegetation model named SOLVEG2 (SOLVEG version 2) was developed to study the heat, water, and CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and land-surface. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer sub-models for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. It also includes sophisticated processes for solar and long-wave radiation transmission in vegetation canopy and CO2 exchanges among the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. Although the model usually simulates only vertical variation of variables in the surface-layer atmosphere, soil, and vegetation canopy by using meteorological data as top boundary conditions, it can be used by coupling with a three-dimensional atmosphere model. In this paper, details of SOLVEG2, which includes the function of coupling with atmosphere model MM5, are described. (author)

  20. Atmospheric boundary layers in storms: advanced theory and modelling applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Zilitinkevich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent planetary boundary layers (PBLs control the exchange processes between the atmosphere and the ocean/land. The key problems of PBL physics are to determine the PBL height, the momentum, energy and matter fluxes at the surface and the mean wind and scalar profiles throughout the layer in a range of regimes from stable and neutral to convective. Until present, the PBLs typical of stormy weather were always considered as neutrally stratified. Recent works have disclosed that such PBLs are in fact very strongly affected by the static stability of the free atmosphere and must be treated as factually stable (we call this type of the PBL "conventionally neutral" in contract to the "truly neutral" PBLs developed against the neutrally stratified free flow. It is common knowledge that basic features of PBLs exhibit a noticeable dependence on the free-flow static stability and baroclinicity. However, the concern of the traditional theory of neural and stable PBLs was almost without exception the barotropic nocturnal PBL, which develops at mid latitudes during a few hours in the night, on the background of a neutral or slightly stable residual layer. The latter separates this type of the PBL from the free atmosphere. It is not surprising that the nature of turbulence in such regimes is basically local and does not depend on the properties of the free atmosphere. Alternatively, long-lived neutral (in fact only conditionally neutral or stable PBLs, which have much more time to grow up, are placed immediately below the stably stratified free flow. Under these conditions, the turbulent transports of momentum and scalars even in the surface layer - far away from the PBL outer boundary - depend on the free-flow Brunt-Väisälä frequency, N. Furthermore, integral measures of the long-lived PBLs (their depths and the resistance law functions depend on N and also on the baroclinic shear, S. In the traditional PBL models both non-local parameters N and S

  1. Validation of coastal oceanographic models at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is undertaking site characterisation at two different locations, the Forsmark and the Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. The characterisation work is divided into an initial site investigation phase and a complete site investigation phase. In this context, the water exchange of the coastal zone is one link of the chain of possible nuclide transport mechanisms that must be assessed in the site description of potential repository areas. For the purpose of validating the pair of nested 3D-models employed to simulate the water exchange in the near-shore coastal zone in the Forsmark area, an encompassing measurement program entailing six stations has been performed. The design of this program was to first assess to what degree the forcing of the fine resolution (FR) model of the Forsmark study area at its interfacial boundary to the coarse resolution (CR) model of the entire Baltic was reproduced. In addition to this scrutiny it is of particular interest how the time-varying density-determining properties, salinity and temperature, at the borders are propagated into the FR-domain, since this corresponds to the most efficient mode of water exchange. An important part of the validation process has been to carefully evaluate which measurement data that can be considered reliable. The result was that several periods of foremost near-surface salinity data had to be discarded due to growth of algae on the conductivity sensors. Lack of thorough absolute calibration of the salinity meters also necessitates dismissal of measurement data. Relative the assessed data that can be accepted as adequate, the outcome of the validation can be summarized in five points: (i) The surface-most salinity of the CR-model drifts downward a little less than one practical salinity unit (psu) per year, requiring that the ensuing correlation analysis be subdivided into periods of a

  2. Validation of coastal oceanographic models at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engqvist, Anders (A och I Engqvist Konsult HB, Vaxholm (SE)); Andrejev, Oleg (Finnish Inst. of Marine Research, Helsinki (FI))

    2008-01-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is undertaking site characterisation at two different locations, the Forsmark and the Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. The characterisation work is divided into an initial site investigation phase and a complete site investigation phase. In this context, the water exchange of the coastal zone is one link of the chain of possible nuclide transport mechanisms that must be assessed in the site description of potential repository areas. For the purpose of validating the pair of nested 3D-models employed to simulate the water exchange in the near-shore coastal zone in the Forsmark area, an encompassing measurement program entailing six stations has been performed. The design of this program was to first assess to what degree the forcing of the fine resolution (FR) model of the Forsmark study area at its interfacial boundary to the coarse resolution (CR) model of the entire Baltic was reproduced. In addition to this scrutiny it is of particular interest how the time-varying density-determining properties, salinity and temperature, at the borders are propagated into the FR-domain, since this corresponds to the most efficient mode of water exchange. An important part of the validation process has been to carefully evaluate which measurement data that can be considered reliable. The result was that several periods of foremost near-surface salinity data had to be discarded due to growth of algae on the conductivity sensors. Lack of thorough absolute calibration of the salinity meters also necessitates dismissal of measurement data. Relative the assessed data that can be accepted as adequate, the outcome of the validation can be summarized in five points: (i) The surface-most salinity of the CR-model drifts downward a little less than one practical salinity unit (psu) per year, requiring that the ensuing correlation analysis be subdivided into periods of a

  3. Towards Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Hydrology Model Systems: Recent Developments and Performance Evaluation For Different Climate Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstmann, Harald; Fersch, Benjamin; Rummler, Thomas; Wagner, Sven; Arnault, Joel; Senatore, Alfonso; Gochis, David

    2015-04-01

    Limitations in the adequate representation of terrestrial hydrologic processes controlling the land-atmosphere coupling are assumed to be a significant factor currently limiting prediction skills of regional atmospheric models. The necessity for more comprehensive process descriptions accounting for the interdependencies between water- and energy fluxes at the compartmental interfaces are driving recent developments in hydrometeorological modeling towards more sophisticated treatment of terrestrial hydrologic processes. It is particularly the lateral surface and subsurface water fluxes that are neglected in standard regional atmospheric models. Current developments in enhanced lateral hydrological process descriptions in the WRF model system will be presented. Based on WRF and WRF-Hydro, new modules and concepts for integrating the saturated zone by a 2-dim groundwater scheme and coupling approaches to the unsaturated zone will be presented. The fully coupled model system allows to model the complete regional water cycle, from the top of the atmosphere, via the boundary layer, the land surface, the unsaturated zone and the saturated zone till the flow in the river beds. With this increasing complexity, that also allows to describe the complex interaction of the regional water cycle on different spatial and temporal scales, the reliability and predictability of model simulations can only be shown, if performance is tested for a variety of hydrological variables for different climatological environments. We will show results of fully coupled simulations for the regions of sempiternal humid Southern Bavaria/Germany (rivers Isar and Ammer) and semiarid to subhumid Westafrica (river Sissilli). In both regions, in addition to streamflow measurements, also the validation of heat fluxes is possible via Eddy-Covariance stations within hydrometeorological testbeds. In the German Isar/Ammer region, e.g., we apply the extended WRF-Hydro modeling system in 3km atmospheric- grid

  4. Modeling The Anthropogenic CO2 Footprint in Europe Using a High Resolution Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Gruber, Nicolas; Brunner, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    The localized nature of most fossil fuel emission sources leaves a distinct footprint on atmospheric CO2 concentrations, yet to date, most studies have used relatively coarse atmospheric transport models to simulate this footprint, causing an excess amount of spatial smoothing. In addition, most studies have considered only monthly variations in emissions, neglecting their substantial diurnal and weekly fluctuations. With the fossil fuel emission fluxes dominating the carbon balance in Europe and many other industrialized countries, it is paramount to simulate the fossil fuel footprint in atmospheric CO2 accurately in time and space in order to discern the footprint of the terrestrial biosphere. Furthermore, a good understanding of the fossil fuel footprint also provides the opportunity to monitor and verify any change in fossil fuel emission. We use here a high resolution (7 km) atmospheric model setup for central Europe based on the operational weather forecast model COSMO and simulate the atmospheric CO2 concentrations separately for 5 fossil fuel emission sectors (i.e., power generation, heating, transport, industrial processes, and rest), and for 10 different country-based regions. The emissions were based on high-resolution emission inventory data (EDGAR(10km) and MeteoTest(500m)), to which we have added detailed time functions for each process and country. The total anthropogenic CO2 footprint compares well with observational estimates based on radiocarbon (C14) and CO for a number of sites across Europe, providing confidence in the emission inventory and atmospheric transport. Despite relatively rapid atmospheric mixing, the fossil fuel footprint shows strong annual mean structures reflecting the point-source nature of most emissions. Among all the processes, the emissions from power plants dominates the fossil fuel footprint, followed by industry, while traffic emissions are less distinct, largely owing to their spatially more distributed nature. However

  5. MIROC-ESM: model description and basic results of CMIP5-20c3m experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, S; Hajima, T; Sudo, K.; Nagashima, T.; Takemura, T.; H. Okajima; Nozawa, T.; Kawase, H; Abe, M.; Yokohata, T.; Ise, T.; SATO, H; Kato, E.; Takata, K.; S. Emori

    2011-01-01

    An earth system model (MIROC-ESM) is fully described in terms of each model component and their interactions. Results for the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5) historical simulation are presented to demonstrate the model's performance from several perspectives: atmosphere, ocean, sea-ice, land-surface, ocean and terrestrial biogeochemistry, and atmospheric chemistry and aerosols. An atmospheric chemistry coupled version of MIROC-ESM (MIROC-ESM-CHEM) reasonably reproduces t...

  6. MIROC-ESM 2010: model description and basic results of CMIP5-20c3m experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, S; Hajima, T; Sudo, K.; Nagashima, T.; Takemura, T.; H. Okajima; Nozawa, T.; Kawase, H; Abe, M.; Yokohata, T.; Ise, T.; SATO, H; Kato, E.; Takata, K.; S. Emori

    2011-01-01

    An earth system model (MIROC-ESM 2010) is fully described in terms of each model component and their interactions. Results for the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5) historical simulation are presented to demonstrate the model's performance from several perspectives: atmosphere, ocean, sea-ice, land-surface, ocean and terrestrial biogeochemistry, and atmospheric chemistry and aerosols. An atmospheric chemistry coupled version of MIROC-ESM (MIROC-ESM-CHEM 2010) reasonably re...

  7. The geometrical optics approach to atmospheric propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss-Hammel, Stephen M.

    2003-04-01

    An accurate model for the propagation of infrared and optical frequencies through the atmosphere is a requirement for a number of important communications and surveillance systems. These systems operate over long nearly-horizontal paths that are close to the land or sea surface. There can be strong heat and mass flux gradients near the surface which make accurate transmission predictions difficult. The development and utility of geometrical optics, or ray-trace, methods for the EOSTAR and IRWarp models will be addressed. Both models are driven by bulk meteorological models to provide the environmental fields that can subsequently be used to define the refractivity field. The ray-trace algorithm uses the refractivity field to generate a transfer map. The transfer map provides precise information concerning the number, location, and orientation of the images of a source point. One application of this information is the geometric gain, or the refractive propagation factor, which is an output consisting of a vertical signal intensity profile at a given range. A second application is a passive ranging capability for sub-refractive conditions. The ranging calculation uses the existence of an inferior mirage image to deduce the target range and height.

  8. Development of Semantic Description for Multiscale Models of Thermo-Mechanical Treatment of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macioł, Piotr; Regulski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    We present a process of semantic meta-model development for data management in an adaptable multiscale modeling framework. The main problems in ontology design are discussed, and a solution achieved as a result of the research is presented. The main concepts concerning the application and data management background for multiscale modeling were derived from the AM3 approach—object-oriented Agile multiscale modeling methodology. The ontological description of multiscale models enables validation of semantic correctness of data interchange between submodels. We also present a possibility of using the ontological model as a supervisor in conjunction with a multiscale model controller and a knowledge base system. Multiscale modeling formal ontology (MMFO), designed for describing multiscale models' data and structures, is presented. A need for applying meta-ontology in the MMFO development process is discussed. Examples of MMFO application in describing thermo-mechanical treatment of metal alloys are discussed. Present and future applications of MMFO are described.

  9. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ13C, δ18O and Δ17O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated 13CO/12CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in 13C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH4) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH4 to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in 13C, were found significant when explicitly simulated. The inaccurate surface

  10. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus. PMID:27586770

  11. Modeling the Cloudy Atmospheres of Cool Stars, Brown Dwarfs and Hot Exoplanets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncher, Diana

    -consistent cloudy atmosphere models that can be used to properly determine the stellar parameters of cool stars. With this enhanced model atmosphere code I have created a grid of cool, dusty atmosphere models ranging in effective temperatures from Teff = 2000 − 3000 K. I have studied the formation and structure of...... properties of its host star, it is crucial that the stellar models linking the observations of a star to its properties are as precise as possible. The primary goal of this project is therefore to merge the model atmosphere code MARCS with the dust model code DRIFT, thus facilitating the computation of self...

  12. Description langugage for the modelling and analysis of temporal change of instrumentation and control system structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goering, Markus Heinrich

    2013-10-25

    comprehensive requirements for the superposition of event sequences and failure combinations. For this reason, the synthesis of a description language, under consideration of the aforementioned challenges, is necessary; supplemented by a method utilising the description language for efficient engineering and I and C design analysis. Due to the abstraction of AutomationML as a meta-metamodel, it is utilised as the basis for the description language synthesis, however AutomationML also does not fulfil all target criteria. On one hand, the description language synthesis is based on the syntax of AutomationML, and on the other hand, the semantics are determined by the context of computer-based I and C in nuclear power plants and structured utilising the general product, function, and location structures of standard IEC 81346. When modelling I and C failure combinations in addition to event sequences, the description language is completed by an event structure, for which CDL is utilised for the conceptualisation and the formalisation is accomplished with PSL. The PSL formalisation allows for implementing the description language in a knowledge-based system, so that automated engineering is enabled. The I and C modelling, as part of the method, is embedded in the IEC 61513 I and C safety life-cycle and is realised in two steps. Consequently, the I and C design can be analysed at both plant and system level. For the I and C design analysis the concepts of the D3-analysis, FTA, ETA, and FMEA are combined. The thesis is concluded with an example applying the description language and method to the modernisation of a reactor protection system; this illustrates the validation of the overall concept developed in this thesis.

  13. Description langugage for the modelling and analysis of temporal change of instrumentation and control system structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    comprehensive requirements for the superposition of event sequences and failure combinations. For this reason, the synthesis of a description language, under consideration of the aforementioned challenges, is necessary; supplemented by a method utilising the description language for efficient engineering and I and C design analysis. Due to the abstraction of AutomationML as a meta-metamodel, it is utilised as the basis for the description language synthesis, however AutomationML also does not fulfil all target criteria. On one hand, the description language synthesis is based on the syntax of AutomationML, and on the other hand, the semantics are determined by the context of computer-based I and C in nuclear power plants and structured utilising the general product, function, and location structures of standard IEC 81346. When modelling I and C failure combinations in addition to event sequences, the description language is completed by an event structure, for which CDL is utilised for the conceptualisation and the formalisation is accomplished with PSL. The PSL formalisation allows for implementing the description language in a knowledge-based system, so that automated engineering is enabled. The I and C modelling, as part of the method, is embedded in the IEC 61513 I and C safety life-cycle and is realised in two steps. Consequently, the I and C design can be analysed at both plant and system level. For the I and C design analysis the concepts of the D3-analysis, FTA, ETA, and FMEA are combined. The thesis is concluded with an example applying the description language and method to the modernisation of a reactor protection system; this illustrates the validation of the overall concept developed in this thesis.

  14. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Riede

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M, the photochemistry submodel JVAL (J, and the new trajectory submodel TRAJECT (T, to simulate chemistry along atmospheric trajectories, which are provided offline. With the same chemistry submodels coupled to the 3-D EMAC model and consistent initial conditions and physical parameters, a unique consistency between the two models is achieved. Since only mixing processes within the 3-D model are excluded from the model consistency, comparisons of results from the two models allow to separate and quantify contributions of transport, chemistry, and mixing along the trajectory pathways. Consistency of transport between the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the 3-D EMAC model is achieved via calculation of kinematic trajectories based on 3-D wind fields from EMAC using the trajectory model LAGRANTO. The combination of the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the trajectory model LAGRANTO can be considered as a Lagrangian chemistry-transport model (CTM moving isolated air parcels. The procedure for obtaining the necessary statistical basis for the quantification method is described as well as the comprehensive diagnostics with respect to chemistry.

    The quantification method presented here allows to investigate the characteristics of transport, chemistry, and mixing in a grid-based 3-D model. The analysis of chemical processes within the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT is easily extendable to include, for example, the impact of different transport pathways or of mixing processes onto

  15. Stable spatial Langmuir solitons as a model of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    I study stable spatial Langmuir solitons in plasma based on nonlinear radial oscillations of charged particles. I discuss two situations when a Langmuir soliton can be stable. In the former case the stability of solitons against the collapse is due to electron-electron interactions which result in the nonlocal terms in the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. In the latter situation I derive the new cubic-quintic nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with accounts for the interaction of induced dipole moments of diatomic ions with a rapidly oscillating electric field and show that the collapse of Langmuir waves can be also arrested. In both cases I find the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and analyze their stability using the Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion. I discuss the application of my results for the description of long-lived atmospheric plasma structures. I show that, using my model, one can explain the existence of atmospheric plasmoids in the upper ionosphere. It is also demonst...

  16. LINDOZ model for Finland environment: Model description and evaluation of model performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LINDOZ model was developed as a realistic assessment tool for radioactive contamination of the environment. It was designed to produce estimates for the concentration of the pollutant in different compartments of the terrestrial ecosystem (soil, vegetation, animal tissue, and animal products), and to evaluate human exposure to the contaminant (concentration in whole human body, and dose to humans) from inhalation, ingestion and external irradiation. The user can apply LINDOZ for both routine and accidental type of releases. 2 figs, 2 tabs

  17. The use of coupled atmospheric and hydrological models for water-resources management in headwater basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, G.; Hay, L.

    1998-01-01

    Coupled atmospheric and hydrological models provide an opportunity for the improved management of water resources in headwater basins. Issues currently limiting full implementation of coupled-model methodologies include (a) the degree of uncertainty in the accuracy of precipitation and other meteorological variables simulated by atmospheric models, and (b) the problem of discordant scales between atmospheric and bydrological models. Alternative methodologies being developed to address these issues are reviewed.

  18. A new model for atmospheric oxygen over Phanerozoic time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, R A; Canfield, D E

    1989-04-01

    A mathematical model has been constructed that enables calculation of the level of atmospheric O2 over the past 570 my from rates of burial and weathering of organic carbon (C) and pyrite sulfur (S). Burial rates as a function of time are calculated from an assumed constant worldwide clastic sedimentation rate and the relative abundance, and C and S contents, of the three rock types: marine sandstones and shales, coal basin sediments, and other non-marine clastics (red beds, arkoses). By our model, values of O2 versus time, using a constant total sedimentation rate, agree with those for variable sedimentation derived from present-day rock abundances and estimates of erosional losses since deposition. This agreement is the result of our reliance on the idea that any increase in total worldwide sediment burial, with consequently faster burial of C and S and greater O2 production, must be accompanied by a corresponding increase in erosion and increased exposure of C and S on the continents to O2 consumption via weathering. It is the redistribution of sediment between the three different rock types, and not total sedimentation rate, that is important in O2 control. To add stability to the system, negative feedback against excessive O2 fluctuation was provided in the modeling by the geologically reasonable assignment of higher weathering rates to younger rocks, resulting in rapid recycling of C and S. We did not use direct O2 negative feedback on either weathering of C and S or burial of C because weathering rates are assumed to be limited by uplift and erosion, and the burial rate of C limited by the rate of sediment deposition. The latter assumption is the result of modern sediment studies which show that marine organic matter burial occurs mainly in oxygenated shallow water and is limited by the rate of supply of nutrients to the oceans by rivers. Results of the modeling indicate that atmospheric O2 probably has varied appreciably over Phanerozoic time. During the

  19. The Limiting Effects of Dust in Brown Dwarf Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, F; Alexander, D R; Tamanai, A; Schweitzer, A; Allard, France; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Alexander, David R.; Tamanai, Akemi; Schweitzer, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    We present opacity sampling model atmospheres, synthetic spectra and colors for brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in two limiting case of dust grain formation: 1) inefficient gravitational settling i.e. the dust is distributed according to the chemical equilibrium predictions, 2) efficient gravitational settling i.e. the dust forms and depletes refractory elements from the gas, but their opacity does not affect the thermal structure. The models include the formation of over 600 gas phase species, and 1000 liquids and crystals, and the opacities of 30 different types of grains including corundum (Al$_2$O$_3$), the magnesium aluminum spinel MgAl$_2$O$_4$, iron, enstatite (MgSiO$_3$), forsterite (Mg$_2$SiO$_4$), amorphous carbon, SiC, and a number of calcium silicates. The models extend from the beginning of the grain formation regime well into the condensation regime of water ice ($\\teff= 3000 - 100$ K) and encompasses the range of $\\log g= 2.5 - 6.0$ at solar metallicity. We find that silicate dust grains c...

  20. On Modeling the Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability in Solar Atmosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. Zhelyazkov

    2015-03-01

    In the present review article, we discuss the recent developments in studying the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in various solar magnetic structures. The main description is on the modeling of KH instability developing in the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and contributes to the triggering of wave turbulence subsequently, leading to the coronal heating. KH instability of MHD waves in coronal active regions recently observed and imaged in unprecedented detail in EUV high cadence, high-resolution observations by SDO/AIA, and spectroscopic observations by Hinode/EIS instrument, is posing new challenge for its realistic modeling. It is shown that, considering the solar mass flows of CMEs as moving cylindrical twisted magnetic flux tubes, the observed instability can be explained in terms of unstable = −3 MHD mode. We also describe the occurrence of the KH instability in solar jets. The obtained critical jet speeds for the instability onset, as well as the linear wave growth rates, are in good agreement with the observational data of solar jets.