WorldWideScience

Sample records for atlastin-1 coordinate microtubule

  1. Hereditary spastic paraplegia-causing mutations in atlastin-1 interfere with BMPRII trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jiali; Hedera, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-linked signaling pathway has been suggested as an important factor in the development of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). HSP-causing proteins spastin, spartin and NIPA1 were reported to inhibit the BMP pathway. We have previously shown a strong interaction of NIPA1 and atlastin-1 proteins. Hence, we investigated the role of another HSP-associated protein atlastin-1 in this signaling cascade. Endogenous and expressed atlastin-1 showed a str...

  2. The effect of HSP-causing mutations in SPG3A and NIPA1 on the assembly, trafficking, and interaction between atlastin-1 and NIPA1

    OpenAIRE

    Botzolakis, Emmanuel J.; Zhao, Jiali; Gurba, Katharine N.; Macdonald, Robert L.; Hedera, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Despite its genetic heterogeneity, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by similar clinical phenotypes, suggesting that a common biochemical pathway underlies its pathogenesis. In support of this hypothesis, we used a combination of immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry to demonstrate that two HSP-associated proteins, atlastin-1 and NIPA1, are direct binding partners, and interestingly, that the endogenous expression and trafficking of these proteins is ...

  3. Dynamics of Microtubule Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, T; Redner, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an idealized model of microtubule growth that evolves by: (i) attachment of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) at rate lambda, (ii) conversion of GTP to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) at rate 1, and (iii) detachment of GDP at rate mu. As a function of these rates, a microtubule can grow steadily or its length can fluctuate wildly. For mu=0, we find the exact tubule and GTP cap length distributions, and power-law length distributions of GTP and GDP islands. For mu=infinity, we argue that the time between catastrophes, where the microtubule shrinks to zero length, scales as exp(lambda). We also find the phase boundary between a growing and shrinking microtubule.

  4. Micromechanical modeling of microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Arslan, Melis

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules serve as one of the structural components of the cell and take place in some of the important cellular functions such as mitosis and vesicular transport. Microtubules comprise of tubulin subunits tubulin dimers arranged in a cylindrical beta and formed by alpha hollow tube structure with a diameter of 20nm. They are typically comprised of 13 or 14 protofilaments arranged in spiral configurations. The longitudinal bonds between the tubulin dimers are much stiffer and stronger than...

  5. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.; Taveau, J.C.;

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  6. Getting a Grip on Microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaletzky, Julia; Rape, Michael

    2016-02-25

    Posttranslational modifications control microtubule behavior, yet assigning roles to particular signals was hampered by lack of defined in vitro systems. In this issue of Cell, Valenstein and Roll-Mecak establish a biochemical platform to interrogate consequences of microtubule polyglutamylation, thereby providing important insights into the specificity and quantitative nature of cellular information transfer. PMID:26919420

  7. The Membrane-Associated Sec1/Munc18 KEULE is Required for Phragmoplast Microtubule Reorganization During Cytokinesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Alexander; Müller, Lin; Rybak, Katarzyna; Vodermaier, Vera; Facher, Eva; Thellmann, Martha; Ravikumar, Raksha; Wanner, Gerhard; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Assaad, Farhah F

    2016-04-01

    Cytokinesis, the partitioning of the cytoplasm following nuclear division, requires extensive coordination between membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics. In plants, the onset of cytokinesis is characterized by the assembly of a bipolar microtubule array, the phragmoplast, and of a transient membrane compartment, the cell plate. Little is known about the coordination between membrane deposition at the cell plate and the dynamics of phragmoplast microtubules. In this study, we monitor the localization dynamics of microtubule and membrane markers throughout cytokinesis. Our spatiotemporal resolution is consistent with the general view that microtubule dynamics drive membrane movements. Nonetheless, we provide evidence for active sorting at the cell plate and show that this is, at least in part, mediated by the TRAPPII tethering complex. We also characterize phragmoplast microtubule organization and cell plate formation in a suite of cytokinesis-defective mutants. Of four mutant lines with defects in phragmoplast microtubule organization, only mor1 microtubule-associated mutants exhibited aberrant cell plates. Conversely, the mutants with the strongest impairment in phragmoplast microtubule reorganization are keule alleles, which have a primary defect in membrane fusion. Our findings identify the SEC1/Munc18 protein KEULE as a central regulatory node in the coordination of membrane and microtubule dynamics during plant cytokinesis. PMID:26700031

  8. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  9. Short Stop provides an essential link between F-actin and microtubules during axon extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungbok; Kolodziej, Peter A

    2002-03-01

    Coordination of F-actin and microtubule dynamics is important for cellular motility and morphogenesis, but little is known about underlying mechanisms. short stop (shot) encodes an evolutionarily conserved, neuronally expressed family of rod-like proteins required for sensory and motor axon extension in Drosophila melanogaster. We identify Shot isoforms that contain N-terminal F-actin and C-terminal microtubule-binding domains, and that crosslink F-actin and microtubules in cultured cells. The F-actin- and microtubule-binding domains of Shot are required in the same molecule for axon extension, though the length of the connecting rod domain can be dramatically reduced without affecting activity. Shot therefore functions as a cytoskeletal crosslinker in axon extension, rather than mediating independent interactions with F-actin and microtubules. A Ca(2+)-binding motif located adjacent to the microtubule-binding domain is also required for axon extension, suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) release may regulate Shot activity. These results suggest that Shot coordinates regulated interactions between F-actin and microtubules that are crucial for neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:11874915

  10. Disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of cultured human skin fibroblasts causes the disassembly of their microtubules. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, we have now investigated whether damage to the microtubule precursor pool may contribute to the disruption of microtubules. Exposure to polychromatic UV radiation inhibits the reassembly of microtubules during cellular recovery from cold treatment. In addition, the ability of taxol to promote microtubule polymerization and bundling is inhibited in UV-irradiated cells. However, UV irradiation of taxol-pretreated cells or in situ detergent-extracted microtubules fails to disrupt the microtubule network. These data suggest that damage to dimeric tubulin, or another soluble factor(s) required for polymerization, contributes to the disassembly of microtubules in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts

  11. Regulation of microtubule dynamic instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Vaart (Babet); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A. Straube (Anne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractProper regulation of MT (microtubule) dynamics is essential for various vital processes, including the segregation of chromosomes, directional cell migration and differentiation. MT assembly and disassembly is modulated by a complex network of intracellular factors that co-operate or ant

  12. Shot and Patronin polarise microtubules to direct membrane traffic and biogenesis of microvilli in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Ichha; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Diaz de la Loza, Maria Del Carmen; Fletcher, Georgina C; Thompson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    In epithelial tissues, polarisation of microtubules and actin microvilli occurs along the apical-basal axis of each cell, yet how these cytoskeletal polarisation events are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we examine the hierarchy of events during cytoskeletal polarisation in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. Core apical-basal polarity determinants polarise the spectrin cytoskeleton to recruit the microtubule-binding proteins Patronin (CAMSAP1, CAMSAP2 and CAMPSAP3 in humans) and Shortstop [Shot; MACF1 and BPAG1 (also known as DST) in humans] to the apical membrane domain. Patronin and Shot then act to polarise microtubules along the apical-basal axis to enable apical transport of Rab11 endosomes by the Nuf-Dynein microtubule motor complex. Finally, Rab11 endosomes are transferred to the MyoV (also known as Didum in Drosophila) actin motor to deliver the key microvillar determinant Cadherin 99C to the apical membrane to organise the biogenesis of actin microvilli. PMID:27231092

  13. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo ex...

  14. Microtubule as nanobioelectronic nonlinear circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekulić Dalibor L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of biological molecules has offered exciting alternatives to conventional synthetic methods. Specific methods use various biological templates to direct the deposition and patterning of inorganic materials. Here we have established a new electrical model of microtubules as a biological nanoscale circuit based on polyelectrolyte features of cylindrical biopolymers. Our working hypothesis is that microtubules play an active role in sub-cellular computation and signaling via electronic and protonic conductivity and can thus be made useful in hybrid materials that offer novel electronic characteristics. We verify these hypotheses both computationally and analytically through a quantitative model based on the atomic resolution structures of the key functional proteins.

  15. Flexural Rigidity of a Single Microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasone, Toru; Juodkazis, Saulius; Kawagishi, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Matsuo, Shigeki; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Haruto; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2002-05-01

    Microtubules, which are flexible biopolymers, can be used for nanotechnology applications (e.g., nano-actuator) as they have a rigidity similar to that of plexyglass and other plastic materials. The flexural rigidity, or bending stiffness, of microtubules was measured using a laser trapping technique and dark-field microscopy. One end of a microtubule rod was chemically bound to a glass microsphere, while the other end was bound to a silica glass substrate. Then, the microsphere was laser-trapped and manipulated to exert three different deformation modes on the microtubule. The values of flexural rigidity for these deformations were between 10-25 and 10-23 Nm2 as measured for the 5-25 μm length microtubules. The origin of the length dependence of the flexural rigidity of microtubules is discussed.

  16. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  17. Microtubule binding distinguishes dystrophin from utrophin

    OpenAIRE

    Belanto, Joseph J.; Mader, Tara L.; Eckhoff, Michael D.; Strandjord, Dana M.; Banks, Glen B.; Gardner, Melissa K.; Lowe, Dawn A.; Ervasti, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Our in vitro analyses reveal that dystrophin, the protein absent in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, binds microtubules with high affinity and pauses microtubule polymerization, whereas utrophin, the autosomal homologue of dystrophin thought to mirror many known functions of dystrophin, has no activity in either assay. We also report that transgenic utrophin overexpression does not correct subsarcolemmal microtubule lattice disorganization, physical inactivity after mild exercise, or los...

  18. Theoretical treatment of microtubules disappearing in solution.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y; Hill, T L

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the two-phase (cap, no cap) macroscopic kinetic model of the end of a microtubule is reviewed. The model is then applied to a new theoretical problem, namely, the Mitchison-Kirschner [Mitchison, T. & Kirschner, M. W. (1984) Nature (London) 312, 237-242] experiment in which aggregated microtubules in solution spontaneously decrease in number (shorten to disappearance) while the surviving microtubules increase in length. The model fits the experiments without difficulty.

  19. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  20. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Xavier; Place, Christophe; Delage, Helene; Mongelard, Fabien; Monier, Karine; Bouvet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells. PMID:27309529

  1. Association of Microtubule Dynamics with Chronic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Hu, Yida; Xiong, Yan; Li, Zhonggui; Wang, Wei; Du, Chao; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yanke; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 30 % of epilepsy cases are refractory to current pharmacological treatments through unknown mechanisms. Much work has been done on the role of synaptic components in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, but relatively little attention has been given to the potential role of the microtubules. We investigated the level of microtubule dynamic in 30 human epileptic tissues and two different chronic epilepsy rat models. The administration of microtubule-modulating agent attenuated the progression of chronic epilepsy. By contrast, microtubule-depolymerizing agent aggravated the progression of chronic epilepsy. The electrophysiological index by whole-cell clamp was used to investigate the neuronal excitation and inhibitory synaptic transmission in brain slices after administration of microtubule-modulating agent and microtubule-depolymerizing agent. Interestingly, we found that microtubule-modulating agent significantly increased the frequency of action potential firing in interneurons, and significantly promoted the amplitudes and frequencies of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Microtubule-depolymerizing agent had an opposite effect. These findings suggest that modulating hyperdynamic microtubules may take an anti-epileptic effect via postsynaptic mechanisms in interneurons. It could represent a potential pharmacologic target in epilepsy treatment. PMID:26377107

  2. Expression of Nucleolin Affects Microtubule Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gaume

    Full Text Available Nucleolin is present in diverse cellular compartments and is involved in a variety of cellular processes from nucleolar structure and function to intracellular trafficking, cell adhesion and migration. Recently, nucleolin has been localized at the mature centriole where it is involved in microtubule nucleation and anchoring. Although this new function of nucleolin linked to microtubule regulation has been identified, the global effects of nucleolin on microtubule dynamics have not been addressed yet. In the present study, we analyzed the roles of nucleolin protein levels on global microtubule dynamics by tracking the EB3 microtubule plus end binding protein in live cells. We have found that during microtubule growth phases, nucleolin affects both the speed and life time of polymerization and by analyzing catastrophe events, we showed that nucleolin reduces catastrophe frequency. This new property of nucleolin was then confirmed in a cold induced microtubule depolymerization experiment in which we have found that cold resistant microtubules were totally destabilized in nucleolin depleted cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate a new function of nucleolin on microtubule stabilization, thus bringing novel insights into understanding the multifunctional properties of nucleolin in healthy and cancer cells.

  3. Microtubule heterogeneity of Ornithogalum umbellatum ovary epidermal cells: non-stable cortical microtubules and stable lipotubuloid microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipotubuloids, structures containing lipid bodies and microtubules, are described in ovary epidermalcells of Ornithogalum umbellatum. Microtubules of lipotubuloids can be fixed in electron microscope fixativecontaining only buffered OsO4 or in glutaraldehyde with OsO4 post-fixation, or in a mixture of OsO4 and glutaraldehyde[1]. None of these substances fixes cortical microtubules of ovary epidermis of this plant which ischaracterized by dynamic longitudinal growth. However, cortical microtubules can be fixed with cold methanolaccording immunocytological methods with the use of b-tubulin antibodies and fluorescein. The existence ofcortical microtubules has also been evidenced by EM observations solely after the use of taxol, microtubulestabilizer, and fixation in a glutaraldehyde/OsO4 mixture. These microtubules mostly lie transversely, sometimesobliquely, and rarely parallel to the cell axis. Staining, using Ruthenium Red and silver hexamine, has revealedthat lipotubuloid microtubules surface is covered with polysaccharides. The presumption has been made thatthe presence of a polysaccharide layer enhances the stability of lipotubuloid microtubules.

  4. Cold exposure reveals two populations of microtubules in pulmonary endothelia

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Stevens, Troy; Balczon, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Microtubules are composed of α-tubulin and β-tubulin dimers. Microtubules yield tubulin dimers when exposed to cold, which reassemble spontaneously to form microtubule fibers at 37°C. However, mammalian neurons, glial cells, and fibroblasts have cold-stable microtubules. While studying the microtubule toxicity mechanisms of the exotoxin Y from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, we observed that some endothelial microtubules were very difficult to disassemble ...

  5. Cellulose-Microtubule Uncoupling Proteins Prevent Lateral Displacement of Microtubules during Cellulose Synthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zengyu; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Zhang, Yi; Somssich, Marc; Zhang, Youjun; Fernie, Alisdair R; Persson, Staffan

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is the major contributor to plant morphogenesis. Cellulose is synthesized by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Nascent cellulose microfibrils become entangled in the cell wall, and further catalysis therefore drives the CSC forward through the membrane: a process guided by cortical microtubules via the protein CSI1/POM2. Still, it is unclear how the microtubules can withstand the forces generated by the motile CSCs to effectively direct CSC movement. Here, we identified a family of microtubule-associated proteins, the cellulose synthase-microtubule uncouplings (CMUs), that located as static puncta along cortical microtubules. Functional disruption of the CMUs caused lateral microtubule displacement and compromised microtubule-based guidance of CSC movement. CSCs that traversed the microtubules interacted with the microtubules via CSI1/POM2, which prompted the lateral microtubule displacement. Hence, we have revealed how microtubules can withstand the propulsion of the CSCs during cellulose biosynthesis and thus sustain anisotropic plant cell growth. PMID:27477947

  6. Microtubule segment stabilization by RASSF1A is required for proper microtubule dynamics and Golgi integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnette, Christopher; Efimova, Nadia; Zhu, Xiaodong; Clark, Geoffrey J.; Kaverina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor and microtubule-associated protein Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A) has a major effect on many cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression and apoptosis. RASSF1A expression is frequently silenced in cancer and is associated with increased metastasis. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that RASSF1A regulates microtubule organization and dynamics in interphase cells, as well as its effect on Golgi integrity and cell polarity. Our results show that RASSF1A uses a unique microtubule-binding pattern to promote site-specific microtubule rescues, and loss of RASSF1A leads to decreased microtubule stability. Furthermore, RASSF1A-associated stable microtubule segments are necessary to prevent Golgi fragmentation and dispersal in cancer cells and maintain a polarized cell front. These results indicate that RASSF1A is a key regulator in the fine tuning of microtubule dynamics in interphase cells and proper Golgi organization and cell polarity. PMID:24478455

  7. Kinesin-12 motors cooperate to suppress microtubule catastrophes and drive the formation of parallel microtubule bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Hauke; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2016-03-22

    Human Kinesin-12 (hKif15) plays a crucial role in assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. These functions of hKif15 are partially redundant with Kinesin-5 (Eg5), which can cross-link and drive the extensile sliding of antiparallel microtubules. Although both motors are known to be tetramers, the functional properties of hKif15 are less well understood. Here we reveal how single or multiple Kif15 motors can cross-link, transport, and focus the plus-ends of intersecting microtubules. During transport, Kif15 motors step simultaneously along both microtubules with relative microtubule transport driven by a velocity differential between motor domain pairs. Remarkably, this differential is affected by the underlying intersection geometry: the differential is low on parallel and extreme on antiparallel microtubules where one motor domain pair becomes immobile. As a result, when intersecting microtubules are antiparallel, canonical transport of one microtubule along the other is allowed because one motor is firmly attached to one microtubule while it is stepping on the other. When intersecting microtubules are parallel, however, Kif15 motors can drive (biased) parallel sliding because the motor simultaneously steps on both microtubules that it cross-links. These microtubule rearrangements will focus microtubule plus-ends and finally lead to the formation of parallel bundles. At the same time, Kif15 motors cooperate to suppress catastrophe events at polymerizing microtubule plus-ends, raising the possibility that Kif15 motors may synchronize the dynamics of bundles that they have assembled. Thus, Kif15 is adapted to operate on parallel microtubule substrates, a property that clearly distinguishes it from the other tetrameric spindle motor, Eg5. PMID:26969727

  8. MCAK selectivity targets long microtubules for depolymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study how the microtubule-associated protein MCAK affects the kinetic properties of a microtubule assembly. On the basis of recent experimental observations, we model the MCAK molecule as performing an unbiased random walk on the microtubule after binding to it from solution, and thereafter inducing depolymerization after reaching one of the ends. We show analytically that this process leads to an effective length-dependent catastrophe rate of the microtubules. Consequently, the steady state length distribution also deviates from pure exponential decay, and varies non-monotonically with the microtubule length. The mean length decreases with the external MCAK concentration, but the ratio of the RMS fluctuation to the mean shows a minimum at a certain MCAK concentration. We discuss the implications of these results for the formation of the mitotic spindle and the chromosome search process during cell division. (author)

  9. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  10. Insights into Antiparallel Microtubule Crosslinking by PRC1, a Conserved Nonmotor Microtubule Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Radhika; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Arthur, Christopher P.; Bick, Matthew J.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Darst, Seth A.; Milligan, Ronald A.; Kapoor, Tarun M. (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

    2010-09-03

    Formation of microtubule architectures, required for cell shape maintenance in yeast, directional cell expansion in plants and cytokinesis in eukaryotes, depends on antiparallel microtubule crosslinking by the conserved MAP65 protein family. Here, we combine structural and single molecule fluorescence methods to examine how PRC1, the human MAP65, crosslinks antiparallel microtubules. We find that PRC1's microtubule binding is mediated by a structured domain with a spectrin-fold and an unstructured Lys/Arg-rich domain. These two domains, at each end of a homodimer, are connected by a linkage that is flexible on single microtubules, but forms well-defined crossbridges between antiparallel filaments. Further, we show that PRC1 crosslinks are compliant and do not substantially resist filament sliding by motor proteins in vitro. Together, our data show how MAP65s, by combining structural flexibility and rigidity, tune microtubule associations to establish crosslinks that selectively mark antiparallel overlap in dynamic cytoskeletal networks.

  11. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control. PMID:27219064

  12. A Thermodynamic Model of Microtubule Assembly and Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard M A G Piette; Junli Liu; Kasper Peeters; Andrei Smertenko; Timothy Hawkins; Michael Deeks; Roy Quinlan; Zakrzewski, Wojciech J.; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo mode...

  13. Microtubule dynamics: Caps, catastrophes, and coupled hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Holy, T.E.; Leibler, S.

    1996-01-01

    An effective theory is formulated for the dynamics of the guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cap believed to stabilize growing microtubules. The theory provides a ''coarse-grained'' description of the cap's dynamics. ''Microscopic'' details, such as the microtubule lattice structure and the fate of its...... data. A constant nonzero catastrophe rare, identical for both microtubule ends, is predicted at large growth rates. The delay time for dilution-induced catastrophes is stochastic with a simple distribution that fits the experimental one and, like the experimental one, does not depend on the rate of....... A recent experimental result for the size of the minimal cap that can stabilize a microtubule is shown to agree with the result predicted by the cap model, after its parameters have been extracted from previous experimental results. Thus the effective theory and cap model presented here provide a...

  14. Microtubule dynamics: Caps, catastrophes, and coupled hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Holy, T.E.; Leibler, S.

    1996-01-01

    probability distributions relating to available experimental data are derived. Caps are found to be short and the total rate of hydrolysis at a microtubule end is found to be dynamically coupled to growth. The so-called catastrophe rate is a simple function of the microtubule growth rare and fits experimental...... data. A constant nonzero catastrophe rare, identical for both microtubule ends, is predicted at large growth rates. The delay time for dilution-induced catastrophes is stochastic with a simple distribution that fits the experimental one and, like the experimental one, does not depend on the rate of...... unified description of several apparently contradictory experimental data. Experimental results for the catastrophe rate at different concentrations of magnesium ions and of microtubule associated proteins are discussed in terms of the model. Feasible experiments are suggested that can provide decisive...

  15. Organization of microtubules in cochlear hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, D N; Hackney, C M; Steyger, P S

    1990-07-01

    The organization of microtubules in hair cells of the guinea-pig cochlea has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and correlated with the location of tubulin-associated immunofluorescence in surface preparations of the organ of Corti. Results from both techniques reveal consistent distributions of microtubules in inner and outer hair cells. In the inner hair cells, microtubules are most concentrated in the apex. Reconstruction from serial sections shows three main groups: firstly, in channels through the cuticular plate and in a discontinuous belt around its upper perimeter; secondly, forming a ring inside a rim extending down from the lower perimeter of the plate; and thirdly, in a meshwork underlying the main body of the plate. In the cell body, microtubules line the inner face of the subsurface cistern and extend longitudinally through a tubulo-vesicular track between the apex and base. In outer hair cells, the pattern of microtubules associated with the cuticular plate is similar, although there are fewer present than in inner hair cells. In outer hair cells from the apex of the cochlea, microtubules occur around an infracuticular protrusion of cuticular plate material. In the cell body, many more microtubules occur in the region below the nucleus compared with inner hair cells. The possible functions of microtubules in hair cells are discussed by comparison with those found in other systems. These include morphogenesis and maintenance of cell shape; intracellular transport, e.g., of neurotransmitter vesicles; providing a possible substrate for motility; mechanical support of structures associated with sensory transduction. PMID:2197374

  16. Microtubules self-repair in response to mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedel, Laura; John, Karin; Gaillard, Jérémie; Nachury, Maxence V.; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules--which define the shape of axons, cilia and flagella, and provide tracks for intracellular transport--can be highly bent by intracellular forces, and microtubule structure and stiffness are thought to be affected by physical constraints. Yet how microtubules tolerate the vast forces exerted on them remains unknown. Here, by using a microfluidic device, we show that microtubule stiffness decreases incrementally with each cycle of bending and release. Similar to other cases of material fatigue, the concentration of mechanical stresses on pre-existing defects in the microtubule lattice is responsible for the generation of more extensive damage, which further decreases microtubule stiffness. Strikingly, damaged microtubules were able to incorporate new tubulin dimers into their lattice and recover their initial stiffness. Our findings demonstrate that microtubules are ductile materials with self-healing properties, that their dynamics does not exclusively occur at their ends, and that their lattice plasticity enables the microtubules' adaptation to mechanical stresses.

  17. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo exchange with the bulk medium readily, suggesting that the tau-microtubule interaction is essentially irreversible. Given this dilemma, we investigated the mechanism of interaction between tau and microtubules in kinetic detail. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis reveals moderate binding affinity between tau and preassembled microtubules and rapid dissociation/association kinetics. In contrast, when microtubules are generated by copolymerization of tubulin and tau, a distinct population of microtubule-bound tau is observed, the binding of which seems irreversible. We propose that reversible binding occurs between tau and the surface of preassembled microtubules, whereas irreversible binding results when tau is coassembled with tubulin into a tau-microtubule copolymer. Because the latter is expected to be physiologically relevant, its characterization is of central importance. PMID:15096589

  18. Post-polymerization crosstalk between the actin cytoskeleton and microtubule network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, E Emily; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Cellular cytoskeletal systems play many pivotal roles in living organisms by controlling cell shape, division, and migration, which ultimately govern morphology, physiology, and functions of animals. Although the cytoskeletal systems are distinct and play different roles, there is growing evidence that these diverse cytoskeletal systems coordinate their functions with each other. This coordination between cytoskeletal systems, often termed cytoskeletal crosstalk, has been identified when the dynamic state of one individual system affects the other system. In this review, we briefly describe some well-established examples of crosstalk between cytoskeletal systems and then introduce a newly discovered form of crosstalk between the actin cytoskeleton and microtubule network that does not appear to directly alter polymerization or depolymerization of either system. The biological impact and possible significance of this post-polymerization crosstalk between actin and microtubules will be discussed in detail. PMID:27058810

  19. Role of the Kinesin Neck Region in Processive Microtubule-based Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Romberg, Laura; Pierce, Daniel W.; Vale, Ronald D.

    1998-01-01

    Kinesin is a dimeric motor protein that can move along a microtubule for several microns without releasing (termed processive movement). The two motor domains of the dimer are thought to move in a coordinated, hand-over-hand manner. A region adjacent to kinesin's motor catalytic domain (the neck) contains a coiled coil that is sufficient for motor dimerization and has been proposed to play an essential role in processive movement. Recent models have suggested that the neck enables head-to-hea...

  20. Differential regulation of microtubule severing by APC underlies distinct patterns of projection neuron and interneuron migration

    OpenAIRE

    Eom, Tae-Yeon; Stanco, Amelia; Guo, Jiami; Wilkins, Gary; Deslauriers, Danielle; Yan, Jessica; Monckton, Chase; Blair, Josh; Oon, Eesim; Perez, Abby; Salas, Eduardo; Oh, Adrianna; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Snider, William D; John L R Rubenstein

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated migration of distinct classes of neurons to appropriate positions leads to the formation of functional neuronal circuitry in the cerebral cortex. Two major classes of cortical neurons, interneurons and projection neurons, utilize distinctly different modes (radial vs. tangential) and routes of migration to arrive at their final positions in the cerebral cortex. Here, we show that adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) modulates microtubule (MT) severing in interneurons to facilitate tan...

  1. Association of Ebola Virus Matrix Protein VP40 with Microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Ruthel, Gordon; Demmin, Gretchen L.; Kallstrom, George; Javid, Melodi P.; Badie, Shirin S.; Will, Amy B.; Nelle, Timothy; Schokman, Rowena; Nguyen, Tam L.; Carra, John H; Bavari, Sina; Aman, M. Javad

    2005-01-01

    Viruses exploit a variety of cellular components to complete their life cycles, and it has become increasingly clear that use of host cell microtubules is a vital part of the infection process for many viruses. A variety of viral proteins have been identified that interact with microtubules, either directly or via a microtubule-associated motor protein. Here, we report that Ebola virus associates with microtubules via the matrix protein VP40. When transfected into mammalian cells, a fraction ...

  2. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal c...

  3. Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lynn; Ross, Jennifer L [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tuezel, Erkan, E-mail: rossj@physics.umass.edu [Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-gliding assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.

  4. Integrin-linked kinase regulates interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Lim

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK localizes to both focal adhesions and centrosomes in distinct multiprotein complexes. Its dual function as a kinase and scaffolding protein has been well characterized at focal adhesions, where it regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration and signaling. At the centrosomes, ILK regulates mitotic spindle organization and centrosome clustering. Our previous study showed various spindle defects after ILK knockdown or inhibition that suggested alteration in microtubule dynamics. Since ILK expression is frequently elevated in many cancer types, we investigated the effects of ILK overexpression on microtubule dynamics. We show here that overexpressing ILK in HeLa cells was associated with a shorter duration of mitosis and decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Measurement of interphase microtubule dynamics revealed that ILK overexpression favored microtubule depolymerization, suggesting that microtubule destabilization could be the mechanism behind the decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, which is known to stabilize microtubules. Conversely, the use of a small molecule inhibitor selective against ILK, QLT-0267, resulted in suppressed microtubule dynamics, demonstrating a new mechanism of action for this compound. We further show that treatment of HeLa cells with QLT-0267 resulted in higher inter-centromere tension in aligned chromosomes during mitosis, slower microtubule regrowth after cold depolymerization and the presence of a more stable population of spindle microtubules. These results demonstrate that ILK regulates microtubule dynamics in both interphase and mitotic cells.

  5. Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-gliding assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.

  6. The role of microtubule movement in bidirectional organelle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kulić, Igor M; Kim, Hwajin; Kural, Comert; Blehm, Benjamin; Selvin, Paul R; Nelson, Philip C; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2008-01-01

    We study the role of microtubule movement in bidirectional organelle transport in Drosophila S2 cells and show that EGFP-tagged peroxisomes in cells serve as sensitive probes of motor induced, noisy cytoskeletal motions. Multiple peroxisomes move in unison over large time windows and show correlations with microtubule tip positions, indicating rapid microtubule fluctuations in the longitudinal direction. We report the first high-resolution measurement of longitudinal microtubule fluctuations performed by tracing such pairs of co-moving peroxisomes. The resulting picture shows that motor-dependent longitudinal microtubule oscillations contribute significantly to cargo movement along microtubules. Thus, contrary to the conventional view, organelle transport cannot be described solely in terms of cargo movement along stationary microtubule tracks, but instead includes a strong contribution from the movement of the tracks.

  7. KIF7 Controls the Proliferation of Cells of the Respiratory Airway through Distinct Microtubule Dependent Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry L Coles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle must be tightly coordinated for proper control of embryonic development and for the long-term maintenance of organs such as the lung. There is emerging evidence that Kinesin family member 7 (Kif7 promotes Hedgehog (Hh signaling during embryonic development, and its misregulation contributes to diseases such as ciliopathies and cancer. Kif7 encodes a microtubule interacting protein that controls Hh signaling through regulation of microtubule dynamics within the primary cilium. However, whether Kif7 has a function in nonciliated cells remains largely unknown. The role Kif7 plays in basic cell biological processes like cell proliferation or cell cycle progression also remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that Kif7 is required for coordination of the cell cycle, and inactivation of this gene leads to increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Immunostaining and transmission electron microscopy experiments show that Kif7dda/dda mutant lungs are hyperproliferative and exhibit reduced alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. KIF7 depleted C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts and Kif7dda/dda mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have increased growth rates at high cellular densities, suggesting that Kif7 may function as a general regulator of cellular proliferation. We ascertained that in G1, Kif7 and microtubule dynamics regulate the expression and activity of several components of the cell cycle machinery known to control entry into S phase. Our data suggest that Kif7 may function to regulate the maintenance of the respiratory airway architecture by controlling cellular density, cell proliferation, and cycle exit through its role as a microtubule associated protein.

  8. Motor protein accumulation on antiparallel microtubule overlaps

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would na\\"ively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center ...

  9. Self-Reduction Rate of a Microtubule

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Matsui, Tetsuo; Sakakibara, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We formulate and study a quantum field theory of a microtubule, a basic element of living cells. Following the quantum theory of consciousness by Hameroff and Penrose, we let the system to reduce to one of the classical states without measurement if certain conditions are satisfied(self-reductions), and calculate the self-reduction time $\\tau_N$ (the mean interval between two successive self-reductions) of a cluster consisting of more than $N$ neighboring tubulins (basic units composing a mic...

  10. Observations of microtubules and microtubule-microfilament associations in osmotically treated cells of Micrasterias denticulata Bréb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus-Url, G; Kiermayer, O

    1982-06-01

    As an extension of the observation and interpretation regarding the different microtubule systems of Micrasterias denticulata [12, 19], the existence of intertubular structures, such as microfilaments, which are strongly marked in osmotically treated cells, is especially interesting. The complex of microtubules and microfilaments occurs during post-telophase nuclear migration, probably engaged in the mechanism of movement. The arrangement of microtubules either parallel or perpendicular to the nuclear membrane is characteristic for the stage of nuclear migration. Another microtubule system, the microtubule band in the cortical protoplasm of the isthmus region [12], is described during morphogenesis of the new half cell. Osmotically treated cells in the stage of septum formation demonstrate the presence of cross-linked microtubules near the plasmalemma and microtubule bundles, situated in the protoplasm between the secondary wall and the chloroplast, probably representing the microtubule system in the cortical protoplasm of the old half cell described by Kiermayer [12, 16]. The frequent appearance of microtubules and intertubular structures in differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata after osmotic treatment is discussed along with implication for stabilization of microtubules, cross bridges, and microfilaments. PMID:6889505

  11. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  12. General theory for the mechanics of confined microtubule asters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cells, dynamic microtubules organize into asters or spindles to assist positioning of organelles. Two types of forces are suggested to contribute to the positioning process: (i) microtubule-growth based pushing forces; and (ii) motor protein mediated pulling forces. In this paper, we present a general theory to account for aster positioning in a confinement of arbitrary shape. The theory takes account of microtubule nucleation, growth, catastrophe, slipping, as well as interaction with cortical force generators. We calculate microtubule distributions and forces acting on microtubule organizing centers in a sphere and in an ellipsoid. Positioning mechanisms based on both pushing forces and pulling forces can be distinguished in our theory for different parameter regimes or in different geometries. In addition, we investigate positioning of microtubule asters in the case of asymmetric distribution of motors. This analysis enables us to characterize situations relevant for Caenorrhabditis elegans embryos. (paper)

  13. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  14. Microtubule Associated Proteins in Plants and the Processes They Manage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) are proteins that physically bind to microtubules in eukaryotes. MAPs play important roles in regulating the polymerization and organization of microtubules and in using the ensuing microtubule arrays to carry out a variety of cellular functions. In plants, MAPs manage the construction, repositioning, and dismantling of four distinct microtubule arrays throughout the cell cycle. Three of these arrays, the cortical array, the preprophase band,and the phragmoplast, are prominent to plants and are responsible for facilitating cell wall deposition and modification,transducing signals, demarcating the plane of cell division, and forming the new cell plate during cytokinesis, This review highlights important aspects of how MAPs in plants establish and maintain microtubule arrays as well as regulate cell growth, cell division, and cellular responses to the environment.

  15. Asymmetric behavior of severed microtubule ends after ultraviolet-microbeam irradiation of individual microtubules in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, R.A.; Inoue, S.; Salmon, E.D.

    1989-03-01

    The molecular basis of microtubule dynamic instability is controversial, but is thought to be related to a GTP cap. A key prediction of the GTP cap model is that the proposed labile GDP-tubulin core will rapidly dissociate if the GTP-tubulin cap is lost. We have tested this prediction by using a UV microbeam to cut the ends from elongating microtubules. Phosphocellulose-purified tubulin was assembled onto the plus and minus ends of sea urchin flagellar axoneme fragments at 21-22 degrees C. The assembly dynamics of individual microtubules were recorded in real time using video microscopy. When the tip of an elongating plus end microtubule was cut off, the severed plus end microtubule always rapidly shortened back to the axoneme at the normal plus end rate. However, when the distal tip of an elongating minus end microtubule was cut off, no rapid shortening occurred. Instead, the severed minus end resumed elongation at the normal minus end rate. Our results show that some form of stabilizing cap, possibly a GTP cap, governs the transition (catastrophe) from elongation to rapid shortening at the plus end. At the minus end, a simple GTP cap is not sufficient to explain the observed behavior unless UV induces immediate recapping of minus, but not plus, ends. Another possibility is that a second step, perhaps a structural transformation, is required in addition to GTP cap loss for rapid shortening to occur. This transformation would be favored at plus, but not minus ends, to account for the asymmetric behavior of the ends.

  16. Association of Adenovirus with the Microtubule Organizing Center

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Christopher J.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Leopold, Philip L.

    2003-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) must deliver their genomes to the nucleus of the target cell to initiate an infection. Following entry into the cell and escape from the endosome, Ad traffics along the microtubule cytoskeleton toward the nucleus. In the final step in Ad trafficking, Ad must leave the microtubule and establish an association with the nuclear envelope. We hypothesized that in cells lacking a nucleus, the capsid moves to and associates with the microtubule organizing center (MTOC). To test thi...

  17. Microtubule-binding agents: a dynamic field of cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Dumontet, Charles; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    International audience Microtubules are dynamic filamentous cytoskeletal proteins composed of tubulin and are an important therapeutic target in tumour cells. Agents that bind to microtubules have been part of the pharmacopoeia of anticancer therapy for decades and until the advent of targeted therapy, microtubules were the only alternative to DNA as a therapeutic target in cancer. The screening of a range of botanical species and marine organisms has yielded promising new antitubulin agen...

  18. GDP-Tubulin Incorporation into Growing Microtubules Modulates Polymer Stability.

    OpenAIRE

    Valiron, Odile; Arnal, Isabelle; Caudron, Nicolas; Job, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Microtubule growth proceeds through the endwise addition of nucleotide-bound tubulin dimers. The microtubule wall is composed of GDP-tubulin subunits, which are thought to come exclusively from the incorporation of GTP-tubulin complexes at microtubule ends followed by GTP hydrolysis within the polymer. The possibility of a direct GDP-tubulin incorporation into growing polymers is regarded as hardly compatible with recent structural data. Here, we have examined GTP-tubulin and GDP-tubulin inco...

  19. The nucleation of microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Monteiro Cristina de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are filaments composed of dimers of alpha- and beta-tubulins, which have a variety of functions in living cells. In fungi, the spindle pole bodies usually have been considered to be microtubule-organizing centers. We used the antimicrotubule drug Benomyl in block/release experiments to depolymerize and repolymerize microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans germlings to learn more about the microtubule nucleation process in this filamentous fungus. Twenty seconds after release from Benomyl short microtubules were formed from several bright (immunofluorescent dots distributed along the germlings, suggesting that microtubule nucleation is randomly distributed in A. nidulans germlings. Since nuclear movement is dependent on microtubules in A. nidulans we analyzed whether mutants defective in nuclear distribution along the growing hyphae (nud mutants have some obvious microtubule defect. Cytoplasmic, astral and spindle microtubules were present and appeared to be normal in all nud mutants. However, significant changes in the percentage of short versus long mitotic spindles were observed in nud mutants. This suggests that some of the nuclei of nud mutants do not reach the late stage of cell division at normal temperatures.

  20. Calculation of the Electromagnetic Field Around a Microtubule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Havelka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are important structures in the cytoskeleton which organizes the cell. A single microtubule is composed of electrically polar structures, tubulin heterodimers, which have a strong electric dipole moment. Vibrations are expected to be generated in microtubules, thus tubulin heterodimers oscillate as electric dipoles. This gives rise to an electromagnetic field which is detected around the cells. We calculate here the electromagnetic field of microtubules if they are excited at 1 GHz. This paper includes work done for the bachelor thesis of the first author. 

  1. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  2. Structural Change in the Dynein Stalk Region Associated with Two Different Affinities for the Microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Yosuke; Inatomi, Momoko; Iwasaki, Haruka; Kurisu, Genji

    2016-05-01

    Dynein is a large microtubule-based motor complex that requires tight coupling of intra-molecular ATP hydrolysis with the generation of mechanical force and track-binding activity. However, the microtubule-binding domain is structurally separated by about 15nm from the nucleotide-binding sites by a coiled-coil stalk. Thus, long-range two-way communication is necessary for coordination between the catalytic cycle of ATP hydrolysis and dynein's track-binding affinities. To investigate the structural changes that occur in the dynein stalk region to produce two different microtubule affinities, here we improve the resolution limit of the previously reported structure of the entire stalk region and we investigate structural changes in the dynein stalk and strut/buttress regions by comparing currently available X-ray structures. In the light of recent crystal structures, the basis of the transition from the low-affinity to the high-affinity coiled-coil registry is discussed. A concerted movement model previously reported by Carter and Vale is modified more specifically, and we proposed it as the open zipper model. PMID:26585405

  3. Inter-domain Cooperation in INCENP Promotes Aurora B Relocation from Centromeres to Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando van der Horst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomal passenger complex is essential for error-free chromosome segregation and proper execution of cytokinesis. To coordinate nuclear division with cytoplasmic division, its enzymatic subunit, Aurora B, relocalizes from centromeres in metaphase to the spindle midzone in anaphase. In budding yeast, this requires dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding (MTB domain of the INCENP analog Sli15. The mechanistic basis for this relocalization in metazoans is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the putative coiled-coil domain within INCENP drives midzone localization of Aurora B via a direct, electrostatic interaction with microtubules. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the CPC multimerizes via INCENP’s centromere-targeting domain (CEN box, which increases the MTB affinity of INCENP. In (prometaphase, the MTB affinity of INCENP is outcompeted by the affinity of its CEN box for centromeres, while at anaphase onset—when the histone mark H2AT120 is dephosphorylated—INCENP and Aurora B switch from centromere to microtubule localization.

  4. Microtubules Have Opposite Orientation in Axons and Dendrites of Drosophila Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Michelle C.; Roegiers, Fabrice; Rolls, Melissa M

    2008-01-01

    In vertebrate neurons, axons have a uniform arrangement of microtubules with plus ends distal to the cell body (plus-end-out), and dendrites have equal numbers of plus- and minus-end-out microtubules. To determine whether microtubule orientation is a conserved feature of axons and dendrites, we analyzed microtubule orientation in invertebrate neurons. Using microtubule plus end dynamics, we mapped microtubule orientation in Drosophila sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. As expec...

  5. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  6. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-05-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity.

  7. Emerging microtubule targets in glioma therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Reginato, M.J.; Baas, P.W.; D'Agostino, L.; Legido, A.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Dráber, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 49-72. ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050; GA MZd NT14467 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR M200521203PIPP; NIH(US) R01 NS028785; Philadelphia Health Education Corporation (PHEC)–St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children Reunified Endowment (C.D.K.)(US) 323256 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : glioma tumorigenesis * glioblastoma * tubulin * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.232, year: 2014

  8. Pattern formation of cortical microtubules and cellulose microfibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we study the roles of microtubules at the plasma membrane and the cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall and how they are organized. This topic is introduces in chapter 1. In chapter 2 we study the formation of the transverse cortical microtubule array that is characteristic for elon

  9. Dynamic microtubules regulate dendritic spine morphology and synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jaworski; L.C. Kapitein; S. Montenegro Gouveia; B.R. Dortland; P.S. Wulf; I. Grigoriev; P. Camera; S.A. Spangler; P. Di Stefano; J. Demmers; H. Krugers; P. Defilippi; A. Akhmanova; C.C. Hoogenraad

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic input, and their morphological changes have been linked to learning and memory processes. Here, we report that growing microtubule plus ends decorated by the microtubule tip-tracking protein EB3 enter spines and can modulate spine morpholog

  10. Leading at the Front: How EB Proteins Regulate Microtubule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Taviare

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are the most rigid of the cytoskeletal filaments, they provide the cell's scaffolding, form the byways on which motor proteins transport intracellular cargo and reorganize to form the mitotic spindle when the cell needs to divide. These biopolymers are composed of alpha and beta tubulin monomers that create hollow cylindrical nanotubes with an outer diameter of 25 nm and an inner diameter of 17 nm. At steady state concentrations, microtubules undergo a process known as dynamic instability. During dynamic instability the length of individual microtubules is changing as the filament alternates between periods of growth to shrinkage (catastrophe) and shrinkage to growth (rescue). This process can be enhanced or diminished with the addition of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). MAPs are microtubule binding proteins that stabilize, destabilize, or nucleate microtubules. We will discuss the effects of the stabilizing end-binding proteins (EB1, EB2 and EB3), on microtubule dynamics observed in vitro. The EBs are a unique family of MAPs known to tip track and enhance microtubule growth by stabilizing the ends. This is a different mechanism than those employed by structural MAPs such as tau or MAP4.

  11. Structural microtubule cap: Stability, catastrophe, rescue, and third state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Microtubules polymerize from GTP-liganded tubulin dinners, but are essentially made of GDP-liganded tubulin. We investigate the tug-of-war resulting from the fact that GDP-liganded tubulin favors a curved configuration, but is forced to remain in a straight one when part of a microtubule. We poin...

  12. Molecular and Mechanical Causes of Microtubule Catastrophe and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Pavel; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Voevodin, Vladimir; Tikhonravov, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2015-12-15

    Tubulin polymers, microtubules, can switch abruptly from the assembly to shortening. These infrequent transitions, termed "catastrophes", affect numerous cellular processes but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We approached this complex stochastic system using advanced coarse-grained molecular dynamics modeling of tubulin-tubulin interactions. Unlike in previous simplified models of dynamic microtubules, the catastrophes in this model arise owing to fluctuations in the composition and conformation of a growing microtubule tip, most notably in the number of protofilament curls. In our model, dynamic evolution of the stochastic microtubule tip configurations over a long timescale, known as the system's "aging", gives rise to the nonexponential distribution of microtubule lifetimes, consistent with experiment. We show that aging takes place in the absence of visible changes in the microtubule wall or tip, as this complex molecular-mechanical system evolves slowly and asymptotically toward the steady-state level of the catastrophe-promoting configurations. This new, to our knowledge, theoretical basis will assist detailed mechanistic investigations of the mechanisms of action of different microtubule-binding proteins and drugs, thereby enabling accurate control over the microtubule dynamics to treat various pathologies. PMID:26682815

  13. The organization of microtubules and microtubule coils in giant platelet disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    White, J. G.; Sauk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Normal human platelets are characteristically discoid in shape. The lentiform appearance is supported by a circumferential band of microtubules lying just under the cell membrane along its greatest circumference. Some of the cells from patients with giant platelet disorders are also disk-shaped, but the majority of their huge platelets are spherical. In the present study platelets from patients with the Gray platelet syndrome (GPS), May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA), and Epstein's syndrome (ES) were ...

  14. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M A G Piette

    Full Text Available Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  15. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  16. Microtubules in the Cerebral Cortex: Role in Memory and Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Nancy J.

    This chapter raises the question whether synaptic connections in the cerebral cortex are adequate in accounting for higher cognition, especially cognition involving multimodal processing. A recent and novel approach to brain mechanics is outlined, one that involves microtubules and microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2). In addition to effects on the neuronal membrane, neurotransmitters exert actions on microtubules. These neurotransmitter effects alter the MAP2 phosphorylation state and rates of microtubule polymerization and transport. It is argued that these processes are important to the physical basis of memory and consciousness. In support of this argument, MAP2 is degraded with learning in discrete cortical modules. How this relates to synaptic change related to learning is unknown. The specific proposal is advanced that learning alters microtubules in the subsynaptic zone lying beneath the synapse, and that this forms the physical basis of long-term memory storage because microtubule networks determine the synapse strength by directing contacts with actin filaments and transport of synaptic proteins. It is argued that this is more probable than memory-related physical storage in the synapse itself. Comparisons to consciousness are made and it is concluded that there is a link between microtubules, memory and consciousness.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics of C-terminal tails in cellular microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L; Sataric, Bogdan M; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Bugay, Aleksandr N; Sataric, Miljko V

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano-electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C-terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C-terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink-waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process. PMID:27475079

  18. Tau mediates microtubule bundle architectures mimicking fascicles of microtubules found in the axon initial segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Peter J.; Song, Chaeyeon; Deek, Joanna; Miller, Herbert P.; Li, Youli; Choi, Myung Chul; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2016-01-01

    Tau, an intrinsically disordered protein confined to neuronal axons, binds to and regulates microtubule dynamics. Although there have been observations of string-like microtubule fascicles in the axon initial segment (AIS) and hexagonal bundles in neurite-like processes in non-neuronal cells overexpressing Tau, cell-free reconstitutions have not replicated either geometry. Here we map out the energy landscape of Tau-mediated, GTP-dependent ‘active' microtubule bundles at 37 °C, as revealed by synchrotron SAXS and TEM. Widely spaced bundles (wall-to-wall distance Dw–w≈25–41 nm) with hexagonal and string-like symmetry are observed, the latter mimicking bundles found in the AIS. A second energy minimum (Dw–w≈16–23 nm) is revealed under osmotic pressure. The wide spacing results from a balance between repulsive forces, due to Tau's projection domain (PD), and a stabilizing sum of transient sub-kBT cationic/anionic charge–charge attractions mediated by weakly penetrating opposing PDs. This landscape would be significantly affected by charge-altering modifications of Tau associated with neurodegeneration. PMID:27452526

  19. Microtubule Dynamics and Oscillating State for Mitotic Spindle

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid-Shomali, Safura

    2010-01-01

    We present a physical mechanism that can cause the mitotic spindle to oscillate. The driving force for this mechanism emerges from the polymerization of astral microtubules interacting with the cell cortex. We show that Brownian ratchet model for growing microtubules reaching the cell cortex, mediate an effective mass to the spindle body and therefore force it to oscillate. We compare the predictions of this mechanism with the previous mechanisms which were based on the effects of motor proteins. Finally we combine the effects of microtubules polymerization and motor proteins, and present the detailed phase diagram for possible oscillating states.

  20. Lessons from in vitro reconstitution analyses of plant microtubule-associated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Plant microtubules, composed of tubulin GTPase, are irreplaceable cellular components that regulate the directions of cell expansion and cell division, chromosome segregation and cell plate formation. To accomplish these functions, plant cells organize microtubule structures by regulating microtubule dynamics. Each microtubule localizes to the proper position with repeated growth and shortening. Although it is possible to reconstitute microtubule dynamics with pure tubulin solution in vitro, ...

  1. Modeling the Effects of Drug Binding on the Dynamic Instability of Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Hinow, Peter; Lopus, Manu; Jordan, Mary Ann; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2010-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin. Both experimentally and theoretically we study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. We find that to be an effective suppressor of microtubule dynamics a drug must primarily suppress the loss of GDP tubulin from the microtubule tip.

  2. A Metastable Intermediate State of Microtubule Dynamic Instability That Differs Significantly between Plus and Minus Ends

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, P.T.; Walker, R A; Salmon, E. D.

    1997-01-01

    The current two-state GTP cap model of microtubule dynamic instability proposes that a terminal crown of GTP-tubulin stabilizes the microtubule lattice and promotes elongation while loss of this GTP-tubulin cap converts the microtubule end to shortening. However, when this model was directly tested by using a UV microbeam to sever axoneme-nucleated microtubules and thereby remove the microtubule's GTP cap, severed plus ends rapidly shortened, but severed minus ends immediately resumed elongat...

  3. Quantification of asymmetric microtubule nucleation at sub-cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Cell polarization is important for multiple physiological processes. In polarized cells, microtubules (MTs) are organized into a spatially polarized array. Generally, in non-differentiated cells, it is assumed that MTs are symmetrically nucleated exclusively from centrosome (microtubule organizing center, MTOC) and then reorganized into the asymmetric array. We have recently identified the Golgi complex as an additional MTOC that asymmetrically nucleates MTs toward one side of the cell. Methods used for alternative MTOC identification include microtubule re-growth after complete drug-induced depolymerization and tracking of growing microtubules using fluorescence labeled MT +TIP binding proteins in living cells. These approaches can be used for quantification of MT nucleation sites at diverse sub-cellular structures. PMID:21773933

  4. Mechanical Models of Microtubule Bundle Collapse in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendek, Austin; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid-beta aggregates initiate Alzheimer's disease, and downstream trigger degradation of tau proteins that act as microtubule bundle stabilizers and mechanical spacers. Currently it is unclear which of tau cutting by proteases, tau phosphorylation, or tau aggregation are responsible for cytoskeleton degradation., We construct a percolation simulation of the microtubule bundle using a molecular spring model for the taus and including depletion force attraction between microtubules and membrane/actin cytoskeletal surface tension. The simulation uses a fictive molecular dynamics to model the motion of the individual microtubules within the bundle as a result of random tau removal, and calculates the elastic modulus of the bundle as the tau concentration falls. We link the tau removal steps to kinetic tau steps in various models of tau degradation. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624

  5. Practically Coordinating

    OpenAIRE

    Durfee, Edmund H.

    1999-01-01

    To coordinate, intelligent agents might need to know something about themselves, about each other, about how others view themselves and others, about how others think others view themselves and others, and so on. Taken to an extreme, the amount of knowledge an agent might possess to coordinate its interactions with others might outstrip the agent's limited reasoning capacity (its available time, memory, and so on). Much of the work in studying and building multiagent systems has thus been dev...

  6. Kinks and bell-type solitons in microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravković, Slobodan; Gligorić, Goran

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we study the nonlinear dynamics of microtubules relying on the known u-model. As a mathematical procedure, we use the simplest equation method. We recover some solutions obtained earlier using less general methods. These are kink solitons. In addition, we show that the solution of the crucial differential equation, describing nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, can be a bell-type soliton. The discovery of this new solution is supported by numerical analysis. PMID:27368766

  7. Quantification of asymmetric microtubule nucleation at sub-cellular structures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization is important for multiple physiological processes. In polarized cells, microtubules (MTs) are organized into a spatially polarized array. Generally, in non-differentiated cells, it is assumed that MTs are symmetrically nucleated exclusively from centrosome (microtubule organizing center, MTOC) and then reorganized into the asymmetric array. We have recently identified the Golgi complex as an additional MTOC that asymmetrically nucleates MTs toward one side of the cell. Metho...

  8. Kinks and bell-type solitons in microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravković, Slobodan; Gligorić, Goran

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we study the nonlinear dynamics of microtubules relying on the known u-model. As a mathematical procedure, we use the simplest equation method. We recover some solutions obtained earlier using less general methods. These are kink solitons. In addition, we show that the solution of the crucial differential equation, describing nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, can be a bell-type soliton. The discovery of this new solution is supported by numerical analysis.

  9. Microtubule as a Transmission Line for Ionic Currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ILI(C) D.I.; SATARI(C) M.V.; RALEVI(C) N.

    2009-01-01

    We establish a new model for ionic waves along microtubules based on polyelectrolyte features of cylindrical biopolymers. The nonlinear transmission line described by a nonlinear differential equation is obtained with stable kink solution pertinent to the shape of the front of accompanying potential. The localized ionic wave could be used to explain the behavior of microtubules as biomolecular transistors capable of amplifying electrical information in neurons.

  10. Axonal tubulin and axonal microtubules: biochemical evidence for cold stability

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Nerve extracts containing tubulin labeled by axonal transport were analyzed by electrophoresis and differential extraction. We found that a substantial fraction of the tubulin in the axons of the retinal ganglion cell of guinea pigs is not solubilized by conventional methods for preparation of microtubules from whole brain. In two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis this cold-insoluble tubulin was biochemically distinct from tubulin obtained from whole brain microtubules prepared b...

  11. Ibuprofen regulation of microtubule dynamics in cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymut, Sharon M; Kampman, Claire M; Corey, Deborah A; Endres, Tori; Cotton, Calvin U; Kelley, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    High-dose ibuprofen, an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), has been shown to preserve lung function in a pediatric population. Despite its efficacy, few patients receive ibuprofen treatment due to potential renal and gastrointestinal toxicity. The mechanism of ibuprofen efficacy is also unclear. We have previously demonstrated that CF microtubules are slower to reform after depolymerization compared with respective wild-type controls. Slower microtubule dynamics in CF cells are responsible for impaired intracellular transport and are related to inflammatory signaling. Here, it is identified that high-dose ibuprofen treatment in both CF cell models and primary CF nasal epithelial cells restores microtubule reformation rates to wild-type levels, as well as induce extension of microtubules to the cell periphery. Ibuprofen treatment also restores microtubule-dependent intracellular transport monitored by measuring intracellular cholesterol transport. These effects are specific to ibuprofen as other cyclooxygenase inhibitors have no effect on these measures. Effects of ibuprofen are mimicked by stimulation of AMPK and blocked by the AMPK inhibitor compound C. We conclude that high-dose ibuprofen treatment enhances microtubule formation in CF cells likely through an AMPK-related pathway. These findings define a potential mechanism to explain the efficacy of ibuprofen therapy in CF. PMID:27317686

  12. Equilibria of idealized confined astral microtubules and coupled spindle poles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V Maly

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle through the interaction of astral microtubules with the cell boundary often determines whether the cell division will be symmetric or asymmetric. This process plays a crucial role in development. In this paper, a numerical model is presented that deals with the force exerted on the spindle by astral microtubules that are bent by virtue of their confinement within the cell boundary. It is found that depending on parameters, the symmetric position of the spindle can be stable or unstable. Asymmetric stable equilibria also exist, and two or more stable positions can exist simultaneously. The theory poses new types of questions for experimental research. Regarding the cases of symmetric spindle positioning, it is necessary to ask whether the microtubule parameters are controlled by the cell so that the bending mechanics favors symmetry. If they are not, then it is necessary to ask what forces external to the microtubule cytoskeleton counteract the bending effects sufficiently to actively establish symmetry. Conversely, regarding the cases with asymmetry, it is now necessary to investigate whether the cell controls the microtubule parameters so that the bending favors asymmetry apart from any forces that are external to the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  13. A coarse-grained model of microtubule self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Chola; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Microtubules play critical roles in cell structures and functions. They also serve as a model system to stimulate the next-generation smart, dynamic materials. A deep understanding of their self-assembly process and biomechanical properties will not only help elucidate how microtubules perform biological functions, but also lead to exciting insight on how microtubule dynamics can be altered or even controlled for specific purposes such as suppressing the division of cancer cells. Combining all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the essential dynamics coarse-graining method, we construct a coarse-grained (CG) model of the tubulin protein, which is the building block of microtubules. In the CG model a tubulin dimer is represented as an elastic network of CG sites, the locations of which are determined by examining the protein dynamics of the tubulin and identifying the essential dynamic domains. Atomistic MD modeling is employed to directly compute the tubulin bond energies in the surface lattice of a microtubule, which are used to parameterize the interactions between CG building blocks. The CG model is then used to study the self-assembly pathways, kinetics, dynamics, and nanomechanics of microtubules.

  14. Microtubule-Driven Multimerization Recruits ase1p onto Overlapping Microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitein, L. C.; Janson, M.E.; Wildenberg, van den, F.A.J.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Peterman, E.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) crosslinking proteins of the ase1p/PRC1/Map65 family play a major role in the construction of MT networks such as the mitotic spindle. Most homologs in this family have been shown to localize with a remarkable specificity to sets of MTs that overlap with an antiparallel relative orientation []. Regulatory proteins bind to ase1p/PRC1/Map65 and appear to use the localization to set up precise spatial signals []. Here, we present evidence for a mechanism of localized protein mul...

  15. Electric field generated by longitudinal axial microtubule vibration modes with high spatial resolution microtubule model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifra, Michal; Havelka, D.; Deriu, M.A.

    Vol. 329. Bristol: IOP, 2011 - (Cifra, M.; Pokorny, J.; Kučera, O.), 012013 ISSN 1742-6588. [9th International Frohlich's Symposium on Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells - Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics. Praha (CZ), 01.07.2011-03.07.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Anisotropic elastic * Biological self- organization * Cellular structure Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. The Katanin Microtubule Severing Protein in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Katanin is a heterodimeric microtubule (MT) severing protein that uses energy from ATP hydrolysis to generate internal breaks along MTs. Katanin p60, one of the two subunits, possesses ATPase and MT-bindinglsevering activities, and the p80 subunit is responsible for targeting of katanin to certain subcellular locations. In animals, katanin plays an important role in the release of MTs from their nucleation sites in the centrosome. It is also involved in severing MTs into smaller fragments which can serve as templates for further polymerization to increase MT number during meiotic and mitotic spindle assembly. Katanin homologs are present in a wide variety of plant species. The Arabidopsis katanin homolog has been shown to possess ATP-dependent MT severing activity in vitro and exhibit a punctate localization pattern at the cell cortex and the perinuclear region. Disruption of katanin functions by genetic mutations causes a delay in the disappearance of the perinuclear MT array and results in an aberrant organization of cortical MTs in elongating cells. Consequently, katanin mutations lead to defects in cell elongation, cellulose microfibril deposition, and hormonal responses. Studies of katanin in plants provide new insights into our understanding of its roles in cellular functions.

  17. In vitro assembly of plant tubulin in the absence of microtubule-stabilizing reagents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The assembly of microtubules is essential for physiological functions of microtubules. Addition of microtubule-stabilizing reagents or microtubule "seeds" is usually necessary for plant tubulin assembly in vitro, which hinders the investigation of plant microtubule dynamics. In the present note, highly purified plant tubulins have been obtained from lily pollen, a non-microtubule-stabilizing reagent or microtubule "seed" system for plant tubulin assembly has been established and the analysis of plant tubulin assembly performed. Experiment results showed that purified tubulin polymerized in vitro, and a typical microtubule structure was observed with electron microscopy. The kinetics curve of tubulin assembly exhibited typical "parabola". The presence of taxol significantly altered the character of plant tubulin assembly, including that abnormal microtubules were assembled and the critical concentration for plant tubulin assembly was decreased exceedingly from 3 mg/mL in the absence of taxol to 0.043 mg/mL in the presence of taxol.

  18. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can exceed the axial energy

  19. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can

  20. Microtubules Are Essential for Guard-Cell Function in Vicia and Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Eisinger; David Ehrhardt; Winslow Briggs

    2012-01-01

    Radially arranged cortical microtubules are a prominent feature of guard cells.Guard cells expressing GFPtubulin showed consistent changes in the appearance of microtubules when stomata opened or closed.Guard cells showed fewer microtubule structures as stomata closed,whether induced by transfer to darkness,ABA,hydrogen peroxide,or sodium hydrogen carbonate.Guard cells kept in the dark (closed stomata) showed increases in microtubule structures and stomatal aperture on light treatment.GFP-EB1,marking microtubule growing plus ends,showed no change in number of plus ends or velocity of assembly on stomatal closure.Since the number of growing plus ends and the rate of plus-end growth did not change when microtubule structure numbers declined,microtubule instability and/or rearrangement must be responsible for the apparent loss of microtubules.Guard cells with closed stomata showed more cytosolic GFP-fluorescence than those with open stomata as cortical microtubules became disassembled,although with a large net loss in total fluorescence.Microtubule-targeted drugs blocked guard-cell function in Vicia and Arabidopsis.Oryzalin disrupted guard-cell microtubules and prevented stomatal opening and taxol stabilized guard-cell microtubules and delayed stomatal closure.Gas exchange measurements indicated that the transgenes for fluorescent-labeled proteins did not disrupt normal stomatal function.These dynamic changes in guard-cell microtubules combined with our inhibitor studies provide evidence for an active role of microtubules in guard-cell function.

  1. Role of microtubules in the contractile dysfunction of hypertrophied myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Ishiguro, Y.; Conrad, C. H.; Buckley, J. M.; Morgan, J. P.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether the ameliorative effects of microtubule depolymerization on cellular contractile dysfunction in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy apply at the tissue level. BACKGROUND: A selective and persistent increase in microtubule density causes decreased contractile function of cardiocytes from cats with hypertrophy produced by chronic right ventricular (RV) pressure overloading. Microtubule depolymerization by colchicine normalizes contractility in these isolated cardiocytes. However, whether these changes in cellular function might contribute to changes in function at the more highly integrated and complex cardiac tissue level was unknown. METHODS: Accordingly, RV papillary muscles were isolated from 25 cats with RV pressure overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) for 4 weeks and 25 control cats. Contractile state was measured using physiologically sequenced contractions before and 90 min after treatment with 10(-5) mol/liter colchicine. RESULTS: The PAB significantly increased RV systolic pressure and the RV weight/body weight ratio in PAB; it significantly decreased developed tension from 59+/-3 mN/mm2 in control to 25+/-4 mN/mm2 in PAB, shortening extent from 0.21+/-0.01 muscle lengths (ML) in control to 0.12+/-0.01 ML in PAB, and shortening rate from 1.12+/-0.07 ML/s in control to 0.55+/-0.03 ML/s in PAB. Indirect immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that PAB muscles had a selective increase in microtubule density and that colchicine caused complete microtubule depolymerization in both control and PAB papillary muscles. Microtubule depolymerization normalized myocardial contractility in papillary muscles of PAB cats but did not alter contractility in control muscles. CONCLUSIONS: Excess microtubule density, therefore, is equally important to both cellular and to myocardial contractile dysfunction caused by chronic, severe pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy.

  2. Integrins Regulate Apical Constriction via Microtubule Stabilization in the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaiwan M. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During morphogenesis, extracellular signals trigger actomyosin contractility in subpopulations of cells to coordinate changes in cell shape. To illuminate the link between signaling-mediated tissue patterning and cytoskeletal remodeling, we study the progression of the morphogenetic furrow (MF, the wave of apical constriction that traverses the Drosophila eye imaginal disc preceding photoreceptor neurogenesis. Apical constriction depends on actomyosin contractility downstream of the Hedgehog (Hh and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways. We identify a role for integrin adhesion receptors in MF progression. We show that Hh and BMP regulate integrin expression, the loss of which disrupts apical constriction and slows furrow progression; conversely, elevated integrins accelerate furrow progression. We present evidence that integrins regulate MF progression by promoting microtubule stabilization, since reducing microtubule stability rescues integrin-mediated furrow acceleration. Thus, integrins act as a genetic link between tissue-level signaling events and morphological change at the cellular level, leading to morphogenesis and neurogenesis in the eye.

  3. PDK1-Akt pathway regulates radial neuronal migration and microtubules in the developing mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yasuhiro; Higuchi, Maiko; Oishi, Koji; Kishi, Yusuke; Okazaki, Tomohiko; Sakai, Hiroshi; Miyata, Takaki; Nakajima, Kazunori; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2016-05-24

    Neurons migrate a long radial distance by a process known as locomotion in the developing mammalian neocortex. During locomotion, immature neurons undergo saltatory movement along radial glia fibers. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the speed of locomotion are largely unknown. We now show that the serine/threonine kinase Akt and its activator phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) regulate the speed of locomotion of mouse neocortical neurons through the cortical plate. Inactivation of the PDK1-Akt pathway impaired the coordinated movement of the nucleus and centrosome, a microtubule-dependent process, during neuronal migration. Moreover, the PDK1-Akt pathway was found to control microtubules, likely by regulating the binding of accessory proteins including the dynactin subunit p150(glued) Consistent with this notion, we found that PDK1 regulates the expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain and light intermediate chain at a posttranscriptional level in the developing neocortex. Our results thus reveal an essential role for the PDK1-Akt pathway in the regulation of a key step of neuronal migration. PMID:27170189

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Tau-Microtubule Interaction Using FRET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle L. Di Maïo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the microtubule associated protein, tau and the microtubules is investigated. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay was used to determine the distance separating tau to the microtubule wall, as well as the binding parameters of the interaction. By using microtubules stabilized with Flutax-2 as donor and tau labeled with rhodamine as acceptor, a donor-to-acceptor distance of 54 ± 1 Å was found. A molecular model is proposed in which Flutax-2 is directly accessible to tau-rhodamine molecules for energy transfer. By titration, we calculated the stoichiometric dissociation constant to be equal to 1.0 ± 0.5 µM. The influence of the C-terminal tails of αβ-tubulin on the tau-microtubule interaction is presented once a procedure to form homogeneous solution of cleaved tubulin has been determined. The results indicate that the C-terminal tails of α- and β-tubulin by electrostatic effects and of recruitment seem to be involved in the binding mechanism of tau.

  5. Spatial organization of the Ran pathway by microtubules in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Doogie; Yu, Che-Hang; Needleman, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Concentration gradients of soluble proteins are believed to be responsible for control of morphogenesis of subcellular systems, but the mechanisms that generate the spatial organization of these subcellular gradients remain poorly understood. Here, we use a newly developed multipoint fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy technique to study the ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) pathway, which forms soluble gradients around chromosomes in mitosis and is thought to spatially regulate microtubule behaviors during spindle assembly. We found that the distribution of components of the Ran pathway that influence microtubule behaviors is determined by their interactions with microtubules, resulting in microtubule nucleators being localized by the microtubules whose formation they stimulate. Modeling and perturbation experiments show that this feedback makes the length of the spindle insensitive to the length scale of the Ran gradient, allows the spindle to assemble outside the peak of the Ran gradient, and explains the scaling of the spindle with cell size. Such feedback between soluble signaling pathways and the mechanics of the cytoskeleton may be a general feature of subcellular organization. PMID:27439876

  6. Highly Transient Molecular Interactions Underlie the Stability of Kinetochore–Microtubule Attachment During Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis is mediated by spindle microtubules that attach to chromosomal kinetochores with strong yet labile links. The exact molecular composition of the kinetochore–microtubule interface is not known but microtubules are thought to bind to kinetochores via the specialized microtubule-binding sites, which contain multiple microtubule-binding proteins. During prometaphase the lifetime of microtubule attachments is short but in metaphase it increases 3-fold, presumably owing to dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding proteins that increases their affinity. Here, we use mathematical modeling to examine in quantitative and systematic manner the general relationships between the molecular properties of microtubule-binding proteins and the resulting stability of microtubule attachment to the protein-containing kinetochore site. We show that when the protein connections are stochastic, the physiological rate of microtubule turnover is achieved only if these molecular interactions are very transient, each lasting fraction of a second. This “microscopic” time is almost four orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time of kinetochore–microtubule attachment. Cooperativity of the microtubule-binding events further increases the disparity of these time scales. Furthermore, for all values of kinetic parameters the microtubule stability is very sensitive to the minor changes in the molecular constants. Such sensitivity of the lifetime of microtubule attachment to the kinetics and cooperativity of molecular interactions at the microtubule-binding site may hinder the accurate regulation of kinetochore–microtubule stability during mitotic progression, and it necessitates detailed experimental examination of the microtubule-binding properties of kinetochore-localized proteins. PMID:24376473

  7. Highly Transient Molecular Interactions Underlie the Stability of Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment During Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2013-12-13

    Chromosome segregation during mitosis is mediated by spindle microtubules that attach to chromosomal kinetochores with strong yet labile links. The exact molecular composition of the kinetochore-microtubule interface is not known but microtubules are thought to bind to kinetochores via the specialized microtubule-binding sites, which contain multiple microtubule-binding proteins. During prometaphase the lifetime of microtubule attachments is short but in metaphase it increases 3-fold, presumably owing to dephosphorylation of the microtubule-binding proteins that increases their affinity. Here, we use mathematical modeling to examine in quantitative and systematic manner the general relationships between the molecular properties of microtubule-binding proteins and the resulting stability of microtubule attachment to the protein-containing kinetochore site. We show that when the protein connections are stochastic, the physiological rate of microtubule turnover is achieved only if these molecular interactions are very transient, each lasting fraction of a second. This "microscopic" time is almost four orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time of kinetochore-microtubule attachment. Cooperativity of the microtubule-binding events further increases the disparity of these time scales. Furthermore, for all values of kinetic parameters the microtubule stability is very sensitive to the minor changes in the molecular constants. Such sensitivity of the lifetime of microtubule attachment to the kinetics and cooperativity of molecular interactions at the microtubule-binding site may hinder the accurate regulation of kinetochore-microtubule stability during mitotic progression, and it necessitates detailed experimental examination of the microtubule-binding properties of kinetochore-localized proteins. PMID:24376473

  8. Single molecule imaging reveals differences in microtubule track selection between Kinesin motors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawen Cai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells generate diverse microtubule populations by polymerization of a common alpha/beta-tubulin building block. How microtubule associated proteins translate microtubule heterogeneity into specific cellular functions is not clear. We evaluated the ability of kinesin motors involved in vesicle transport to read microtubule heterogeneity by using single molecule imaging in live cells. We show that individual Kinesin-1 motors move preferentially on a subset of microtubules in COS cells, identified as the stable microtubules marked by post-translational modifications. In contrast, individual Kinesin-2 (KIF17 and Kinesin-3 (KIF1A motors do not select subsets of microtubules. Surprisingly, KIF17 and KIF1A motors that overtake the plus ends of growing microtubules do not fall off but rather track with the growing tip. Selection of microtubule tracks restricts Kinesin-1 transport of VSVG vesicles to stable microtubules in COS cells whereas KIF17 transport of Kv1.5 vesicles is not restricted to specific microtubules in HL-1 myocytes. These results indicate that kinesin families can be distinguished by their ability to recognize microtubule heterogeneity. Furthermore, this property enables kinesin motors to segregate membrane trafficking events between stable and dynamic microtubule populations.

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  10. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  11. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Hellal (Farida); A. Hurtado (Andres); J. Ruschel (Jörg); K.C. Flynn (Kevin); C.J. Laskowski (Claudia); M. Umlauf (Martina); L.C. Kapitein (Lukas); D. Strikis (Dinara); V. Lemmon (Vance); J. Bixby (John); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); F. Bradke (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic scarring and poor intrinsic axon growth capacity constitute major obstacles for spinal cord repair. These processes are tightly regulated by microtubule dynamics. Here, moderate microtubule stabilization decreased scar formation after spinal cord injury in rodents through va

  12. Contraction due to microtubule disruption is associated with increased phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodney, M S; Elson, E L

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules have been proposed to function as rigid struts which oppose cellular contraction. Consistent with this hypothesis, microtubule disruption strengthens the contractile force exerted by many cell types. We have investigated alternative explanation for the mechanical effects of microtubule disruption: that microtubules modulate the mechanochemical activity of myosin by influencing phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (LC20). We measured the force produced by a populat...

  13. Dynamic organization of microtubules and microtubule-organizing centers during the sexual phase of a parasitic protozoan, Lecudina tuzetae (Gregarine, Apicomplexa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Ryoko; Besse, Colette; Gèze, Marc; Omoto, Charlotte K; Schrével, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    Lecudina tuzetae is a parasitic protozoan (Gregarine, Apicomplexa) living in the intestine of a marine polychaete annelid, Nereis diversicolor. Using electron and fluorescence microscopy, we have characterized the dynamic changes in microtubule organization during the sexual phase of the life cycle. The gametocyst excreted from the host worm into seawater consists of two (one male and one female) gamonts in which cortical microtubule arrays are discernible. Each gamont undergoes multiple nuclear divisions without cytokinesis, resulting in the formation of large multinucleate haploid cells. After cellularization, approximately 1000 individual gametes are produced from each gamont within 24 h. Female gametes are spherical and contain interphase cytoplasmic microtubule arrays emanating from a gamma-tubulin-containing site. In male gametes, both interphase microtubules and a flagellum with "6 + 0" axonemal microtubules extend from the same microtubule-organizing site. At the beginning of spore formation, each zygote secretes a wall to form a sporocyst. Following meiotic and mitotic divisions, each sporocyst gives rise to eight haploid cells that ultimately differentiate into sporozoites. The ovoid shaped sporocyst is asymmetric and forms at least two distinctive microtubule arrays: spindle microtubules and microtubule bundles originating from the protruding apical end corresponding to the dehiscence pole of the sporocyst. Because antibodies raised against mammalian centrosome components, such as gamma-tubulin, pericentrin, Cep135, and mitosis-specific phosphoproteins, react strongly with the microtubule-nucleating sites of Lecudina, this protozoan is likely to share common centrosomal antigens with higher eukaryotes. PMID:16240430

  14. Phospholipase D activation correlates with microtubule reorganization in living plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.B. Dhonukshe; A.M. Laxalt; J. Goedhart; Th.W.J. Gadella; T. Munnik

    2003-01-01

    A phospholipase D (PLD) was shown recently to decorate microtubules in plant cells. Therefore, we used tobacco BY-2 cells expressing the microtubule reporter GFP-MAP4 to test whether PLD activation affects the organization of plant microtubules. Within 30 min of adding n-butanol, a potent activator

  15. Coordinated unbundling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Zabala-Iturriagagoitia, Jon Mikel

    2013-01-01

    not focused on the role this policy instrument can play in the promotion of (knowledge-intensive) entrepreneurship. This paper investigates this link in more detail and introduces the concept of coordinated unbundling as a strategy that can facilitate this purpose. We also present a framework on how......Public procurement for innovation is a matter of using public demand to trigger innovation. Empirical studies have demonstrated that demand-based policy instruments can be considered to be a powerful tool in stimulating innovative processes among existing firms; however, the existing literature has...

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  17. How biological microtubules may avoid decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Entangled superpositions persisting for hundreds of milliseconds in protein assemblies such as microtubules (MTs) are proposed in biological functions, e.g. quantum computation relevant to consciousness in the Penrose-Hameroff 'Orch OR' model. Cylindrical polymers of the protein tubulin, MTs organize cell activities. The obvious question is how biological quantum states could avoid decoherence, e.g. in the brain at 37.6 degrees centigrade. Screening/sheelding: tubulin protein states/functions are governed by van der Waals London forces, quantum interactions among clouds of delocalizable electrons in nonpolar 'hydrophobic' intra-protein pockets screened from external van der Waals thermal interactions. Such pockets include amino acid resonance structures benzene and indole rings. (Anesthetic gases erase consciousness solely by interfering with London forces in hydrophobic pockets in various brain proteins). Hence tubulin states may act as superpositioned qubits also shielded at the MT level by counter-ion Debye plasma layers (due to charged C-termini tails on tubulin) and by water-ordering actin gels which embed MTs in a quasi-solid. Biological systems may also exploit thermodynamic gradients to give extremely low effective temperatures. Decoherence free subspaces: paradoxically, a system coupled strongly to its environment through certain degrees of freedom can effectively 'freeze' other degrees of freedom (quantum Zeno effect), enabling coherent superpositions and entanglement to persist. Metabolic energy supplied to MT collective dynamics (e.g. Froehlich coherence) can cause Bose-Einstein condenzation and counter decoherence as lasers avoid decoherence at room temperature. Topological quantum error correction: MT lattice structure reveals various helical winding paths through adjacent tubulins which follow the Fibonacci series. Propagation/interactions of quasi-particles along these paths may process information. As proposed by Kitaev (1997), various

  18. Prion protein inhibits microtubule assembly by inducing tubulin oligomerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A growing body of evidence points to an association of prion protein (PrP) with microtubular cytoskeleton. Recently, direct binding of PrP to tubulin has also been found. In this work, using standard light scattering measurements, sedimentation experiments, and electron microscopy, we show for First time the effect of a direct interaction between these proteins on tubulin polymerization. We demonstrate that full-length recombinant PrP induces a rapid increase in the turbidity of tubulin diluted below the critical concentration for microtubule assembly. This effect requires magnesium ions and is weakened by NaCl. Moreover, the PrP-induced light scattering structures of tubulin are cold-stable. In preparations of diluted tubulin incubated with PrP, electron microscopy revealed the presence of ∼50 nm disc-shaped structures not reported so far. These unique tubulin oligomers may form large aggregates. The effect of PrP is more pronounced under the conditions promoting microtubule formation. In these tubulin samples, PrP induces formation of the above oligomers associated with short protofilaments and sheets of protofilaments into aggregates. Noticeably, this is accompanied by a significant reduction of the number and length of microtubules. Hence, we postulate that prion protein may act as an inhibitor of microtubule assembly by inducing formation of stable tubulin oligomers

  19. Dictyoceratidan poisons: Defined mark on microtubule-tubulin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanambal K, Mary Elizabeth; Lakshmipathy, Shailaja Vommi

    2016-03-01

    Tubulin/microtubule assembly and disassembly is characterized as one of the chief processes during cell growth and division. Hence drugs those perturb these process are considered to be effective in killing fast multiplying cancer cells. There is a collection of natural compounds which disturb microtubule/tubulin dis/assemblage and there have been a lot of efforts concerted in the marine realm too, to surveying such killer molecules. Close to half the natural compounds shooting out from marine invertebrates are generally with no traceable definite mechanisms of action though may be tough anti-cancerous hits at nanogram levels, hence fatefully those discoveries conclude therein without a capacity of translation from laboratory to pharmacy. Astoundingly at least 50% of natural compounds which have definite mechanisms of action causing disorders in tubulin/microtubule kinetics have an isolation history from sponges belonging to the Phylum: Porifera. Poriferans have always been a wonder worker to treat cancers with a choice of, yet precise targets on cancerous tissues. There is a specific order: Dictyoceratida within this Phylum which has contributed to yielding at least 50% of effective compounds possessing this unique mechanism of action mentioned above. However, not much notice is driven to Dictyoceratidans alongside the order: Demospongiae thus dictating the need to know its select microtubule/tubulin irritants since the unearthing of avarol in the year 1974 till date. Hence this review selectively pinpoints all the compounds, noteworthy derivatives and analogs stemming from order: Dictyoceratida focusing on the past, present and future. PMID:26874035

  20. Information transport by sine-Gordon solitons in microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Abdalla, Elcio; Melgar, B C; Sedra, M B; Abdalla, Elcio; Maroufi, Bouchra; Melgar, Bertha Cuadros; Sedra, Moulay Brahim

    2001-01-01

    We study the problem of information propagation in brain microtubules. After considering the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a fluid of permanent electric dipoles, the problem reduces to the sine-Gordon wave equation in one space and one time dimensions. The problem of propagation of information is thus set.

  1. Contribution of noncentrosomal microtubules to spindle assembly in Drosophila spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rebollo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous data suggested that anastral spindles, morphologically similar to those found in oocytes, can assemble in a centrosome-independent manner in cells that contain centrosomes. It is assumed that the microtubules that build these acentrosomal spindles originate over the chromatin. However, the actual processes of centrosome-independent microtubule nucleation, polymerisation, and sorting have not been documented in centrosome-containing cells. We have identified two experimental conditions in which centrosomes are kept close to the plasma membrane, away from the nuclear region, throughout meiosis I in Drosophila spermatocytes. Time-lapse confocal microscopy of these cells labelled with fluorescent chimeras reveals centrosome-independent microtubule nucleation, growth, and sorting into a bipolar spindle array over the nuclear region, away from the asters. The onset of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation is significantly delayed with respect to nuclear envelope breakdown and coincides with the end of chromosome condensation. It takes place in foci that are close to the membranes that ensheath the nuclear region, not over the condensed chromosomes. Metaphase plates are formed in these spindles, and, in a fraction of them, some degree of polewards chromosome segregation takes place. In these cells that contain both membrane-bound asters and an anastral spindle, the orientation of the cytokinesis furrow correlates with the position of the asters and is independent of the orientation of the spindle. We conclude that the fenestrated nuclear envelope may significantly contribute to the normal process of spindle assembly in Drosophila spermatocytes. We also conclude that the anastral spindles that we have observed are not likely to provide a robust back-up able to ensure successful cell division. We propose that these anastral microtubule arrays could be a constitutive component of wild-type spindles, normally masked by the abundance of centrosome

  2. Coordination Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Cuff, Paul; Cover, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We develop elements of a theory of cooperation and coordination in networks. Rather than considering a communication network as a means of distributing information, or of reconstructing random processes at remote nodes, we ask what dependence can be established among the nodes given the communication constraints. Specifically, in a network with communication rates between the nodes, we ask what is the set of all achievable joint distributions p(x1, ..., xm) of actions at the nodes on the network. Several networks are solved, including arbitrarily large cascade networks. Distributed cooperation can be the solution to many problems such as distributed games, distributed control, and establishing mutual information bounds on the influence of one part of a physical system on another.

  3. Metallic Glass Wire Based Localization of Kinesin/Microtubule Bio-molecular Motility System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Sikora, A.; Yaginuma, S.; Nakayama, K. S.; Nakazawa, H.; Umetsu, M.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2014-03-01

    We report electrophoretic accumulation of microtubules along metallic glass (Pd42.5Cu30Ni7.5P20) wires free-standing in solution. Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal filaments. Kinesin is a cytoskeletal motor protein. Functions of these bio-molecules are central to various dynamic cellular processes. Functional artificial organization of bio-molecules is a prerequisite for transferring their native functions into device applications. Fluorescence microscopy at the individual-microtubule level reveals microtubules aligning along the wire axis during the electrophoretic migration. Casein-treated electrodes are effective for releasing trapped microtubules upon removal of the external field. Furthermore, we demonstrate gliding motion of microtubules on kinesin-treated metallic glass wires. The reversible manner in the local adsorption of microtubules, the flexibility of wire electrodes, and the compatibility between the wire electrode and the bio-molecules are beneficial for spatio-temporal manipulation of the motility machinery in 3 dimensions.

  4. Cell edges accumulate gamma tubulin complex components and nucleate microtubules following cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ambrose

    Full Text Available Microtubules emanate from distinct organizing centers in fungal and animal cells. In plant cells, by contrast, microtubules initiate from dispersed sites in the cell cortex, where they then self-organize into parallel arrays. Previous ultrastructural evidence suggested that cell edges participate in microtubule nucleation but so far there has been no direct evidence for this. Here we use live imaging to show that components of the gamma tubulin nucleation complex (GCP2 and GCP3 localize at distinct sites along the outer periclinal edge of newly formed crosswalls, and that microtubules grow predominantly away from these edges. These data confirm a role for cell edges in microtubule nucleation, and suggest that an asymmetric distribution of microtubule nucleation factors contributes to cortical microtubule organization in plants, in a manner more similar to other kingdoms than previously thought.

  5. Tubulin bond energies and microtubule biomechanics determined from nanoindentation in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Theisen, Kelly E; Marx, Kenneth A; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral non-covalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physico-chemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force-deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversib...

  6. Dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A central question in plant cell development is how the cell wall determines directional cell expansion and therefore the final shape of the cell. As the major load-bearing component of the cell wall, cellulose microfibrils are laid down transversely to the axis of elongation, thus forming a spring-like structure that reinforces the cell laterally and while favoring longitudinal expansion in most growing cells. Mounting evidence suggests that cortical microtubules organize the deposition of cellulose microfibrils, but the precise molecular mechanisms linking microtubules to cellulose organization have remained unclear until the recent discovery of CSI1, a linker protein between the cortical microtubules and the cellulose biosynthesizing machinery. In this review, we will focus on the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules, in particular, we will discuss microtubule arrangement and cell wall architecture, the linkage between cellulose synthase complexes and microtubules, and the feedback mechanisms between cell wall and microtubules.

  7. Sulfo-SMCC Prevents Annealing of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules In Vitro

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule structure and functions have been widely studied in vitro and in cells. Research has shown that cysteines on tubulin play a crucial role in the polymerization of microtubules. Here, we show that blocking sulfhydryl groups of cysteines in taxol-stabilized polymerized microtubules with a commonly used chemical crosslinker prevents temporal end-to-end annealing of microtubules in vitro. This can dramatically affect the length distribution of the microtubules. The crosslinker sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, sulfo-SMCC, consists of a maleimide and a N-hydroxysuccinimide ester group to bind to sulfhydryl groups and primary amines, respectively. Interestingly, addition of a maleimide dye alone does not show the same prevention of annealing in stabilized microtubules. This study shows that the sulfhydryl groups of cysteines of tubulin that are vital for the polymerization are also important for the subsequent annealing of microtubules.

  8. Modeling the effects of drug binding on the dynamic instability of microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady-state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin in the possible presence of a microtubule-associated drug. As an example of the latter, we both experimentally and theoretically study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. Our model predicts that among the drugs that act locally at the microtubule tip, primary inhibition of the loss of GDP tubulin results in stronger damping of microtubule dynamics than inhibition of GTP tubulin addition. On the other hand, drugs whose action occurs in the interior of the microtubule need to be present in much higher concentrations to have visible effects

  9. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  10. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  11. Alignment between PIN1 polarity and microtubule orientation in the shoot apical meristem reveals a tight coupling between morphogenesis and auxin transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus G Heisler

    Full Text Available Morphogenesis during multicellular development is regulated by intercellular signaling molecules as well as by the mechanical properties of individual cells. In particular, normal patterns of organogenesis in plants require coordination between growth direction and growth magnitude. How this is achieved remains unclear. Here we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin patterning and cellular growth are linked through a correlated pattern of auxin efflux carrier localization and cortical microtubule orientation. Our experiments reveal that both PIN1 localization and microtubule array orientation are likely to respond to a shared upstream regulator that appears to be biomechanical in nature. Lastly, through mathematical modeling we show that such a biophysical coupling could mediate the feedback loop between auxin and its transport that underlies plant phyllotaxis.

  12. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  13. Motor-mediated cortical versus astral microtubule organization in lipid-monolayered droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Hella; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The correct spatial organization of microtubules is of crucial importance for determining the internal architecture of eukaryotic cells. Microtubules are arranged in space by a multitude of biochemical activities and by spatial constraints imposed by the cell boundary. The principles underlying the establishment of distinct intracellular architectures are only poorly understood. Here, we studied the effect of spatial confinement on the self-organization of purified motors and microtubules that are encapsulated in lipid-monolayered droplets in oil, varying in diameter from 5-100 μm, which covers the size range of typical cell bodies. We found that droplet size alone had a major organizing influence. The presence of a microtubule-crosslinking motor protein decreased the number of accessible types of microtubule organizations. Depending on the degree of spatial confinement, the presence of the motor caused either the formation of a cortical array of bent microtubule bundles or the generation of single microtubule asters in the droplets. These are two of the most prominent forms of microtubule arrangements in plant and metazoan cells. Our results provide insights into the combined organizing influence of spatial constraints and cross-linking motor activities determining distinct microtubule architectures in a minimal biomimetic system. In the future, this simple lipid-monolayered droplet system characterized here can be expanded readily to include further biochemical activities or used as the starting point for the investigation of motor-mediated microtubule organization inside liposomes surrounded by a deformable lipid bilayer. PMID:24966327

  14. Inhibition of microtubule dynamics impedes repair of kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury and increases fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Jun; Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Kim, Jee In; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is composed of α-tubulin and β-tubulin heterodimers, and it serves to regulate the shape, motility, and division of a cell. Post-translational modifications including acetylation are closely associated with the functional aspects of the microtubule, involving in a number of pathological diseases. However, the role of microtubule acetylation in acute kidney injury (AKI) and progression of AKI to chronic kidney disease have yet to be understood. In this study, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), a major cause of AKI, resulted in deacetylation of the microtubules with a decrease in α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1 (α-TAT1). Paclitaxel (taxol), an agent that stabilizes microtubules by tubulin acetylation, treatment during the recovery phase following I/R injury inhibited tubular cell proliferation, impaired renal functional recovery, and worsened fibrosis. Taxol induced α-tubulin acetylation and post-I/R cell cycle arrest. Taxol aggregated the microtubule in the cytoplasm, resulting in suppression of microtubule dynamics. Our studies have demonstrated for the first time that I/R induced deacetylation of the microtubules, and that inhibition of microtubule dynamics retarded repair of injured tubular epithelial cells leading to an acceleration of fibrosis. This suggests that microtubule dynamics plays an important role in the processes of repair and fibrosis after AKI. PMID:27270990

  15. Doublecortin Is Excluded from Growing Microtubule Ends and Recognizes the GDP-Microtubule Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; van Haren, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Susana A; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-06-20

    Many microtubule (MT) functions are mediated by a diverse class of proteins (+TIPs) at growing MT plus ends that control intracellular MT interactions and dynamics and depend on end-binding proteins (EBs) [1]. Cryoelectron microscopy has recently identified the EB binding site as the interface of four tubulin dimers that undergoes a conformational change in response to β-tubulin GTP hydrolysis [2, 3]. Doublecortin (DCX), a MT-associated protein (MAP) required for neuronal migration during cortical development [4, 5], binds to the same site as EBs [6], and recent in vitro studies proposed DCX localization to growing MT ends independent of EBs [7]. Because this conflicts with observations in neurons [8, 9] and the molecular function of DCX is not well understood, we revisited intracellular DCX dynamics at low expression levels. Here, we report that DCX is not a +TIP in cells but, on the contrary, is excluded from the EB1 domain. In addition, we find that DCX-MT interactions are highly sensitive to MT geometry. In cells, DCX binding was greatly reduced at MT segments with high local curvature. Remarkably, this geometry-dependent binding to MTs was completely reversed in the presence of taxanes, which reconciles incompatible observations in cells [9] and in vitro [10]. We propose a model explaining DCX specificity for different MT geometries based on structural changes induced by GTP hydrolysis that decreases the spacing between adjacent tubulin dimers [11]. Our data are consistent with a unique mode of MT interaction in which DCX specifically recognizes this compacted GDP-like MT lattice. PMID:27238282

  16. Disruption of microtubules uncouples budding and nuclear division in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Naomi S; Sibley, L David

    2002-03-01

    The tachyzoite stage of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii has two populations of microtubules: spindle microtubules and subpellicular microtubules. To determine how these two microtubule populations are regulated, we investigated microtubule behavior during the cell cycle following treatment with microtubule-disrupting drugs. Previous work had established that the microtubule populations are individually nucleated by two distinct microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs): the apical polar ring for the subpellicular microtubules and spindle pole plaques/centrioles for the spindle microtubules. When replicating tachyzoites were treated with 0.5 microM oryzalin or 1.0 mM colchicine they retained the capacity to form a spindle and undergo nuclear division. Although these parasites could complete budding, they lost the bulk of their subpellicular microtubules and the ability to reinvade host cells. Both nascent spindle and subpellicular microtubules were disrupted in 2.5 microM oryzalin or 5.0 mM colchicine. Under these conditions, parasites grew in size and replicated their genome but were incapable of nuclear division. After removal from 0.5 microM oryzalin, Toxoplasma tachyzoites were able to restore normal subpellicular microtubules and a fully invasive phenotype. When oryzalin was removed from Toxoplasma tachyzoites treated with 2.5 microM drug, the parasites attempted to bud as crescent-shaped tachyzoites. Because the polyploid nuclear mass could not be correctly segregated, many daughter parasites lacked nuclei altogether although budding and scission from the maternal mass was able to be completed. Multiple MTOCs permit Toxoplasma tachyzoites to control nuclear division independently from cell polarity and cytokinesis. This unusual situation grants greater cell cycle flexibility to these parasites but abolishes the checks for coregulation of nuclear division and cytokinesis found in other eukaryotes. PMID:11870220

  17. The Feasibility of Coherent Energy Transfer in Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too warm and wet to support quantum phenomena mainly due to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherence, especially in the dry hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherence and entanglement between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. Amazingly, the tubulin subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be of import for ...

  18. Spatiotemporal control of microtubule nucleation and assembly using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Céline; Mazari, Elsa; Lallet, Sylvie; Le Borgne, Roland; Marchi, Valérie; Gosse, Charlie; Gueroui, Zoher

    2013-03-01

    Decisions on the fate of cells and their functions are dictated by the spatiotemporal dynamics of molecular signalling networks. However, techniques to examine the dynamics of these intracellular processes remain limited. Here, we show that magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with key regulatory proteins can artificially control, in time and space, the Ran/RCC1 signalling pathway that regulates the cell cytoskeleton. In the presence of a magnetic field, RanGTP proteins conjugated to superparamagnetic nanoparticles can induce microtubule fibres to assemble into asymmetric arrays of polarized fibres in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. The orientation of the fibres is dictated by the direction of the magnetic force. When we locally concentrated nanoparticles conjugated with the upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, the assembly of microtubule fibres could be induced over a greater range of distances than RanGTP particles. The method shows how bioactive nanoparticles can be used to engineer signalling networks and spatial self-organization inside a cell environment.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamics of Dipoles in Microtubules: Pseudo-Spin Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Berman, Gennady P; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-01-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the dynamics of the electric field excitations in a microtubule by taking into consideration the realistic cylindrical geometry, dipole-dipole interactions of the tubulin-based protein heterodimers, the radial electric field produced by the solvent, and a possible degeneracy of energy states of individual heterodimers. The consideration is done in the frames of the classical pseudo-spin model. We derive the system of nonlinear dynamical ordinary differential equations of motion for interacting dipoles, and the continuum version of these equations. We obtain the solutions of these equations in the form of snoidal waves, solitons, kinks, and localized spikes. Our results will help to a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. Our considerations are based on classical dynamics. Some speculations on the role of possible quantum effects are also made.

  20. The octarepeat region of hamster PrP (PrP51-91) enhances the formation of microtubule and antagonize Cu~(2+)-induced microtubule-disrupting activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli Li; Chenfang Dong; Song Shi; Guirong Wang; Yuan Li; Xin Wang; Qi Shi; Chan Tian; Ruimin Zhou; Chen Gao; Xiaoping Dong

    2009-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is considered to associate with microtubule and its major component, tubulin. In the present study, octarepeat region of PrP (PrP51-91) was expressed in prokaryotic-expressing system. Using GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation, the mol-ecular interaction between PrP51-91 and tubulin was observed. Our data also demonstrated that PrP51-91 could efficiently stimulate microtubule assembly in vitro, indicating a potential effect of PrP on microtu-bule dynamics. Moreover, PrP51-91 was confirmed to be able to antagonize Cu~(2+)-induced microtubule-disrupt-ing activity in vivo, partially protecting against Cu~(2+) intoxication to culture cells and stabilize cellular micro-tubule structure. The association of the octarepeat region of PrP with tubulin may further provide insight into the biological function of PrP in the neurons.

  1. Electric oscillations generated by collective vibration modes of microtubule

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifra, Michal; Havelka, D.; Kučera, O.

    Vol. 7376. Bellingham : SPIE, 2010 - (Kinnunen, M.; Myllyla, R.), 73760N1-73760N12 ISBN 978-0-8194-7652-4. ISSN 0277-786X. [Conference on Laser Applications in Life Sciences. Oulu (FI), 09.06.2010-11.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/10/P454 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : bioelectric phenomena * cellular biophysics * microtubules Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  2. Golgi as an MTOC: making microtubules for its own good

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    In cells, microtubules (MTs) are nucleated at MT-organizing centers (MTOCs). The centrosome-based MTOCs organize radial MT arrays which are often not optimal for polarized trafficking. A recently discovered subset of non-centrosomal MTs nucleated at the Golgi has proven to be indispensable for the Golgi organization, post-Golgi trafficking and cell polarity. Here, we summarize the history of this discovery, known molecular prerequisites of MT nucleation at the Golgi and unique functions of Go...

  3. Constructing 3D microtubule networks using holographic optical trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, J.; Osunbayo, O.; Vershinin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing abilities to assemble nanoscale structures is a major scientific and engineering challenge. We report a technique which allows precise positioning and manipulation of individual rigid filaments, enabling construction of custom-designed 3D filament networks. This approach uses holographic optical trapping (HOT) for nano-positioning and microtubules (MTs) as network building blocks. MTs are desirable engineering components due to their high aspect ratio, rigidity, and their ability t...

  4. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neurobiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a significant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like structures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 significantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufficient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assembly in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neurological diseases.

  5. Two-state mechanochemical model for microtubule growth

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a two-state mechanochemical model is presented to describe the dynamic properties of microtubule (MT) growth in cells. The MT switches between two states, assembly state and disassembly state. In assembly state, the growth of microtubule includes two processes: GTP-tubulin binding to the tip of protofilament (PF) and conformational change of PF, during which the penultimate GTP is hydrolyzed and the first tubulin unit that curls out the MT surface is rearranged into MT surface using the energy released from GTP hydrolysis. In disassembly state, the shortening of microtubule is also described by two processes, the release of GDP-tibulin from the tip of PF and one new tubulin unit curls out from the MT surface. Switches between these two states, which are usually called rescue and catastrophe, happen stochastically with external force dependent rates. Using this two-state model with parameters obtained by fitting the recent experimental data, detailed properties of MT growth are obtained, we find...

  6. The distribution of microtubules in differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata bréb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermayer, O

    1968-09-01

    As an extension of earlier cytophysiological and morphological studies on differentiating cells of Micrasterias denticulata, a fine structural investigation of glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide fixed material has been made. Special emphasis has been placed on the distribution of cytoplasmic microtubules and on their possible role in the processes of growth and differentiation. Four distinct systems of microtubules were found: (a) a band in the cortical protoplasm of the isthmus region which surrounds the nucleus; (b) several bands in the cortical protoplasm of the old half cells, with rod-like cross bridges between individual microtubules and between the microtubules and the plasmalemma; (c) clusters of microtubules near the posttelophase nucleus, some separated by "intertubular structures" possibly fibrils; and (d) microtubules in the internal and cortical protoplasm of differentiating half cells. PMID:24519210

  7. Regulation of developmental and environmental signaling by interaction between microtubules and membranes in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Wenhua

    2016-02-01

    Cell division and expansion require the ordered arrangement of microtubules, which are subject to spatial and temporal modifications by developmental and environmental factors. Understanding how signals translate to changes in cortical microtubule organization is of fundamental importance. A defining feature of the cortical microtubule array is its association with the plasma membrane; modules of the plasma membrane are thought to play important roles in the mediation of microtubule organization. In this review, we highlight advances in research on the regulation of cortical microtubule organization by membrane-associated and membrane-tethered proteins and lipids in response to phytohormones and stress. The transmembrane kinase receptor Rho-like guanosine triphosphatase, phospholipase D, phosphatidic acid, and phosphoinositides are discussed with a focus on their roles in microtubule organization. PMID:26687389

  8. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  9. Mitosis and microtubule organizational changes in rice root-tip cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUSHIXIONG(SYZEE); CHUNGUILI; CHENGZHU

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of change of the microtubule cytoskeleton of the root-tip cells of rice during mitosis was studied using immunofluorescence technic and confocal laser scanning microscopy. All the major stages of ceil division including preprophase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase were observed. The most significant finding was that in the preprophase cells microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface to the cortex were frequently seen. During development these microtubules became closely associated with the preprophase band and prophase spindie indicating that the microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface, the preprophase band and the prophazc spindle were structurally and functionally closely related to each other. Granule-like anchorage sites for the radiating microtubules at the muclear surface were often seen and the possibility that these gramle-like anchorage sites might represent the microtubule organizing centres was discussed.

  10. Kinesin-1 translocation: Surprising differences between bovine brain and MCF7-derived microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizabadi, Mitra Shojania; Jun, Yonggun

    2014-10-30

    While there have been many single-molecule studies of kinesin-1, most have been done along microtubules purified from bovine or porcine brain, and relatively little is known about how variations in tubulin might alter motor function. Of particular interest is transport along microtubules polymerized from tubulin purified from MCF7 breast cancer cells, both because these cells are a heavily studied model system to help understand breast cancer, and also because the microtubules are already established to have interesting polymerization/stability differences from bovine tubulin, suggesting that perhaps transport along them is also different. Thus, we carried out paired experiments to allow direct comparison of in vitro kinesin-1 translocation along microtubules polymerized from either human breast cancer cells (MCF7) or microtubules from bovine brain. We found surprising differences: on MCF7 microtubules, kinesin-1's processivity is significantly reduced, although its velocity is only slightly altered. PMID:25450690

  11. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  12. Dynamic Behavior of Microtubules during Dynein-dependent Nuclear Migrations of Meiotic Prophase in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Ayumu; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Kojima, Hiroaki; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    During meiotic prophase in fission yeast, the nucleus migrates back and forth between the two ends of the cell, led by the spindle pole body (SPB). This nuclear oscillation is dependent on astral microtubules radiating from the SPB and a microtubule motor, cytoplasmic dynein. Here we have examined the dynamic behavior of astral microtubules labeled with the green fluorescent protein during meiotic prophase with the use of optical sectioning microscopy. During nuclear migrations, the SPB mostl...

  13. Microtubule regulation of corneal fibroblast morphology and mechanical activity in 3-D culture

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Areum; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of microtubules in regulating corneal fibroblast structure and mechanical behavior using static (3-D) and dynamic (4-D) imaging of both cells and their surrounding matrix. Human corneal fibroblasts transfected to express GFP-zyxin (to label focal adhesions) or GFP-tubulin (to label microtubules) were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick type I collagen matrices. After 24 hours, the effects of nocodazole (to depolymerize microtubules),...

  14. Modulating microtubule stability enhances the cytotoxic response of cancer cells to paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lu, Zhen; Goldsmith, Juliet,; Le, Xiao-Feng; Grandjean, Geoffrey; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Broom, Bradley; Bast, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix protein TGFBI enhances the cytotoxic response of cancer cells to paclitaxel by affecting integrin signals that stabilize microtubules. Extending the implications of this knowledge, we tested the more general hypothesis that cancer cell signals which increase microtubule stability before exposure to paclitaxel may increase its ability to stablize microtubules and thereby enhance its cytotoxicity. Toward this end, we performed an siRNA screen to evaluate how genetic dep...

  15. The Microtubule-Associated Protein END BINDING1 Modulates Membrane Trafficking Pathways in Plant Root Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shahidi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    EB1 protein preferentially binds to the fast growing ends of microtubules where it regulates microtubule dynamics. In addition to microtubules, EB1 interacts with several additional proteins, and through these interactions modulates various cellular processes. Arabidopsis thaliana eb1 mutants have roots that exhibit aberrant responses to touch/gravity cues. Columella cells in the centre of the root cap are polarized and play key roles in these responses by functioning as sensors.I examined th...

  16. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: ► We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. ► The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. ► Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. ► The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  17. Measurement of Breaking Force of Fluorescence Labelled Microtubules with Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-Xiang; GUO Hong-Lian; XU Chun-Hua; YUAN Ming; LI Znao-Lin; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Under illumination of excitation light, the force that can make fluorescent dye-labelled microtubules break up is measured by using dual-beam optical tweezers. It is found that this force is about several piconewtons, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than that without fluorescence label. Microtubules can be elongated about 20% and the increase of the tensile force is nonlinear with the microtubule elongation. Some qualitative explanations are given for the mechanisms about the breakup and elongation of microtubules exposed to excitation light.

  18. Astral microtubule pivoting promotes their search for cortical anchor sites during mitosis in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Baumgärtner

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for proper cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mechanisms contribute to spindle positioning. In the Kar9 pathway, astral microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body interact via the linker protein Kar9 with the myosin Myo2, which moves the microtubule along the actin cables towards the neck. In the dynein pathway, astral microtubules off-load dynein onto the cortical anchor protein Num1, which is followed by dynein pulling on the spindle. Yet, the mechanism by which microtubules target cortical anchor sites is unknown. Here we quantify the pivoting motion of astral microtubules around the spindle pole bodies, which occurs during spindle translocation towards the neck and through the neck. We show that this pivoting is largely driven by the Kar9 pathway. The microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body pivot faster than those at the mother-bound spindle pole body. The Kar9 pathway reduces the time needed for an astral microtubule inside the daughter cell to start pulling on the spindle. Thus, we propose a new role for microtubule pivoting: By pivoting around the spindle pole body, microtubules explore the space laterally, which helps them search for cortical anchor sites in the context of spindle positioning in budding yeast.

  19. Combing and self-assembly phenomena in dry films of Taxol-stabilized microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Franck

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMicrotubules are filamentous proteins that act as a substrate for the translocation of motor proteins. As such, they may be envisioned as a scaffold for the self-assembly of functional materials and devices. Physisorption, self-assembly and combing are here investigated as a potential prelude to microtubule-templated self-assembly. Dense films of self-assembled microtubules were successfully produced, as well as patterns of both dendritic and non-dendritic bundles of microtubules. They are presented in the present paper and the mechanism of their formation is discussed.

  20. Phase-change kinetics for a microtubule with two free ends.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, T L

    1985-01-01

    The two-phase macroscopic kinetic model of the end of a microtubule is extended to microtubules in solution, with two free ends. The theoretical treatment of this system is complicated by the possibility of microtubules shortening all the way to disappearance. Another possibility, if a microtubule is shortening from one end only (and has a GTP cap on the other end), is that completed shortening will leave a residual cap from which growth can then take place at both ends. Two approximations ar...

  1. Inhibition of kinesin-5 improves regeneration of injured axons by a novel microtubule-based mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter W. Baas; Andrew J. Matamoros

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules have been identiifed as a powerful target for augmenting regeneration of injured adult axons in the central nervous system. Drugs that stabilize microtubules have shown some promise, but there are concerns that abnormally stabilizing microtubules may have only limited beneifts for regeneration, while at the same time may be detrimental to the normal work that microtubules perform for the axon. Kinesin-5 (also called kif11 or Eg5), a molecular motor protein best known for its crucial role in mitosis, acts as a brake on microtubule movements by other motor proteins in the axon. Drugs that inhibit kinesin-5, originally developed to treat cancer, result in greater mobility of microtubules in the axon and an overall shift in the forces on the microtubule array. As a result, the axon grows faster, retracts less, and more readily enters environments that are inhibitory to axonal regeneration. Thus, drugs that inhibit kinesin-5 offer a novel microtubule-based means to boost axonal regeneration without the concerns that ac-company abnormal stabilization of the microtubule array. Even so, inhibiting kinesin-5 is not without its own caveats, such as potential problems with navigation of the regenerating axon to its target, as well as morphological effects on dendrites that could affect learning and memory if the drugs reach the brain.

  2. Dependency of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) for tubulin stability and assembly; use of estramustine phosphate in the study of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridén, B; Wallin, M

    1991-07-10

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were separated from tubulin with several different methods. The ability of the isolated MAPs to reinduce assembly of phosphocellulose purified tubulin differed markedly between the different methods. MAPs isolated by addition of 0.35 M NaCl to taxol-stabilized microtubules stimulated tubulin assembly most effectively, while addition of 0.6 M NaCl produced MAPs with a substantially lower ability to stimulate tubulin assembly. The second best preparation was achieved with phosphocellulose chromatographic separation of MAPs with 0.6 M NaCl elution. The addition of estramustine phosphate to microtubules reconstituted of MAPs prepared by 0.35 M NaCl or phosphocellulose chromatography, induced less disassembly than for microtubules assembled from unseparated proteins, and was almost without effect on microtubules reconstituted from MAPs prepared by taxol and 0.6 M NaCl. Estramustine phosphate binds to the tubulin binding part of the MAPs, and the results do therefore indicate that the MAPs are altered by the separation methods. Since the MAPs are regarded as highly stable molecules, one probable alteration could be aggregation of the MAPs, as also indicated by the results. The purified tubulin itself seemed not to be affected by the phosphocellulose purification, since the microtubule proteins were unchanged by the low buffer strenght used during the cromatography. However, the assembly competence after a prolonged incubation of the microtubule proteins at 4 degrees C was dependent on intact bindings between the tubulin and MAPs. PMID:1681420

  3. Supracellular microtubule alignments in cell layers associated with the secretion of certain fish scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, P J; Tucker, J B

    1986-01-01

    Intercellularly aligned microtubule arrays are present in cell layers associated with the growth and secretion of scales in the zebra fish Brachydanio rerio and the neon tetra fish Hyphessobrycon innesi. The layers in question are: the osteoblast layer that covers the ossified outer surface of a scale, and the layer of fibroblasts that is situated immediately underneath the inner collagenous surface of a scale's fibrillary plate. In certain osteoblasts, the proximal portions of microtubules (with respect to centrosomes) run closely alongside the anterior margin of each cell where it flanks one of a scale's ridge-shaped circuli. These osteoblasts and microtubule portions are arranged in aligned rows that are parallel to circuli. However, the distal portions of the microtubules curve into an orientation that is approximately at right angles to circuli and they are aligned with each other and similar microtubule portions in adjacent osteoblasts. Such microtubule alignments only occur in osteoblasts that are associated with circuli. In Hyphessobrycon osteoblasts situated elsewhere on a scale's surface, microtubules radiate from cell centres but their distal portions curve into alignment with each other and are oriented alongside cell margins. The proximal portions of fibroblast microtubules radiate from centrally positioned centrosomes but the distal portions curve into alignment with each other and distal microtubule portions in neighbouring fibroblasts. The overall pattern of microtubule alignment is similar to that of collagen fibres, which these fibroblasts are secreting onto the fibrillary plate. The immunofluorescence protocol that was used to demonstrate the microtubule alignments described above did not reveal such alignments in the osteoblast and fibroblast layers associated with scales of the brown trout Salmo trutta fario. These findings are assessed in terms of intra-and inter-cellular control of microtubule alignment, and decentralized reorientation of

  4. Buckling of microtubules: An insight by molecular and continuum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structural mechanics method has been extended to investigate the buckling of microtubules (MTs) with various configurations. The results indicate that for relative short MTs the shear deformation effect, rather than the nonlocal effect, is mainly responsible for the limitation of their widely used Euler beam description and the observed length-dependence of their bending stiffness. In addition, the configuration effect of MTs is also studied and considered as an explanation for the large scattering of the critical buckling force and bending stiffness observed in existing experiments. This configuration effect is also found to mainly originate from the geometry of the MTs and is mainly determined by the protofilament number.

  5. Golgi as an MTOC: making microtubules for its own good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Kaverina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    In cells, microtubules (MTs) are nucleated at MT-organizing centers (MTOCs). The centrosome-based MTOCs organize radial MT arrays which are often not optimal for polarized trafficking. A recently discovered subset of non-centrosomal MTs nucleated at the Golgi has proven to be indispensable for the Golgi organization, post-Golgi trafficking and cell polarity. Here, we summarize the history of this discovery, known molecular prerequisites of MT nucleation at the Golgi and unique functions of Golgi-derived MTs. PMID:23821162

  6. Interaction of microtubules with active principles of Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, G S; Kuchroo, K; Dasgupta, D

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous variety of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) was screened for its antimitotic activity using the microtubule-tubulin system isolated from mammalian tissue. A preliminary phytochemical screening of the whole extracts of the plant was carried out followed by partial purification of the whole extract of X.strumarium. The separated fractions obtained were identified and used for in vitro polymerization studies. The whole as well as partially separated chemical constituents of X. strumarium showed effective inhibition of tubulin polymerization. The results thus suggest that X. strumarium may possess antimitotic components. PMID:12002689

  7. BLOC-1 Brings Together the Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeletons to Generate Recycling Endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delevoye, Cédric; Heiligenstein, Xavier; Ripoll, Léa; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Dennis, Megan K; Linares, Ricardo A; Derman, Laura; Gokhale, Avanti; Morel, Etienne; Faundez, Victor; Marks, Michael S; Raposo, Graça

    2016-01-11

    Recycling endosomes consist of a tubular network that emerges from vacuolar sorting endosomes and diverts cargoes toward the cell surface, the Golgi, or lysosome-related organelles. How recycling tubules are formed remains unknown. We show that recycling endosome biogenesis requires the protein complex BLOC-1. Mutations in BLOC-1 subunits underlie an inherited disorder characterized by albinism, the Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome, and are associated with schizophrenia risk. We show here that BLOC-1 coordinates the kinesin KIF13A-dependent pulling of endosomal tubules along microtubules to the Annexin A2/actin-dependent stabilization and detachment of recycling tubules. These components cooperate to extend, stabilize and form tubular endosomal carriers that function in cargo recycling and in the biogenesis of pigment granules in melanocytic cells. By shaping recycling endosomal tubules, our data reveal that dysfunction of the BLOC-1-KIF13A-Annexin A2 molecular network underlies the pathophysiology of neurological and pigmentary disorders. PMID:26725201

  8. Limitations of Radar Coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Donato; Lusanna, Luca; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a radar coordinate system about the world line of an observer is discussed. Radar coordinates for a hyperbolic observer as well as a uniformly rotating observer are described in detail. The utility of the notion of radar distance and the admissibility of radar coordinates are investigated. Our results provide a critical assessment of the physical significance of radar coordinates.

  9. Feeding cells induced by phytoparasitic nematodes require γ-tubulin ring complex for microtubule reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Youssef Banora

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reorganization of the microtubule network is important for the fast isodiametric expansion of giant-feeding cells induced by root-knot nematodes. The efficiency of microtubule reorganization depends on the nucleation of new microtubules, their elongation rate and activity of microtubule severing factors. New microtubules in plants are nucleated by cytoplasmic or microtubule-bound γ-tubulin ring complexes. Here we investigate the requirement of γ-tubulin complexes for giant feeding cells development using the interaction between Arabidopsis and Meloidogyne spp. as a model system. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrate that γ-tubulin localizes to both cortical cytoplasm and mitotic microtubule arrays of the giant cells where it can associate with microtubules. The transcripts of two Arabidopsis γ-tubulin (TUBG1 and TUBG2 and two γ-tubulin complex proteins genes (GCP3 and GCP4 are upregulated in galls. Electron microscopy demonstrates association of GCP3 and γ-tubulin as part of a complex in the cytoplasm of giant cells. Knockout of either or both γ-tubulin genes results in the gene dose-dependent alteration of the morphology of feeding site and failure of nematode life cycle completion. We conclude that the γ-tubulin complex is essential for the control of microtubular network remodelling in the course of initiation and development of giant-feeding cells, and for the successful reproduction of nematodes in their plant hosts.

  10. Important factors determining the nanoscale tracking precision of dynamic microtubule ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, G; Gustafsson, N; Cade, N I; Maurer, S P; Griffin, L D; Surrey, T

    2016-01-01

    Tracking dynamic microtubule ends in fluorescence microscopy movies provides insight into the statistical properties of microtubule dynamics and is vital for further analysis that requires knowledge of the trajectories of the microtubule ends. Here we analyse the performance of a previously developed automated microtubule end tracking routine; this has been optimized for comparatively low signal-to-noise image sequences that are characteristic of microscopy movies of dynamic microtubules growing in vitro. Sequences of simulated microtubule images were generated assuming a variety of different experimental conditions. The simulated movies were then tracked and the tracking errors were characterized. We found that the growth characteristics of the microtubules within realistic ranges had a negligible effect on the tracking precision. The fluorophore labelling density, the pixel size of the images, and the exposure times were found to be important parameters limiting the tracking precision which could be explained using concepts of single molecule localization microscopy. The signal-to-noise ratio was found to be a good single predictor of the tracking precision: typical experimental signal-to-noise ratios lead to tracking precisions in the range of tens of nanometres, making the tracking program described here a useful tool for dynamic microtubule end tracking with close to molecular precision. PMID:26444439

  11. Dietary flavonoid fisetin binds to β-tubulin and disrupts microtubule dynamics in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Sechi, Mario; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-10-28

    Microtubule targeting based therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment; however, resistance and side effects remain a major limitation. Therefore, novel strategies that can overcome these limitations are urgently needed. We made a novel discovery that fisetin, a hydroxyflavone, is a microtubule stabilizing agent. Fisetin binds to tubulin and stabilizes microtubules with binding characteristics far superior than paclitaxel. Surface plasmon resonance and computational docking studies suggested that fisetin binds to β-tubulin with superior affinity compared to paclitaxel. Fisetin treatment of human prostate cancer cells resulted in robust up-regulation of microtubule associated proteins (MAP)-2 and -4. In addition, fisetin treated cells were enriched in α-tubulin acetylation, an indication of stabilization of microtubules. Fisetin significantly inhibited PCa cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Nudc, a protein associated with microtubule motor dynein/dynactin complex that regulates microtubule dynamics, was inhibited with fisetin treatment. Further, fisetin treatment of a P-glycoprotein overexpressing multidrug-resistant cancer cell line NCI/ADR-RES inhibited the viability and colony formation. Our results offer in vitro proof-of-concept for fisetin as a microtubule targeting agent. We suggest that fisetin could be developed as an adjuvant for treatment of prostate and other cancer types. PMID:26235140

  12. Control of microtubule organization and dynamics : two ends in the limelight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhmanova, Anna; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules have fundamental roles in many essential biological processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. They assemble and disassemble from their two ends, denoted the plus end and the minus end. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of microtubule plus-end

  13. CAMSAP3 orients the apical-to-basal polarity of microtubule arrays in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Mika; Kobayashi, Saeko; Kawasaki, Miwa; Shioi, Go; Kaneko, Mari; Ishiuchi, Takashi; Misaki, Kazuyo; Meng, Wenxiang; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2016-01-12

    Polarized epithelial cells exhibit a characteristic array of microtubules that are oriented along the apicobasal axis of the cells. The minus-ends of these microtubules face apically, and the plus-ends face toward the basal side. The mechanisms underlying this epithelial-specific microtubule assembly remain unresolved, however. Here, using mouse intestinal cells and human Caco-2 cells, we show that the microtubule minus-end binding protein CAMSAP3 (calmodulin-regulated-spectrin-associated protein 3) plays a pivotal role in orienting the apical-to-basal polarity of microtubules in epithelial cells. In these cells, CAMSAP3 accumulated at the apical cortices, and tethered the longitudinal microtubules to these sites. Camsap3 mutation or depletion resulted in a random orientation of these microtubules; concomitantly, the stereotypic positioning of the nucleus and Golgi apparatus was perturbed. In contrast, the integrity of the plasma membrane was hardly affected, although its structural stability was decreased. Further analysis revealed that the CC1 domain of CAMSAP3 is crucial for its apical localization, and that forced mislocalization of CAMSAP3 disturbs the epithelial architecture. These findings demonstrate that apically localized CAMSAP3 determines the proper orientation of microtubules, and in turn that of organelles, in mature mammalian epithelial cells. PMID:26715742

  14. XTACC3-XMAP215 association reveals an asymmetric interaction promoting microtubule elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Cavazza, Tommaso; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor;

    2014-01-01

    chTOG is a conserved microtubule polymerase that catalyses the addition of tubulin dimers to promote microtubule growth. chTOG interacts with TACC3, a member of the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) family. Here we analyse their association using the Xenopus homologues, XTACC3 (TACC3) and XM...

  15. Ipl1/Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of Sli15/INCENP regulates CPC–spindle interaction to ensure proper microtubule dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Yuko; Cormier, Anthony; Tyers, Randall G.; Pigula, Adrianne; Peng, Yutian; Drubin, David G; Barnes, Georjana

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic microtubules facilitate chromosome arrangement before anaphase, whereas during anaphase microtubule stability assists chromosome separation. Changes in microtubule dynamics at the metaphase–anaphase transition are regulated by Cdk1. Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of Sli15/INCENP promotes preanaphase microtubule dynamics by preventing chromosomal passenger complex (CPC; Sli15/INCENP, Bir1/Survivin, Nbl1/Borealin, Ipl1/Aurora) association with spindles. However, whether Cdk1 has sole con...

  16. Learning-induced and stathmin-dependent changes in microtubule stability are critical for memory and disrupted in ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Shusaku; Martel, Guillaume; Pavlowsky, Alice; Takizawa, Shuichi; Hevi, Charles; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Kandel, Eric R.; Alarcon, Juan Marcos; Shumyatsky, Gleb P.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the stability of microtubules regulate many biological processes, but their role in memory remains unclear. Here we show that learning causes biphasic changes in the microtubule-associated network in the hippocampus. In the early phase, stathmin is dephosphorylated, enhancing its microtubule-destabilizing activity by promoting stathmin-tubulin binding, whereas in the late phase these processes are reversed leading to an increase in microtubule/KIF5-mediated localization of the GluA...

  17. Mechanochemical modeling of dynamic microtubule growth involving sheet-to-tube transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Xiang-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics is largely influenced by nucleotide hydrolysis and the resultant tubulin configuration changes. The GTP cap model has been proposed to interpret the stabilizing mechanism of microtubule growth from the view of hydrolysis effects. Besides, the microtubule growth involves the closure of a curved sheet at its growing end. The curvature conversion also helps to stabilize the successive growth, and the curved sheet is referred to as the conformational cap. However, there still lacks theoretical investigation on the mechanical-chemical coupling growth process of microtubules. In this paper, we study the growth mechanisms of microtubules by using a coarse-grained molecular method. Firstly, the closure process involving a sheet-to-tube transition is simulated. The results verify the stabilizing effect of the sheet structure, and the minimum conformational cap length that can stabilize the growth is demonstrated to be two dimers. Then, we show that the conformational cap can function independently...

  18. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  19. Contributions of microtubule dynamic instability and rotational diffusion to kinetochore capture

    CERN Document Server

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Gergely, Zachary R; Flynn, Patrick J; Montes, Salvador; Crapo, Ammon; Doostan, Alireza; McIntosh, J Richard; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule dynamic instability allows search and capture of kinetochores during spindle formation, an important process for accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent work has found that microtubule rotational diffusion about minus-end attachment points contributes to kinetochore capture in fission yeast, but the relative contributions of dynamic instability and rotational diffusion are not well understood. We have developed a biophysical model of kinetochore capture in small fission-yeast nuclei using hybrid Brownian dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo simulation techniques. With this model, we have studied the importance of dynamic instability and microtubule rotational diffusion for kinetochore capture, both to the lateral surface of a microtubule and at or near its end. Over a range of biologically relevant parameters, microtubule rotational diffusion decreased capture time, but made a relatively small contribution compared to dynamic instability. At most, rotational diffusion reduced capture ...

  20. On the Nature and Shape of Tubulin Trails: Implications on Microtubule Self-Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Glade, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules, major elements of the cell skeleton are, most of the time, well organized in vivo, but they can also show self-organizing behaviors in time and/or space in purified solutions in vitro. Theoretical studies and models based on the concepts of collective dynamics in complex systems, reaction-diffusion processes and emergent phenomena were proposed to explain some of these behaviors. In the particular case of microtubule spatial self-organization, it has been advanced that microtubules could behave like ants, self-organizing by 'talking to each other' by way of hypothetic (because never observed) concentrated chemical trails of tubulin that are expected to be released by their disassembling ends. Deterministic models based on this idea yielded indeed like-looking spatio-temporal self-organizing behaviors. Nevertheless the question remains of whether microscopic tubulin trails produced by individual or bundles of several microtubules are intense enough to allow microtubule self-organization at a macr...

  1. Paired arrangement of kinetochores together with microtubule pivoting and dynamics drive kinetochore capture in meiosis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Gheorghe; Florescu, Ana-Maria; Krull, Alexander; Klemm, Anna H; Pavin, Nenad; Jülicher, Frank; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores are protein complexes on the chromosomes, whose function as linkers between spindle microtubules and chromosomes is crucial for proper cell division. The mechanisms that facilitate kinetochore capture by microtubules are still unclear. In the present study, we combine experiments and theory to explore the mechanisms of kinetochore capture at the onset of meiosis I in fission yeast. We show that kinetochores on homologous chromosomes move together, microtubules are dynamic and pivot around the spindle pole, and the average capture time is 3-4 minutes. Our theory describes paired kinetochores on homologous chromosomes as a single object, as well as angular movement of microtubules and their dynamics. For the experimentally measured parameters, the model reproduces the measured capture kinetics and shows that the paired configuration of kinetochores accelerates capture, whereas microtubule pivoting and dynamics have a smaller contribution. Kinetochore pairing may be a general feature that increases capture efficiency in meiotic cells. PMID:27166749

  2. Microtubules restrict plastid sedimentation in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuchow, J.; Sack, F. D.

    1994-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are unusual among plant cells with sedimentation in that only some amyloplasts sediment and these do not fall completely to the bottom of vertical cells. To determine whether the cytoskeleton restricts plastid sedimentation, the effects of amiprophos-methyl (APM) and cytochalasin D (CD) on plastid position were quantified. APM treatments of 30-60 min increased the plastid sedimentation that is normally seen along the length of untreated or control cells. Longer APM treatments often resulted in more dramatic plastid sedimentation, and in some cases almost all plastids sedimented to the lowermost point in the cell. In contrast, the microfilament inhibitor CD did not affect longitudinal plastid sedimentation compared to untreated cells, although it did disturb or eliminate plastid zonation in the tip. These data suggest that microtubules restrict the sedimentation of plastids along the length of the cell and that microtubules are load-bearing for all the plastids in the apical cell. This demonstrates the importance of the cytoskeleton in maintaining organelle position and cell organization against the force of gravity.

  3. Hepatocyte cotransport of taurocholate and bilirubin glucuronides: Role of microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modulation of bile pigment excretion by bile salts has been attributed to modification of canalicular membrane transport or a physical interaction in bile. Based on the observation that a microtubule-dependent pathway is involved in the hepatocellular transport of bile salts, the authors investigated the possibility that bilirubin glucuronides are associated with bile salts during intracellular transport. Experiments were conducted in intact rats (basal) or after overnight biliary diversion and intravenous reinfusion of taurocholate (depleted/reinfused). All rats were pretreated with intravenous low-dose colchicine or its inactive isomer lumicolchicine. Biliary excretion of radiolabeled bilirubin glucuronides derived from tracer [14C]bilirubin-[3H]bilirubin monoglucuronide (coinjected iv) was unchanged in basal rats but was consistently delayed in depleted/reinfused rats. This was accompanied by a significant shift toward bilirubin diglucuronide formation from both substrates. In basal Gunn rats, with deficient bilirubin glucuronidation, biliary excretion of intravenous [14C]bilirubin monoglucuronide-[3H]bilirubin diglucuronide was unaffected by colchicine but was retarded in depleted/reinfused Gunn rats. Colchicine had no effect on the rate of bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro in rat liver microsomes. They conclude that a portion of the bilirubin glucuronides generated endogenously in hepatocytes or taken up directly from plasma may be cotransported with bile salts to the bile canalicular membrane via a microtubule-dependent mechanism

  4. Oxidative stress decreases microtubule growth and stability in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Benjamin M L; Yuan, Can; Li, Lei; Liu, Qinghang; Wordeman, Linda; Santana, L Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Microtubules (MTs) have many roles in ventricular myocytes, including structural stability, morphological integrity, and protein trafficking. However, despite their functional importance, dynamic MTs had never been visualized in living adult myocytes. Using adeno-associated viral vectors expressing the MT-associated protein plus end binding protein 3 (EB3) tagged with EGFP, we were able to perform live imaging and thus capture and quantify MT dynamics in ventricular myocytes in real time under physiological conditions. Super-resolution nanoscopy revealed that EB1 associated in puncta along the length of MTs in ventricular myocytes. The vast (~80%) majority of MTs grew perpendicular to T-tubules at a rate of 0.06μm∗s(-1) and growth was preferentially (82%) confined to a single sarcomere. Microtubule catastrophe rate was lower near the Z-line than M-line. Hydrogen peroxide increased the rate of catastrophe of MTs ~7-fold, suggesting that oxidative stress destabilizes these structures in ventricular myocytes. We also quantified MT dynamics after myocardial infarction (MI), a pathological condition associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our data indicate that the catastrophe rate of MTs increases following MI. This contributed to decreased transient outward K(+) currents by decreasing the surface expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channels after MI. On the basis of these data, we conclude that, under physiological conditions, MT growth is directionally biased and that increased ROS production during MI disrupts MT dynamics, decreasing K(+) channel trafficking. PMID:26902968

  5. Cytomagnetometric study of interactions between microfilaments and microtubules by measuring the energy imparted to magnetic particles within the cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Iku [Tokyo Denki University School of Information Environment 2-1200, Muzai-Gakuendai, Inzai, Chiba 270-1382 (Japan)]. E-mail: nemoto@sie.dendai.ac.jp; Kawamura, Kazuhisa [Tokyo Denki University School of Science and Engineering Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0394 (Japan)

    2005-05-15

    Cytomagnetometric measurements of the energy imparted to intracellular organelles were made to study the relationship between microtubules and microfilaments. Depolymerization of microtubules by colchicine resulted in an increase in the energy suggesting that microtubules in control condition suppress the activity of microfilaments.

  6. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  7. Saturable binding of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP) on microtubules, but not filamentous actin or vimentin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenmüller, B; Ahrens, D P; Li, Q; Suprenant, K A

    2001-11-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP) is a 75-kDa, WD-repeat protein associated with the mitotic spindle apparatus. To understand EMAP's biological role, it is important to determine its affinity for microtubules (MTs) and other cytoskeletal components. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a low-cost, bubble-column bioreactor to express EMAP as a hexahistidine fusion (6his) protein in baculovirus-infected insect cells. After optimizing cell growth conditions, up to 30 mg of EMAP was obtained in the soluble cell lysate from a 1-liter culture. EMAP was purified to homogeneity in a two-step process that included immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC) and anion-exchange chromatography. In vitro binding studies on cytoskeletal components were performed with the 6his-EMAP. EMAP bound to MTs, but not actin or vimentin filaments, with an intrinsic dissociation constant of 0.18 microM and binding stoichiometry of 0.7 mol EMAP per mol tubulin heterodimer. In addition, we show that a strong MT binding domain resides in the 137 amino acid, NH(2)-terminus of EMAP and a weaker binding site in the WD-domain. Previous work has shown that the EMAP concentration in the sea urchin egg is over 4 microM. Together, these results show that there is sufficient EMAP in the egg to regulate the assembly of a large pool of maternally stored tubulin. PMID:11807937

  8. Cytoskeletal logic: a model for molecular computation via Boolean operations in microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz-Beltra, R; Hameroff, S R; Dayhoff, J E

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors and dynamic activities within living cells are organized by the cytoskeleton: intracellular networks of interconnected protein polymers which include microtubules (MTs), actin, intermediate filaments, microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) and other protein structures. Cooperative interactions among cytoskeletal protein subunit conformational states have been used to model signal transmission and information processing. In the present work we present a theoretical model for molecular computing in which Boolean logic is implemented in parallel networks of individual MTs interconnected by MAPs. Conformational signals propagate on MTs as in data buses and in the model MAPs are considered as Boolean operators, either as bit-lines (like MTs) where a signal can be transported unchanged between MTs ('BUS-MAP'), or as bit-lines where a Boolean operation is performed in one of the two MAP-MT attachments ('LOGIC-MAP'). Three logic MAPs have been defined ('NOT-MAP, 'AND-MAP', 'XOR-MAP') and used to demonstrate addition, subtraction and other arithmetic operations. Although our choice of Boolean logic is arbitrary, the simulations demonstrate symbolic manipulation in a connectionist system and suggest that MT-MAP networks can perform computation in living cells and are candidates for future molecular computing devices. PMID:8318677

  9. The effect of human microtubule-associated-protein tau on the assembly structure of microtubules and its ionic strength dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M. C.; Raviv, U.; Miller, H. P.; Gaylord, M. R.; Kiris, E.; Ventimiglia, D.; Needleman, D. J.; Chung, P. J.; Deek, J.; Lapointe, N.; Kim, M. W.; Wilson, L.; Feinstein, S. C.; Safinya, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs), 25 nm protein nanotubes, are among the major filamentous elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton involved in intracellular trafficking, cell division and the establishment and maintenance of cell shape. Microtubule-associated-protein tau regulates tubulin assembly, MT dynamics and stability. Aberrant tau action has long been correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, and fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) Using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and binding assay, we examine the effects of tau on the assembly structure of taxol-stabilized MTs. We find that tau regulates the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs as reflected in the observed increase in the average radius of MTs with increasing the tau/tubulin molar ratio. Additionally, tau-MT interactions are mediated to a large extent via electrostatic interactions: the binding affinity of tau to MTs is ionic strength dependent. Supported by DOE-BES DE-FG02-06ER46314, NSF DMR-0803103, NIH NS35010, NIH NS13560. (Ref) M.C. Choi, S.C. Feinstein, and C.R. Safinya et al. Biophys. J. 97; 519 (2009).

  10. Altered nucleotide-microtubule coupling and increased mechanical output by a kinesin mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Lei Liu

    Full Text Available Kinesin motors hydrolyze ATP to produce force and do work in the cell--how the motors do this is not fully understood, but is thought to depend on the coupling of ATP hydrolysis to microtubule binding by the motor. Transmittal of conformational changes from the microtubule- to the nucleotide-binding site has been proposed to involve the central β-sheet, which could undergo large structural changes important for force production. We show here that mutation of an invariant residue in loop L7 of the central β-sheet of the Drosophila kinesin-14 Ncd motor alters both nucleotide and microtubule binding, although the mutated residue is not present in either site. Mutants show weak-ADP/tight-microtubule binding, instead of tight-ADP/weak-microtubule binding like wild type--they hydrolyze ATP faster than wild type, move faster in motility assays, and assemble long spindles with greatly elongated poles, which are also produced by simulations of assembly with tighter microtubule binding and faster sliding. The mutated residue acts like a mechanochemical coupling element--it transmits changes between the microtubule-binding and active sites, and can switch the state of the motor, increasing mechanical output by the motor. One possibility, based on our findings, is that movements by the residue and the loop that contains it could bend or distort the central β-sheet, mediating free energy changes that lead to force production.

  11. Anillin interacts with microtubules and is part of the astral pathway that defines cortical domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostende Triplet, Chloe; Jaramillo Garcia, Melina; Haji Bik, Husni; Beaudet, Daniel; Piekny, Alisa

    2014-09-01

    Cytokinesis occurs by the ingression of an actomyosin ring that separates the cell into two daughter cells. The mitotic spindle, comprising astral and central spindle microtubules, couples contractile ring ingression with DNA segregation. Cues from the central spindle activate RhoA, the upstream regulator of the contractile ring. However, additional cues from the astral microtubules also reinforce the localization of active RhoA. Using human cells, we show that astral and central spindle microtubules independently control the localization of contractile proteins during cytokinesis. Astral microtubules restrict the accumulation and localization of contractile proteins during mitosis, whereas the central spindle forms a discrete ring by directing RhoA activation in the equatorial plane. Anillin stabilizes the contractile ring during cytokinesis. We show that human anillin interacts with astral microtubules and that this interaction is competed by the cortical recruitment of anillin by active RhoA. Anillin restricts the localization of myosin to the equatorial cortex and that of NuMA (part of the microtubule-tethering complex that regulates spindle position) to the polar cortex. The sequestration of anillin by astral microtubules might alter the organization of cortical proteins to polarize cells for cytokinesis. PMID:24994938

  12. Long astral microtubules and RACK-1 stabilize polarity domains during maintenance phase in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkang Ai

    Full Text Available Cell polarity is a very well conserved process important for cell differentiation, cell migration, and embryonic development. After the establishment of distinct cortical domains, polarity cues have to be stabilized and maintained within a fluid and dynamic membrane to achieve proper cell asymmetry. Microtubules have long been thought to deliver the signals required to polarize a cell. While previous studies suggest that microtubules play a key role in the establishment of polarity, the requirement of microtubules during maintenance phase remains unclear. In this study, we show that depletion of Caenorhabditis elegans RACK-1, which leads to short astral microtubules during prometaphase, specifically affects maintenance of cortical PAR domains and Dynamin localization. We then investigated the consequence of knocking down other factors that also abolish astral microtubule elongation during polarity maintenance phase. We found a correlation between short astral microtubules and the instability of PAR-6 and PAR-2 domains during maintenance phase. Our data support a necessary role for astral microtubules in the maintenance phase of cell polarity.

  13. Laulimalide induces dose-dependent modulation of microtubule behaviour in the C. elegans embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Bajaj

    Full Text Available Laulimalide is a microtubule-binding drug that was originally isolated from marine sponges. High concentrations of laulimalide stabilize microtubules and inhibit cell division similarly to paclitaxel; however, there are important differences with respect to the nature of the specific cellular defects between these two drugs and their binding sites on the microtubule. In this study, we used Caenorhabditis elegans embryos to investigate the acute effects of laulimalide on microtubules in vivo, with a direct comparison to paclitaxel. We observed surprising dose-dependent effects for laulimalide, whereby microtubules were stabilized at concentrations above 100 nM, but destabilized at concentrations between 50 and 100 nM. Despite this behaviour at low concentrations, laulimalide acted synergistically with paclitaxel to stabilize microtubules when both drugs were used at sub-effective concentrations, consistent with observations of synergistic interactions between these two drugs in other systems. Our results indicate that laulimalide induces a concentration-dependent, biphasic change in microtubule polymer dynamics in the C. elegans embryo.

  14. Probing a self-assembled fd virus membrane with a microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng; Pelcovits, Robert A.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-06-01

    The self-assembly of highly anisotropic colloidal particles leads to a rich variety of morphologies whose properties are just beginning to be understood. This article uses computer simulations to probe a particle-scale perturbation of a commonly studied colloidal assembly, a monolayer membrane composed of rodlike fd viruses in the presence of a polymer depletant. Motivated by experiments currently in progress, we simulate the interaction between a microtubule and a monolayer membrane as the microtubule "pokes" and penetrates the membrane face-on. Both the viruses and the microtubule are modeled as hard spherocylinders of the same diameter, while the depletant is modeled using ghost spheres. We find that the force exerted on the microtubule by the membrane is zero either when the microtubule is completely outside the membrane or when it has fully penetrated the membrane. The microtubule is initially repelled by the membrane as it begins to penetrate but experiences an attractive force as it penetrates further. We assess the roles played by translational and rotational fluctuations of the viruses and the osmotic pressure of the polymer depletant. We find that rotational fluctuations play a more important role than the translational ones. The dependence on the osmotic pressure of the depletant of the width and height of the repulsive barrier and the depth of the attractive potential well is consistent with the assumed depletion-induced attractive interaction between the microtubule and viruses. We discuss the relevance of these studies to the experimental investigations.

  15. Separase Promotes Microtubule Polymerization by Activating CENP-E-Related Kinesin Kin7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Panagiotis N; Gutierrez-Beltran, Emilio; Bozhkov, Peter V; Smertenko, Andrei

    2016-05-23

    Microtubules play an essential role in breaking cellular symmetry. We have previously shown that separase associates with microtubules and regulates microtubule-dependent establishment of cell polarity in Arabidopsis. However, separase lacks microtubule-binding activity, raising questions about mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Here we report that the N-terminal non-catalytic domain of separase binds to the C-terminal tail domain of three homologs of the centromeric protein CENP-E Kinesin 7 (Kin7). Conformational changes of Kin7 induced upon binding to separase facilitate recruitment of Kin7/separase complex (KISC) onto microtubules. KISC operates independently of proteolytic activity of separase in promoting microtubule rescue and pauses, as well as in suppressing catastrophes. Genetic complementation experiments in conditional separase mutant rsw4 background demonstrate the importance of KISC for the establishment of cell polarity and for plant development. Our study establishes a mechanism governing microtubule dynamics via the separase-dependent activation of CENP-E-related kinesins. PMID:27219063

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation on Coordinated Movement of Kinesin and Dynein Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong; DOU Shuo-Xing; WANG Peng-Ye

    2008-01-01

    Kinesin and dynein are two important classes of molecular motors which are responsible for active organelle trafficking and cell division.They call work together to carry a cargo,moving along the microtubule in a coordinated way.We use Monte Carlo method to simulate the dynamics of this coordinated movement.Based on four essential assumptions,our simulations reproduce some features of the recent in vivo experiments.The fast moving speed of the cargo js simulated and the speed distribution is presented.

  17. Detyrosinated microtubules buckle and bear load in contracting cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Patrick; Caporizzo, Matthew A; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Bogush, Alexey I; Chen, Christina Yingxian; Margulies, Kenneth B; Shenoy, Vivek B; Prosser, Benjamin L

    2016-04-22

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton can transmit mechanical signals and resist compression in contracting cardiomyocytes. How MTs perform these roles remains unclear because of difficulties in observing MTs during the rapid contractile cycle. Here, we used high spatial and temporal resolution imaging to characterize MT behavior in beating mouse myocytes. MTs deformed under contractile load into sinusoidal buckles, a behavior dependent on posttranslational "detyrosination" of α-tubulin. Detyrosinated MTs associated with desmin at force-generating sarcomeres. When detyrosination was reduced, MTs uncoupled from sarcomeres and buckled less during contraction, which allowed sarcomeres to shorten and stretch with less resistance. Conversely, increased detyrosination promoted MT buckling, stiffened the myocyte, and correlated with impaired function in cardiomyopathy. Thus, detyrosinated MTs represent tunable, compression-resistant elements that may impair cardiac function in disease. PMID:27102488

  18. Conformational mechanism for the stability of microtubule-kinetochore attachments

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; Maiato, Helder; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Regulating the stability of microtubule(MT)-kinetochore attachments is fundamental to avoiding mitotic errors and ensure proper chromosome segregation during cell division. While biochemical factors involved in this process have been identified, its mechanics still needs to be better understood. Here we introduce and simulate a mechanical model of MT-kinetochore interactions in which the stability of the attachment is ruled by the geometrical conformations of curling MT-protofilaments entangled in kinetochore fibrils. The model allows us to reproduce with good accuracy in vitro experimental measurements of the detachment times of yeast kinetochores from MTs under external pulling forces. Numerical simulations suggest that geometrical features of MT-protofilaments may play an important role in the switch between stable and unstable attachments.

  19. HSPB1 facilitates the formation of non-centrosomal microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Almeida-Souza

    Full Text Available The remodeling capacity of microtubules (MT is essential for their proper function. In mammals, MTs are predominantly formed at the centrosome, but can also originate from non-centrosomal sites, a process that is still poorly understood. We here show that the small heat shock protein HSPB1 plays a role in the control of non-centrosomal MT formation. The HSPB1 expression level regulates the balance between centrosomal and non-centrosomal MTs. The HSPB1 protein can be detected specifically at sites of de novo forming non-centrosomal MTs, while it is absent from the centrosomes. In addition, we show that HSPB1 binds preferentially to the lattice of newly formed MTs in vitro, suggesting that its function occurs by stabilizing MT seeds. Our findings open new avenues for the understanding of the role of HSPB1 in the development, maintenance and protection of cells with specialized non-centrosomal MT arrays.

  20. A Mechanism for Cytoplasmic Streaming: Kinesin-Driven Alignment of Microtubules and Fast Fluid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Corey E; Brunner, Matthew E; Djagaeva, Inna; Bielecki, Anthony M; Deutsch, Joshua M; Saxton, William M

    2016-05-10

    The transport of cytoplasmic components can be profoundly affected by hydrodynamics. Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes offers a striking example. Forces on fluid from kinesin-1 are initially directed by a disordered meshwork of microtubules, generating minor slow cytoplasmic flows. Subsequently, to mix incoming nurse cell cytoplasm with ooplasm, a subcortical layer of microtubules forms parallel arrays that support long-range, fast flows. To analyze the streaming mechanism, we combined observations of microtubule and organelle motions with detailed mathematical modeling. In the fast state, microtubules tethered to the cortex form a thin subcortical layer and undergo correlated sinusoidal bending. Organelles moving in flows along the arrays show velocities that are slow near the cortex and fast on the inward side of the subcortical microtubule layer. Starting with fundamental physical principles suggested by qualitative hypotheses, and with published values for microtubule stiffness, kinesin velocity, and cytoplasmic viscosity, we developed a quantitative coupled hydrodynamic model for streaming. The fully detailed mathematical model and its simulations identify key variables that can shift the system between disordered (slow) and ordered (fast) states. Measurements of array curvature, wave period, and the effects of diminished kinesin velocity on flow rates, as well as prior observations on f-actin perturbation, support the model. This establishes a concrete mechanistic framework for the ooplasmic streaming process. The self-organizing fast phase is a result of viscous drag on kinesin-driven cargoes that mediates equal and opposite forces on cytoplasmic fluid and on microtubules whose minus ends are tethered to the cortex. Fluid moves toward plus ends and microtubules are forced backward toward their minus ends, resulting in buckling. Under certain conditions, the buckling microtubules self-organize into parallel bending arrays, guiding varying directions

  1. Coordination and Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Maarten

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis comment makes four related points. First, explaining coordination is different from explaining cooperation. Second, solving the coordination problem is more important for the theory of games than solving the cooperation problem. Third, a version of the Principle of Coordination can be rationalized on individualistic grounds. Finally, psychological game theory should consider how players perceive their gaming situation. ---------------------------------------------------------...

  2. A Coordination Theory

    OpenAIRE

    J. Foss, Nicolai

    2009-01-01

    Important aspects of leadership behavior can be rendered intelligible through a focus on coordination games. The concept of common knowledge is shown to be particularly important to understanding leadership. Thus, leaders may establish common knowledge conditions and assist the coordination of strategies in this way, or make decisions in situations where coordination problems persist in spite of common knowledge.

  3. Quantifying linguistic coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    task (Bahrami et al 2010, Fusaroli et al. 2012) we extend to linguistic coordination dynamical measures of recurrence employed in the analysis of sensorimotor coordination (such as heart-rate (Konvalinka et al 2011), postural sway (Shockley 2005) and eye-movements (Dale, Richardson and Kirkham 2012...... linguistic coordination and their effects at a fine-degree....

  4. Steering microtubule shuttle transport with dynamically controlled magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, K. D.; Ruan, G.; Dorcéna, C. J.; Vieira, G.; Nabar, G.; Bouxsein, N. F.; Chalmers, J. J.; Bachand, G. D.; Sooryakumar, R.; Winter, J. O.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale control of matter is critical to the design of integrated nanosystems. Here, we describe a method to dynamically control directionality of microtubule (MT) motion using programmable magnetic fields. MTs are combined with magnetic quantum dots (i.e., MagDots) that are manipulated by external magnetic fields provided by magnetic nanowires. MT shuttles thus undergo both ATP-driven and externally-directed motion with a fluorescence component that permits simultaneous visualization of shuttle motion. This technology is used to alter the trajectory of MTs in motion and to pin MT motion. Such an approach could be used to evaluate the MT-kinesin transport system and could serve as the basis for improved lab-on-a-chip technologies based on MT transport.Nanoscale control of matter is critical to the design of integrated nanosystems. Here, we describe a method to dynamically control directionality of microtubule (MT) motion using programmable magnetic fields. MTs are combined with magnetic quantum dots (i.e., MagDots) that are manipulated by external magnetic fields provided by magnetic nanowires. MT shuttles thus undergo both ATP-driven and externally-directed motion with a fluorescence component that permits simultaneous visualization of shuttle motion. This technology is used to alter the trajectory of MTs in motion and to pin MT motion. Such an approach could be used to evaluate the MT-kinesin transport system and could serve as the basis for improved lab-on-a-chip technologies based on MT transport. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08529b

  5. Communication between the AAA+ ring and microtubule-binding domain of dynein1

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Andrew P.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Dyneins are microtubule motors, the core of which consists of a ring of AAA+ domains. ATP-driven conformational changes of the AAA+ ring are used to drive the movement of a mechanical element (termed the linker domain) that provides the motor’s powerstroke and to change the affinity of the motor for microtubules (strong binding during the power stroke and weak binding to allow stepping and recocking of the linker domain). Dynein’s microtubule-binding domain (MTBD) is located at the end of a 1...

  6. Polypyrrole microtubules and their use in the construction of a third generation biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopal, C.G.J.; Feiters, M.C.; Nolte, R.J.M. (Nijmegen SON Research Center, Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Ruiter, B. de (TNO Industrial Research, Plastics and Rubber Research Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Schasfoort, R.B.M. (TNO Food Research, Inst. of Biotechnology and Chemistry, Zeist (Netherlands)); Czajka, R.; Kempen, H. van (Univ. of Nijmegen, Research Inst. for Materials (Netherlands))

    1992-09-01

    Conducting polypyrrole microtubules have been prepared by template synthesis inside track-etch membranes. The interiors of these microtubules can adsorb the redox enzyme, glucose oxidase. The enzyme-coated tubules have been employed in the construction of a third generation amperometric biosensor for the determination of glucose. With this biosensor, glucose concentrations in the range 0.1 - 250 mM can be measured easily. The polypyrrole microtubules have been characterized by different microscopic techniques, including scanning tunneling microscopy. Based on the microscopy data, a model is presented for the interaction between the conducting polymer and the glucose oxidase molecules. (orig.).

  7. Adventures in Coordinate Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.

    2003-08-01

    A variety of coordinate systems have been used to study the N-body problem for cases involving a dominant central mass. These include the traditional Keplerian orbital elements and the canonical Delaunay variables, which both incorporate conserved quantities of the two-body problem. Recently, Cartesian coordinate systems have returned to favour with the rise of mixed-variable symplectic integrators, since these coordinates prove to be more efficient than using orbital elements. Three sets of canonical Cartesian coordinates are well known, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Inertial coordinates (which include barycentric coordinates as a special case) are the simplest and easiest to implement. However, they suffer from the disadvantage that the motion of the central body must be calculated explicitly, leading to relatively large errors in general. Jacobi coordinates overcome this problem by replacing the coordinates and momenta of the central body with those of the system as a whole, so that momentum is conserved exactly. This leads to substantial improvements in accuracy, but has the disadvantage that every object is treated differently, and interactions between each pair of bodies are now expressed in a complicated manner involving the coordinates of many bodies. Canonical heliocentric coordinates (also known as democratic heliocentric coordinates) treat all bodies equally, and conserve the centre of mass motion, but at the cost of introducing momentum cross terms into the kinetic energy. This complicates the development of higher order symplectic integrators and symplectic correctors, as well as the development of methods used to resolve close encounters with the central body. Here I will re-examine the set of possible canonical Cartesian coordinate systems to determine if it is possible to (a) conserve the centre of mass motion, (b) treat all bodies equally, and (c) eliminate the momentum cross terms. I will demonstrate that this is indeed possible

  8. Chromosome position at the spindle equator is regulated by chromokinesin and a bipolar microtubule array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The chromosome alignment is mediated by polar ejection and poleward forces acting on the chromosome arm and kinetochores, respectively. Although components of the motile machinery such as chromokinesin have been characterized, their dynamics within the spindle is poorly understood. Here we show that a quantum dot (Qdot) binding up to four Xenopus chromokinesin (Xkid) molecules behaved like a nanosize chromosome arm in the meiotic spindle, which is self-organized in cytoplasmic egg extracts. Xkid-Qdots travelled long distances along microtubules by changing several tracks, resulting in their accumulation toward and distribution around the metaphase plate. The analysis indicated that the direction of motion and velocity depend on the distribution of microtubule polarity within the spindle. Thus, this mechanism is governed by chromokinesin motors, which is dependent on symmetrical microtubule orientation that may allow chromosomes to maintain their position around the spindle equator until correct microtubule-kinetochore attachment is established. PMID:24077015

  9. Computational Study of Pseudo-phosphorylation of the Microtubule associated Protein Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopovich, Dmitriy; Larini, Luca

    This computational study focuses on the effect of pseudo-phosphorylation on the aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau. In the axon of the neuron, tau regulates the assembly of microtubules in the cytoskeleton. This is important for both stabilization of and transport across the microtubules. One of the hallmarks of the Alzheimer's disease is that tau is hyper-phosphorylated and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles that lay waste to the neurons. It is not known if hyper-phosphorylation directly causes the aggregation of tau into tangles. Experimentally, pseudo-phosphorylation mimics the effects of phosphorylation by mutating certain residues of the protein chain into charged residues. In this study, we will consider the fragment called PHF43 that belongs to the microtubule binding region and has been shown to readily aggregate.

  10. Survivin counteracts the therapeutic effect of microtubule de-stabilizers by stabilizing tubulin polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Hsing-Pang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a dual function protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Over-expression of survivin has been demonstrated to induce drug-resistance to various chemo-therapeutic agents such as cisplatin (DNA damaging agent and paclitaxel (microtubule stabilizer in cancers. However, survivin-induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers such as Vinca alkaloids and Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4-related compounds were seldom demonstrated in the past. Furthermore, the question remains as to whether survivin plays a dominant role in processing cytokinesis or inhibiting caspases activity in cells treated with anti-mitotic compounds. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of survivin on the resistance and susceptibility of human cancer cells to microtubule de-stabilizer-induced cell death. Results BPR0L075 is a CA-4 analog that induces microtubule de-polymerization and subsequent caspase-dependent apoptosis. To study the relationship between the expression of survivin and the resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers, a KB-derived BPR0L075-resistant cancer cell line, KB-L30, was generated for this study. Here, we found that survivin was over-expressed in the KB-L30 cells. Down-regulation of survivin by siRNA induced hyper-sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB cells and partially re-stored sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB-L30 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of survivin induced microtubule de-stabilization in both KB and KB-L30 cells. However, the same treatment did not enhance the down-stream caspase-3/-7 activities in BPR0L075-treated KB cells. Translocation of a caspase-independent apoptosis-related molecule, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, from cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed in survivin-targeted KB cells under BPR0L075 treatment. Conclusion In this study, survivin plays an important role in the

  11. ICP0 dismantles microtubule networks in herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Liu

    Full Text Available Infected-cell protein 0 (ICP0 is a RING finger E3 ligase that regulates herpes simplex virus (HSV mRNA synthesis, and strongly influences the balance between latency and replication of HSV. For 25 years, the nuclear functions of ICP0 have been the subject of intense scrutiny. To obtain new clues about ICP0's mechanism of action, we constructed HSV-1 viruses that expressed GFP-tagged ICP0. To our surprise, both GFP-tagged and wild-type ICP0 were predominantly observed in the cytoplasm of HSV-infected cells. Although ICP0 is exclusively nuclear during the immediate-early phase of HSV infection, further analysis revealed that ICP0 translocated to the cytoplasm during the early phase where it triggered a previously unrecognized process; ICP0 dismantled the microtubule network of the host cell. A RING finger mutant of ICP0 efficiently bundled microtubules, but failed to disperse microtubule bundles. Synthesis of ICP0 proved to be necessary and sufficient to disrupt microtubule networks in HSV-infected and transfected cells. Plant and animal viruses encode many proteins that reorganize microtubules. However, this is the first report of a viral E3 ligase that regulates microtubule stability. Intriguingly, several cellular E3 ligases orchestrate microtubule disassembly and reassembly during mitosis. Our results suggest that ICP0 serves a dual role in the HSV life cycle, acting first as a nuclear regulator of viral mRNA synthesis and acting later, in the cytoplasm, to dismantle the host cell's microtubule network in preparation for virion synthesis and/or egress.

  12. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIJIMA, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sl...

  13. Microtubule cytoskeleton behavior in the initial steps of host cell invasion by Besnoitia besnoiti

    OpenAIRE

    REIS, Y; CORTES, H; VISEUMELO, L; FAZENDEIRO, I; Leitao, A.; SOARES, H

    2006-01-01

    Microtubule cytoskeleton behavior in the initial steps of host cell invasion by Besnoitia besnoiti Besnoitia besnoiti is a protozoan parasite responsible for bovine besnoitiosis. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that isolated B. besnoiti possesses a set of subpellicular microtubules, radiating from the apical end and extending for more than 2/3 of the cell body. Upon interaction with the host cell, B. besnoiti undergoes dramatic modifications of shape and surface, as revealed by atomic ...

  14. Association of mitogen-activated protein kinase with the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    OpenAIRE

    Reszka, A. A.; Seger, R.; Diltz, C D; Krebs, E G; Fischer, E H

    1995-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical techniques, we have determined that approximately one-third of the total mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is associated with the microtubule cytoskeleton in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This population of enzyme can be separated from the soluble form that is found distributed throughout the cytosol and is also present in the nucleus after mitogen stimulation. The microtubule-associated enzyme pool constitutes half of all detect...

  15. Kar3Vik1 uses a minus-end directed powerstroke for movement along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Julia; Rank, Katherine C; Gilbert, Susan P; Rayment, Ivan; Hoenger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and helical averaging to examine the 3-D structure of the heterodimeric kinesin-14 Kar3Vik1 complexed to microtubules at a resolution of 2.5 nm. 3-D maps were obtained at key points in Kar3Vik1's nucleotide hydrolysis cycle to gain insight into the mechanism that this motor uses for retrograde motility. In all states where Kar3Vik1 maintained a strong interaction with the microtubule, we found, as observed by cryo-EM, that the motor bound with one head domain while the second head extended outwards. 3-D reconstructions of Kar3Vik1-microtubule complexes revealed that in the nucleotide-free state, the motor's coiled-coil stalk points toward the plus-end of the microtubule. In the ATP-state, the outer head is shown to undergo a large rotation that reorients the stalk ∼75° to point toward the microtubule minus-end. To determine which of the two heads binds to tubulin in each nucleotide state, we employed specific Nanogold®-labeling of Vik1. The resulting maps confirmed that in the nucleotide-free, ATP and ADP+Pi states, Kar3 maintains contact with the microtubule surface, while Vik1 extends away from the microtubule and tracks with the coiled-coil as it rotates towards the microtubule minus-end. While many previous investigations have focused on the mechanisms of homodimeric kinesins, this work presents the first comprehensive study of the powerstroke of a heterodimeric kinesin. The stalk rotation shown here for Kar3Vik1 is highly reminiscent of that reported for the homodimeric kinesin-14 Ncd, emphasizing the conservation of a mechanism for minus-end directed motility. PMID:23342004

  16. A Low Affinity Ground State Conformation for the Dynein Microtubule Binding Domain*

    OpenAIRE

    McNaughton, Lynn; Tikhonenko, Irina; Banavali, Nilesh K.; LeMaster, David M.; Koonce, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Dynein interacts with microtubules through a dedicated binding domain that is dynamically controlled to achieve high or low affinity, depending on the state of nucleotide bound in a distant catalytic pocket. The active sites for microtubule binding and ATP hydrolysis communicate via conformational changes transduced through a ∼10-nm length antiparallel coiled-coil stalk, which connects the binding domain to the roughly 300-kDa motor core. Recently, an x-ray structure of the murine cytoplasmic...

  17. Mechanism of the mitotic kinesin CENP-E in tethering kinetochores to spindle microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yumi

    2009-01-01

    The mitotic kinesin CENP-E is an essential kinetochore motor that directly contributes to the capture and stabilization of spindle microtubules by kinetochores. Although it has been well established that CENP-E is essential for metaphase chromosome alignment and reduction of CENP-E leads to high rates of whole chromosome missegregation in cells, its properties as a microtubule- dependent motor, the mechanism by which CENP-E contributes to the dynamic linkage between kinetochores and spindle m...

  18. Statistical Mechanics Provides Novel Insights into Microtubule Stability and Mechanism of Shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Ishutesh; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Microtubules are cylindrical machines inside biological cells, and are crucial for many functions such as chromosome segregation, intra-cellular transport, and cell motility. They are made of 13 elastic filaments (protofilaments) that can be either in a straight or in a curved conformation depending on the chemical state of the constituent tubulin molecules. The interplay between these two conformations help microtubules to display a fascinating phenomenon known as “dynamic ins...

  19. Genetic evidence that cellulose synthase activity influences microtubule cortical array organization

    OpenAIRE

    Paredez, A.; S. Persson; Ehrhardt, D; Somerville, C

    2008-01-01

    To identify factors that influence cytoskeletal organization we screened for Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that show hypersensitivity to the microtubule destabilizing drug oryzalin. We cloned the genes corresponding to two of the 131 mutant lines obtained. The genes encoded mutant alleles of PROCUSTE1 and KORRIGAN, which both encode proteins that have previously been implicated in cellulose synthesis. Analysis of microtubules in the mutants revealed that both mutants have altere...

  20. Microtubule Disruption in Keratinocytes Induces Cell-Cell Adhesion through Activation of Endogenous E-Cadherin

    OpenAIRE

    Kee, Sun-Ho; Steinert, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    The association of the cytoskeleton with the cadherin–catenin complex is essential for strong cell-cell adhesion in epithelial cells. In this study, we have investigated the effect of microtubule organization on cell-cell adhesion in differentiating keratinocytes. When microtubules of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) grown in low calcium media (0.05 mM) were disrupted with nocodazole or colcemid, cell-cell adhesion was induced through relocalization of the ...

  1. Structural Basis for Induction of Peripheral Neuropathy by Microtubule-Targeting Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Slusher, Barbara S; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Farah, Mohamed H; Smiyun, Gregoriy; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a serious, dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment with microtubule-targeting drugs. Symptoms present in a "stocking-glove" distribution, with longest nerves affected most acutely, suggesting a length-dependent component to the toxicity. Axonal transport of ATP-producing mitochondria along neuronal microtubules from cell body to synapse is crucial to neuronal function. We compared the effects of the drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone that bind along the lengths of microtubules and the drugs eribulin and vincristine that bind at microtubule ends, on mitochondrial trafficking in cultured human neuronal SK-N-SH cells and on axonal transport in mouse sciatic nerves. Antiproliferative concentrations of paclitaxel and ixabepilone significantly inhibited the anterograde transport velocity of mitochondria in neuronal cells, whereas eribulin and vincristine inhibited transport only at significantly higher concentrations. Confirming these observations, anterogradely transported amyloid precursor protein accumulated in ligated sciatic nerves of control and eribulin-treated mice, but not in paclitaxel-treated mice, indicating that paclitaxel inhibited anterograde axonal transport, whereas eribulin did not. Electron microscopy of sciatic nerves of paclitaxel-treated mice showed reduced organelle accumulation proximal to the ligation consistent with inhibition of anterograde (kinesin based) transport by paclitaxel. In contrast, none of the drugs significantly affected retrograde (dynein based) transport in neuronal cells or mouse nerves. Collectively, these results suggest that paclitaxel and ixabepilone, which bind along the lengths and stabilize microtubules, inhibit kinesin-based axonal transport, but not dynein-based transport, whereas the microtubule-destabilizing drugs, eribulin and vincristine, which bind preferentially to microtubule ends, have significantly less effect on all microtubule-based axonal transport. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5115-23.

  2. Direct visualization of fluorescein-labeled microtubules in vitro and in microinjected fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Microtubule proteins and tubulin have been purified from brain and labeled with dichlorotriazinyl fluorescein (DTAF). This procedure compromises neither the polymerizability of the proteins nor their affinities for unlabeled proteins. Within 15 min after microinjection of either DTAF-microtubule proteins or DTAF-tubulin into cultured gerbil fibroma cells, there was an evolution of a fluorescent fibrillar pattern with a distribution similar to that of the microtubular network seen after staini...

  3. Lis1 mediates planar polarity of auditory hair cells through regulation of microtubule organization

    OpenAIRE

    Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Lee, Jianyi; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia; Lu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    The V-shaped hair bundles atop auditory hair cells and their uniform orientation are manifestations of epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) required for proper perception of sound. PCP is regulated at the tissue level by a conserved core Wnt/PCP pathway. However, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery is poorly understood. Recent findings implicate hair cell microtubules in planar polarization of hair cells. To elucidate the microtubule-mediated polarity pathway, we analyzed Lis1 functio...

  4. Interactions of the HSV-1 UL25 Capsid Protein with Cellular Microtubule-associated Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei GUO; Ying ZHANG; Yan-chun CHE; Wen-juan WU; Wei-zhong LI; Li-chun WANG; Yun LIAO; Long-ding LIU; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    An interaction between the HSV-1 UL25 capsid protein and cellular microtubule-associated protein was found using a yeast two-hybrid screen and β-D-galactosidase activity assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy of the UL25 protein demonstrated its co-localization with cellular microtubule-associated protein in the plasma membrane. Further investigations with deletion mutants suggest that UL25 is likely to have a function in the nucleus.

  5. Katanin maintains meiotic metaphase chromosome alignment and spindle structure in vivo and has multiple effects on microtubules in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Karen; Berg, Evan; Cortes, Daniel B; Hernandez, Veronica; Mains, Paul E; McNally, Francis J

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles requires both MEI-1 and MEI-2 subunits of the microtubule-severing ATPase katanin. Strong loss-of-function mutants assemble apolar intersecting microtubule arrays, whereas weaker mutants assemble bipolar meiotic spindles that are longer than wild type. To determine whether katanin is also required for spindle maintenance, we monitored metaphase I spindles after a fast-acting mei-1(ts) mutant was shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. Within 4 min of temperature shift, bivalents moved off the metaphase plate, and microtubule bundles within the spindle lengthened and developed a high degree of curvature. Spindles eventually lost bipolar structure. Immunofluorescence of embryos fixed at increasing temperature indicated that MEI-1 was lost from spindle microtubules before loss of ASPM-1, indicating that MEI-1 and ASPM-1 act independently at spindle poles. We quantified the microtubule-severing activity of purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes corresponding to six different point mutations and found a linear relationship between microtubule disassembly rate and meiotic spindle length. Previous work showed that katanin is required for severing at points where two microtubules intersect in vivo. We show that purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes preferentially sever at intersections between two microtubules and directly bundle microtubules in vitro. These activities could promote parallel/antiparallel microtubule organization in meiotic spindles. PMID:24501424

  6. Tracking the Biogenesis and Inheritance of Subpellicular Microtubule in Trypanosoma brucei with Inducible YFP-α-Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Sheriff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton forms the most prominent structural system in Trypanosoma brucei, undergoing extensive modifications during the cell cycle. Visualization of tyrosinated microtubules leads to a semiconservative mode of inheritance, whereas recent studies employing microtubule plus end tracking proteins have hinted at an asymmetric pattern of cytoskeletal inheritance. To further the knowledge of microtubule synthesis and inheritance during T. brucei cell cycle, the dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton was visualized by inducible YFP-α-tubulin expression. During new flagellum/flagellum attachment zone (FAZ biogenesis and cell growth, YFP-α-tubulin was incorporated mainly between the old and new flagellum/FAZ complexes. Cytoskeletal modifications at the posterior end of the cells were observed with EB1, a microtubule plus end binding protein, particularly during mitosis. Additionally, the newly formed microtubules segregated asymmetrically, with the daughter cell inheriting the new flagellum/FAZ complex retaining most of the new microtubules. Together, our results suggest an intimate connection between new microtubule formation and new FAZ assembly, consequently leading to asymmetric microtubule inheritance and cell division.

  7. The microtubule aster formation and its role in nuclear envelope assembly around the sperm chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ning; CHEN Zhongcai; LU Ping; ZHANG Chuanmao; ZHAI Zhonghe; TANG Xiaowei

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear envelope is a dynamic structure in the cell cycle. At the beginning of mitosis, nuclear envelope breaks down and its components disperse into the cytoplasm. At the end of mitosis, nuclear envelope reassembles using the dispersed components. Searching for the mechanisms of the nuclear disassembly and reassembly has for a long time been one of the key projects for cell biologists. In this report we show that microtubules take a role in the nuclear envelope assembly around the sperm chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts. Microtubule cytoskeleton has been demonstrated to take roles in the transport of intracellular membranes such as Golgi and ER vesicles. We found that the nuclear envelope assembly needs functional microtubules. At the beginning of the nuclear assembly, microtubules nucleated to form a microtubule aster around the centrosome at the base of the sperm head. Using the microtubule drug colchicine to disrupt the microtubule nucleation, nuclear envelope reassembly was seriously inhibited. If the microtubules were stabilized by taxol, another microtubule drug, the nuclear envelope reassembly was also interfered, although a significantly large aster formed around the chromatin. Based on these observations, we propose that microtubules play an important role in the nuclear envelope reassembly maybe by transporting the nuclear envelope precursors to the chromatin surfaces.

  8. HYS-32-Induced Microtubule Catastrophes in Rat Astrocytes Involves the PI3K-GSK3beta Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-Ting; Liao, Chih-Kai; Shen, Chien-Chang; Tang, Tswen-Kei; Jow, Guey-Mei; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2015-01-01

    HYS-32 is a novel derivative of combretastatin-A4 (CA-4) previously shown to induce microtubule coiling in rat primary astrocytes. In this study, we further investigated the signaling mechanism and EB1, a microtubule-associated end binding protein, involved in HYS-32-induced microtubule catastrophes. Confocal microscopy with double immunofluorescence staining revealed that EB1 accumulates at the growing microtubule plus ends, where they exhibit a bright comet-like staining pattern in control astrocytes. HYS-32 induced microtubule catastrophes in both a dose- and time-dependent manner and dramatically increased the distances between microtubule tips and the cell border. Treatment of HYS-32 (5 μM) eliminated EB1 localization at the microtubule plus ends and resulted in an extensive redistribution of EB1 to the microtubule lattice without affecting the β-tubulin or EB1 protein expression. Time-lapse experiments with immunoprecipitation further displayed that the association between EB-1 and β-tubulin was significantly decreased following a short-term treatment (2 h), but gradually increased in a prolonged treatment (6-24 h) with HYS-32. Further, HYS-32 treatment induced GSK3β phosphorylation at Y216 and S9, where the ratio of GSK3β-pY216 to GSK3β-pS9 was first elevated followed by a decrease over time. Co-treatment of astrocytes with HYS-32 and GSK3β inhibitor SB415286 attenuated the HYS-32-induced microtubule catastrophes and partially prevented EB1 dissociation from the plus end of microtubules. Furthermore, co-treatment with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibited HYS-32-induced GSK3β-pS9 and partially restored EB1 distribution from the microtubule lattice to plus ends. Together these findings suggest that HYS-32 induces microtubule catastrophes by preventing EB1 from targeting to microtubule plus ends through the GSK3β signaling pathway. PMID:25938237

  9. Tubulin cofactor B regulates microtubule densities during microglia transition to the reactive states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microglia are highly dynamic cells of the CNS that continuously survey the welfare of the neural parenchyma and play key roles modulating neurogenesis and neuronal cell death. In response to injury or pathogen invasion parenchymal microglia transforms into a more active cell that proliferates, migrates and behaves as a macrophage. The acquisition of these extra skills implicates enormous modifications of the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Here we show that tubulin cofactor B (TBCB), which has been found to contribute to various aspects of microtubule dynamics in vivo, is also implicated in microglial cytoskeletal changes. We find that TBCB is upregulated in post-lesion reactive parenchymal microglia/macrophages, in interferon treated BV-2 microglial cells, and in neonate amoeboid microglia where the microtubule densities are remarkably low. Our data demonstrate that upon TBCB downregulation both, after microglia differentiation to the ramified phenotype in vivo and in vitro, or after TBCB gene silencing, microtubule densities are restored in these cells. Taken together these observations support the view that TBCB functions as a microtubule density regulator in microglia during activation, and provide an insight into the understanding of the complex mechanisms controlling microtubule reorganization during microglial transition between the amoeboid, ramified, and reactive phenotypes

  10. ATPase Cycle of the Nonmotile Kinesin NOD Allows Microtubule End Tracking and Drives Chromosome Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, J.; Sindelar, C; Mulko, N; Collins, K; Kong, S; Hawley, R; Kull, F

    2009-01-01

    Segregation of nonexchange chromosomes during Drosophila melanogaster meiosis requires the proper function of NOD, a nonmotile kinesin-10. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of the NOD catalytic domain in the ADP- and AMPPNP-bound states. These structures reveal an alternate conformation of the microtubule binding region as well as a nucleotide-sensitive relay of hydrogen bonds at the active site. Additionally, a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the nucleotide-free microtubule-NOD complex shows an atypical binding orientation. Thermodynamic studies show that NOD binds tightly to microtubules in the nucleotide-free state, yet other nucleotide states, including AMPPNP, are weakened. Our pre-steady-state kinetic analysis demonstrates that NOD interaction with microtubules occurs slowly with weak activation of ADP product release. Upon rapid substrate binding, NOD detaches from the microtubule prior to the rate-limiting step of ATP hydrolysis, which is also atypical for a kinesin. We propose a model for NOD's microtubule plus-end tracking that drives chromosome movement.

  11. Emerging roles for microtubules in angiosperm pollen tube growth highlight new research cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eMoscatelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, actin filaments have an important role in organelle movement and cytoplasmic streaming. Otherwise microtubules have a role in restricting organelles to specific areas of the cell and in maintaining organelle morphology. In somatic plant cells, microtubules also participate in cell division and morphogenesis, allowing cells to take their definitive shape in order to perform specific functions. In the latter case, microtubules influence assembly of the cell wall, controlling the delivery of enzymes involved in cellulose synthesis and of wall modulation material to the proper sites.In angiosperm pollen tubes, organelle movement is generally attributed to the acto-myosin system, the main role of which is in distributing organelles in the cytoplasm and in carrying secretory vesicles to the apex for polarized growth. Recent data on membrane trafficking suggests a role of microtubules in fine delivery and repositioning of vesicles to sustain pollen tube growth. This review examines the role of microtubules in secretion and endocytosis, highlighting new research cues regarding cell wall construction and pollen tube-pistil crosstalk, that help unravel the role of microtubules in polarized growth.

  12. A mitotic SKAP isoform regulates spindle positioning at astral microtubule plus ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, David M; Nicholls, Peter K; Page, David C; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2016-05-01

    The Astrin/SKAP complex plays important roles in mitotic chromosome alignment and centrosome integrity, but previous work found conflicting results for SKAP function. Here, we demonstrate that SKAP is expressed as two distinct isoforms in mammals: a longer, testis-specific isoform that was used for the previous studies in mitotic cells and a novel, shorter mitotic isoform. Unlike the long isoform, short SKAP rescues SKAP depletion in mitosis and displays robust microtubule plus-end tracking, including localization to astral microtubules. Eliminating SKAP microtubule binding results in severe chromosome segregation defects. In contrast, SKAP mutants specifically defective for plus-end tracking facilitate proper chromosome segregation but display spindle positioning defects. Cells lacking SKAP plus-end tracking have reduced Clasp1 localization at microtubule plus ends and display increased lateral microtubule contacts with the cell cortex, which we propose results in unbalanced dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces. Our work reveals an unappreciated role for the Astrin/SKAP complex as an astral microtubule mediator of mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:27138257

  13. Human EML4, a novel member of the EMAP family, is essential for microtubule formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human EML4 (EMAP-like protein 4) is a novel microtubule-associated WD-repeat protein of 120 kDa molecular weight, which is classified as belonging to the conserved family of EMAP-like proteins. Cosedimentation assays demonstrated that EML4 associates with in vitro polymerized microtubules. Correspondingly, immunofluorescence stainings and transient expression of EGFP-labeled EML4 revealed a complete colocalization of EML4 with the interphase microtubule array of HeLa cells. We present evidence that the amino-terminal portion of EML4 (amino acids 1-249) is essential for the association with microtubules. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that EML4 is hyperphosphorylated on serine/threonine residues during mitosis. In addition, immunofluorescence stainings demonstrated that hyperphosphorylated EML4 is associated with the mitotic spindle, suggesting that the function of EML4 is regulated by phosphorylation. siRNA-mediated knockdown of EML4 in HeLa cells led to a significant decrease in the number of cells. In no case mitotic figures could be observed in EML4 negative HeLa cells. Additionally, we observed a significant reduction of the proliferation rate and the uptake of radioactive [3H]-thymidine as a result of EML4 silencing. Most importantly, EML4 negative cells showed a completely modified microtubule network, indicating that EML4 is necessary for correct microtubule formation

  14. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  15. Laminin/β1 integrin signal triggers axon formation by promoting microtubule assembly and stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Liang Lei; Shi-Ge Xing; Cai-Yun Deng; Xiang-Chun Ju; Xing-Yu Jiang; Zhen-Ge Luo

    2012-01-01

    Axon specification during neuronal polarization is closely associated with increased microtubule stabilization in one of the neurites of unpolarized neuron,but how this increased microtubule stability is achieved is unclear.Here,we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) component laminin promotes neuronal polarization via regulating directional microtubule assembly through β1 integrin (Itgb1).Contact with laminin coated on culture substrate or polystyrene beads was sufficient for axon specification of undifferentiated neurites in cultured hippocampal neurons and cortical slices.Active Itgb1 was found to be concentrated in laminin-contacting neurites.Axon formation was promoted and abolished by enhancing and attenuating Itgbl signaling,respectively.Interestingly,laminin contact promoted plus-end microtubule assembly in a manner that required Itgbl.Moreover,stabilizing microtubules partially prevented polarization defects caused by ltgbl downregulation.Finally,genetic ablation of ltgbl in dorsal telencephalic progenitors caused deficits in axon development of cortical pyramidal neurons.Thus,laminin/Itgb1 signaling plays an instructive role in axon initiation and growth,both in vitro and in vivo,through the regulation of microtubule assembly.This study has established a linkage between an extrinsic factor and intrinsic cytoskeletai dynamics during neuronal polarization.

  16. Hypothesis: NDL Proteins Function in Stress Responses by Regulating Microtubule Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha eKhatri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available N-MYC DOWNREGULATED-LIKE proteins (NDL, members of the alpha/beta hydrolase superfamily were recently rediscovered as interactors of G-protein signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the precise molecular function of NDL proteins is still elusive, in animals these proteins play protective role in hypoxia and expression is induced by hypoxia and nickel, indicating role in stress. Homology of NDL1 with animal counterpart NDRG suggests similar functions in animals and plants. It is well established that stress responses leads to the microtubule depolymerization and reorganization which is crucial for stress tolerance. NDRG is a microtubule-associated protein (MAP which mediates the microtubule organization in animals by causing acetylation and increases the stability of α-tubulin. As NDL1 is highly homologous to NDRG, involvement of NDL1 in the microtubule organization during plant stress can also be expected. Discovery of interaction of NDL with protein kinesin light chain- related 1, enodomembrane family protein 70, syntaxin-23, tubulin alpha-2 chain, as a part of G protein interactome initiative encourages us to postulate microtubule stabilizing functions for NDL family in plants. Our search for NDL interactors in G protein interactome also predicts the role of NDL proteins in abiotic stress tolerance management. Based on published report in animals and predicted interacting partners for NDL in G protein interactome lead us to hypothesize involvement of NDL in the microtubule organization during abiotic stress management in plants.

  17. Mapping brains without coordinates

    OpenAIRE

    Kötter, Rolf; Wanke, Egon

    2005-01-01

    Brain mapping has evolved considerably over the last century. While most emphasis has been placed on coordinate-based spatial atlases, coordinate-independent parcellation-based mapping is an important technique for accessing the multitude of structural and functional data that have been reported from invasive experiments, and provides for flexible and efficient representations of information. Here, we provide an introduction to motivations, concepts, techniques and implications of coordinate-...

  18. Adaptive Coordinate Descent

    OpenAIRE

    Loshchilov, Ilya; Schoenauer, Marc; Sebag, Michèle

    2011-01-01

    Independence from the coordinate system is one source of efficiency and robustness for the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES). The recently proposed Adaptive Encoding (AE) procedure generalizes CMA-ES adaptive mechanism, and can be used together with any optimization algorithm. Adaptive Encoding gradually builds a transformation of the coordinate system such that the new coordinates are as decorrelated as possible with respect to the objective function. But any optimizat...

  19. Characterization of gold nanoparticle binding to microtubule filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microtubule (MT) protein filaments were used as templates for fabricating Au nanowires as a bottom-up approach for fabricating building blocks for future integrated circuits. Photochemical reduction methods were employed to form Au nanoparticles which bind and uniformly cover the MT filaments. Synthesis of the MT-templated Au nanowires was characterized using UV/vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, binding between the MT filaments and Au nanoparticles was investigated using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to establish the nature of the binding sites. A variety of functional groups were identified by SERS to interact with the Au including imidazole, sulfur, aromatic rings, amine, and carboxylate. The imidazole ring in the histidine is the most prominent functional group for Au binding. The results from these studies provide better understanding of the binding between Au and the biotemplate and give insight concerning methods to improve Au coverage for MT-templated Au nanowires.

  20. APC functions at the centrosome to stimulate microtubule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Christina; Ashton, Cahora; Sharma, Manisha; Brocardo, Mariana G; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is multi-functional. APC is known to localize at the centrosome, and in mitotic cells contributes to formation of the mitotic spindle. To test whether APC contributes to nascent microtubule (MT) growth at interphase centrosomes, we employed MT regrowth assays in U2OS cells to measure MT assembly before and after nocodazole treatment and release. We showed that siRNA knockdown of full-length APC delayed both initial MT aster formation and MT elongation/regrowth. In contrast, APC-mutant SW480 cancer cells displayed a defect in MT regrowth that was unaffected by APC knockdown, but which was rescued by reconstitution of full-length APC. Our findings identify APC as a positive regulator of centrosome MT initial assembly and suggest that this process is disrupted by cancer mutations. We confirmed that full-length APC associates with the MT-nucleation factor γ-tubulin, and found that the APC cancer-truncated form (1-1309) also bound to γ-tubulin through APC amino acids 1-453. While binding to γ-tubulin may help target APC to the site of MT nucleation complexes, additional C-terminal sequences of APC are required to stimulate and stabilize MT growth. PMID:26556314

  1. Shape-motion relationships of centering microtubule asters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Kimura, Akatsuki; Minc, Nicolas

    2016-03-28

    Although mechanisms that contribute to microtubule (MT) aster positioning have been extensively studied, still little is known on how asters move inside cells to faithfully target a cellular location. Here, we study sperm aster centration in sea urchin eggs, as a stereotypical large-scale aster movement with extreme constraints on centering speed and precision. By tracking three-dimensional aster centration dynamics in eggs with manipulated shapes, we show that aster geometry resulting from MT growth and interaction with cell boundaries dictates aster instantaneous directionality, yielding cell shape-dependent centering trajectories. Aster laser surgery and modeling suggest that dynein-dependent MT cytoplasmic pulling forces that scale to MT length function to convert aster geometry into directionality. In contrast, aster speed remains largely independent of aster size, shape, or absolute dynein activity, which suggests it may be predominantly determined by aster growth rate rather than MT force amplitude. These studies begin to define the geometrical principles that control aster movements. PMID:27022090

  2. The rise and fall of the phragmoplast microtubule array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh-Ru Julie; Liu, Bo

    2013-12-01

    The cytokinetic apparatus, the phragmoplast, contains a bipolar microtubule (MT) framework that has the MT plus ends concentrated at or near the division site. This anti-parallel MT array provides tracks for the transport of Golgi-derived vesicles toward the plus ends so that materials enclosed are subsequently deposited at the division site. Here we will discuss a proposed model of the centrifugal expansion of the phragmoplast that takes place concomitantly with the assembly of the cell plate, the ultimate product of vesicle fusion. The expansion is a result of continuous MT assembly at the phragmoplast periphery while the MTs toward the center of the phragmoplast are disassembled. These events are the result of MT-dependent MT polymerization, bundling of anti-parallel MTs coming from opposite sides of the division plane that occurs selectively at the phragmoplast periphery, positioning of the plus ends of cross-linked MTs at or near the division site by establishing a minimal MT-overlapping zone, and debundling of anti-parallel MTs that is triggered by phosphorylation of MT-associated proteins. The debundled MTs are disassembled at last by factors including the MT severing enzyme katanin. PMID:24172707

  3. Proper symmetric and asymmetric endoplasmic reticulum partitioning requires astral microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Jeremy T; Schoborg, Todd A; Bergman, Zane J; Riggs, Blake; Rusan, Nasser M

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that regulate partitioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during cell division are largely unknown. Previous studies have mostly addressed ER partitioning in cultured cells, which may not recapitulate physiological processes that are critical in developing, intact tissues. We have addressed this by analysing ER partitioning in asymmetrically dividing stem cells, in which precise segregation of cellular components is essential for proper development and tissue architecture. We show that in Drosophila neural stem cells, called neuroblasts, the ER asymmetrically partitioned to centrosomes early in mitosis. This correlated closely with the asymmetric nucleation of astral microtubules (MTs) by centrosomes, suggesting that astral MT association may be required for ER partitioning by centrosomes. Consistent with this, the ER also associated with astral MTs in meiotic Drosophila spermatocytes and during syncytial embryonic divisions. Disruption of centrosomes in each of these cell types led to improper ER partitioning, demonstrating the critical role for centrosomes and associated astral MTs in this process. Importantly, we show that the ER also associated with astral MTs in cultured human cells, suggesting that this centrosome/astral MT-based partitioning mechanism is conserved across animal species. PMID:26289801

  4. Stochastic models for plant microtubule self-organization and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Ezgi C; Dixit, Ram; Gautam, Natarajan

    2015-12-01

    One of the key enablers of shape and growth in plant cells is the cortical microtubule (CMT) system, which is a polymer array that forms an appropriately-structured scaffolding in each cell. Plant biologists have shown that stochastic dynamics and simple rules of interactions between CMTs can lead to a coaligned CMT array structure. However, the mechanisms and conditions that cause CMT arrays to become organized are not well understood. It is prohibitively time-consuming to use actual plants to study the effect of various genetic mutations and environmental conditions on CMT self-organization. In fact, even computer simulations with multiple replications are not fast enough due to the spatio-temporal complexity of the system. To redress this shortcoming, we develop analytical models and methods for expeditiously computing CMT system metrics that are related to self-organization and array structure. In particular, we formulate a mean-field model to derive sufficient conditions for the organization to occur. We show that growth-prone dynamics itself is sufficient to lead to organization in presence of interactions in the system. In addition, for such systems, we develop predictive methods for estimation of system metrics such as expected average length and number of CMTs over time, using a stochastic fluid-flow model, transient analysis, and approximation algorithms tailored to our problem. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerical test instances and discuss biological insights. PMID:25700800

  5. Microtubule length dependence of motor traffic in cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunxin

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, motor proteins, such as kinesin and dynein can move processively along microtubule (MT), and also detach from or attach to MT stochastically. Experiments have found that, the traffic of motor might be jammed, and various theoretical models have been designed to understand this traffic jam phenomenon. But previous studies mainly focus on motor attachment/detachment rate dependent properties. Recent experiment of Leduc {\\it et al.} found that the traffic jam formation of motor protein kinesin depends also on the length of MT [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. {\\bf 109}, 6100-6105 (2012)]. In this study, the MT length dependent properties of motor traffic will be analyzed. We found that MT length has one {\\it critical value} $N_c$, traffic jam occurs only when MT length $N>N_c$. The jammed length of MT increases with total MT length, while the non-jammed MT length might not change monotonically with the total MT length. The critical value $N_c$ increases with motor detachment rate from MT, but decre...

  6. Toxicity and interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with microtubule protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra Naghdi Gheshlaghi; Gholam Hossein Riazi; Shahin Ahmadian; Mahmoud Ghafari; Roya Mahinpour

    2008-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in several manufactured products. The small size of NPs facilitates their uptake into cells as well as transcytosis across epithelial cells into blood and lymph circulation to reach different sites, such as the central nervous system. Different studies have shown the risks that TiO2 NPs in the neuronal system and other organs present. As membranebound layer aggregates or single particles, TiO2 NPs can enter not only cells, but also mitochondria and nuclei.Therefore these particles can interact with cytoplasmic proteins such as microtubules (MTs). MTs are cytoskeletal proteins that are essential in eukaryotic cells for a variety of functions, such as cellular transport, cell motility and mitosis. MTs in neurons are used to transport substances such as neurotransmitters. Single TiO2 NPs in cytoplasm can interact with these proteins and affect their crucial functions in different tissues. In this study, we showed the effects of TiO2 NPs on MT polymerization and structure using ultraviolet spectrophotometer and fluorometry. The fluorescent spectroscopy showed a significant tubulin conformational change in the presence of TiO2 NPs and the ultraviolet spectroscopy results showed that TiO2 NPs affect tubulin polymerization and decrease it. The aim of this study was to find the potential risks that TiO2 NPs pose to human organs and cells.

  7. Effects of microtubule mechanics on hydrolysis and catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a model for microtubule (MT) mechanics containing lateral bonds between dimers in neighboring protofilaments, bending rigidity of dimers, and repulsive interactions between protofilaments modeling steric constraints to investigate the influence of mechanical forces on hydrolysis and catastrophes. We use the allosteric dimer model, where tubulin dimers are characterized by an equilibrium bending angle, which changes from 0∘ to 22∘ by hydrolysis of a dimer. This also affects the lateral interaction and bending energies and, thus, the mechanical equilibrium state of the MT. As hydrolysis gives rise to conformational changes in dimers, mechanical forces also influence the hydrolysis rates by mechanical energy changes modulating the hydrolysis rate. The interaction via the MT mechanics then gives rise to correlation effects in the hydrolysis dynamics, which have not been taken into account before. Assuming a dominant influence of mechanical energies on hydrolysis rates, we investigate the most probable hydrolysis pathways both for vectorial and random hydrolysis. Investigating the stability with respect to lateral bond rupture, we identify initiation configurations for catastrophes along the hydrolysis pathways and values for a lateral bond rupture force. If we allow for rupturing of lateral bonds between dimers in neighboring protofilaments above this threshold force, our model exhibits avalanche-like catastrophe events. (papers)

  8. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  9. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  10. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  11. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  12. Coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with three exercises of 2 hours duration as a part of the course GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY AND MACHINE TESTING. The exercises concern three aspects of coordinate measuring: 1) Measuring and verification of tolerances on coordinate measuring machines, 2) Traceabilit...

  13. On Reaction Coordinate Optimality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivov, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    The following question is addressed: how to establish that a constructed reaction coordinate is optimal, i.e., that it provides an accurate description of dynamics. It is shown that the reaction coordinate is optimal if its cut free energy profile, determined using length-weighted transitions, is constant, i.e., it is position and sampling interval independent. The observation leads to a number of interesting results. In particular, the equilibrium flux between two boundary states can be computed exactly as diffusion on a free energy profile associated with the coordinate. The mean square displacement, for the trajectory projected onto the coordinate, grows linear with time. That for the same trajectory projected onto a suboptimal coordinate grows slower than linear with time. The results are illustrated on a number of model systems, Sierpinski gasket, FIP35 protein, and beta3s peptide. PMID:26589017

  14. The plant formin AtFH4 interacts with both actin and microtubules, and contains a newly identified microtubule-binding domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deeks, M.J.; Fendrych, Matyáš; Smertenko, A.; Bell, K.S.; Oparka, K.; Cvrčková, F.; Žárský, Viktor; Hussey, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 8 (2010), s. 1209-1215. ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA ČR GAP305/10/0433 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Actin regulating proteins * Membrane * Microtubule Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.290, year: 2010

  15. Evolution of a domain conserved in microtubule-associated proteins of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Rajangam

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Alex S Rajangam1, Hongqian Yang2, Tuula T Teeri1, Lars Arvestad21KTH Biotechnology, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, AlbaNova, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Stockholm Bioinformatics Center and School of Computer Science and Communication, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The microtubule network, the major organelle of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, is involved in cell division and differentiation but also with many other cellular functions. In plants, microtubules seem to be involved in the ordered deposition of cellulose microfibrils by a so far unknown mechanism. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAP typically contain various domains targeting or binding proteins with different functions to microtubules. Here we have investigated a proposed microtubule-targeting domain, TPX2, first identified in the Kinesin-like protein 2 in Xenopus. A TPX2 containing microtubule binding protein, PttMAP20, has been recently identified in poplar tissues undergoing xylogenesis. Furthermore, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB, which is a known inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, was shown to bind specifically to PttMAP20. It is thus possible that PttMAP20 may have a role in coupling cellulose biosynthesis and the microtubular networks in poplar secondary cell walls. In order to get more insight into the occurrence, evolution and potential functions of TPX2-containing proteins we have carried out bioinformatic analysis for all genes so far found to encode TPX2 domains with special reference to poplar PttMAP20 and its putative orthologs in other plants.Keywords: TPX2 domain, MAP20, evolution, microtubule, cellulose, bioinformatics

  16. Cep192 controls the balance of centrosome and non-centrosomal microtubules during interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P O'Rourke

    Full Text Available Cep192 is a centrosomal protein that contributes to the formation and function of the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells. Cep192's mitotic activities stem largely from its role in the recruitment to the centrosome of numerous additional proteins such as gamma-tubulin and Pericentrin. Here, we examine Cep192's function in interphase cells. Our data indicate that, as in mitosis, Cep192 stimulates the nucleation of centrosomal microtubules thereby regulating the morphology of interphase microtubule arrays. Interestingly, however, cells lacking Cep192 remain capable of generating normal levels of MTs as the loss of centrosomal microtubules is augmented by MT nucleation from other sites, most notably the Golgi apparatus. The depletion of Cep192 results in a significant decrease in the level of centrosome-associated gamma-tubulin, likely explaining its impact on centrosome microtubule nucleation. However, in stark contrast to mitosis, Cep192 appears to maintain an antagonistic relationship with Pericentrin at interphase centrosomes. Interphase cells depleted of Cep192 display significantly higher levels of centrosome-associated Pericentrin while overexpression of Cep192 reduces the levels of centrosomal Pericentrin. Conversely, depletion of Pericentrin results in elevated levels of centrosomal Cep192 and enhances microtubule nucleation at centrosomes, at least during interphase. Finally, we show that depletion of Cep192 negatively impacts cell motility and alters normal cell polarization. Our current working hypothesis is that the microtubule nucleating capacity of the interphase centrosome is determined by an antagonistic balance of Cep192, which promotes nucleation, and Pericentrin, which inhibits nucleation. This in turn determines the relative abundance of centrosomal and non-centrosomal microtubules that tune cell movement and shape.

  17. Rearrangements of microtubule cytoskeleton in stomatal closure of Arabidopsis induced by nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YongMei; WU ZhongYi; WANG XueChen; YU Rong

    2008-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide), known as a key signal molecule in plant, plays important roles in regulation of stomatal movement. In this study, microtubule dynamics and its possible mechanism in the NO signal pathway were investigated. The results were as follows: (ⅰ) In vivo stomatal aperture assays revealed that both vinblastine (microtubule-disrupting drug) and SNP (exogenous NO donor) prevented stomatal opening in the light, and vinblastine even could enhance the inhibitory effect of SNP, whereas taxol (a microtubule-stabilizing agent) was able to reduce this effect; (ⅱ) microtubules in the opening Arabi-dopsis guard cells expressing GFP:α-tubulin-6 (AtGFP:α-tubulin-6) were organized in parallel, straight and dense bundles, radiating from the ventral side to the dorsal side, and most of them were localized perpendicularly to the ventral wall; (ⅲ) under the same environmental conditions, treated with SNP for 30 min, the radial arrays of microtubules in guard cells began to break down, twisted partially and be-came oblique or exhibited a random pattern; (ⅳ) furthermore, the involvement of cytosolic Ca2+ in this event was tested. Stomatal aperture assays revealed that BAPTA-AM (a chelator of Ca2+) greatly sup-pressed the effect of NO on stomatal closure; however, it did not show the same function on stomatal closure induced by vinblastine. When BAPTA-AM was added to the SNP-pretreated solution, the SNP-induced disordered microtubulue cytoskeleton in guard cells underwent rearrangement in a time-dependent manner. After 30 min of treatment with BAPTA-AM, the cortical microtubules resumed the original radial distribution, almost the same as the control. All this indicates that NO may promote rearrangement of microtubule cytoskeleton via elevation of [Ca2+]cyt (free Ca2+ concentration in the cy-toplasm), finally leading to stomatal closure.

  18. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  19. Chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and diisopropylfluorophosphate inhibit kinesin-dependent microtubule motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate, originally developed as a chemical warfare agent, is structurally similar to nerve agents, and chlorpyrifos has extensive worldwide use as an agricultural pesticide. While inhibition of cholinesterases underlies the acute toxicity of these organophosphates, we previously reported impaired axonal transport in the sciatic nerves from rats treated chronically with subthreshold doses of chlorpyrifos. Those data indicate that chlorpyrifos (and/or its active metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon) might directly affect the function of kinesin and/or microtubules-the principal proteins that mediate anterograde axonal transport. The current report describes in vitro assays to assess the concentration-dependent effects of chlorpyrifos (0-10 μM), chlorpyrifos-oxon (0-10 μM), and diisopropylfluorophosphate (0-0.59 nM) on kinesin-dependent microtubule motility. Preincubating bovine brain microtubules with the organophosphates did not alter kinesin-mediated microtubule motility. In contrast, preincubation of bovine brain kinesin with diisopropylfluorophosphate, chlorpyrifos, or chlorpyrifos-oxon produced a concentration-dependent increase in the number of locomoting microtubules that detached from the kinesin-coated glass cover slip. Our data suggest that the organophosphates-chlorpyrifos-oxon, chlorpyrifos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate-directly affect kinesin, thereby disrupting kinesin-dependent transport on microtubules. Kinesin-dependent movement of vesicles, organelles, and other cellular components along microtubules is fundamental to the organization of all eukaryotic cells, especially in neurons where organelles and proteins synthesized in the cell body must move down long axons to pre-synaptic sites in nerve terminals. We postulate that disruption of kinesin-dependent intracellular transport could account for some of the long-term effects of organophosphates on the peripheral and central nervous system

  20. Taking directions: the role of microtubule-bound nucleation in the self-organization of the plant cortical array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highly aligned cortical microtubule array of interphase plant cells is a key regulator of anisotropic cell expansion. Recent computational and analytical work has shown that the non-equilibrium self-organization of this structure can be understood on the basis of experimentally observed collisional interactions between dynamic microtubules attached to the plasma membrane. Most of these approaches assumed that new microtubules are homogeneously and isotropically nucleated on the cortical surface. Experimental evidence, however, shows that nucleation mostly occurs from other microtubules and under specific relative angles. Here, we investigate the impact of directed microtubule-bound nucleations on the alignment process using computer simulations. The results show that microtubule-bound nucleations can increase the degree of alignment achieved, decrease the timescale of the ordering process and widen the regime of dynamic parameters for which the system can self-organize. We establish that the major determinant of this effect is the degree of co-alignment of the nucleations with the parent microtubule. The specific role of sideways branching nucleations appears to allow stronger alignment while maintaining a measure of overall spatial homogeneity. Finally, we investigate the suggestion that observed persistent rotation of microtubule domains can be explained through a handedness bias in microtubule-bound nucleations, showing that this is possible only for an extreme bias and over a limited range of parameters

  1. Differential responsiveness of cortical microtubule orientation to suppression of cell expansion among the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Panteris

    Full Text Available Τhe bidirectional relationship between cortical microtubule orientation and cell wall structure has been extensively studied in elongating cells. Nevertheless, the possible interplay between microtubules and cell wall elements in meristematic cells still remains elusive. Herein, the impact of cellulose synthesis inhibition and suppressed cell elongation on cortical microtubule orientation was assessed throughout the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex by whole-mount tubulin immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. Apart from the wild-type, thanatos and pom2-4 mutants of Cellulose SynthaseA3 and Cellulose Synthase Interacting1, respectively, were studied. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches inhibiting cell expansion were also applied. Cortical microtubules of untreated wild-type roots were predominantly transverse in the meristematic, transition and elongation root zones. Cellulose-deficient mutants, chemical inhibition of cell expansion, or growth in soil resulted in microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone, wherein cell length was significantly decreased. Combinatorial genetic and chemical suppression of cell expansion extended microtubule reorientation to the transition zone. According to the results, transverse cortical microtubule orientation is established in the meristematic root zone, persisting upon inhibition of cell expansion. Microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone could be attributed to conditional suppression of cell elongation. The differential responsiveness of microtubule orientation to genetic and environmental cues is most likely associated with distinct biophysical traits of the cells among each developmental root zone.

  2. Differential responsiveness of cortical microtubule orientation to suppression of cell expansion among the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis; Rigas, Stamatis

    2013-01-01

    Τhe bidirectional relationship between cortical microtubule orientation and cell wall structure has been extensively studied in elongating cells. Nevertheless, the possible interplay between microtubules and cell wall elements in meristematic cells still remains elusive. Herein, the impact of cellulose synthesis inhibition and suppressed cell elongation on cortical microtubule orientation was assessed throughout the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex by whole-mount tubulin immunolabeling and confocal microscopy. Apart from the wild-type, thanatos and pom2-4 mutants of Cellulose SynthaseA3 and Cellulose Synthase Interacting1, respectively, were studied. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches inhibiting cell expansion were also applied. Cortical microtubules of untreated wild-type roots were predominantly transverse in the meristematic, transition and elongation root zones. Cellulose-deficient mutants, chemical inhibition of cell expansion, or growth in soil resulted in microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone, wherein cell length was significantly decreased. Combinatorial genetic and chemical suppression of cell expansion extended microtubule reorientation to the transition zone. According to the results, transverse cortical microtubule orientation is established in the meristematic root zone, persisting upon inhibition of cell expansion. Microtubule reorientation in the elongation zone could be attributed to conditional suppression of cell elongation. The differential responsiveness of microtubule orientation to genetic and environmental cues is most likely associated with distinct biophysical traits of the cells among each developmental root zone. PMID:24324790

  3. Yeast GSK-3 kinase regulates astral microtubule function through phosphorylation of the microtubule-stabilizing kinesin Kip2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Hauke; Tan, Ann Na; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-11-01

    The S. cerevisiae kinesin Kip2 stabilises astral microtubules (MTs) and facilitates spindle positioning through transport of MT-associated proteins, such as the yeast CLIP-170 homologue Bik1, dynein and the adenomatous-polyposis-coli-related protein Kar9 to the plus ends of astral MTs. Here, we show that Kip2 associates with its processivity factor Bim1, the yeast homologue of the plus-end-tracking protein EB1. This interaction requires an EB1-binding motif in the N-terminal extension of Kip2 and is negatively regulated by phosphorylation through Mck1, the yeast glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, Mck1-dependent phosphorylation decreases the intrinsic MT affinity of Kip2. Reduction in Kip2 phosphorylation leads to stabilisation of astral MTs, and accumulation of Kip2, dynein and Kar9 at MT plus ends, whereas loss of Mck1 function leads to defects in spindle positioning. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a subpopulation of Mck1 at the bud-cortex phosphorylates Kip2. We propose that yeast GSK-3 spatially controls astral MT dynamics and the loading of dynein and Kar9 on astral MT plus ends by regulating Kip2 interactions with Bim1 and MTs. PMID:26395399

  4. Distribution of lifetimes of kinetochore-microtubule attachments:interplay of energy landscape, molecular motors and microtubule (de-)polymerization

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ajeet K; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-01-01

    Before a cell divides into two daughter cells, the chromosomes are replicated resulting in two sister chromosomes embracing each other. Each sister chromosome is bound to a separate proteinous structure, called kinetochore (kt), that captures the tip of a filamentous protein, called microtubule (MT). Two oppositely oriented MTs pull the two kts attached to two sister chromosomes thereby pulling the two sisters away from each other. Here we theoretically study an even simpler system, namely an isolated kt coupled to a single MT; this system mimics an {\\it in-vitro} experiment where a single kt-MT attachment is reconstituted using purified extracts from budding yeast. Our models not only account for the experimentally observed "catch-bond-like" behavior of the kt-MT coupling, but also make new predictions on the probability distribution of the lifetimes of the attachments. In principle, our new predictions can be tested by analyzing the data collected in the {\\it in-vitro} experiments provided the experiment is...

  5. Distribution of lifetimes of kinetochore–microtubule attachments: interplay of energy landscape, molecular motors and microtubule (de-)polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before a cell divides into two daughter cells, chromosomes are replicated resulting in two sister chromosomes embracing each other. Each sister chromosome is bound to a separate proteinous structure, called kinetochore (kt), that captures the tip of a filamentous protein, called microtubule (MT). Two oppositely oriented MTs pull the two kts attached to two sister chromosomes, thereby pulling the two sisters away from each other. Here we theoretically study an even simpler system, namely an isolated kt coupled to a single MT; this system mimics an in vitro experiment where a single kt–MT attachment is reconstituted using purified extracts from budding yeast. Our models not only account for the experimentally observed ‘catch-bond-like’ behavior of the kt–MT coupling, but also make new predictions on the probability distribution of the lifetimes of the attachments. In principle, our new predictions can be tested by analyzing the data collected in the in vitro experiments, provided that the experiment is repeated a sufficiently large number of times. Our theory provides a deep insight into the effects of (a) size, (b) energetics, and (c) stochastic kinetics of the kt–MT coupling on the distribution of the lifetimes of these attachments. (paper)

  6. Coordination failure caused by sunspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beugnot, Julie; Gürgüç, Zeynep; Øvlisen, Frederik Roose; Roos, Michael M. W.

    2012-01-01

    In a coordination game with Pareto-ranked equilibria, we study whether a sunspot can lead to either coordination on an inferior equilibrium (mis-coordination) or to out-of equilibrium behavior (dis-coordination). While much of the literature searches for mechanisms to attain coordination on the e......-dominant equilibrium, but in the sunspot treatment, dis-coordination is frequent. Sunspots lead to significant inefficiency, and we conclude that sunspots can indeed cause coordination failure....

  7. Novel microtubule-targeting agents – the epothilones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Budman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kit L Cheng, Thomas Bradley, Daniel R Budman1Monter Cancer Center, North Shore – LIJ Health Systems, Lake Success, New York, USAAbstract: Epothilones are a new class of antimicrotubule agents currently in clinical trials. Their chemical structures are distinct from taxanes and are more amenable to synthetic modification. Six epothilones have been studied in preclinical and clinical trials: patupilone (epothilone B, ixabepilone (BMS247550, BMS 310705, sagopilone (ZK-EPO, KOS-862 (epothilone D, and KOS-1584. In vitro data have shown increased potency in taxane-sensitive and taxane-resistant cancer cell lines. This enhanced cytotoxic effect has been attributed to epothilone being a poor substrate for p-glycoprotein drug resistance protein and having high affinity to the various β tubulin isoforms. Phase I clinical data have shown different dose-limiting toxicities for each of the epothilones. These effects are drug specific, dose specific, and schedule of administration specific. While diarrhea and myelosuppression are the dose-limiting toxicities for patupilone and BMS 310705, respectively, neurologic toxicity, as seen with taxanes, is the dose-limiting toxicity of ixabepilone, sagopilone, and KOS-862. In an effort to decrease neurologic toxicity, investigators have modified dosing schedules with limited success. Ixabepilone has the most mature clinical results with published phase II and III data, and regulatory approval for clinical use in the treatment of breast cancer. Ixabepilone has also been combined with other anticancer agents and has regulatory approval in combination with capecitabine for heavily treated breast cancer.Keywords: microtubule-targeting agents, epothilones, taxanes, ixabepilone

  8. TIPsy tour guides: How microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs facilitate axon guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Bearce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth cone is a dynamic cytoskeletal vehicle, which drives the end of a developing axon. It serves to interpret and navigate through the complex landscape and guidance cues of the early nervous system. The growth cone’s distinctive cytoskeletal organization offers a fascinating platform to study how extracellular cues can be translated into mechanical outgrowth and turning behaviors. While many studies of cell motility highlight the importance of actin networks in signaling, adhesion, and propulsion, both seminal and emerging works in the field have highlighted a unique and necessary role for microtubules in growth cone navigation. Here, we focus on the role of singular pioneer microtubules, which extend into the growth cone periphery and are regulated by a diverse family of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs. These +TIPs accumulate at the dynamic ends of microtubules, where they are well-positioned to encounter and respond to key signaling events downstream of guidance receptors, catalyzing immediate changes in microtubule stability and actin cross-talk, that facilitate both axonal outgrowth and turning events.

  9. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  10. Polycystin-1 is a microtubule-driven desmosome-associated component in polarized epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basora, Nuria, E-mail: Nuria.Basora@USherbrooke.ca [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1N 5N4 (Canada); Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Boucher, Marie-Pierre; Herring, Elizabeth; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1N 5N4 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    In this study, we have analyzed the expression and localization of polycystin-1 in intestinal epithelial cells, a system lacking primary cilia. Polycystin-1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of the small intestine during development and levels remained elevated in the adult. Dual-labelling indirect immunofluorescence revealed polycystin-1 at sites of cell-cell contact co-localizing with the desmosomes both in situ as well as in polarized Caco-2/15 cells. In unpolarized cultures of Caco-2/15 cells, polycystin-1 was recruited to the cell surface early during initiation of cell junction assembly. In isolated Caco-2/15 cells and HIEC-6 cell cultures, where junctional complexes are absent, polycystin-1 was found predominantly associated with the cytoskeletal elements of the intermediate filaments and microtubule networks. More precisely, polycystin-1 was seen as brightly labelled puncta decorating the keratin-18 positive filaments as well as the {beta}-tubulin positive microtubules, which was particularly obvious in the lamellipodia. Treatment with the microtubule-disrupting agent, nocodazole, eliminated the microtubule association of polycystin-1 but did not seem to affect its association with keratin or the desmosomes. Taken together these data suggest that polycystin-1 is involved with the establishment of cell-cell junctions in absorptive intestinal epithelial cells and exploits the microtubule-based machinery in order to be transported to the plasma membrane.

  11. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumio Ishijima

    Full Text Available It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements.

  12. Stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to silence the spindle assembly checkpoint in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchman, Eric C.; Boehm, Frederick J.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    During mitosis, duplicated sister chromatids attach to microtubules emanating from opposing sides of the bipolar spindle through large protein complexes called kinetochores. In the absence of stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments, a cell surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) produces an inhibitory signal that prevents anaphase onset. Precisely how the inhibitory SAC signal is extinguished in response to microtubule attachment remains unresolved. To address this, we induced formation of hyper-stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments in human cells using a non-phosphorylatable version of the protein Hec1, a core component of the attachment machinery. We find that stable attachments are sufficient to silence the SAC in the absence of sister kinetochore bi-orientation and strikingly in the absence of detectable microtubule pulling forces or tension. Furthermore, we find that SAC satisfaction occurs despite the absence of large changes in intra-kinetochore distance, suggesting that substantial kinetochore stretching is not required for quenching the SAC signal. PMID:26620470

  13. Microtubule dynamics of the centrosome-like polar organizers from the basal land plant Marchantia polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Michael; Borchers, Agnes; O'Donoghue, Martin-Timothy; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The liverwort Marchantia employs both modern and ancestral devices during cell division: it forms preprophase bands and in addition it shows centrosome-like polar organizers. We investigated whether polar organizers and preprophase bands cooperate to set up the division plane. To this end, two novel green fluorescent protein-based microtubule markers for dividing cells of Marchantia were developed. Cells of the apical notch formed polar organizers first and subsequently assembled preprophase bands. Polar organizers were formed de novo from multiple mobile microtubule foci localizing to the nuclear envelope. The foci then became concentrated by bipolar aggregation. We determined the comet production rate of polar organizers and show that microtubule plus ends of astral microtubules polymerize faster than those found on cortical microtubules. Importantly, it was observed that conditions increasing polar organizer numbers interfere with preprophase band formation. The data show that polar organizers have much in common with centrosomes, but that they also have specialized features. The results suggest that polar organizers contribute to preprophase band formation and in this way are involved in controlling the division plane. Our analyses of the basal land plant Marchantia shed new light on the evolution of plant cell division. PMID:26467050

  14. Overexpression of cytoplasmic dynein's globular head causes a collapse of the interphase microtubule network in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, M P; Samsó, M

    1996-06-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a minus-end directed microtubule-based motor. Using a molecular genetic approach, we have begun to dissect structure-function relationships of dynein in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Expression of a carboxy-terminal 380-kDa fragment of the heavy chain produces a protein that approximates the size and shape of the globular, mechanochemical head of dynein. This polypeptide cosediments with microtubules in an ATP-sensitive fashion and undergoes a UV-vanadate cleavage reaction. The deleted amino-terminal region appears to participate in dimerization of the native protein and in binding the intermediate and light chains. Overexpression of the 380-kDa carboxy-terminal construct in Dictyostelium produces a distinct phenotype in which the interphase radial microtubule array appears collapsed. In many cells, the microtubules form loose bundles that are whorled around the nucleus. Similar expression of a central 107-kDa fragment of the heavy chain does not produce this result. The data presented here suggest that dynein may participate in maintaining the spatial pattern of the interphase microtubule network. PMID:8816999

  15. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  16. Lymphocytes with cytotoxic activity induce rapid microtubule axonal destabilization independently and before signs of neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Jana

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MS (multiple sclerosis is the most prevalent autoimmune disease of the CNS (central nervous system historically characterized as an inflammatory and demyelinating disease. More recently, extensive neuronal pathology has lead to its classification as a neurodegenerative disease as well. While the immune system initiates the autoimmune response it remains unclear how it orchestrates neuronal damage. In our previous studies, using in vitro cultured embryonic neurons, we demonstrated that MBP (myelin basic protein-specific encephalitogenic CD4 T-cells induce early neuronal damage. In an extension of those studies, here we show that polarized CD4 Th1 and Th17 cells as wells as CD8 T-cells and NK (natural killer cells induce microtubule destabilization within neurites in a contact-independent manner. Owing to the cytotoxic potential of these immune cells, we isolated the luminal components of lytic granules and determined that they were sufficient to drive microtubule destabilization. Since lytic granules contain cytolytic proteins, we determined that the induction of microtubule destabilization occurred prior to signs of apoptosis. Furthermore, we determined that microtubule destabilization was largely restricted to axons, sparing dendrites. This study demonstrated that lymphocytes with cytolytic activity have the capacity to directly drive MAD (microtubule axonal destabilization in a bystander manner that is independent of neuronal death.

  17. Polycystin-1 is a microtubule-driven desmosome-associated component in polarized epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we have analyzed the expression and localization of polycystin-1 in intestinal epithelial cells, a system lacking primary cilia. Polycystin-1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of the small intestine during development and levels remained elevated in the adult. Dual-labelling indirect immunofluorescence revealed polycystin-1 at sites of cell-cell contact co-localizing with the desmosomes both in situ as well as in polarized Caco-2/15 cells. In unpolarized cultures of Caco-2/15 cells, polycystin-1 was recruited to the cell surface early during initiation of cell junction assembly. In isolated Caco-2/15 cells and HIEC-6 cell cultures, where junctional complexes are absent, polycystin-1 was found predominantly associated with the cytoskeletal elements of the intermediate filaments and microtubule networks. More precisely, polycystin-1 was seen as brightly labelled puncta decorating the keratin-18 positive filaments as well as the β-tubulin positive microtubules, which was particularly obvious in the lamellipodia. Treatment with the microtubule-disrupting agent, nocodazole, eliminated the microtubule association of polycystin-1 but did not seem to affect its association with keratin or the desmosomes. Taken together these data suggest that polycystin-1 is involved with the establishment of cell-cell junctions in absorptive intestinal epithelial cells and exploits the microtubule-based machinery in order to be transported to the plasma membrane.

  18. Disruption of microtubule network rescues aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Henmi

    Full Text Available A large GTPase dynamin, which is required for endocytic vesicle formation, regulates the actin cytoskeleton through its interaction with cortactin. Dynamin2 mutants impair the formation of actin comets, which are induced by Listeria monocytogenes or phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. However, the role of dynamin2 in the regulation of the actin comet is still unclear. Here we show that aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells were rescued by disrupting of microtubule networks. Depletion of dynamin2, but not cortactin, significantly reduced the length and the speed of actin comets induced by Listeria. This implies that dynamin2 may regulate the actin comet in a cortactin-independent manner. As dynamin regulates microtubules, we investigated whether perturbation of microtubules would rescue actin comet formation in dynamin2-depleted cells. Treatment with taxol or colchicine created a microtubule-free space in the cytoplasm, and made no difference between control and dynamin2 siRNA cells. This suggests that the alteration of microtubules by dynamin2 depletion reduced the length and the speed of the actin comet.

  19. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  20. Movement and Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Action Medical Editor & Editorial Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician ... Movement and Coordination Page Content Article Body At this age, your child will seem to be continually on the go— ...

  1. Coordination and Policy Traps

    OpenAIRE

    Angeletos, George-Marios; Hellwig, Christian; Pavan, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of a policy maker to control equilibrium outcomes in an environment where market participants play a coordination game with information heterogeneity. We consider defense policies against speculative currency attacks in a model where speculators observe the fundamentals with idiosyncratic noise. The policy maker is willing to take a costly policy action only for moderate fundamentals. Market participants can use this information to coordinate on di.erent respon...

  2. Attribute coordination in organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Yingyi Qian; Gerard Roland; Chenggang Xu

    2001-01-01

    We study coordination in organizations with a variety of organizational forms. Coordination in organization is modeled as the adjustment of attributes and capacities of tasks when facing external shocks. An M-form (U-form) organization groups complementary (substitutable) tasks together in one unit. In the presence of only attribute shocks, particularly when gains from specialization are small, communication is poor, or shocks are more likely, the expected payoff of the decentralized M-form i...

  3. Continuous parallel coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Julian; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Typical scientific data is represented on a grid with appropriate interpolation or approximation schemes,defined on a continuous domain. The visualization of such data in parallel coordinates may reveal patterns latently contained in the data and thus can improve the understanding of multidimensional relations. In this paper, we adopt the concept of continuous scatterplots for the visualization of spatially continuous input data to derive a density model for parallel coordinates. Based on the point-line duality between scatterplots and parallel coordinates, we propose a mathematical model that maps density from a continuous scatterplot to parallel coordinates and present different algorithms for both numerical and analytical computation of the resulting density field. In addition, we show how the 2-D model can be used to successively construct continuous parallel coordinates with an arbitrary number of dimensions. Since continuous parallel coordinates interpolate data values within grid cells, a scalable and dense visualization is achieved, which will be demonstrated for typical multi-variate scientific data. PMID:19834230

  4. Magnetic Coordinate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundal, K. M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    Geospace phenomena such as the aurora, plasma motion, ionospheric currents and associated magnetic field disturbances are highly organized by Earth's main magnetic field. This is due to the fact that the charged particles that comprise space plasma can move almost freely along magnetic field lines, but not across them. For this reason it is sensible to present such phenomena relative to Earth's magnetic field. A large variety of magnetic coordinate systems exist, designed for different purposes and regions, ranging from the magnetopause to the ionosphere. In this paper we review the most common magnetic coordinate systems and describe how they are defined, where they are used, and how to convert between them. The definitions are presented based on the spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) and, in some of the coordinate systems, the position of the Sun which we show how to calculate from the time and date. The most detailed coordinate systems take the full IGRF into account and define magnetic latitude and longitude such that they are constant along field lines. These coordinate systems, which are useful at ionospheric altitudes, are non-orthogonal. We show how to handle vectors and vector calculus in such coordinates, and discuss how systematic errors may appear if this is not done correctly.

  5. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  6. Template-free electrosynthesis of aligned poly(p-phenylene) microtubules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) microtubules with diameters of 0.2-0.8μm and lengths of~10 (m have been synthesized by direct oxidation of benzene in the mixed electrolyte of boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BFEE) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (BFEE:TFA= 2:1, by volume), containing a certain amount of sodium dodecylbenzene- sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant. The microtubules were grown vertically on the working electrode surface. The tubular morphology has been confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies and the chain structure of the skin of the tubules has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The electrode property, monomer/surfactant molar ratio and the value of applied potential have strong effects on the morphology of the microtubules.

  7. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles alter cellular morphology via disturbing the microtubule dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhilei; Xu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Minjian; Han, Xiumei; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder, disruption, retraction, and decreased intensity of the microtubules after TiO2 NPs treatment. Both α and β tubule expressions did not change in the TiO2 NP-treated group, but the percentage of soluble tubules was increased. A microtubule dynamic study in living cells indicated that TiO2 NPs caused a lower growth rate and a higher shortening rate of microtubules as well as shortened lifetimes of de novo microtubules. TiO2 NPs did not cause changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of tau proteins, but a tau-TiO2 NP interaction was observed. TiO2 NPs could interact with tubule heterodimers, microtubules and tau proteins, which led to the instability of microtubules, thus contributing to the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder

  8. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  9. Axis establishment and microtubule-mediated waves prior to first cleavage in Beroe ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houliston, E; Carré, D; Johnston, J A; Sardet, C

    1993-01-01

    The single axis (oral-aboral) and two planes of symmetry of the ctenophore Beroe ovata become established with respect to the position of zygote nucleus formation and the orientation of first cleavage. Bisection of Beroe eggs at different times revealed that differences in egg organisation are established in relation to the presumptive oral-aboral axis before first cleavage. Lateral fragments produced after but not before the time of first mitosis developed into larvae lacking comb-plates on one side. Time-lapse video demonstrated that waves of cytoplasmic reorganisation spread through the layer of peripheral cytoplasm (ectoplasm) of the egg during the 80 minute period between pronuclear fusion and first cleavage, along the future oral-aboral axis. These waves are manifest as the progressive displacement and dispersal of plaques of accumulated organelles around supernumerary sperm nuclei, and a series of surface movements. Their timing and direction of propagation suggest they may be involved in establishing cytoplasmic differences with respect to the embryonic axis. Inhibitor experiments suggested that the observed cytoplasmic reorganisation involves microtubules. Nocodazole and taxol, which prevent microtubule turnover,blocked plaque dispersal and reduced surface movements. The microfilament-disrupting drug cytochalasin B did not prevent plaque dispersal but induced abnormal surface contractions. We examined changes in microtubule organisation using immunofluorescence on eggs fixed at different times and in live eggs following injection of rhodamine-tubulin. Giant microtubule asters become associated with each male pronucleus after the end of meiosis. Following pronuclear fusion they disappear successively, those nearest the zygote nucleus shrinking first, to establish gradients of aster size within single eggs. Regional differences in microtubule behaviour around the time of mitosis were revealed by brief taxol treatment, which induced the formation of small

  10. The Effect of the Crocus Sativus L. Carotenoid, Crocin, on the Polymerization of Microtubules, in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zarei Jaliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Crocin, as the main carotenoid of saffron, has shown anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. Crocin might interact with cellular proteins and modulate their functions, but the exact target of this carotenoid and the other compounds of the saffron have not been discovered yet. Microtubular proteins, as one of the most important proteins inside the cells, have several functions in nearly all kinds of cellular processes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether crocin affects microtubule polymerization and tubulin structure. Materials and Methods: Microtubules were extracted from sheep brains after two cycles of temperature-dependant assembly-disassembly in the polymerization buffer (PMG. Then phosphocellulose P11 column was used to prepare MAP-free tubulin. Turbidimetric assay of microtubules was performed by incubation of tubulins at 37 ºC in PIPES buffer. To investigate the intrinsic fluorescence spectra of tubulins, the emission spectra of tryptophans was monitored. To test the interaction of crocin with tubulin in more details, ANS has been used. Results: Crocin extremely affected the tubulin polymerization and structure. Ultraviolet spectroscopy indicated that crocin increased polymerization of microtubules by nearly a factor of two. Fluorescence spectroscopic data also pointed to significant conformational changes of tubulin. Conclusion: We showed that crocin increased tubulin polymerization and microtubule nucleation rate and this effect was concentration dependant. After entering cell, crocin can modulate cellular proteins and their functions. Concerning the results of this study, crocin would be able to affect several cell processes through interaction with tubulin proteins or microtubules.

  11. KATNAL1 regulation of sertoli cell microtubule dynamics is essential for spermiogenesis and male fertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee B Smith

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process reliant upon interactions between germ cells (GC and supporting somatic cells. Testicular Sertoli cells (SC support GCs during maturation through physical attachment, the provision of nutrients, and protection from immunological attack. This role is facilitated by an active cytoskeleton of parallel microtubule arrays that permit transport of nutrients to GCs, as well as translocation of spermatids through the seminiferous epithelium during maturation. It is well established that chemical perturbation of SC microtubule remodelling leads to premature GC exfoliation demonstrating that microtubule remodelling is an essential component of male fertility, yet the genes responsible for this process remain unknown. Using a random ENU mutagenesis approach, we have identified a novel mouse line displaying male-specific infertility, due to a point mutation in the highly conserved ATPase domain of the novel KATANIN p60-related microtubule severing protein Katanin p60 subunit A-like1 (KATNAL1. We demonstrate that Katnal1 is expressed in testicular Sertoli cells (SC from 15.5 days post-coitum (dpc and that, consistent with chemical disruption models, loss of function of KATNAL1 leads to male-specific infertility through disruption of SC microtubule dynamics and premature exfoliation of spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium. The identification of KATNAL1 as an essential regulator of male fertility provides a significant novel entry point into advancing our understanding of how SC microtubule dynamics promotes male fertility. Such information will have resonance both for future treatment of male fertility and the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives.

  12. Arabidopsis cortical microtubules position cellulose synthase delivery to the plasma membrane and interact with cellulose synthase trafficking compartments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, R.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Paredez, A.R.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ehrhardt, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis relies on the organization and function of two polymer arrays separated by the plasma membrane: the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton and cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Studies using in vivo markers confirmed that one function of the cortical microtubule array is t

  13. Learning-induced and stathmin-dependent changes in microtubule stability are critical for memory and disrupted in ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Shusaku; Martel, Guillaume; Pavlowsky, Alice; Takizawa, Shuichi; Hevi, Charles; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Kandel, Eric R.; Alarcon, Juan Marcos; Shumyatsky, Gleb P.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the stability of microtubules regulate many biological processes, but their role in memory remains unclear. Here we show that learning causes biphasic changes in the microtubule-associated network in the hippocampus. In the early phase, stathmin is dephosphorylated, enhancing its microtubule-destabilizing activity by promoting stathmin-tubulin binding, whereas in the late phase these processes are reversed leading to an increase in microtubule/KIF5-mediated localization of the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors at synaptic sites. A microtubule stabilizer paclitaxel decreases or increases memory when applied at the early or late phases, respectively. Stathmin mutations disrupt changes in microtubule stability, GluA2 localization, synaptic plasticity and memory. Aged wild-type mice show impairments in stathmin levels, changes in microtubule stability, and GluA2 localization. Blocking GluA2 endocytosis rescues memory deficits in stathmin mutant and aged wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate a role for microtubules in memory in young adult and aged individuals. PMID:25007915

  14. Duplication in the microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 gene causes a novel neuromuscular condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise H; Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Færgeman, Nils J;

    2014-01-01

    Spectrins and plakins are important communicators linking cytoskeletal components to each other and to cellular junctions. Microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) belongs to the spectraplakin family and is involved in control of microtubule dynamics. Complete knock out of MACF1 in mice is...

  15. A casein kinase II-related activity is involved in phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein MAP-1B during neuroblastoma cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    A neuroblastoma protein related to the brain microtubule-associated protein, MAP-1B, as determined by immunoprecipitation and coassembly with brain microtubules, becomes phosphorylated when N2A mouse neuroblastoma cells are induced to generate microtubule-containing neurites. To characterize the protein kinases that may be involved in this in vivo phosphorylation of MAP-1B, we have studied its in vitro phosphorylation. In brain microtubule protein, MAP-1B appears to be phosphorylated in vitro...

  16. A Mechanistic Model for the Organization of Microtubule Asters by Motor and Non-Motor Proteins in a Mammalian Mitotic ExtractD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravarty, Arijit; Howard, Louisa; Compton, Duane A.

    2004-01-01

    We used computer simulation to understand the functional relationships between motor (dynein, HSET, and Eg5) and non-motor (NuMA) proteins involved in microtubule aster organization. The simulation accurately predicted microtubule organization under all combinations of motor and non-motor proteins, provided that microtubule cross-links at minus-ends were dynamic, and dynein and HSET were restricted to cross-linking microtubules in parallel orientation only. A mechanistic model was derived fro...

  17. Kar3Vik1 Uses a Minus-End Directed Powerstroke for Movement along Microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Cope, Julia; Rank, Katherine C.; Gilbert, Susan P.; Rayment, Ivan; Hoenger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and helical averaging to examine the 3-D structure of the heterodimeric kinesin-14 Kar3Vik1 complexed to microtubules at a resolution of 2.5 nm. 3-D maps were obtained at key points in Kar3Vik1’s nucleotide hydrolysis cycle to gain insight into the mechanism that this motor uses for retrograde motility. In all states where Kar3Vik1 maintained a strong interaction with the microtubule, we found, as observed by cryo-EM, that the motor bound with o...

  18. Axoplasmic transport of microtubule-associated proteins in the rat sciatic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    32P-ATP was injected into the L5 dorsal root ganglion and axoplasmic transport of the phosphorylate MA proteins 2, microtubule-associated proteins 2, was observed. After the injection of 32P-ATP, the nerve was dissected out at prescribed time intervals and sliced into 5-mm pieces. Each segment was electrophoresed on an SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel and subjected to autoradiography. A protein of 310,000 dalton was transported at a velocity of 6.6-10.6 mm/day in the axon with the electrophoretic mobility identical to that of MA proteins 2, one of the key components associated with the microtubules

  19. Melanophilin and myosin Va track the microtubule plus end on EB1

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xufeng S.; Tsan, Grace L.; Hammer, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In mouse melanocytes, myosin Va is recruited onto the surface of melanosomes by a receptor complex containing Rab27a that is present in the melanosome membrane and melanophilin (Mlp), which links myosin Va to Rab27a. In this study, we show that Mlp is also a microtubule plus end–tracking protein or +TIP. Moreover, myosin Va tracks the plus end in a Mlp-dependent manner. Data showing that overexpression and short inhibitory RNA knockdown of the +TIP EB1 have opposite effects on Mlp–microtubule...

  20. X-ray fiber diffraction analysis shows dynamic changes in axial tubulin repeats in native microtubules depending on paclitaxel content, temperature and GTP-hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Shinji; Fujita, Yosuke; Wada, Yuuko; Yagi, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Microtubules are key components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. The dynamics between assembled microtubules and free tubulin dimers in the cytoplasm is closely related to the active shape changes of microtubule networks. One of the most fundamental questions is the association of microtubule dynamics with the molecular conformation of tubulin within microtubules. To address this issue, we applied a new technique for the rapid shear-flow alignment of biological filaments, enabling us to acquire the structural periodicity data of microtubules by X-ray fiber diffraction under various physiological conditions. We classified microtubules into three main groups on the basis of distinct axial tubulin periodicities and mean microtubule diameters that varied depending on GTP hydrolysis and the content of paclitaxel, a microtubule stabilizer. Paclitaxel induced rapid changes in tubulin axial repeats in a cooperative manner. This is the first demonstration of dynamic changes of axial tubulin repeats within native microtubules without fixation. We also found extraordinary features of negative thermal expansion of axial tubulin repeats in both paclitaxel-stabilized and GMPCPP-containing microtubules. Our results suggest that even in assembled microtubules, both GTP- and GDP-tubulin dimers can undergo dynamic conversion between at least two different states: short and long configurations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26873786

  1. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Do

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient – KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form.

  2. Generator Coordinate Truncations

    CERN Document Server

    Hagino, K; Reinhard, P G

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of several schemes to calculate ground-state correlation energies using the generator coordinate technique. Our test-bed for the study is the $sd$ interacting boson model, equivalent to a 6-level Lipkin-type model. We find that the simplified projection of a triaxial generator coordinate state using the $S_3$ subgroup of the rotation group is not very accurate in the parameter space of the Hamiltonian of interest. On the other hand, a full rotational projection of an axial generator coordinate state gives remarkable accuracy. We also discuss the validity of the simplified treatment using the extended Gaussian overlap approximation (top-GOA), and show that it works reasonably well when the number of boson is four or larger.

  3. Coordination and citizen participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, D J

    1980-03-01

    This study investigates the validity of the assumption that coordination and citizen participation are related inversely and, thus, are incompatible as features in the same social service reform strategy. Seventeen social service organizations situated in the same urban area were studied. Data were obtained by structured interview. The concepts of coordination and citizen participation were operationalized by means of scales. The findings support the validity of the assumption noted above. Although interpretations of the findings can be provided, they are post-factum. This implies a need for explanatory research which might be guided by theories of community power structure and of organizational behavior. PMID:10246483

  4. Introduction to Coordination Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrance, Geoffrey Alan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction to Coordination Chemistry examines and explains how metals and molecules that bind as ligands interact, and the consequences of this assembly process. This book describes the chemical and physical properties and behavior of the complex assemblies that form, and applications that may arise as a result of these properties. Coordination complexes are an important but often hidden part of our world?even part of us?and what they do is probed in this book. This book distills the essence of this topic for undergraduate students and for research scientists.

  5. Glass micro-wire tracks for guiding kinesin-powered gliding motion of microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Liao, A. L.; Sikora, A.; Oliveira, D.; Umetsu, M.; Kumagai, I.; Adschiri, T.; Hwang, W.; Teizer, W.

    2013-03-01

    Kinesin, an enzyme molecule found in eukaryotic cells, walks on specific paths, namely microtubules. These microtubules, self-assembled in-vitro, cooperate with kinesin molecules by playing the role of either a track for the molecular motors or a lengthy cargo lorry driven by the motor molecules. One of major challenges in utilization of the latter case, which is particularly advantageous for practical applications because of the longer cruising range and the higher carrying capacity of the bio-transporter, is herding the gliding microtubules. A general approach to achieve this goal is aligning motor molecules along a track. In previous attempts such tracks were physically and/or chemically patterned on a glass surface. We use a kinesin-coated glass wire to demonstrate kinesin-powered gliding movement of microtubules confined by the wire-like structure. This new approach distinguishes itself in that the glass wire track is an independent entity, being separable from a two-dimensional surface in principle. We will also discuss quantitative analysis of the guided motility and potential applications.

  6. Septins guide microtubule protrusions induced by actin-depolymerizing toxins like Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölke, Thilo; Schwan, Carsten; Lehmann, Friederike; Østevold, Kristine; Pertz, Olivier; Aktories, Klaus

    2016-07-12

    Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, produce the actin-ADP ribosylating toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT). CDT depolymerizes actin, causes formation of microtubule-based protrusions, and increases pathogen adherence. Here, we show that septins (SEPT) are essential for CDT-induced protrusion formation. SEPT2, -6, -7, and -9 accumulate at predetermined protrusion sites and form collar-like structures at the base of protrusions. The septin inhibitor forchlorfenuron or knockdown of septins inhibits protrusion formation. At protrusion sites, septins colocalize with the GTPase Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and its effector Borg (binder of Rho GTPases), which act as up-stream regulators of septin polymerization. Precipitation and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed high-affinity binding of septins to the microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1, thereby guiding incoming microtubules. The data suggest that CDT usurps conserved regulatory principles involved in microtubule-membrane interaction, depending on septins, Cdc42, Borgs, and restructuring of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27339141

  7. Phospholipase D family interactions with the cytoskeleton: isoform delta promotes plasma membrane anchoring of cortical microtubules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreeva, Z.; Ho, A. Y. Y.; Barthet, M. M.; Potocký, Martin; Bezvoda, R.; Žárský, Viktor; Marc, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 7 (2009), s. 600-612. ISSN 1445-4408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601110916 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Allium * Arabidopsis * F-actin-microtubule interactions Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.678, year: 2009

  8. Microtubule flux mediates poleward motion of acentric chromosome fragments during meiosis in insect spermatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFountain, J R; Oldenbourg, R; Cole, R W; Rieder, C L

    2001-12-01

    We applied a combination of laser microsurgery and quantitative polarization microscopy to study kinetochore-independent forces that act on chromosome arms during meiosis in crane fly spermatocytes. When chromosome arms located within one of the half-spindles during prometa- or metaphase were cut with the laser, the acentric fragments (lacking kinetochores) that were generated moved poleward with velocities similar to those of anaphase chromosomes (approximately 0.5 microm/min). To determine the mechanism underlying this poleward motion of detached arms, we treated spermatocytes with the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol. Spindles in taxol-treated cells were noticeably short, yet with polarized light, the distribution and densities of microtubules in domains where fragment movement occurred were not different from those in control cells. When acentric fragments were generated in taxol-treated spermatocytes, 22 of 24 fragments failed to exhibit poleward motion, and the two that did move had velocities attenuated by 80% (to approximately 0.1 microm/min). In these cells, taxol did not inhibit the disjunction of chromosomes nor prevent their poleward segregation during anaphase, but the velocity of anaphase was also decreased 80% (approximately 0.1 microm/min) relative to untreated controls. Together, these data reveal that microtubule flux exerts pole-directed forces on chromosome arms during meiosis in crane fly spermatocytes and strongly suggest that the mechanism underlying microtubule flux also is used in the anaphase motion of kinetochores in these cells. PMID:11739800

  9. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C; Tan, Chia H; Pereira, Antonio J; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick; Geley, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end-directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  10. Microtubule dynamics and signal transduction at the immunological synapse: new partners and new connections

    OpenAIRE

    Lasserre, Rémi; Alcover, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Antigen recognition induces T-cell polarization towards antigen presenting cells, generating the immunological synapse at the cell interface. Now, microtubule-mediated polarized vesicle transport is shown to be required for the organization of a signalling-competent synapse and hence T-cell activation.

  11. Tubular lysosome morphology and distribution within macrophages depend on the integrity of cytoplasmic microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, J.; Bushnell, A.; Silverstein, S.C.

    1987-04-01

    Pinocytosis of the fluorescent dye lucifer yellow labels elongated, membrane-bound tubular organelles in several cell types, including cultured human monocytes, thioglycolate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages, and the macrophage-like cell line J774.2. These tubular structures can be identified as lysosomes by acid phosphatase histochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of cathepsin L. The abundance of tubular lysosomes is markedly increased by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. When labeled by pinocytosis of microperoxidase and examined by electron microscopic histochemistry, the tubular lysosomes have an outside diameter of approx. = 75 nm and a length of several micrometers; they radiate from the cell's centrosphere in alignment with cytoplasmic microtubules and intermediate filaments. Incubation of phorbol myristate acetate-treated macrophages at 4/sup 0/C or in medium containing 5 ..mu..M colchicine or nocodazole at 37/sup 0/C leads to disassembly of microtubules and fragmentation of the tubular lysosomes. Return of the cultures to 37/sup 0/C or removal of nocodazole from the medium leads to reassembly of microtubules and the reappearance of tubular lysosomes within 10-20 min. The authors conclude that microtubules are essential for the maintenance of tubular lysosome morphology and that, in macrophages, a significant proportion of the lysosomal compartment is contained within these tubular structures.

  12. Tubular lysosome morphology and distribution within macrophages depend on the integrity of cytoplasmic microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinocytosis of the fluorescent dye lucifer yellow labels elongated, membrane-bound tubular organelles in several cell types, including cultured human monocytes, thioglycolate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages, and the macrophage-like cell line J774.2. These tubular structures can be identified as lysosomes by acid phosphatase histochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of cathepsin L. The abundance of tubular lysosomes is markedly increased by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. When labeled by pinocytosis of microperoxidase and examined by electron microscopic histochemistry, the tubular lysosomes have an outside diameter of ≅ 75 nm and a length of several micrometers; they radiate from the cell's centrosphere in alignment with cytoplasmic microtubules and intermediate filaments. Incubation of phorbol myristate acetate-treated macrophages at 40C or in medium containing 5 μM colchicine or nocodazole at 370C leads to disassembly of microtubules and fragmentation of the tubular lysosomes. Return of the cultures to 370C or removal of nocodazole from the medium leads to reassembly of microtubules and the reappearance of tubular lysosomes within 10-20 min. The authors conclude that microtubules are essential for the maintenance of tubular lysosome morphology and that, in macrophages, a significant proportion of the lysosomal compartment is contained within these tubular structures

  13. Dissecting the function and assembly of acentriolar microtubule organizing centers in Drosophila cells in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Baumbach

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2--the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems. We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs.

  14. Dissecting the function and assembly of acentriolar microtubule organizing centers in Drosophila cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Janina; Novak, Zsofia Anna; Raff, Jordan W; Wainman, Alan

    2015-05-01

    Acentriolar microtubule organizing centers (aMTOCs) are formed during meiosis and mitosis in several cell types, but their function and assembly mechanism is unclear. Importantly, aMTOCs can be overactive in cancer cells, enhancing multipolar spindle formation, merotelic kinetochore attachment and aneuploidy. Here we show that aMTOCs can form in acentriolar Drosophila somatic cells in vivo via an assembly pathway that depends on Asl, Cnn and, to a lesser extent, Spd-2--the same proteins that appear to drive mitotic centrosome assembly in flies. This finding enabled us to ablate aMTOC formation in acentriolar cells, and so perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of aMTOCs to acentriolar mitotic spindle formation. Here we show that although aMTOCs can nucleate microtubules, they do not detectably increase the efficiency of acentriolar spindle assembly in somatic fly cells. We find that they are required, however, for robust microtubule array assembly in cells without centrioles that also lack microtubule nucleation from around the chromatin. Importantly, aMTOCs are also essential for dynein-dependent acentriolar spindle pole focusing and for robust cell proliferation in the absence of centrioles and HSET/Ncd (a kinesin essential for acentriolar spindle pole focusing in many systems). We propose an updated model for acentriolar spindle pole coalescence by the molecular motors Ncd/HSET and dynein in conjunction with aMTOCs. PMID:26020779

  15. Microtubule-based transport -basic mechanisms, traffic rules and role in neurological pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.M. Franker (Mariella); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMicrotubule-based transport is essential for neuronal function because of the large distances that must be traveled by various building blocks and cellular materials. Recent studies in various model systems have unraveled several regulatory mechanisms and traffic rules that control the s

  16. Application of quasi-steady state methods to molecular motor transport on microtubules in fungal hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvergne, Duncan; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2015-08-21

    We consider bidirectional transport of cargo by molecular motors dynein and kinesin that walk along microtubules, and/or diffuse in the cell. The motors compete to transport cargo in opposite directions with respect to microtubule polarity (towards the plus or minus end of the microtubule). In recent work, Gou et al. (2014) used a hierarchical set of models, each consisting of continuum transport equations to track the evolution of motors and their cargo (early endosomes) in the specific case of the fungus Ustilago maydis. We complement their work using a framework of quasi-steady state analysis developed by Newby and Bressloff (2010) and Bressloff and Newby (2013) to reduce the models to an approximating steady state Fokker-Plank equation. This analysis allows us to find analytic approximations to the steady state solutions in many cases where the full models are not easily solved. Consequently, we can make predictions about parameter dependence of the resulting spatial distributions. We also characterize the overall rates of bulk transport and diffusion, and how these are related to state transition parameters, motor speeds, microtubule polarity distribution, and specific assumptions made. PMID:25960428

  17. Recursive Advice for Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terepeta, Michal Tomasz; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    Aspect-oriented programming is a programming paradigm that is often praised for the ability to create modular software and separate cross-cutting concerns. Recently aspects have been also considered in the context of coordination languages, offering similar advantages. However, introducing aspect...... systems. Even though primarily used for analysis of recursive programs, we are able to adapt them to fit this new context....

  18. Coordination of mobile labor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steiner, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 1 (2008), s. 25-46. ISSN 0022-0531 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : coordination * general equilibrium * global game s Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2008

  19. Facets of coordination chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwala, BV

    1993-01-01

    A concise account of coordination chemistry since its inception is given here together with some of the newer significant facets. This book covers a broad spectrum of various topics on Environment, Cyclic Voltammetry, Chromatography, Metal Complexes of biological interest, Alkoxides, NMR spectroscopy and others. These are useful to the scientific community engaged in the field of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry.

  20. Coordinating Work with Groupware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Jens Kaaber; Simonsen, Jesper

    One important goal of employing groupware is to make possible complex collaboration between geographically distributed groups. This requires a dual transformation of both technology and work practice. The challenge is to re­duce the complexity of the coordination work by successfully inte­grating...

  1. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on microtubule organisation and morphogenesis in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The involvement of the cytoskeleton in the development of somatic embryos was studied in Larix x eurolepis. Protoplasts were isolated from both somatic embryo-regenerating and non-generating cultures and fractionated on a discontinuous Percoll density gradient, whereby a highly embryogenic protoplast fraction could be enriched. Protoplasts of two cell lines of Larix eurolepis, one with regenerating potential and one lacking this potential, were compared. In contrast to the non-regenerating line were a protoplast-like organisation of the cortical microtubules was maintained, re-organisation of this microtubular network occurred in the regenerable line after only three days of culture, indicating that organised growth was occurring. However, this early organisation of cortical microtubules may not always be a valid marker for regenerable and non-regenerable material. In order to investigate the effect of ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation on the microtubule cytoskeleton, protoplasts were isolated from leaves of Petunia hybrida and subjected to four different doses of UV-B radiation. The organisation of the microtubules and the progression of the cells through the cell cycle was observed at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation. UV-B induced breaks in the cortical microtubules resulting in shorter fragments with increasing amounts of radiation. Also, the division of the protoplasts was delayed, which was related to the absence of an microtubule network. Whole Petunia plants were grown in growth chambers in the presence and absence of UV-B. The plants responded to UV-B with increased rates of CO2 assimilation, a 60% increase in UV-screening compounds and the changes in the morphology of the leaves that were reflected in a 70-100% increase in leaf area and 20% decrease in leaf thickness. The microtubules of the epidermal cells was not affected by UV-B, nor was the number of epidermal cells (per unit area). The increase in leaf area in the UV-treated plants

  2. The plant cytoskeleton: recent advances in the study of the plant microtubule-associated proteins MAP-65, MAP-190 and the Xenopus MAP215-like protein, MOR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Patrick J; Hawkins, Timothy J; Igarashi, Hisako; Kaloriti, Despina; Smertenko, Andrei

    2002-12-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is a dynamic filamentous structure involved in many key processes in plant cell morphogenesis including nuclear and cell division, deposition of cell wall, cell expansion, organelle movement and secretion. The principal microtubule protein is tubulin, which associates to form the wall of the tubule. In addition, various associated proteins bind microtubules either to anchor, cross-link or regulate the microtubule network within cells. Biochemical, molecular biological and genetic approaches are being successfully used to identify these microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) in plants, and we describe recent progress on three of these proteins. PMID:12516862

  3. The polarity protein Par6 is coupled to the microtubule network during molluscan early embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Taihei [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Shimizu, Miho [Kuroda Chiromorphology Team, ERATO-SORST, JST, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kuroda, Reiko, E-mail: ckuroda@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kuroda Chiromorphology Team, ERATO-SORST, JST, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The cDNAs encoding Par6 and aPKC homologues were cloned from the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. {yields} L. stagnalis Par6 directly interacts with tubulin and microtubules and localizes to the microtubule cytoskeleton during the early embryogenesis. {yields} Identical sequence and localization of LsPar6 for the dextral and the sinistral snails exclude the possibility of the gene being the primary determinant of body handedness. -- Abstract: Cell polarity, which directs the orientation of asymmetric cell division and segregation of fate determinants, is a fundamental feature of development and differentiation. Regulators of polarity have been extensively studied, and the critical importance of the Par (partitioning-defective) complex as the polarity machinery is now recognized in a wide range of eukaryotic systems. The Par polarity module is evolutionarily conserved, but its mechanism and cooperating factors vary among different systems. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis homologue of partitioning-defective 6 (Lspar6). The protein product LsPar6 shows high affinity for microtubules and localizes to the mitotic apparatus during embryonic cell division. In vitro assays revealed direct binding of LsPar6 to tubulin and microtubules, which is the first evidence of the direct interaction between the two proteins. The interaction is mediated by two distinct regions of LsPar6 both located in the N-terminal half. Atypical PKC, a functional partner of Par6, was also found to localize to the mitotic spindle. These results suggest that the L. stagnalis Par complex employs the microtubule network in cell polarity processes during the early embryogenesis. Identical sequence and localization of LsPar6 for the dextral and the sinistral snails exclude the possibility of the gene being the primary determinant of handedness.

  4. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Liang; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable ef...

  5. Principles of Coordination Polymerisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuran, Witold

    2001-11-01

    The first all-inclusive text covering coordination polymerisation, including important classes of non-hydrocarbon monomers. Charting the achievements and progress in the field, in terms of both basic and industrial research, this book offers a unified and complete overview of coordination polymerisation. Provides detailed description of the historical development of the subject Presents a unified view of catalysis, mechanisms, structures and utility Encourages learning through a step-by-step progression from basic to in-depth text Features end-of-chapter exercises to reinforce understanding Offers a full bibliography and comprehensive literature review Requisite reading for research students studying introductory and advanced courses in; polymer science, catalysis and polymerisation catalysis, and valuable reference for researchers and technicians in industry.

  6. Communication and interference coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Blasco-Serrano, Ricardo; Thobaben, Ragnar; Skoglund, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    We study the problem of controlling the interference created to an external observer by a communication processes. We model the interference in terms of its type (empirical distribution), and we analyze the consequences of placing constraints on the admissible type. Considering a single interfering link, we characterize the communication-interference capacity region. Then, we look at a scenario where the interference is jointly created by two users allowed to coordinate their actions prior to...

  7. Advertising and Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    We show that when relevant market information such as price is difficult to communicate, advertising plays a key role in bringing about optimal coordination of purchase behavior: an efficient firm uses advertising expenditures in place of price to inform sophisticated consumers that it offers a better deal. This provides a theoretical explanation for Benham's (1972) empirical association of the ability to advertise with lower prices and larger scale. We find that advertising improves welfare ...

  8. Global coordination: weighted voting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Erik Lane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to halt the depletion of global ecological capital, a number of different kinds of meetings between Governments of countries in the world has been scheduled. The need for global coordination of environmental policies has become ever more obvious, supported by more and more evidence of the running down of ecological capital. But there are no formal or binding arrangements in sight, as global environmental coordination suffers from high transaction costs (qualitative voting. The CO2 equivalent emissions, resulting in global warming, are driven by the unstoppable economic expansion in the global market economy, employing mainly fossil fuel generated energy, although at the same time lifting sharply the GDP per capita of several emerging countries. Only global environmental coordination on the successful model of the World Band and the IMF (quantitative voting can stem the rising emissions numbers and stop further environmental degradation. However, the system of weighted voting in the WB and the IMF must be reformed by reducing the excessive voting power disparities, for instance by reducing all member country votes by the cube root expression.

  9. Improving Project Manufacturing Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpivaara Ville

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop firms’ project manufacturing coordination. The development will be made by centralizing the manufacturing information flows in one system. To be able to centralize information, a deep user need assessment is required. After user needs have been identified, the existing system will be developed to match these needs. The theoretical background is achieved through exploring the literature of project manufacturing, development project success factors and different frameworks and tools for development project execution. The focus of this research is rather in customer need assessment than in system’s technical expertise. To ensure the deep understanding of customer needs this study is executed by action research method. As a result of this research the information system for project manufacturing coordination was developed to respond revealed needs of the stakeholders. The new system improves the quality of the manufacturing information, eliminates waste in manufacturing coordination processes and offers a better visibility to the project manufacturing. Hence it provides a solid base for the further development of project manufacturing.

  10. Synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Quantitatively Detects Angstrom Level Changes in the Average Radius of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules Decorated with the Microtubule-Associated-Protein Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myung Chul; Raviv, Uri; Needleman, Daniel J; Safinya, Cyrus R [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Li, Youli [Materials Research Laboratory, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Miller, Herbert P; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C [Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Departments, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Kim, Mahn Won, E-mail: myungchul.choi@gmail.com, E-mail: safinya@mrl.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, S. Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    With the emerging proteomics era the scientific community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the structures and functions of a large number of self-assembling proteins. Here, our study was concerned with the effect of the microtubule-associated-protein (MAP) tau on the assembled structure of taxol-stabilized microtubules. Significantly, the synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique is able to quantitatively detect angstrom level changes in the average diameter of the microtubules modeled as a simple hollow nanotube with a fixed wall thickness. We show that the electrostatic binding of MAP tau isoforms to taxol-stabilized MTs leads to a controlled increase in the average radius of microtubules with increasing coverage of tau on the MT surface. The increase in the average diameter results from an increase in the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs upon binding of MAP tau.

  11. Effects of ultraviolet radiation on microtubule organisation and morphogenesis in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staxen, I.

    1994-09-01

    The involvement of the cytoskeleton in the development of somatic embryos was studied in Larix x eurolepis. Protoplasts were isolated from both somatic embryo-regenerating and non-generating cultures and fractionated on a discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Protoplasts of two cell lines of Larix eurolepis, one with regenerating potential and one lacking this potential, were compared. In contrast to the non-regenerating line were a protoplast-like organisation of the cortical microtubules was maintained, re-organisation of this microtubular network occurred in the regenerable line after only three days of culture, indicating that organised growth was occurring. However, this early organisation of cortical microtubules may not always be a valid marker for regenerable and non-regenerable material. In order to investigate the effect of ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-320 nm) radiation on the microtubule cytoskeleton, protoplasts were isolated from leaves of Petunia hybrida and subjected to four different doses of UV-B radiation. The organisation of the microtubules and the progression of the cells through the cell cycle was observed at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after irradiation. UV-B induced breaks in the cortical microtubules resulting in shorter fragments with increasing amounts of radiation. Also, the division of the protoplasts was delayed. Whole Petunia plants were grown in growth chambers in the presence and absence of UV-B. The plants responded to UV-B with increased rates of CO{sub 2} assimilation, a 60% increase in UV-screening compounds and the changes in the morphology of the leaves that were reflected in a 70-100% increase in leaf area and 20% decrease in leaf thickness. The microtubules of the epidermal cells was not affected by UV-B, nor was the number of epidermal cells (per unit area). The increase in leaf area in the UV-treated plants appeared due to stimulation of cell division in the leaf meristems. 111 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs.

  12. Microtubule-binding protein doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) guides kinesin-3-mediated cargo transport to dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Joanna; Kapitein, Lukas C; Jaworski, Jacek; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2016-02-01

    In neurons, the polarized distribution of vesicles and other cellular materials is established through molecular motors that steer selective transport between axons and dendrites. It is currently unclear whether interactions between kinesin motors and microtubule-binding proteins can steer polarized transport. By screening all 45 kinesin family members, we systematically addressed which kinesin motors can translocate cargo in living cells and drive polarized transport in hippocampal neurons. While the majority of kinesin motors transport cargo selectively into axons, we identified five members of the kinesin-3 (KIF1) and kinesin-4 (KIF21) subfamily that can also target dendrites. We found that microtubule-binding protein doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) labels a subset of dendritic microtubules and is required for KIF1-dependent dense-core vesicles (DCVs) trafficking into dendrites and dendrite development. Our study demonstrates that microtubule-binding proteins can provide local signals for specific kinesin motors to drive polarized cargo transport. PMID:26758546

  13. Cytosolic Proteins From Tobacco Pollen Tubes That Crosslink Microtubules and Actin Filaments In Vitro Are Metabolic Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnoli, Silvia; Faleri, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Baskin, Tobias I.; Cresti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In plant cells, many processes require cooperative action of both microtubules and actin filaments, but proteins mediating interactions between these cytoskeletal members are mostly undiscovered. Here, we attempt to identify such proteins by affinity purification. Cytosol from Nicotiana tabacum (tob

  14. Effects of wild type tau and disease-linked tau mutations on microtubule organization and intracellular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dezhi; Feinstein, Stuart C; Valentine, Megan T

    2016-05-24

    We investigate the effects of transient expression of wild type (WT) and disease-linked mutations of tau (R406W, P301L, ΔN296) on cytoskeletal organization and cargo transport in COS-7 cells, which are natively tau-free. The introduction of tau proteins (either WT or mutant forms) leads to a dramatic restructuring of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as observed using immunofluorescence microscopy. Yet, this microtubule bundling and aggregation has a modest effect on the speed and travel distance of motor-driven cargo transport, as measured by the motions of fluorescently-labeled lysosomes. This suggests that localized transport events are insensitive to the global structure of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Importantly, we also found no evidence that the disease-linked tau mutants were particularly toxic; in fact we found that expression of mutant and WT tau had similar effects on overall microtubule structure and transport phenotypes. PMID:26674472

  15. Communication, leadership and coordination failure

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Lu; Montero, Maria; Possajennikov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Using experimental methods, this paper investigates the limits of communication and leadership in aiding group coordination in a minimum effort game. Choosing the highest effort is the payoff dominant Nash equilibrium in this game, and communication and leadership are expected to help in coordinating on such an equilibrium. We consider an environment in which the benefits of coordination are low compared to the cost of mis-coordination. In this environment, players converge to the most ineffi...

  16. Communication, Leadership and Coordination Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Dong; Maria Montero; Alex Possajennikov

    2015-01-01

    Using experimental methods, this paper investigates the limits of communication and leadership in aiding group coordination in a minimum effort game. Choosing the highest effort is the payoff dominant Nash equilibrium in this game, and communication and leadership are expected to help in coordinating on such an equilibrium. We consider an environment in which the benefits of coordination are low compared to the cost of mis-coordination. In this environment, players converge to the most ineffi...

  17. Modeling Students' Units Coordinating Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Steven James

    2014-01-01

    Primarily via constructivist teaching experiment methodology, units coordination (Steffe, 1992) has emerged as a useful construct for modeling students' psychological constructions pertaining to several mathematical domains, including counting sequences, whole number multiplicative conceptions, and fractions schemes. I describe how consideration of units coordination as a Piagetian (1970b) structure is useful for modeling units coordination across contexts. In this study, I extend teaching ...

  18. The Daughter Four-Membered Microtubule Rootlet Determines Anterior-Posterior Positioning of the Eyespot in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Joseph S; Gray, Miranda M.; Thompson, Mark D.; Horst, Cynthia J.; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristic geometry of the unicellular chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has contributed to its adoption as a model system for cellular asymmetry and organelle positioning. The eyespot, a photosensitive organelle, is localized asymmetrically in the cell at a precisely-defined position relative to the flagella and cytoskeletal microtubule rootlets. We have isolated a mutant, named pey1 for posterior eyespot, with variable microtubule rootlet lengths. The length of the acetylated da...

  19. Alcohol-Induced Alterations in Hepatic Microtubule Dynamics Can Be Explained by Impaired Histone Deacetylase 6 Function

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, Blythe D.; Joseph, Rohan A.; Kannarkat, George T.; Rutledge, Tara M.; Dean J. Tuma; Tuma, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    We have been using polarized, hepatic WIF-B cells to examine ethanol-induced liver injury. These cells polarize in culture and maintain numerous liver-specific activities including the ability to metabolize alcohol. Previously, we found that microtubules were more highly acetylated and more stable in ethanol-treated WIF-B cells and that increased microtubule acetylation required ethanol metabolism and was likely mediated by acetaldehyde. This study was aimed at identifying the mechanism respo...

  20. Image Reconstructions of Microtubules Decorated with Monomeric and Dimeric Kinesins: Comparison with X-Ray Structure and Implications for Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenger, A.; Sack, S.; Thormählen, M.; Marx, A.; Müller, J.; GROSS, H.; Mandelkow, E

    1998-01-01

    We have decorated microtubules with monomeric and dimeric kinesin constructs, studied their structure by cryoelectron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction, and compared the results with the x-ray crystal structure of monomeric and dimeric kinesin. A monomeric kinesin construct (rK354, containing only a short neck helix insufficient for coiled-coil formation) decorates microtubules with a stoichiometry of one kinesin head per tubulin subunit (α–β-heterodimer). The orientation ...

  1. Kar3Vik1, a member of the Kinesin-14 superfamily, shows a novel kinesin microtubule binding pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Rank, Katherine C.; Chen, Chun Ju; Cope, Julia; Porche, Ken; Hoenger, Andreas; Gilbert, Susan P.; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin-14 motors generate microtubule minus-end–directed force used in mitosis and meiosis. These motors are dimeric and operate with a nonprocessive powerstroke mechanism, but the role of the second head in motility has been unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Kinesin-14 Kar3 forms a heterodimer with either Vik1 or Cik1. Vik1 contains a motor homology domain that retains microtubule binding properties but lacks a nucleotide binding site. In this case, both heads are implicated in moti...

  2. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Amber L. Jolly; Chi-Hao Luan; Brendon E. Dusel; Sara F. Dunne; Michael Winding; Vishrut J. Dixit; Chloe Robins; Jennifer L. Saluk; David J. Logan; Anne E. Carpenter; Manu Sharma; Deborah Dean; Andrew R. Cohen; Vladimir I. Gelfand

    2016-01-01

    Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo”) occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an auto...

  3. A genome-wide RNAi screen for microtubule bundle formation and lysosome motility regulation in Drosophila S2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, Amber L.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Dusel, Brendon E.; Dunne, Sara Fernandez; Winding, Michael; Dixit, Vishrut J.; Robins, Chloe; Saluk, Jennifer L.; Logan, David J.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Sharma, Manu; Dean, Deborah; Cohen, Andrew R.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo”) occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins; the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automate...

  4. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubules arrays direct the growth and orientatio...

  5. The Tubulin Binding Mode of Microtubule Stabilizing Agents Studied by Electron Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, James H.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    Since tubulin was discovered in 1967, drug probes have been used to manipulate mechanisms of microtubule polymerization and disassembly. In parallel, advances in optical imagery, electron microscopy, along with both electron and X-ray diffraction have provided ability to "see" the molecular underpinning of these machines. Nanoscale mapping of different tubulin polymers formed in the presence of different drugs and cofactors provide a context for examining the dynamic features relevant to their biological activity. Models built from EM maps have been used to understand the binding of stabilizing drugs such as taxanes and epothilones, to predict more effective molecules, and to explain mutation based resistance. Here, we discuss drug binding in the context of different polymeric forms and propose a trigger mechanism associated with microtubules' dynamic instability.

  6. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...

  7. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Miragoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart.

  8. Asymptotic Analysis of Microtubule-Based Transport by Multiple Identical Molecular Motors

    CERN Document Server

    McKinley, Scott A; Fricks, John; Kramer, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    We describe a system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) which model the interaction between processive molecular motors, such as kinesin and dynein, and the biomolecular cargo they tow as part of microtubule-based intracellular transport. We show that the classical experimental environment fits within a parameter regime which is qualitatively distinct from conditions one expects to find in living cells. Through an asymptotic analysis of our system of SDEs, we develop a means for applying in vitro observations of the nonlinear response by motors to forces induced on the attached cargo to make analytical predictions for two parameter regimes that have thus far eluded direct experimental observation: 1) highly viscous in vivo transport and 2) dynamics when multiple identical motors are attached to the cargo and microtubule.

  9. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization. PMID:14660552

  10. Microtubule Polymerization Functions in Hypersensitive Response and Accumulation of H2O2 in Wheat Induced by the Stripe Rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xinjie; Xu, Yuanliu; Ma, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The plant cytoskeleton, including microtubules and microfilaments, is one of the important factors in determining the polarity of cell division and growth, as well as the interaction of plants with invading pathogens. In defense responses of wheat against the stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) infection, hypersensitive response is the most crucial event to prevent the spread of pathogens. In order to reveal the effect of microtubules on the hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 accumulation in the interaction of wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Suwon 11 with an incompatible race, CYR23, wheat leaves were treated with microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin, before inoculation. The results showed that the frequency of infection sites with hypersensitive response occurrence was significantly reduced, and hypersensitive cell death in wheat leaves was suppressed compared to the control. In addition, the frequency and the incidence of infected cells with H2O2 accumulation were also reduced after the treatment with oryzalin. Those results indicated that microtubules are related to hypersensitive response and H2O2 accumulation in wheat induced by the stripe rust, and depolymerization of microtubules reduces the resistance of plants to pathogen infection in incompatible interaction, suggesting that microtubules play a potential role in the expression of resistance of wheat against the stripe rust fungus. PMID:27610380

  11. The transcription factor Egr3 is a putative component of the microtubule organizing center in mouse oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Shin

    Full Text Available The early growth response (Egr family of zinc finger transcription factors consists of 4 members. During an investigation of Egr factor localization in mouse ovaries, we noted that Egr3 exhibits a subcellular localization that overlaps with the meiotic spindle in oocytes. Using Egr3-specific antibodies, we establish that Egr3 co-localizes with the spindle and cytosolic microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs in oocytes during meiotic maturation. Notably, the Egr3 protein appears to accumulate around γ-tubulin in MTOCs. Nocodazole treatment, which induces microtubule depolymerization, resulted in the disruption of spindle formation and Egr3 localization, suggesting that Egr3 localization is dependent on the correct configuration of the spindle. Shortly after warming of vitrified oocytes, growing arrays of microtubules were observed near large clusters of Egr3. An in vitro microtubule interaction assay showed that Egr3 does not directly interact with polymerized microtubules. Egr3 localization on the spindle was sustained in early preimplantation mouse embryos, but this pattern did not persist until the blastocyst stage. Collectively, our result shows for the first time that the Egr3 a transcription factor may play a novel non-transcriptional function during microtubule organization in mouse oocytes.

  12. GTSE1 is a microtubule plus-end tracking protein that regulates EB1-dependent cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimilano Scolz

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell migration is a highly complex process that is often compromised when cancer cells become metastatic. The microtubule cytoskeleton is necessary for cell migration, but how microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins regulate multiple pathways promoting cell migration remains unclear. Microtubule plus-end binding proteins (+TIPs are emerging as important players in many cellular functions, including cell migration. Here we identify a +TIP, GTSE1, that promotes cell migration. GTSE1 accumulates at growing microtubule plus ends through interaction with the EB1+TIP. The EB1-dependent +TIP activity of GTSE1 is required for cell migration, as well as for microtubule-dependent disassembly of focal adhesions. GTSE1 protein levels determine the migratory capacity of both nontransformed and breast cancer cell lines. In breast cancers, increased GTSE1 expression correlates with invasive potential, tumor stage, and time to distant metastasis, suggesting that misregulation of GTSE1 expression could be associated with increased invasive potential.

  13. A nematode microtubule-associated protein, PTL-1, closely resembles its mammalian counterparts in overall molecular architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashi, Yurika; Kotani, Susumu; Adachi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    The mammalian microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), MAP2, MAP4, and τ, are structurally similar and considered to be evolutionarily related. The primary structure of a nematode MAP, PTL-1, also reportedly resembles those of the MAPs, but only in a small portion of the molecule. In this study, we elucidated the overall domain organization of PTL-1, using a molecular dissection technique. Firstly, we isolated nematode microtubules and proved that the recombinant PTL-1 binds to nematode and porcine microtubules with similar affinities. Then, the recombinant PTL-1 was genetically dissected to generate four shorter polypeptides, and their microtubule-binding and assembly promoting activities were assessed, using porcine microtubules and tubulin. PTL-1 was found to consist of two parts, microtubule-binding and projection domains, with the former further divided into three functionally distinct subdomains. The molecular architecture of PTL-1 was proved to be quite analogous to its mammalian counterparts, MAP2, MAP4, and τ, strongly supporting their evolutionary relationships. PMID:26906882

  14. Microtubule inhibitors: structure-activity analyses suggest rational models to identify potentially active compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, H L; Kelley, C; Pereira, T.; Grogl, M

    1996-01-01

    Trifluralin, a dinitroaniline microtubule inhibitor currently in use as an herbicide, has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei, and several species of Leishmania, in vitro. As a topical formulation, trifluralin is also effective in vivo (in BALB/c mice) against Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana. Although trifluralin and other dinitroaniline herbicides show significant activity as antiparasitic compounds, disputed indications of potential ...

  15. Effect of Pin1 or Microtubule Binding on Dephosphorylation of FTDP-17 Mutant Tau*

    OpenAIRE

    Yotsumoto, Kensuke; Saito, Taro; Asada, Akiko; Oikawa, Takayuki; Kimura, Taeko; Uchida, Chiyoko; Ishiguro, Koichi; Uchida, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Masato; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative tauopathies, including Alzheimer disease, are characterized by abnormal hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. One group of tauopathies, known as frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), is directly associated with mutations of the gene tau. However, it is unknown why mutant Tau is highly phosphorylated in the patient brain. In contrast to in vivo high phosphorylation, FTDP-17 Tau is phosphorylated less than wild-t...

  16. Microtubule-Stabilizing Drugs from Marine Sponges: Focus on Peloruside A and Zampanolide

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, John H.; A. Jonathan Singh; Northcote, Peter T.

    2010-01-01

    Marine sponges are an excellent source of bioactive secondary metabolites with potential therapeutic value in the treatment of diseases. One group of compounds of particular interest is the microtubule-stabilizing agents, the most well-known compound of this group being paclitaxel (Taxol®), an anti-cancer compound isolated from the bark and leaves of the Pacific yew tree. This review focuses on two of the more recent additions to this important class of drugs, peloruside A and zampanolide, bo...

  17. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Savoian, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In par...

  18. Microtubule stabilizer ameliorates synaptic function and behavior in a mouse model for schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieux, Annie; Salin, Paul; Schweitzer, Annie; Bégou, Mélina; Pachoud, Bastien; Brun, Philippe; Gory-Fauré, Sylvie; Kujala, Pekka; Suaud-Chagny, Marie-Françoise; Höfle, Gerhard; Job, Didier

    2006-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: Recent data suggest that cytoskeletal defects may play a role in schizophrenia. We previously imitated features of schizophrenia in an animal model by disrupting gene coding for a microtubule-associated protein called STOP. STOP-null mice display synaptic defects in glutamatergic neurons, hyper-dopaminergy, and severe behavioral disorders. Synaptic and behavioral deficits are amended by neuroleptic treatment in STOP-null mice, providing an attractive mode...

  19. Biophysical measurements of cells, microtubules, and DNA with an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenica, Luka M.; Contee, Clay; Cabrejo, Raysa; Kurek, Matthew; Deveney, Edward F.; Carter, Ashley R.

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are ubiquitous in research laboratories and have recently been priced for use in teaching laboratories. Here, we review several AFM platforms and describe various biophysical experiments that could be done in the teaching laboratory using these instruments. In particular, we focus on experiments that image biological materials (cells, microtubules, and DNA) and quantify biophysical parameters including membrane tension, persistence length, contour length, and the drag force.

  20. Identification of interphase functions for the NIMA kinase involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Govindaraghavan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Never in Mitosis A (NIMA kinase (the founding member of the Nek family of kinases has been considered a mitotic specific kinase with nuclear restricted roles in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. By extending to A. nidulans the results of a synthetic lethal screen performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the NIMA ortholog KIN3, we identified a conserved genetic interaction between nimA and genes encoding proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT pathway. Absence of ESCRT pathway functions in combination with partial NIMA function causes enhanced cell growth defects, including an inability to maintain a single polarized dominant cell tip. These genetic insights suggest NIMA potentially has interphase functions in addition to its established mitotic functions at nuclei. We therefore generated endogenously GFP-tagged NIMA (NIMA-GFP which was fully functional to follow its interphase locations using live cell spinning disc 4D confocal microscopy. During interphase some NIMA-GFP locates to the tips of rapidly growing cells and, when expressed ectopically, also locates to the tips of cytoplasmic microtubules, suggestive of non-nuclear interphase functions. In support of this, perturbation of NIMA function either by ectopic overexpression or through partial inactivation results in marked cell tip growth defects with excess NIMA-GFP promoting multiple growing cell tips. Ectopic NIMA-GFP was found to locate to the plus ends of microtubules in an EB1 dependent manner, while impairing NIMA function altered the dynamic localization of EB1 and the cytoplasmic microtubule network. Together, our genetic and cell biological analyses reveal novel non-nuclear interphase functions for NIMA involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway for normal polarized fungal cell tip growth. These insights extend the roles of NIMA both spatially and temporally and indicate that this conserved protein kinase could help integrate cell

  1. Drosophila Stathmin: A Microtubule-destabilizing Factor Involved in Nervous System Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ozon, Sylvie; Guichet, Antoine; Gavet, Olivier; Roth, Siegfried; Sobel, André

    2002-01-01

    Stathmin is a ubiquitous regulatory phosphoprotein, the generic element of a family of neural phosphoproteins in vertebrates that possess the capacity to bind tubulin and interfere with microtubule dynamics. Although stathmin and the other proteins of the family have been associated with numerous cell regulations, their biological roles remain elusive, as in particular inactivation of the stathmin gene in the mouse resulted in no clear deleterious phenotype. We identified stathmin phosphoprot...

  2. Mirror-symmetric microtubule assembly and cell interactions drive lumen formation in the zebrafish neural rod

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Clare E.; Ren, Xiaoyun; Ward, Laura C; Girdler, Gemma C; Araya, Claudio; Green, Mary J; Clark, Brian S.; Link, Brian A.; Clarke, Jonathan D. W.

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the cellular and subcellular events that occur in the centre of the developing zebrafish neural rod, we have uncovered a novel mechanism of cell polarisation during lumen formation. Cells from each side of the neural rod interdigitate across the tissue midline. This is necessary for localisation of apical junctional proteins to the region where cells intersect the tissue midline. Cells assemble a mirror-symmetric microtubule cytoskeleton around the tissue midline, which is necess...

  3. The conserved protein kinase Ipl1 regulates microtubule binding to kinetochores in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Biggins, Sue; Fedor F. Severin; Bhalla, Needhi; Sassoon, Ingrid; Hyman, Anthony A.; Murray, Andrew W.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome segregation depends on kinetochores, the structures that mediate chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle. We isolated mutants in IPL1, which encodes a protein kinase, in a screen for budding yeast mutants that have defects in sister chromatid separation and segregation. Cytological tests show that ipl1 mutants can separate sister chromatids but are defective in chromosome segregation. Kinetochores assembled in extracts from ipl1 mutants show altered binding to microtubules. Ip...

  4. Infrared dynamics of collagen, microtubules, and water: Biophysical research enabling biomedical FEL applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental evidence is presented for FEL induced photothermal protein chemistry and FEL modulation of microtubule dynamics. These findings are discussed in terms of previous investigations of FEL tissue ablation to explore the importance of the micropulse structure of the Mark-III FEL. We propose various roles for localized heating in FEL modulation of the dynamics of biological macromolecules. Potential medical applications are described. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Uniform polarity microtubule assemblies imaged in native brain tissue by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dombeck, Daniel A.; Kasischke, Karl A.; Vishwasrao, Harshad D.; Ingelsson, Martin; Hyman, Bradley T.; Webb, Watt W.

    2003-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) ensemble polarity is a diagnostic determinant of the structure and function of neuronal processes. Here, polarized MT structures are selectively imaged with second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in native brain tissue. This SHG is found to colocalize with axons in both brain slices and cultured neurons. Because SHG arises only from noninversion symmetric structures, the uniform polarity of axonal MTs leads to the observed signal, whereas the mixed polarity in dend...

  6. Host Cell Invasion by Toxoplasma gondii Is Temporally Regulated by the Host Microtubule Cytoskeleton ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Kristin R.; Morrissette, Naomi S.; LaChapelle, Stephanie; Blader, Ira J.

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that invades and replicates within most nucleated cells of warm-blooded animals. The basis for this wide host cell tropism is unknown but could be because parasites invade host cells using distinct pathways and/or repertoires of host factors. Using synchronized parasite invasion assays, we found that host microtubule disruption significantly reduces parasite invasion into host cells early after stimulating parasite invasion but...

  7. Proper Microtubule Structure Is Vital for Timely Progression through Meiosis in Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Akira Yamashita; Yoshihiro Fujita; Masayuki Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe normally reproduce by mitotic division in the haploid state. When subjected to nutrient starvation, two haploid cells fuse and undergo karyogamy, forming a diploid cell that initiates meiosis to form four haploid spores. Here, we show that deletion of the mal3 gene, which encodes a homolog of microtubule regulator EB1, produces aberrant asci carrying more than four spores. The mal3 deletion mutant cells have a disordered cytoplasmic microtu...

  8. Opposing microtubule motors control motility, morphology and cargo segregation during ER-to-Golgi transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Brown

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently demonstrated that dynein and kinesin motors drive multiple aspects of endosomal function in mammalian cells. These functions include driving motility, maintaining morphology (notably through providing longitudinal tension to support vesicle fission, and driving cargo sorting. Microtubule motors drive bidirectional motility during traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi. Here, we have examined the role of microtubule motors in transport carrier motility, morphology, and domain organization during ER-to-Golgi transport. We show that, consistent with our findings for endosomal dynamics, microtubule motor function during ER-to-Golgi transport of secretory cargo is required for motility, morphology, and cargo sorting within vesicular tubular carriers en route to the Golgi. Our data are consistent with previous findings that defined roles for dynein-1, kinesin-1 (KIF5B and kinesin-2 in this trafficking step. Our high resolution tracking data identify some intriguing aspects. Depletion of kinesin-1 reduces the number of motile structures seen, which is in line with other findings relating to the role of kinesin-1 in ER export. However, those transport carriers that were produced had a much greater run length suggesting that this motor can act as a brake on anterograde motility. Kinesin-2 depletion did not significantly reduce the number of motile transport carriers but did cause a similar increase in run length. These data suggest that kinesins act as negative regulators of ER-to-Golgi transport. Depletion of dynein not only reduced the number of motile carriers formed but also caused tubulation of carriers similar to that seen for sorting nexin-coated early endosomes. Our data indicated that the previously observed anterograde–retrograde polarity of transport carriers in transit to the Golgi from the ER is maintained by microtubule motor function.

  9. Long-range cooperative binding of kinesin to a microtubule in the presence of ATP

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, Etsuko; Sakai, Hiroyuki; Kaseda, Kuniyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Interaction of kinesin-coated latex beads with a single microtubule (MT) was directly observed by fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of ATP, binding of a kinesin bead to the MT facilitated the subsequent binding of other kinesin beads to an adjacent region on the MT that extended for micrometers in length. This cooperative binding was not observed in the presence of ADP or 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), where binding along the MT was random. Cooperative binding also was induced ...

  10. Role of microtubules in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein

    OpenAIRE

    Más, Paloma; Beachy, Roger N.

    2000-01-01

    Despite its central role in virus infection, little is known about the mechanisms of intracellular trafficking of virus components within infected cells. In this study, we followed the dynamics of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (MP) distribution in living protoplasts after disruption of microtubules (MTs) by cold treatment and subsequent rewarming to 29°C. At early stages of infection, cold treatment (4°C) caused the accumulation of MP fused to green fluores...

  11. Computational Modeling Reveals Optimal Strategy for Kinase Transport by Microtubules to Nerve Terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Koon, Yen Ling; Koh, Cheng Gee; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins by motors along cytoskeletal filaments is crucial to the proper functioning of many eukaryotic cells. Since most proteins are synthesized at the cell body, mechanisms are required to deliver them to the growing periphery. In this article, we use computational modeling to study the strategies of protein transport in the context of JNK (c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase) transport along microtubules to the terminals of neuronal cells. One such strategy for protein tr...

  12. Pronounced and Extensive Microtubule Defects in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae DIS3 Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Sarah B.; Kiss, Daniel L.; Turk, Edward; Tartakoff, Alan M.; Andrulis, Erik D

    2011-01-01

    Subunits of the RNA processing exosome assemble into structurally distinct protein complexes that function in disparate cellular compartments and RNA metabolic pathways. Here, in a genetic, cell biological, and transcriptomic analysis, we examine the role of Dis3 – an essential polypeptide with endo- and 3’ to 5’ exo-ribonuclease activity – in cell cycle progression. We present several lines of evidence that perturbation of DIS3 affects microtubule (MT) localization and structure in Saccharom...

  13. Immunocytochemical localization of microtubule-associated protein 1 in rat cerebellum using monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibodies showed that microtubule-associated protein 1 (MAP1) has a restricted cellular distribution in the rat cerebellum. Anti-MAP1 staining was found only in neurons, where it was much stronger in dendrites than in axons. There were striking variations in the apparent concentration of MAP1 in different classes of neurons. Purkinje cells were the most strongly labeled, while granule cell neurons gave a faint, threshold-level reaction with the an...

  14. Modulation of Golgi-associated microtubule nucleation throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Ana Rita Ramada; Zhu, Xiaodong; Miller, Paul; Gu, Guoqiang; Maiato, Helder; Kaverina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    A microtubule (MT) sub-population that emanates from Golgi membrane has been recently shown to comprise a significant part of MT network in interphase cells. In this study, we address whether Golgi membrane, which is being extensively remodeled throughout the cell cycle, retains its ability to nucleate MTs at diverse cell cycle stages. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that Golgi-derived MTs form at multiple stages of the cell cycle, including G1, G2 and distinct pha...

  15. Mechanism for the catastrophe-promoting activity of the microtubule destabilizer Op18/stathmin

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Kamlesh K.; Li, Chunlei; Duan, Aranda; Alberico, Emily O.; Kim, Oleg V.; Alber, Mark S.; Goodson, Holly V.

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is a dynamic polymer network that plays a crucial role in cell function and disease. MT assembly and dynamics are precisely controlled; a key regulator is the MT destabilizer known as stathmin. Stathmin’s mechanism of action remains controversial: one well-supported model is that it reduces polymer indirectly by sequestering MT subunits; the alternative is that it acts directly on MTs by an as yet unknown mechanism. We provide a resolution to this debate by p...

  16. Coordination Processes in International Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The EU is not a member of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), but relatively elaborate EU coordination takes place anyway. This paper addresses two research questions: 1) How is it possible to evaluate the coordination of the EU in its specific observable configuration in the ILO?, and 2......) To what outcome does this coordination lead and why? Based on an analysis of EU coordination before and during the International Labour Conference in 2005, and on a comparison with coordination processes of the IMEC group, it is found that the Commission and the Presidency act as twin-agents vis...

  17. SAS-6 engineering reveals interdependence between cartwheel and microtubules in determining centriole architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Manuel; Noga, Akira; Frey, Daniel; Hamel, Virginie; Guichard, Paul; Kraatz, Sebastian H W; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Hosner, Sarah; Flückiger, Isabelle; Jaussi, Rolf; Wieser, Mara M; Thieltges, Katherine M; Deupi, Xavier; Müller, Daniel J; Kammerer, Richard A; Gönczy, Pierre; Hirono, Masafumi; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-04-01

    Centrioles are critical for the formation of centrosomes, cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. They are thought to assemble around a nine-fold symmetric cartwheel structure established by SAS-6 proteins. Here, we have engineered Chlamydomonas reinhardtii SAS-6-based oligomers with symmetries ranging from five- to ten-fold. Expression of a SAS-6 mutant that forms six-fold symmetric cartwheel structures in vitro resulted in cartwheels and centrioles with eight- or nine-fold symmetries in vivo. In combination with Bld10 mutants that weaken cartwheel-microtubule interactions, this SAS-6 mutant produced six- to eight-fold symmetric cartwheels. Concurrently, the microtubule wall maintained eight- and nine-fold symmetries. Expressing SAS-6 with analogous mutations in human cells resulted in nine-fold symmetric centrioles that exhibited impaired length and organization. Together, our data suggest that the self-assembly properties of SAS-6 instruct cartwheel symmetry, and lead us to propose a model in which the cartwheel and the microtubule wall assemble in an interdependent manner to establish the native architecture of centrioles. PMID:26999736

  18. Assembly of bipolar microtubule structures by passive cross-linkers and molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, D.; Goswami, D.; Kruse, K.

    2016-06-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. The spindle contains the midzone, a stable region of overlapping antiparallel microtubules, that is essential for maintaining bipolarity. Although a lot is known about the molecular players involved, the mechanism underlying midzone formation and maintenance is still poorly understood. We study the interaction of polar filaments that are cross-linked by molecular motors moving directionally and by passive cross-linkers diffusing along microtubules. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross-linkers can generate a stable finite overlap between a pair of antiparallel polar filaments. We develop a mean-field theory to study this mechanism in detail and investigate the influence of steric interactions between motors and passive cross-linkers on the overlap dynamics. In the presence of interspecies steric interactions, passive cross-linkers mimic the behavior of molecular motors and stable finite overlaps are generated even for non-cross-linking motors. Finally, we develop a mean-field theory for a bundle of aligned polar filaments and show that they can self-organize into a spindlelike pattern. Our work suggests possible ways as to how cells can generate spindle midzones and control their extensions.

  19. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, Alexander; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubule arrays direct the growth and orientation of cellulose microfibrils, forming part of the cell external skeleton and determine the shape of the cell. Reorientation of microtubules is also observed in reaction to light in phototropism and mechanical bending, thus suggesting universality of the proposed mechanism. PMID:26422460

  20. Theory of dynamic force spectroscopy for kinetochore-microtubule attachments: rupture force distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ghanti, Dipanwita

    2016-01-01

    Application of pulling force, under force-clamp conditions, to kinetochore-microtubule attachments {\\it in-vitro} revealed a catch-bond-like behavior. In an earlier paper ({\\it Sharma et al. Phys. Biol. (2014)} the physical origin of this apparently counter-intuitive phenomenon was traced to the nature of the force-dependence of the (de-)polymerization kinetics of the microtubules. In this brief communication that work is extended to situations where the external forced is ramped up till the attachment gets ruptured. In spite of the fundamental differences in the underlying mechanisms, the trend of variation of the rupture force distribution observed in our model kinetochore-microtubule attachment with the increasing loading rate is qualitatively similar to that displayed by the catch bonds formed in some other ligand-receptor systems. Our theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally by a straightforward modification of the protocol for controlling the force in the optical trap set up that was used in...

  1. Effects of colchicine treatment on the microtubule cytoskeleton and total protein during microsporogenesis in ginkgo biloba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of colchicine treatment on the microtubule cytoskeleton and the expression of proteins during microsporogenesis in G. biloba, as observed by immunofluorescence and 2-DE analysis in microsporangia treated with colchicine. The results showed the microtubule structures were affected by the colchicine in Ginkgo biloba, but the treatment effect of the colchicine had certain limitation in G. biloba. The percentage of microsporocytes whose microtubule structures were affected by the colchicine treatment was less than that observed in other plant species, not higher than 10 %. It was also found that the expression level of several endogenous proteins were changed in G. biloba when the microsporangia were treated with colchicine. Although we only tested colchicines was only tested in the present study, G. biloba appeared to possess factors that restricted the effect of such chemical agents. Our observations led us to speculate that the endogenous proteins are possibly responsible for the reduced effects of colchicine treatment in G. biloba. (author)

  2. TMAO promotes fibrillization and microtubule assembly activity in the C-terminal repeat region of tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramozzino, Francesca; Peterson, Dylan W; Farmer, Patrick; Gerig, J T; Graves, Donald J; Lew, John

    2006-03-21

    Alzheimer's disease most closely correlates with the appearance of the neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), intracellular fibrous aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein, tau. Under native conditions, tau is an unstructured protein, and its physical characterization has revealed no clues about the three-dimensional structural determinants essential for aggregation or microtubule binding. We have found that the natural osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) induces secondary structure in a C-terminal fragment of tau (tau(187)) and greatly promotes both self-aggregation and microtubule (MT) assembly activity. These processes could be distinguished, however, by a single-amino acid substitution (Tyr(310) --> Ala), which severely inhibited aggregation but had no effect on MT assembly activity. The inability of this mutant to aggregate could be completely reversed by TMAO. We propose a model in which TMAO induces partial order in tau(187), resulting in conformers that may correspond to on-pathway intermediates of either aggregation or tau-dependent MT assembly or both. These studies set the stage for future high-resolution structural characterization of these intermediates and the basis by which Tyr(310) may direct pathologic versus normal tau function. PMID:16533051

  3. Image-based compound profiling reveals a dual inhibitor of tyrosine kinase and microtubule polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule compounds are widely used as biological research tools and therapeutic drugs. Therefore, uncovering novel targets of these compounds should provide insights that are valuable in both basic and clinical studies. I developed a method for image-based compound profiling by quantitating the effects of compounds on signal transduction and vesicle trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Using six signal transduction molecules and two markers of vesicle trafficking, 570 image features were obtained and subjected to multivariate analysis. Fourteen compounds that affected EGFR or its pathways were classified into four clusters, based on their phenotypic features. Surprisingly, one EGFR inhibitor (CAS 879127-07-8) was classified into the same cluster as nocodazole, a microtubule depolymerizer. In fact, this compound directly depolymerized microtubules. These results indicate that CAS 879127-07-8 could be used as a chemical probe to investigate both the EGFR pathway and microtubule dynamics. The image-based multivariate analysis developed herein has potential as a powerful tool for discovering unexpected drug properties. PMID:27117592

  4. Identification of a microtubule-based cytoplasmic motor in the nematode C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. elegans contains a microtubule binding protein that resembles both dynein and kinesin. This protein has a MgATPase activity and copurifies on both sucrose gradients and DEAE Sephadex columns with a polypeptide of Mr approximately 400 kd. The ATPase activity is 50% inhibited by 10 microM vanadate, 1 mM N-ethyl maleimide, or 5 mM AMP-PNP; it is enhanced 50% by 0.2% Triton. The 400 kd polypeptide is cleaved at a single site by ultraviolet light in the presence of ATP and vanadate. In these ways, the protein resembles dynein. The protein also promotes ATP-dependent translocation of microtubules or axonemes, plus ends trailing. This property is kinesin-like; however, the motility is blocked by 5 microM vanadate, 1 mM N-ethyl maleimide, 0.5 mM ATP-gamma-S, or by ATP-vanadate-UV cleavage of the 400 kd polypeptide, characteristics that differ from kinesin. We propose that this protein is a novel microtubule translocator

  5. Network Coordinator Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himwich, Ed; Strand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This report includes an assessment of the network performance in terms of lost observing time for the 2012 calendar year. Overall, the observing time loss was about 12.3%, which is in-line with previous years. A table of relative incidence of problems with various subsystems is presented. The most significant identified causes of loss were electronics rack problems (accounting for about 21.8% of losses), antenna reliability (18.1%), RFI (11.8%), and receiver problems (11.7%). About 14.2% of the losses occurred for unknown reasons. New antennas are under development in the USA, Germany, and Spain. There are plans for new telescopes in Norway and Sweden. Other activities of the Network Coordinator are summarized.

  6. Coordination using Implicit Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Cuff, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We explore a basic noise-free signaling scenario where coordination and communication are naturally merged. A random signal X_1,...,X_n is processed to produce a control signal or action sequence A_1,...,A_n, which is observed and further processed (without access to X_1,...,X_n) to produce a third sequence B_1,...,B_n. The object of interest is the set of empirical joint distributions p(x,a,b) that can be achieved in this setting. We show that H(A) >= I(X;A,B) is the necessary and sufficient condition for achieving p(x,a,b) when no causality constraints are enforced on the encoders. We also give results for various causality constraints. This setting sheds light on the embedding of digital information in analog signals, a concept that is exploited in digital watermarking, steganography, cooperative communication, and strategic play in team games such as bridge.

  7. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  8. Coordinating distributed work: Exploring situated coordination with gaming-simulation

    OpenAIRE

    van Laere, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational work has become more and more distributed nowadays. Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide opportunities to improve coordination of distributed work, but in practice many organizations struggle with integrating new organizational structures, new work practices and ICT. In this dissertation we present a design approach for improving the coordination of distributed work. First we develop an integrated view on coordination, based on observations of current coordi...

  9. Dilution of individual microtubules observed in real time in vitro: evidence that cap size is small and independent of elongation rate

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Although the mechanism of microtubule dynamic instability is thought to involve the hydrolysis of tubulin-bound GTP, the mechanism of GTP hydrolysis and the basis of microtubule stability are controversial. Video microscopy of individual microtubules and dilution protocols were used to examine the size and lifetime of the stabilizing cap. Purified porcine brain tubulin (7-23 microM) was assembled at 37 degrees C onto both ends of isolated sea urchin axoneme fragments in a miniature flow cell ...

  10. A novel microtubule-modulating agent EM011 inhibits angiogenesis by repressing the HIF-1α axis and disrupting cell polarity and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Karna, Prasanthi; Rida, Padmashree C. G.; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Gao, Jinmin; Gupta, Meenakshi; Fritz, Andreas; Werner, Erica; Yates, Clayton; Zhou, Jun; Aneja, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial tubular morphogenesis relies on an exquisite interplay of microtubule dynamics and actin remodeling to propel directed cell migration. Recently, the dynamicity and integrity of microtubules have been implicated in the trafficking and efficient translation of the mRNA for HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor), the master regulator of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, microtubule-disrupting agents that perturb the HIF-1α axis and neovascularization cascade are attractive anticancer drug candida...

  11. Membrane/microtubule tip attachment complexes (TACs) allow the assembly dynamics of plus ends to push and pull membranes into tubulovesicular networks in interphase Xenopus egg extracts

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We discovered by using high resolution video microscopy, that membranes become attached selectively to the growing plus ends of microtubules by membrane/microtubule tip attachment complexes (TACs) in interphase- arrested, undiluted, Xenopus egg extracts. Persistent plus end growth of stationary microtubules pushed the membranes into thin tubules and dragged them through the cytoplasm at the approximately 20 microns/min velocity typical of free plus ends. Membrane tubules also remained attache...

  12. 270K microtubule-associated protein cross-reacting with anti-MAP2 IgG in the crayfish peripheral nerve axon

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    MAPs (microtubule-associated proteins) were isolated from crayfish walking leg nerves. A major MAP was identified as a high molecular weight protein (270K). This protein co-migrated with mammalian MAP2, stimulated the polymerization of rat brain tubulin into microtubules, and was heat resistant. Rotary shadowing revealed that the 270K MAP is a long thin flexible structure. It formed cross-bridges of fine strands, linking microtubules with each other in vitro. These strands resemble the cross-...

  13. A role for plant microtubules in the formation of transmission-specific inclusion bodies of Cauliflower mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Gargani, Daniel; Uzest, Marilyne; Lautredou, Nicole; Blanc, Stéphane; Drucker, Martin

    2009-04-01

    Interactions between microtubules and viruses play important roles in viral infection. The best-characterized examples involve transport of animal viruses by microtubules to the nucleus or other intracellular destinations. In plant viruses, most work to date has focused on interaction between viral movement proteins and the cytoskeleton, which is thought to be involved in viral cell-to-cell spread. We show here, in Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV)-infected plant cells, that viral electron-lucent inclusion bodies (ELIBs), whose only known function is vector transmission, require intact microtubules for their efficient formation. The kinetics of the formation of CaMV-related inclusion bodies in transfected protoplasts showed that ELIBs represent newly emerging structures, appearing at late stages of the intracellular viral life cycle. Viral proteins P2 and P3 are first produced in multiple electron-dense inclusion bodies, and are later specifically exported to transiently co-localize with microtubules, before concentrating in a single, massive ELIB in each infected cell. Treatments with cytoskeleton-affecting drugs suggested that P2 and P3 might be actively transported on microtubules, by as yet unknown motors. In addition to providing information on the intracellular life cycle of CaMV, our results show that specific interactions between host cell and virus may be dedicated to a later role in vector transmission. More generally, they indicate a new unexpected function for plant cell microtubules in the virus life cycle, demonstrating that microtubules act not only on immediate intracellular or intra-host phenomena, but also on processes ultimately controlling inter-host transmission. PMID:19077170

  14. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of...-18, 2013 meeting of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee due to the Government partial shutdown... INFORMATION CONTACT: Maya Solomon, Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Program Coordinator; by phone...

  15. Coordinate transformations in quaternion spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The quaternion spaces can be used to describe the property of electromagnetic field and gravitational field. In the quaternion space, some coordinate transformations can be deduced from the feature of quaternions, including Lorentz transformation and Galilean transformation etc., when the coordinate system is transformed into others. And some coordinate transformations with variable speed of light can be obtained in the electromagnetic field and gravitational field.

  16. Enterprise Coordination on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Petrie

    2011-01-01

    Enterprises are now connected internally and externally to other Enterprises via the Internet in ways that are increasingly difficult to manage, especially as these interconnections become more dynamic. Current methods of coordinating the effects of change as they propagate through these networks of connections are not likely to scale. What is needed is a new paradigm for how the Internet supports such coordination. Indeed, the Internet should and could provide fundamental coordination functi...

  17. Child Labor and Coordination Failures

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain Dessy; Stephane Pallage

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we show how coordination failures may explain the prevalence of child labor in developing countries. We do so within a simple game-theoretic setup. Child labor arises in our environment because of the lack of a coordination mechanism between parental decisions to invest in the human capital of their children and firm's decisions to invest in skill-intensive technology. Governmental policies that help coordinate expectations lead to the disappearance of child labor.

  18. On Coordinating Collaborative Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Imine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A collaborative object represents a data type (such as a text document designed to be shared by a group of dispersed users. The Operational Transformation (OT is a coordination approach used for supporting optimistic replication for these objects. It allows the users to concurrently update the shared data and exchange their updates in any order since the convergence of all replicas, i.e. the fact that all users view the same data, is ensured in all cases. However, designing algorithms for achieving convergence with the OT approach is a critical and challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a formal compositional method for specifying complex collaborative objects. The most important feature of our method is that designing an OT algorithm for the composed collaborative object can be done by reusing the OT algorithms of component collaborative objects. By using our method, we can start from correct small collaborative objects which are relatively easy to handle and incrementally combine them to build more complex collaborative objects.

  19. Effect of axonal micro-tubules on the morphology of retinal nerve fibers studied by second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyungsik; Danias, John

    2012-11-01

    Many studies suggest that the degradation of microtubules in the retinal ganglion cells may be an early event in the progression of glaucoma. Because reflectance and birefringence of the retinal nerve fibers arise primarily from microtubules, the optical properties have been intensively studied for early detection of the disease. We previously reported a novel nonlinear optical signal from axonal microtubules for visualizing the retinal nerve fibers, namely second-harmonic generation (SHG). We demonstrate the use of axonal SHG to investigate the effect of microtubules on the morphology of the retinal nerve fiber bundles. Time-lapse SHG imaging of ex vivo rat retinal flat mounts was performed during pharmacological treatment of nocodazole, and the intensity of axonal SHG and the changes in nerve fiber bundle morphology were monitored. We found that the microtubule disruption does not lead to immediate modification in the morphology of the nerve fibers. Our results indicate that microtubular SHG may provide a useful means for sensitive detection of axonal injuries. Since the intrinsic radiation depends on the regular architecture of the cytoskeleton element as maintained by active cellular regulations, the intensity of signal reflects the health of the retinal ganglion cell axons.

  20. Kar3Vik1, a member of the kinesin-14 superfamily, shows a novel kinesin microtubule binding pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Katherine C; Chen, Chun Ju; Cope, Julia; Porche, Ken; Hoenger, Andreas; Gilbert, Susan P; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-06-25

    Kinesin-14 motors generate microtubule minus-end-directed force used in mitosis and meiosis. These motors are dimeric and operate with a nonprocessive powerstroke mechanism, but the role of the second head in motility has been unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Kinesin-14 Kar3 forms a heterodimer with either Vik1 or Cik1. Vik1 contains a motor homology domain that retains microtubule binding properties but lacks a nucleotide binding site. In this case, both heads are implicated in motility. Here, we show through structural determination of a C-terminal heterodimeric Kar3Vik1, electron microscopy, equilibrium binding, and motility that at the start of the cycle, Kar3Vik1 binds to or occludes two αβ-tubulin subunits on adjacent protofilaments. The cycle begins as Vik1 collides with the microtubule followed by Kar3 microtubule association and ADP release, thereby destabilizing the Vik1-microtubule interaction and positioning the motor for the start of the powerstroke. The results indicate that head-head communication is mediated through the adjoining coiled coil. PMID:22734002

  1. Microtubule-Associated Protein EB3 Regulates IP3 Receptor Clustering and Ca2+ Signaling in Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Geyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which the microtubule cytoskeleton regulates the permeability of endothelial barrier are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that microtubule-associated end-binding protein 3 (EB3, a core component of the microtubule plus-end protein complex, binds to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs through an S/TxIP EB-binding motif. In endothelial cells, α-thrombin, a pro-inflammatory mediator that stimulates phospholipase Cβ, increases the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and elicits clustering of IP3R3s. These responses, and the resulting Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of myosin light chain, are prevented by depletion of either EB3 or mutation of the TxIP motif of IP3R3 responsible for mediating its binding to EB3. We also show that selective EB3 gene deletion in endothelial cells of mice abrogates α-thrombin-induced increase in endothelial permeability. We conclude that the EB3-mediated interaction of IP3Rs with microtubules controls the assembly of IP3Rs into effective Ca2+ signaling clusters, which thereby regulate microtubule-dependent endothelial permeability.

  2. Kinesin-14 and kinesin-5 antagonistically regulate microtubule nucleation by γ-TuRC in yeast and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Zachary T; Colliver, Andrew G; Riehlman, Timothy D; Paluh, Janet L

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar spindle assembly is a critical control point for initiation of mitosis through nucleation and organization of spindle microtubules and is regulated by kinesin-like proteins. In fission yeast, the kinesin-14 Pkl1 binds the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC) microtubule-organizing centre at spindle poles and can alter its structure and function. Here we show that kinesin-14 blocks microtubule nucleation in yeast and reveal that this inhibition is countered by the kinesin-5 protein, Cut7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Cut7 binding to γ-TuRC and the Cut7 BimC domain are both required for inhibition of Pkl1. We also demonstrate that a yeast kinesin-14 peptide blocks microtubule nucleation in two human breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that this mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. In conclusion, using genetic, biochemical and cell biology approaches we uncover antagonistic control of microtubule nucleation at γ-TuRC by two kinesin-like proteins, which may represent an attractive anti-mitotic target for cancer therapies. PMID:25348260

  3. Hepatic microtubule acetylation and stability induced by chronic alcohol exposure impair nuclear translocation of STAT3 and STAT5B, but not Smad2/3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David J; Tuma, Dean J; Tuma, Pamela L

    2012-12-15

    Although alcoholic liver disease is clinically well described, the molecular basis for alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity is not well understood. Previously, we found that alcohol exposure led to increased microtubule acetylation and stability in polarized, hepatic WIF-B cells and in livers from ethanol-fed rats. Because microtubules are known to regulate transcription factor nuclear translocation and dynamic microtubules are required for translocation of at least a subset of these factors, we examined whether alcohol-induced microtubule acetylation and stability impair nuclear translocation. We examined nuclear delivery of factors representing the two mechanisms by which microtubules regulate translocation. To represent factors that undergo directed delivery, we examined growth hormone-induced STAT5B translocation and IL-6-induced STAT3 translocation. To represent factors that are sequestered in the cytoplasm by microtubule attachment until ligand activation, we examined transforming growth factor-β-induced Smad2/3 translocation. We found that ethanol exposure selectively impaired translocation of the STATs, but not Smad2/3. STAT5B delivery was decreased to a similar extent by addition of taxol (a microtubule-stabilizing drug) or trichostatin A (a deacetylase inhibitor), agents that promote microtubule acetylation in the absence of alcohol. Thus the alcohol-induced impairment of STAT nuclear translocation can be explained by increased microtubule acetylation and stability. Only ethanol treatment impaired STAT5B activation, indicating that microtubules are not important for its activation by Jak2. Furthermore, nuclear exit was not changed in treated cells, indicating that this process is also independent of microtubule acetylation and stability. Together, these results raise the exciting possibility that deacetylase agonists may be effective therapeutics for the treatment of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:23064763

  4. 75 FR 55947 - Coordinated Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... Proposed Rulemaking on Coordinated Communications, 75 FR 6590 (Feb. 10, 2010). The SNPRM invited comments..., 68 FR at 427. The first content standard was satisfied if the communication was an electioneering... Proposed Rulemaking on Coordinated ] Communications, 70 FR 73946 (Dec. 14, 2005) (``2005 NPRM'')....

  5. Coordinated Transportation: Problems and Promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the legal, administrative, and logistical barriers that have prevented the wide acceptance of coordinating community and school transportation services and why these barriers may be breaking down. Two examples of successful implementation of coordinated transportation are examined: employing a single system to serve all transportation…

  6. Coordinate-Free Rotation Operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leubner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests the use of a coordinate-free rotation operator for the teaching of rotations in Euclidean three space because of its twofold didactic advantage. Illustrates the potentialities of the coordinate-free rotation operator approach by a number of examples. (Author/GA)

  7. Coordination of Conditional Poisson Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grafström Anton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sample coordination seeks to maximize or to minimize the overlap of two or more samples. The former is known as positive coordination, and the latter as negative coordination. Positive coordination is mainly used for estimation purposes and to reduce data collection costs. Negative coordination is mainly performed to diminish the response burden of the sampled units. Poisson sampling design with permanent random numbers provides an optimum coordination degree of two or more samples. The size of a Poisson sample is, however, random. Conditional Poisson (CP sampling is a modification of the classical Poisson sampling that produces a fixed-size πps sample. We introduce two methods to coordinate Conditional Poisson samples over time or simultaneously. The first one uses permanent random numbers and the list-sequential implementation of CP sampling. The second method uses a CP sample in the first selection and provides an approximate one in the second selection because the prescribed inclusion probabilities are not respected exactly. The methods are evaluated using the size of the expected sample overlap, and are compared with their competitors using Monte Carlo simulation. The new methods provide a good coordination degree of two samples, close to the performance of Poisson sampling with permanent random numbers.

  8. The effect of multivalent cations and Tau on paclitaxel-stabilized microtubule assembly, disassembly, and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safinya, Cyrus R; Chung, Peter J; Song, Chaeyeon; Li, Youli; Ewert, Kai K; Choi, Myung Chul

    2016-06-01

    In this review we describe recent studies directed at understanding the formation of novel nanoscale assemblies in biological materials systems. In particular, we focus on the effects of multivalent cations, and separately, of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) Tau, on microtubule (MT) ordering (bundling), MT disassembly, and MT structure. Counter-ion directed bundling of paclitaxel-stabilized MTs is a model electrostatic system, which parallels efforts to understand MT bundling by intrinsically disordered proteins (typically biological polyampholytes) expressed in neurons. We describe studies, which reveal an unexpected transition from tightly spaced MT bundles to loose bundles consisting of strings of MTs as the valence of the cationic counter-ion decreases from Z=3 to Z=2. This transition is not predicted by any current theories of polyelectrolytes. Notably, studies of a larger series of divalent counter-ions reveal strong ion specific effects. Divalent counter-ions may either bundle or depolymerize paclitaxel-stabilized MTs. The ion concentration required for depolymerization decreases with increasing atomic number. In a more biologically related system we review synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies on the effect of the Tau on the structure of paclitaxel-stabilized MTs. The electrostatic binding of MAP Tau isoforms leads to an increase in the average radius of microtubules with increasing Tau coverage (i.e. a re-distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs). Finally, inspired by MTs as model nanotubes, we briefly describe other more robust lipid-based cylindrical nanostructures, which may have technological applications, for example, in drug encapsulation and delivery. PMID:26684364

  9. Distribution of the phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau in developing cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, J P; Octave, J N; Couck, A M

    1994-12-01

    During brain development, the microtubule-associated protein tau presents a transient state of high phosphorylation. We have investigated the developmental distribution of the phosphorylated fetal-type tau in the developing rat cortex and in cultures of embryonic cortical neurons, using antibodies which react with tau in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The phosphorylated fetal-type tau was present in the developing cortex at 20 days but not at 18 days of embryonic life and was not detected before four to five days in neuronal culture. The cyclin-dependent kinase p34cdc2 was expressed only in germinal layers in the embryonic brain and was not co-localized with phosphorylated tau. After 10 days of postnatal life, the phosphorylated tau progressively disappeared from cortical neurons, disappearing first from the deepest cortical layers where neurons are ontogenetically the oldest. Phosphorylated tau was found in axons and dendrites of cortical neurons at all developmental stages whereas unphosphorylated tau tended to disappear from dendrites during development. The timing of appearance of phosphorylated tau in the cortex, by comparison with the expression of other developmental markers, indicates that phosphorylated tau is present at a high level only during the period of intense neuritic outgrowth and that it disappears during the period of neurite stabilization and synaptogenesis, concomitantly to the expression of adult tau isoforms. In control cultures and in cultures treated with colchicine, the phosphorylated tau was not associated to cold-stable and to colchicine-resistant microtubules. These in vivo results suggest that the high expression of phosphorylated tau species is correlated with the presence of a dynamic microtubule network during a period of high plasticity in the developing brain. PMID:7898684

  10. Role of fungal dynein in hyphal growth, microtubule organization, spindle pole body motility and nuclear migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S; Turgeon, B G; Yoder, O C; Aist, J R

    1998-06-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule-associated motor protein with several putative subcellular functions. Sequencing of the gene (DHC1) for cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of the filamentous ascomycete, Nectria haematococca, revealed a 4,349-codon open reading frame (interrupted by two introns) with four highly conserved P-loop motifs, typical of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chains. The predicted amino acid sequence is 78.0% identical to the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of Neurospora crassa, 70.2% identical to that of Aspergillus nidulans and 24.8% identical to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genomic copy of DHC1 in N. haematococca wild-type strain T213 was disrupted by inserting a selectable marker into the central motor domain. Mutants grew at 33% of the wild-type rate, forming dense compact colonies composed of spiral and highly branched hyphae. Major cytological phenotypes included (1) absence of aster-like arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules focused at the spindle pole bodies of post-mitotic and interphase nuclei, (2) limited post-mitotic nuclear migration, (3) lack of spindle pole body motility at interphase, (4) failure of spindle pole bodies to anchor interphase nuclei, (5) nonuniform distribution of interphase nuclei and (6) small or ephemeral Spitzenkörper at the apices of hyphal tip cells. Microtubule distribution in the apical region of tip cells of the mutant was essentially normal. The nonuniform distribution of nuclei in hyphae resulted primarily from a lack of both post-mitotic nuclear migration and anchoring of interphase nuclei by the spindle pole bodies. The results support the hypothesis that DHC1 is required for the motility and functions of spindle pole bodies, normal secretory vesicle transport to the hyphal apex and normal hyphal tip cell morphogenesis. PMID:9580563

  11. Archimedes' principle in general coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archimedes' principle is well known to state that a body submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. Herein, Archimedes' principle is derived from first principles by using conservation of the stress-energy-momentum tensor in general coordinates. The resulting expression for the force is applied in Schwarzschild coordinates and in rotating coordinates. Using Schwarzschild coordinates for the case of a spherical mass suspended within a perfect fluid leads to the familiar expression of Archimedes' principle. Using rotating coordinates produces an expression for a centrifugal buoyancy force that agrees with accepted theory. It is then argued that Archimedes' principle ought to be applicable to non-gravitational phenomena, as well. Conservation of the energy-momentum tensor is then applied to electromagnetic phenomena. It is shown that a charged body submerged in a charged medium experiences a buoyancy force in accordance with an electromagnetic analogue of Archimedes' principle.

  12. Are Coiled-Coils of Dimeric Kinesins Unwound during Their Walking on Microtubule?

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Xie, Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2012-01-01

    Dimeric kinesin motor proteins such as homodimeric kinesin-1, homodimeric Ncd and heterodimeric Kar3/Vik1are composed of two head domains which are connected together by a rod-shaped, coiled-coil stalk. Despite the extensive and intensive studies on structures, kinetics, dynamics and walking mechanism of the dimers, whether their coiled-coils are unwound or not during their walking on the microtubule is still an unclear issue. Here, we try to clarify this issue by using molecular dynamics sim...

  13. Fidgetin-like 2: a microtubule-based regulator of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Charafeddine, Rabab A.; Makdisi, Joy; Schairer, David; O’Rourke, Brian P.; Diaz-Valencia, Juan D.; Chouake, Jason; Kutner, Allison; Krausz, Aimee; Adler, Brandon; Nacharaju, Parimala; Liang, Hongying; Mukherjee, Suranjana; Friedman, Joel M.; Friedman, Adam; Joshua D Nosanchuk

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process driven largely by the migration of a variety of distinct cell types from the wound margin into the wound zone. In this study, we identify the previously uncharacterized microtubule-severing enzyme, Fidgetin-like 2 (FL2), as a fundamental regulator of cell migration that can be targeted in vivo using nanoparticle-encapsulated siRNA to promote wound closure and regeneration. In vitro, depletion of FL2 from mammalian tissue culture cells results in a more than ...

  14. Fragile X mental retardation protein interactions with the microtubule associated protein 1B RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, Lakshmi; Mader, Samantha Ann; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to use its arginine–glycine–glycine (RGG) box to bind to a subset of RNA targets that form a G quadruplex structure. We performed a detailed analysis of the interactions between the FMRP RGG box and the microtubule associated protein 1B (MAP1B) mRNA, a relevant in vivo FMRP target. We show that MAP1B RNA f...

  15. Colchitaxel, a coupled compound made from microtubule inhibitors colchicine and paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppal Sonal O

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor promoters enhance tumor yield in experimental animals without directly affecting the DNA of the cell. Promoters may play a role in the development of cancer, as humans are exposed to them in the environment. In work based on computer-assisted microscopy and sophisticated classification methods, we showed that cells could be classified by reference to a database of known normal and cancerous cell phenotypes. Promoters caused loss of properties specific to normal cells and gain of properties of cancer cells. Other compounds, including colchicine, had a similar effect. Colchicine given together with paclitaxel, however, caused cells to adopt properties of normal cells. This provided a rationale for tests of microtubule inhibitor combinations in cancer patients. The combination of a depolymerizing and a stabilizing agent is a superior anti-tumor treatment. The biological basis of the effect is not understood. Results A single compound containing both colchicine and paclitaxel structures was synthesized. Colchicine is an alkaloid with a trimethoxyphenyl ring (ring A, a ring with an acetamide linkage (ring B, and a tropolone ring (ring C. Although rings A and C are important for tubulin-binding activity, the acetamide linkage on ring B could be replaced by an amide containing a glutamate linker. Alteration of the C-7 site on paclitaxel similarly had little or no inhibitory effect on its biological activity. The linker was attached to this position. The coupled compound, colchitaxel (1, had some of the same effects on microtubules as the combination of starting compounds. It also caused shortening and fragmentation of the + end protein cap. Conclusion Since microtubule inhibitor combinations give results unlike those obtained with either inhibitor alone, it is important to determine how such combinations affect cell shape and growth. Colchitaxel shows a subset of the effects of the inhibitor combination. Thus, it may be able

  16. The linear and rotational motions of the fission yeast nucleus are governed by the stochastic dynamics of spatially distributed microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Tsz Hin; Zheng, Fan; Lin, Yuan; Fu, Chuanhai

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic nuclei are involved in a wide variety of fundamental biological processes including cell migration, cell division and fertilization. Here, we develop a mathematical model, in combination with live-cell imaging at high temporal resolution, to quantitatively elucidate how the linear and rotational motions of the nucleus are governed by the stochastic dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Our simulation and experimental results demonstrate that microtubule rescue and catastrophe frequencies are the decisive factors in regulating the nuclear movement. Lower rescue and catastrophe frequencies can lead to significantly larger angular and translational oscillations of the nucleus. In addition, our model also suggests that the stochastic dynamics of individual spatially distributed microtubules works collectively as a restoring force to maintain nuclear centering and hence ensures symmetric cell division, in excellent agreement with direct experimental observations. PMID:26921917

  17. Disruption of microtubules in rat skeletal muscle does not inhibit insulin- or contraction-stimulated glucose transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ai, Hua; Ralston, Evelyn; Lauritzen, Hans P M M;

    2003-01-01

    found in all muscle fibers. Here, we test whether microtubules are required mediators of the effect of insulin and contractions. In three different incubated rat muscles with distinct fiber type composition, depolymerization of microtubules with colchicine for < or =8 h did not inhibit insulin- or...... contraction-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose transport or force production. On the contrary, colchicine at least partially prevented the approximately 30% decrease in insulin-stimulated transport that specifically developed during 8 h of incubation in soleus muscle but not in flexor digitorum brevis or...... epitrochlearis muscles. In contrast, nocodazole, another microtubule-disrupting drug, rapidly and dose dependently blocked insulin- and contraction-stimulated glucose transport. A similar discrepancy between colchicine and nocodazole was also found in their ability to block glucose transport in muscle giant...

  18. Microtubule-associated Proteins 1 (MAP1) Promote Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) Intracytoplasmic Routing to the Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juliette; Portilho, Débora M.; Danckaert, Anne; Munier, Sandie; Becker, Andreas; Roux, Pascal; Zambo, Anaba; Shorte, Spencer; Jacob, Yves; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Charneau, Pierre; Clavel, François; Arhel, Nathalie J.

    2015-01-01

    After cell entry, HIV undergoes rapid transport toward the nucleus using microtubules and microfilaments. Neither the cellular cytoplasmic components nor the viral proteins that interact to mediate transport have yet been identified. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified four cytoskeletal components as putative interaction partners for HIV-1 p24 capsid protein: MAP1A, MAP1S, CKAP1, and WIRE. Depletion of MAP1A/MAP1S in indicator cell lines and primary human macrophages led to a profound reduction in HIV-1 infectivity as a result of impaired retrograde trafficking, demonstrated by a characteristic accumulation of capsids away from the nuclear membrane, and an overall defect in nuclear import. MAP1A/MAP1S did not impact microtubule network integrity or cell morphology but contributed to microtubule stabilization, which was shown previously to facilitate infection. In addition, we found that MAP1 proteins interact with HIV-1 cores both in vitro and in infected cells and that interaction involves MAP1 light chain LC2. Depletion of MAP1 proteins reduced the association of HIV-1 capsids with both dynamic and stable microtubules, suggesting that MAP1 proteins help tether incoming viral capsids to the microtubular network, thus promoting cytoplasmic trafficking. This work shows for the first time that following entry into target cells, HIV-1 interacts with the cytoskeleton via its p24 capsid protein. Moreover, our results support a role for MAP1 proteins in promoting efficient retrograde trafficking of HIV-1 by stimulating the formation of stable microtubules and mediating the association of HIV-1 cores with microtubules. PMID:25505242

  19. Microtubule self-organisation by reaction-diffusion processes causes collective transport and organisation of cellular particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demongeot Jacques

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transport of intra-cellular particles by microtubules is a major biological function. Under appropriate in vitro conditions, microtubule preparations behave as a 'complex' system and show 'emergent' phenomena. In particular, they form dissipative structures that self-organise over macroscopic distances by a combination of reaction and diffusion. Results Here, we show that self-organisation also gives rise to a collective transport of colloidal particles along a specific direction. Particles, such as polystyrene beads, chromosomes, nuclei, and vesicles are carried at speeds of several microns per minute. The process also results in the macroscopic self-organisation of these particles. After self-organisation is completed, they show the same pattern of organisation as the microtubules. Numerical simulations of a population of growing and shrinking microtubules, incorporating experimentally realistic reaction dynamics, predict self-organisation. They forecast that during self-organisation, macroscopic parallel arrays of oriented microtubules form which cross the reaction space in successive waves. Such travelling waves are capable of transporting colloidal particles. The fact that in the simulations, the aligned arrays move along the same direction and at the same speed as the particles move, suggest that this process forms the underlying mechanism for the observed transport properties. Conclusions This process constitutes a novel physical chemical mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into collective transport of colloidal particles along a given direction. Self-organisation of this type provides a new mechanism by which intra cellular particles such as chromosomes and vesicles can be displaced and simultaneously organised by microtubules. It is plausible that processes of this type occur in vivo.

  20. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, Björn J; Kieft, Henk; Franssen-Verheijen, Tiny; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W

    2009-11-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant's final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g. Likewise, at near weightlessness cortical microtubules in protoplasts have difficulty organizing into parallel arrays, which are required for proper plant cell elongation. However, intact plants do grow in space and therefore should have a normally functioning microtubule cytoskeleton. Since the main difference between protoplasts and plant cells in a tissue is the presence of a cell wall, we studied single, but walled, tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells during an 8-day space-flight experiment on board of the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station during the 12S mission (March-April 2006). We show that the cortical microtubule density, ordering and orientation in isolated walled plant cells are unaffected by near weightlessness, as are the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils, cell proliferation, and cell shape. Likely, tissue organization is not essential for the organization of these structures in space. When combined with the fact that many recovering protoplasts have an aberrant cortical microtubule cytoskeleton, the results suggest a role for the cell wall, or its production machinery, in structuring the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:19756725

  1. Three-dimensional tracking of plus-tips by lattice light-sheet microscopy permits the quantification of microtubule growth trajectories within the mitotic apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Norio; Morita, Masahiko; Legant, Wesley R.; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Yokota, Hideo; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2015-10-01

    Mitotic apparatus, which comprises hundreds of microtubules, plays an essential role in cell division, ensuring the correct segregation of chromosomes into each daughter cell. To gain insight into its regulatory mechanisms, it is essential to detect and analyze the behavior of individual microtubule filaments. However, the discrimination of discrete microtubule filaments within the mitotic apparatus is beyond the capabilities of conventional light microscopic technologies. Recently, we detected three-dimensional (3-D) microtubule growth dynamics within the cellular cytoplasmic space using lattice light-sheet microscopy in conjunction with microtubule growth marker protein end-binding 1, a microtubule plus-end-tracking protein, which was fused to green fluorescent protein (EB1-GFP). This technique enables high-resolution 3-D imaging at subsecond intervals. We adapted mathematical computing and geometric representation techniques to analyze spatial variations in microtubule growth dynamics within the mitotic spindle apparatus. Our analytical approach enabled the different dynamic properties of individual microtubules to be determined, including the direction and speed of their growth, and their growth duration within a 3-D spatial map. Our analysis framework provides an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms driving cellular machinery at the whole-cell level.

  2. Three-dimensional tracking of plus-tips by lattice light-sheet microscopy permits the quantification of microtubule growth trajectories within the mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Norio; Morita, Masahiko; Legant, Wesley R; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Yokota, Hideo; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2015-10-01

    Mitotic apparatus, which comprises hundreds of microtubules, plays an essential role in cell division, ensuring the correct segregation of chromosomes into each daughter cell. To gain insight into its regulatory mechanisms, it is essential to detect and analyze the behavior of individual microtubule filaments. However, the discrimination of discrete microtubule filaments within the mitotic apparatus is beyond the capabilities of conventional light microscopic technologies. Recently, we detected three-dimensional (3-D) microtubule growth dynamics within the cellular cytoplasmic space using lattice light-sheet microscopy in conjunction with microtubule growth marker protein end-binding 1, a microtubule plus-end-tracking protein, which was fused to green fluorescent protein (EB1-GFP). This technique enables high-resolution 3-D imaging at subsecond intervals. We adapted mathematical computing and geometric representation techniques to analyze spatial variations in microtubule growth dynamics within the mitotic spindle apparatus. Our analytical approach enabled the different dynamic properties of individual microtubules to be determined, including the direction and speed of their growth, and their growth duration within a 3-D spatial map. Our analysis framework provides an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms driving cellular machinery at the whole-cell level. PMID:26527322

  3. The Ndc80 internal loop is required for recruitment of the Ska complex to establish end-on microtubule attachment to kinetochores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hu, Xiao-Wen; Hansen, Mathilde J Kaas; Singleton, Martin R; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    The Ndc80 complex establishes end-on attachment of kinetochores to microtubules essential for chromosome segregation. The Ndc80 subunit is characterized by an N-terminal region, that binds directly to microtubules, and a long coiled-coil region that interacts with Nuf2. A loop region in Ndc80 tha...

  4. Keep Meaning in Conversational Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Clare Cuffari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making. These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination.

  5. Coordinating distributed work: Exploring situated coordination with gaming-simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laere, J.

    2003-01-01

    Organizational work has become more and more distributed nowadays. Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide opportunities to improve coordination of distributed work, but in practice many organizations struggle with integrating new organizational structures, new work practices and IC

  6. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  7. The role of microtubule actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) in the Wnt signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hui-Jye; Lin, Chung-Ming; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Perez-Olle, Raul; Leung, Conrad L.; Liem, Ronald K.H.

    2006-01-01

    MACF1 (microtubule actin cross-linking factor 1) is a multidomain protein that can associate with microfilaments and microtubules. We found that MACF1 was highly expressed in neuronal tissues and the foregut of embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) embryos and the head fold and primitive streak of E7.5 embryos. MACF1−/− mice died at the gastrulation stage and displayed developmental retardation at E7.5 with defects in the formation of the primitive streak, node, and mesoderm. This phenotype was similar to...

  8. Fidgetin-like 2: a microtubule-based regulator of wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charafeddine, Rabab A.; Makdisi, Joy; Schairer, David; O’Rourke, Brian P.; Diaz-Valencia, Juan D.; Chouake, Jason; Kutner, Allison; Krausz, Aimee; Adler, Brandon; Nacharaju, Parimala; Liang, Hongying; Mukherjee, Suranjana; Friedman, Joel M.; Friedman, Adam; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Sharp, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process driven largely by the migration of a variety of distinct cell types from the wound margin into the wound zone. In this study, we identify the previously uncharacterized microtubule-severing enzyme, Fidgetin-like 2 (FL2), as a fundamental regulator of cell migration that can be targeted in vivo using nanoparticle-encapsulated siRNA to promote wound closure and regeneration. In vitro, depletion of FL2 from mammalian tissue culture cells results in a more than two-fold increase in the rate of cell movement, due in part to a significant increase in directional motility. Immunofluorescence analyses indicate that FL2 normally localizes to the cell edge, importantly to the leading edge of polarized cells, where it regulates the organization and dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton. To clinically translate these findings, we utilized a nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery platform to locally deplete FL2 in both murine full-thickness excisional and burn wounds. Topical application of FL2 siRNA nanoparticles to either wound type results in a significant enhancement in the rate and quality of wound closure both clinically and histologically relative to controls. Taken together, these results identify FL2 as a promising therapeutic target to promote the regeneration and repair of cutaneous wounds. PMID:25756798

  9. Fidgetin-Like 2: A Microtubule-Based Regulator of Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charafeddine, Rabab A; Makdisi, Joy; Schairer, David; O'Rourke, Brian P; Diaz-Valencia, Juan D; Chouake, Jason; Kutner, Allison; Krausz, Aimee; Adler, Brandon; Nacharaju, Parimala; Liang, Hongying; Mukherjee, Suranjana; Friedman, Joel M; Friedman, Adam; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Sharp, David J

    2015-09-01

    Wound healing is a complex process driven largely by the migration of a variety of distinct cell types from the wound margin into the wound zone. In this study, we identify the previously uncharacterized microtubule-severing enzyme, Fidgetin-like 2 (FL2), as a fundamental regulator of cell migration that can be targeted in vivo using nanoparticle-encapsulated small interfering RNA (siRNA) to promote wound closure and regeneration. In vitro, depletion of FL2 from mammalian tissue culture cells results in a more than twofold increase in the rate of cell movement, in part due to a significant increase in directional motility. Immunofluorescence analyses indicate that FL2 normally localizes to the cell edge, importantly to the leading edge of polarized cells, where it regulates the organization and dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton. To clinically translate these findings, we utilized a nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery platform to locally deplete FL2 in both murine full-thickness excisional and burn wounds. Topical application of FL2 siRNA nanoparticles to either wound type results in a significant enhancement in the rate and quality of wound closure both clinically and histologically relative to controls. Taken together, these results identify FL2 as a promising therapeutic target to promote the regeneration and repair of cutaneous wounds. PMID:25756798

  10. Analysis of the binding mode of laulimalide to microtubules: Establishing a laulimalide-tubulin pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Cassandra D M; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2016-07-01

    Laulimalide (LA) is a microtubule-stabilizing agent, currently in preclinical studies. However, studying the binding of this species and successfully synthesizing potent analogues have been challenging. The LA binding site is located between tubulin protofilaments, and therefore LA is in contact with two adjacent [Formula: see text]-tubulin units. Here, an improved model of the binding mode of LA in microtubules is presented, using the newly available crystal structure pose and an extended tubulin heterodimer complex, as well as molecular dynamics simulations. With this model, a series of LA analogues developed by Mooberry and coworkers are also analyzed in order to establish important pharmacophores in LA binding and cytotoxicity. In the side chain, [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text] interactions are important contributors to LA binding, as are water-mediated hydrogen bonds. An intramolecular hydrogen bond is correlated with high cytotoxicity, and is dependent on macrocycle conformation. Therefore, while the epoxide and olefin groups in the macrocycle do not engage in specific interactions with the protein, they are essential contributions to an active macrocycle conformation, and therefore potency. Calculations reveal that a balance in binding affinity is important for LA activity, where the more potent compounds have larger interactions with the adjacent tubulin unit than the less-active analogs. Several modifications are suggested for the rational design of LA analogues that should not disrupt the active macrocycle conformation. PMID:26230757

  11. Disruption of Microtubules Post-Virus Entry Enhances Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Mitchell, Angela M; Huang, Lu; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R Jude

    2016-04-01

    Perinuclear retention of viral particles is a poorly understood phenomenon observed during many virus infections. In this study, we investigated whether perinuclear accumulation acts as a barrier to limit recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) transduction. After nocodazole treatment to disrupt microtubules at microtubule-organization center (MT-MTOC) after virus entry, we observed higher rAAV transduction. To elucidate the role of MT-MTOC in rAAV infection and study its underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that rAAV's perinuclear localization was retained by MT-MTOC with fluorescent analysis, and enhanced rAAV transduction from MT-MTOC disruption was dependent on the rAAV capsid's nuclear import signals. Interestingly, after knocking down RhoA or inhibiting its downstream effectors (ROCK and Actin), MT-MTOC disruption failed to increase rAAV transduction or nuclear entry. These data suggest that enhancement of rAAV transduction is the result of increased trafficking to the nucleus via the RhoA-ROCK-Actin pathway. Ten-fold higher rAAV transduction was also observed by disrupting MT-MTOC in brain, liver, and tumor in vivo. In summary, this study indicates that virus perinuclear accumulation at MT-MTOC is a barrier-limiting parameter for effective rAAV transduction and defines a novel defense mechanism by which host cells restrain viral invasion. PMID:26942476

  12. Statistical mechanics provides novel insights into microtubule stability and mechanism of shrinkage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishutesh Jain

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are nano-machines that grow and shrink stochastically, making use of the coupling between chemical kinetics and mechanics of its constituent protofilaments (PFs. We investigate the stability and shrinkage of microtubules taking into account inter-protofilament interactions and bending interactions of intrinsically curved PFs. Computing the free energy as a function of PF tip position, we show that the competition between curvature energy, inter-PF interaction energy and entropy leads to a rich landscape with a series of minima that repeat over a length-scale determined by the intrinsic curvature. Computing Langevin dynamics of the tip through the landscape and accounting for depolymerization, we calculate the average unzippering and shrinkage velocities of GDP protofilaments and compare them with the experimentally known results. Our analysis predicts that the strength of the inter-PF interaction (E(s(m has to be comparable to the strength of the curvature energy (E(b(m such that E(s(m - E(b(m ≈ 1kBT, and questions the prevalent notion that unzippering results from the domination of bending energy of curved GDP PFs. Our work demonstrates how the shape of the free energy landscape is crucial in explaining the mechanism of MT shrinkage where the unzippered PFs will fluctuate in a set of partially peeled off states and subunit dissociation will reduce the length.

  13. The HIV-1 protein Vpr impairs phagosome maturation by controlling microtubule-dependent trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Audrey; Lê-Bury, Gabrielle; Marie-Anaïs, Florence; Herit, Floriane; Mazzolini, Julie; Guilbert, Thomas; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Russell, David G; Benichou, Serge; Zahraoui, Ahmed; Niedergang, Florence

    2015-10-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) impairs major functions of macrophages but the molecular basis for this defect remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that macrophages infected with HIV-1 were unable to respond efficiently to phagocytic triggers and to clear bacteria. The maturation of phagosomes, defined by the presence of late endocytic markers, hydrolases, and reactive oxygen species, was perturbed in HIV-1-infected macrophages. We showed that maturation arrest occurred at the level of the EHD3/MICAL-L1 endosomal sorting machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that the regulatory viral protein (Vpr) was crucial to perturb phagosome maturation. Our data reveal that Vpr interacted with EB1, p150(Glued), and dynein heavy chain and was sufficient to critically alter the microtubule plus end localization of EB1 and p150(Glued), hence altering the centripetal movement of phagosomes and their maturation. Thus, we identify Vpr as a modulator of the microtubule-dependent endocytic trafficking in HIV-1-infected macrophages, leading to strong alterations in phagolysosome biogenesis. PMID:26504171

  14. The complex dynamic network of microtubule and microfilament cytasters of the leech zygote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillana, V; Urrutia, M; Ubilla, A; Fernández, J

    2000-12-01

    The organization of the cytoskeleton in the early first interphase zygote and its involvement in organelle redistribution were studied in the glossiphoniid leech Theromyzon trizonare by confocal and electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and time-lapse video imaging after microinjection of labeled tubulin and/or actin and loading with a mitotracker. The cytoskeleton consists of an inner or endoplasmic and an outer or ectoplasmic domain. The inner domain consists of a monaster whose fibers retract from the zygote periphery by the end of the early first interphase. The outer domain is built upon a network of microtubules and microfilaments cytasters. Short pulses of microinjected labeled actin or tubulin and Taxol treatment demonstrate that cytasters are centers of microtubule and microfilament nucleation. Immunostaining with anti-centrophilin, anti-BX-63, and anti-AH-6 indicates that the network of cytasters includes centrosomal antigens. Cytasters move in an orderly fashion at speeds of 0.5-2 micrometer/min, in an energy-dependent process retarded and finally blocked by the ATP analogue AMP-PNP and high concentrations of Taxol. Colliding cytasters fuse and form larger cytoskeletal nucleation centers. The leech zygote is a highly compartmentalized cell whose cytasters function as articulated components of a very dynamic cytoskeletal system engaged in bulk transportation of organelles during ooplasmic segregation. PMID:11087633

  15. Peloruside A, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, induces aneuploidy in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ariane; Singh, A Jonathan; Northcote, Peter T; Miller, John H

    2016-08-01

    To ensure proper chromosome segregation, mitosis is tightly regulated by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Low concentrations of microtubule-stabilizing agents can induce aneuploid populations of cells in the absence of G2/M block, suggesting pertubation of the spindle checkpoint. We investigated the effects of peloruside A, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, on expression levels of several key cell cycle proteins, MAD2, BUBR1, p55CDC and cyclin B1. Synchronized 1A9 ovarian carcinoma cells were allowed to progress through the cell cycle in the presence or absence of peloruside A. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to probe the cell cycle kinetics of MAD2 and BUBR1 dissociation from p55CDC. Using confocal microscopy, we investigated whether premature dissociation of MAD2 and BUBR1 at low (40 nM) but not high (100 nM) concentrations of peloruside A was caused by defects in the attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle. An increased frequency of polar chromosomes was observed at low concentrations of peloruside A, suggesting that an increased frequency of pseudo-metaphase cells, which are not detected by the spindle assembly checkpoint, may be underlying the induction of aneuploidy. PMID:27155614

  16. Abnormal Phosphorylation of the Microtubule-Associated Protein τ (Tau) in Alzheimer Cytoskeletal Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Tung, Yunn-Chyn; Quinlan, Maureen; Wisniewski, Henryk M.; Binder, Lester I.

    1986-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody to the microtubule-associated protein τ (tau) labeled some neurofibrillary tangles and plaque neurites, the two major locations of paired-helical filaments (PHF), in Alzheimer disease brain. The antibody also labeled isolated PHF that had been repeatedly washed with NaDodSO4. Dephosphorylation of the tissue sections with alkaline phosphatase prior to immunolabeling dramatically increased the number of tangles and plaques recognized by the antibody. The plaque core amyloid was not stained in either dephosphorylated or nondephosphorylated tissue sections. On immunoblots PHF polypeptides were labeled readily only when dephosphorylated. In contrast, a commercially available monoclonal antibody to a phosphorylated epitope of neurofilaments that labeled the tangles and the plaque neurites in tissue did not label any PHF polypeptides on immunoblots. The PHF polypeptides, labeled with the monoclonal antibody to τ , electrophoresed with those polypeptides recognized by antibodies to isolated PHF. The antibody to τ -labeled microtubules from normal human brains assembled in vitro but identically treated Alzheimer brain preparations had to be dephosphorylated to be completely recognized by this antibody. These findings suggest that τ in Alzheimer brain is an abnormally phosphorylated protein component of PHF.

  17. DJ-1 can inhibit microtubule associated protein 1 B formed aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jianqing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal accumulation and aggregation of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Loss-of-function mutation of DJ-1/Park7 can cause early onset of PD. DJ-1, a molecular chaperone, can inhibit α-synuclein aggregation. Currently, little is known whether or not loss of function of DJ-1 contributes to abnormal MAPs aggregation in neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. Results We presented evidence that DJ-1 could bind to microtubule associated protein1b Light Chain (MAP1b-LC. Overexpression of DJ-1 prevented MAP1b-LC aggregation in HEK293t and SH-SY5Y cells while DJ-1 knocking down (KD enhanced MAP1b-LC aggregation in SH-SY5Y cells. The increase in insoluble MAP1b-LC was also observed in the DJ-1 null mice brain. Moreover, in the DJ-1 KD SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of MAP1B-LC led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-induced apoptosis. Conclusion Our results suggest that DJ-1 acts as a molecular chaperone to inhibit MAP1B aggregation thus leading to neuronal apoptosis. Our study provides a novel insight into the mechanisms that underly the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD.

  18. Suprafenacine, an indazole-hydrazide agent, targets cancer cells through microtubule destabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Hwa Choi

    Full Text Available Microtubules are a highly validated target in cancer therapy. However, the clinical development of tubulin binding agents (TBA has been hampered by toxicity and chemoresistance issues and has necessitated the search for new TBAs. Here, we report the identification of a novel cell permeable, tubulin-destabilizing molecule--4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid [1p-tolyl-meth-(E-ylidene]-hydrazide (termed as Suprafenacine, SRF. SRF, identified by in silico screening of annotated chemical libraries, was shown to bind microtubules at the colchicine-binding site and inhibit polymerization. This led to G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death via a mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Cell death was preceded by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, JNK-mediated phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bad, and activation of caspase-3. Intriguingly, SRF was found to selectively inhibit cancer cell proliferation and was effective against drug-resistant cancer cells by virtue of its ability to bypass the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein. Taken together, our results suggest that SRF has potential as a chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment and provides an alternate scaffold for the development of improved anti-cancer agents.

  19. The coordinate transforming in geography information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coordinate transforming of geography information system includes two kinds of transforming, map projection and coordinate-transforming. This paper proposed a arithmetic of coordinate-transforming, it implement the transforming between the longitude-latitude coordinate and the screen coordinate and apply it in the GIS. The preferable effect was made. (authors)

  20. Evaluating the Relational Coordination instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    2014-01-01

    and surgical performance. This has prompted the attention of both practitioners and politicians some of who perceive relational coordination as a means to attain better performance. The relational coordination instrument has been validated as a measure of teamwork from the following perspectives......: internal consistency, interrater agreement and reliability, structural validity, content validity. However as relational coordination is being used as a diagnostics tool it is important to examine further if the instrument can measure changes. Indeed we need to know how precise and sensitive the instrument...... the change using the relational coordination instrument. Managers were interviewed before the projects and a chronicle workshop (structured group interview) were performed after the project. This design allows us to compare the qualitative descriptions of change in the wards, with the measured change...

  1. Coordination Games on Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Pestelacci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model in which agents of a population interacting according to a network of contacts play games of coordination with each other and can also dynamically break and redirect links to neighbors if they are unsatisfied. As a result, there is co-evolution of strategies in the population and of the graph that represents the network of contacts. We apply the model to the class of pure and general coordination games. For pure coordination games, the networks co-evolve towards the polarization of different strategies. In the case of general coordination games our results show that the possibility of refusing neighbors and choosing different partners increases the success rate of the Pareto-dominant equilibrium.

  2. Who matters in coordination problems?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sákovics, J.; Steiner, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 7 (2012), s. 3439-3461. ISSN 0002-8282 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : coordination problems * heterogeneous agents Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2012

  3. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of coordinating actions with an agent or process represented as a POMDP Because the actions coordinate with the agent rather than influence its behavior, the optimal solution to this problem can be computed locally and quickly. We also demonstrate the use of the technique on sequential POMDPs, which can be used to model a behavior that follows a linear, acyclic trajectory through a series of states. By imposing a "windowing" restriction that restricts the number of possible alternatives considered at any moment to a fixed size, a coordinating action can be calculated in constant time, making this amenable to coordination with complex agents.

  4. Kaluza's theory in generalized coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    García-Perciante, A L; García-Colin, L S; Garcia-Perciante, Ana Laura; Sandoval-Villalbazo, Alfredo

    2001-01-01

    Maxwell's equations can be obtained in generalized coordinates by considering the electromagnetic field as an external agent. The work here presented shows how to obtain the electrodynamics for a charged particle in generalized coordinates eliminating the concept of external force. Based on Kaluza's formalism, the one here presented extends the 5x5 metric into a 6x6 space-time giving enough room to include magnetic monopoles in a very natural way.

  5. Coordinated Design In Urban Environments

    OpenAIRE

    KAMALI, Fereshteh Pashaei; RAZMGIR, Akramalsadat; KHOBRO, Babaksimintan; BARADARAN, Alireza Ghandriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. In a society in which accepting sociability, consensus and collective product are emphasized, new buildings try to coordinate themselves with the existing patterns. Edmund Bacon (1979) has searched the formation of urban landscape coordinated with manner of relation in which architects have worked in one place but in different times and by stating,the second person’s theory, emphasized that the second designer determines that whether the first architectural work is valuable or recog...

  6. Currency Areas and Monetary Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Liu; Shouyong Shi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we integrate the recent development in monetary theory with international finance, in order to examine the coordination between two currency areas in setting long-run inflation. The model determines the value of each currency and the size of each currency area without requiring buyers to use a particular currency to buy a country's goods. We show that the two countries inflate above the Friedman rule in a non-cooperative game. Coordination between the two areas reduces inflation...

  7. Coordination Demands of International Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jon I Martinez; J Carlos Jarillo

    1991-01-01

    A study of fifty subsidiaries of Multinational Corporations shows a connection between their strategy and their use of different mechanisms of coordination. The main finding is that subsidiaries pursuing strategies with a high degree of integration with their corporate parent make a much more extensive use of both “formal” and “subtle” coordination mechanisms than other firms in the sample. These results are borne out in both static and dynamic tests. They confirm previous literature on coord...

  8. Consumption externalities, coordination and advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Pastine, Tuvana; Pastine, Ivan

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this Paper is to demonstrate that advertising can have an important function in markets with consumption externalities, apart from its persuasive and informative roles. We show that advertising may function as a device to coordinate consumer expectations of the purchasing decisions of other consumers in markets with consumption externalities. The implications of advertising as a coordinating device are examined in the pricing and advertising decisions of firms interacting strategic...

  9. Comsumption Externalities, Coordination, and Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Pastine; Tuvana Pastine

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate that advertising can have an important function in markets with consumption externalities apart from its persuasive and informative roles. We show that advertising may function as a device to coordinate consumer expectations of the purchasing decisions of other consumers in markets with consumption externalities. The implications of advertising as a coordinating device are examined in the pricing and advertising decisions of firms interacting strategi...

  10. Co-ordination and specialisation

    OpenAIRE

    Egidi, Massimo; Ricottilli, Massimo

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of division of labour as an evolutionary process in which co-ordinated agents attempt problem-solving as a search in problem space. Co-ordination stress and learning trigger adaptation but as complexity rises radical solutions are sought prompting radical organisational as well as technological change. The analytical issues involved are further explored by resorting to the so-called NKC model of evolution and co-evolution.

  11. Dynamic coordination via organizational routines

    OpenAIRE

    Blume, Andreas; April M. Franco; Heidhues, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We investigate dynamic coordination among members of a problem solving team who receive private signals about which of their actions are required for a (static) coordinated solution and who have repeated opportunities to explore different action combinations. In this environment ordinal equilibria, in which agents condition only on how their signals rank their actions and not on signal strength, lead to simple patterns of behavior that have a natural interpretation as routines. These routine ...

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL COORDINATION DISORDER IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Saeideh MIRAFKHAMI; Seyyed Hossein FAKHRAEE; Sina MIRAFKHAMI; Mojtaba YOUSEFI; Mona VARZANDEH FAR

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveIn this article, a motor skill disorder called developmental coordination disorder (DCD), that is usually first diagnosed during childhood, is explained and discussed. In the year 1987, DCD was formally recognized as a distinct disorder in children by the American Psychiatric Association  (APA). DCD is a generalized term for the children who have some degrees of impairment in the development of motor coordination and therefore have difficulties with physical skills which significantl...

  13. 78 FR 44519 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Office of the Secretary Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; Re-establishment of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee and call for nominations. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture re-established the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee...

  14. 78 FR 34035 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forest Resource Coordinating Committee will meet via teleconference every month on... conference call will be posted to the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Web site,...

  15. Loss of Gravitropism in Farnesene-Treated Arabidopsis Is Due to Microtubule Malformations Related to Hormonal and ROS Unbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araniti, Fabrizio; Graña, Elisa; Krasuska, Urszula; Bogatek, Renata; Reigosa, Manuel J.; Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Sánchez-Moreiras, Adela M.

    2016-01-01

    Mode of action of farnesene, a volatile sesquiterpene commonly found in the essential oils of several plants, was deeply studied on the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. The effects of farnesene on the Arabidopsis root morphology were evaluated by different microscopic techniques. As well, microtubules immunolabeling, phytohormone measurements and ROS staining helped us to elucidate the single or multi-modes of action of this sesquiterpene on plant metabolism. Farnesene-treated roots showed a strong growth inhibition and marked modifications on morphology, important tissue alterations, cellular damages and anisotropic growth. Left-handed growth of farnesene-treated roots, reverted by taxol (a known microtubule stabilizer), was related to microtubule condensation and disorganization. As well, the inhibition of primary root growth, lateral root number, lateral root length, and both root hairs length and density could be explained by the strong increment in ethylene production and auxin content detected in farnesene-treated seedlings. Microtubule alteration and hormonal unbalance appear as important components in the mode of action of farnesene and confirm the strong phytotoxic potential of this sesquiterpene. PMID:27490179

  16. Transport properties of melanosomes along microtubules interpreted by a tug-of-war model with loose mechanical coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Bouzat

    Full Text Available In this work, we explored theoretically the transport of organelles driven along microtubules by molecular motors of opposed polarities using a stochastic model that considers a Langevin dynamics for the cargo, independent cargo-motor linkers and stepping motion for the motors. It has been recently proposed that the stiffness of the motor plays an important role when multiple motors collectively transport a cargo. Therefore, we considered in our model the recently reported values for the stiffness of the cargo-motor linker determined in living cells (∼0.01 pN/nm, which is significantly lower than the motor stiffness obtained in in vitro assays and used in previous studies. Our model could reproduce the multimodal velocity distributions and typical trajectory characteristics including the properties of the reversions in the overall direction of motion observed during melanosome transport along microtubules in Xenopus laevis melanophores. Moreover, we explored the contribution of the different motility states of the cargo-motor system to the different modes of the velocity distributions and could identify the microscopic mechanisms of transport leading to trajectories compatible with those observed in living cells. Finally, by changing the attachment and detachment rates, the model could reproduce the different velocity distributions observed during melanosome transport along microtubules in Xenopus laevis melanophores stimulated for aggregation and dispersion. Our analysis suggests that active tug-of-war processes with loose mechanical coupling can account for several aspects of cargo transport along microtubules in living cells.

  17. The NMDAR subunit NR3A interacts with microtubule-associated protein 1S in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Samuelsson, Helena; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Liu, Leyuan; McKeehan, Wallace L; Benedikz, Eirikur; Sundström, Erik

    2007-01-01

    When screening a brain cDNA library, we found that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR3A binds to microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 1S/chromosome 19 open reading frame 5 (C19ORF5). The interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo, and binding of MAP1S was localized to the membrane...

  18. Cyclin B1 is localized to unattached kinetochores and contributes to efficient microtubule attachment and proper chromosome alignment during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Chen; Xiaoyan Zhang; Qing Jiang; Paul R Clarke; Chuanmao Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin Bl is a key regulatory protein controlling cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Cyclin Bl binds CDK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit, forming a complex that orchestrates mitosis through phosphorylation of key proteins. Cyclin Bl regulates both the activation of CDK1 and its subcellular localization, which may be critical for substrate selection. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin Bl is concentrated on the outer plate of the kinetochore during prometaphase. This localization requires the cyclin box region of the protein. Cyclin Bl is displaced from individual kinetochores to the spindle poles by microtubule attachment to the kinetochores, and this displacement is dependent on the dynein/dynactin complex. Depletion of cyclin Bl by vector-based siRNA causes inefficient attachment between kinetochores and microtubules, and chromosome alignment defects, and delays the onset of anaphase. We conclude that cyclin Bl accumulates at kinetochores during prometaphase, where it contributes to the correct attachment of microtubules to kinetochores and efficient alignment of the chromosomes, most likely through localized phosphorylation of specific substrates by cyclin B1-CDK1. Cyclin Bl is then transported from each kinetochore as microtubule attachment is completed, and this relocalization may redirect the activity of cyclin B1-CDK1 and contribute to inactivation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  19. Surface Chemistry and Microtopography of Parylene C Films Control the Morphology and Microtubule Density of Cardiac Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantidou, Tatiana; Humphrey, Eleanor J; Poulet, Claire; Gorelik, Julia; Prodromakis, Themistoklis; Terracciano, Cesare M

    2016-05-01

    Cell micropatterning has certainly proved to improve the morphological and physiological properties of cardiomyocytes in vitro; however, there is little knowledge on the single cell-scaffold interactions that influence the cells' development and differentiation in culture. In this study, we employ hydrophobic/hydrophilic micropatterned Parylene C thin films (2-10 μm) as cell microscaffolds that can control the morphology and microtubule density of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) by regulating their adhesion area on Parylene through a thickness-dependent hydrophobicity. Structured NRVM on thin films tend to bridge across the hydrophobic areas, demonstrating a more spread-out shape and sparser microtubule organization, while cells on thicker films adopt a cylindrical (in vivo-like) shape (contact angles at the level of the nucleus are 64.51° and 84.73°, respectively) and a significantly (p < 0.05) denser microtubule structure. Ion scanning microscopy on NRVM revealed that cells on thicker membranes were significantly (p < 0.05) smaller in volume, but more elongated. The cylindrical shape and a significantly denser microtubule structure indicate the ability to influence cardiomyocyte phenotype using patterning and manipulation of hydrophilicity. These combined bioengineering strategies are promising tools in the generation of more representative cardiomyocytes in culture. PMID:27018760

  20. C1, a highly potent novel curcumin derivative, binds to tubulin, disrupts microtubule network and induces apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shalini; Mishra, Satyendra; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized a curcumin derivative, 4-{5-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-acryloyl]-3-oxo-penta-1,4-dienyl}-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester (C1) that displays much stronger antiproliferative activity against various types of cancer cells including multidrug resistance cells than curcumin. C1 depolymerized both interphase and mitotic microtubules in MCF-7 cells and also inhibited the reassembly of microtubules in these cells. C1 inhibited the polymerization of purified tubulin, disrupted the lattice structure of microtubules and suppressed their GTPase activity in vitro. The compound bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 2.8±1 μM and perturbed the secondary structures of tubulin. Further, C1 treatment reduced the expression of Bcl2, increased the expression of Bax and down regulated the level of a key regulator of p53, murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) (S166), in MCF-7 cells. C1 appeared to induce p53 mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, C1 showed more stability in aqueous buffer than curcumin. The results together showed that C1 perturbed microtubule network and inhibited cancer cells proliferation more efficiently than curcumin. The strong antiproliferative activity and improved stability of C1 indicated that the compound may have a potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:26980197

  1. The microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin controls the transition from dividing neuronal precursors to postmitotic neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Boekhoorn; V. van Dis; E. Goedknegt; A. Sobel; P.J. Lucassen; C.C. Hoogenraad

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is one of the two areas in the mammalian brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be involved in hippocampal physiological functions as well as pathophysiological conditions. Microtubules (MTs), providing intracellular transport, stability, and trans

  2. Kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule integrity and cell viability in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malea, Paraskevi, E-mail: malea@bio.auth.gr [Department of Botany, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S. [Department of Botany, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kevrekidis, Theodoros [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Education, Democritus University of Thrace, Nea Hili, GR-68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Cd effect on microtubules and viability of seagrass leaf cells was assessed. •The Michaelis–Menten equation satisfactorily dercribed the kinetics of Cd uptake. •Cd depolymerized MTs after 3–9 d of exposure, cell death occurred at later time. •Toxicity appeared to depend on Cd uptake rate rather than on tissue Cd content. •MTs can be used as biomarker of Cd stress and uptake rate for predicting effects. -- Abstract: The kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule cytoskeleton and cell viability in leaf blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were investigated under laboratory conditions in exposure concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 40 mg L{sup −1}. An initial rapid accumulation of cadmium was followed by a steady state. The Michaelis–Menten model adequately described metal accumulation; equilibrium concentration and uptake velocity tended to increase, whereas bioconcentration factor at equilibrium to decrease, as the exposure concentration increased. Cadmium depolymerized microtubules after 3–9 d of exposure, depending on trace metal concentration, indicating that microtubules could be used as an early biomarker of cadmium stress; cell death, occurring at later time than microtubule disturbance, was also observed. Microtubule depolymerization expressed as percentage of reduction of fluorescence intensity and cell mortality expressed as percentage of live cells increased with time. The lowest experimental tissue concentration associated with the onset of microtubule depolymerization and cell death (98.5–128.9 μg g{sup −1} dry wt, 0.5 mg L{sup −1} treatment, 7th and 9th d) was within the wide range of reported cadmium concentrations in leaves of seagrass species from various geographical areas. This lowest tissue concentration was exceeded up to the 3rd d at higher exposure concentrations, but toxic effects were generally detected at later time. The time periods required for the onset of depolymerization and

  3. Kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule integrity and cell viability in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Cd effect on microtubules and viability of seagrass leaf cells was assessed. •The Michaelis–Menten equation satisfactorily dercribed the kinetics of Cd uptake. •Cd depolymerized MTs after 3–9 d of exposure, cell death occurred at later time. •Toxicity appeared to depend on Cd uptake rate rather than on tissue Cd content. •MTs can be used as biomarker of Cd stress and uptake rate for predicting effects. -- Abstract: The kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule cytoskeleton and cell viability in leaf blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were investigated under laboratory conditions in exposure concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 40 mg L−1. An initial rapid accumulation of cadmium was followed by a steady state. The Michaelis–Menten model adequately described metal accumulation; equilibrium concentration and uptake velocity tended to increase, whereas bioconcentration factor at equilibrium to decrease, as the exposure concentration increased. Cadmium depolymerized microtubules after 3–9 d of exposure, depending on trace metal concentration, indicating that microtubules could be used as an early biomarker of cadmium stress; cell death, occurring at later time than microtubule disturbance, was also observed. Microtubule depolymerization expressed as percentage of reduction of fluorescence intensity and cell mortality expressed as percentage of live cells increased with time. The lowest experimental tissue concentration associated with the onset of microtubule depolymerization and cell death (98.5–128.9 μg g−1 dry wt, 0.5 mg L−1 treatment, 7th and 9th d) was within the wide range of reported cadmium concentrations in leaves of seagrass species from various geographical areas. This lowest tissue concentration was exceeded up to the 3rd d at higher exposure concentrations, but toxic effects were generally detected at later time. The time periods required for the onset of depolymerization and for 10 and 50% of

  4. Chimera proteins with affinity for membranes and microtubule tips polarize in the membrane of fission yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Sokolowski, Thomas R; Grammoustianou, Aristea; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-02-16

    Cell polarity refers to a functional spatial organization of proteins that is crucial for the control of essential cellular processes such as growth and division. To establish polarity, cells rely on elaborate regulation networks that control the distribution of proteins at the cell membrane. In fission yeast cells, a microtubule-dependent network has been identified that polarizes the distribution of signaling proteins that restricts growth to cell ends and targets the cytokinetic machinery to the middle of the cell. Although many molecular components have been shown to play a role in this network, it remains unknown which molecular functionalities are minimally required to establish a polarized protein distribution in this system. Here we show that a membrane-binding protein fragment, which distributes homogeneously in wild-type fission yeast cells, can be made to concentrate at cell ends by attaching it to a cytoplasmic microtubule end-binding protein. This concentration results in a polarized pattern of chimera proteins with a spatial extension that is very reminiscent of natural polarity patterns in fission yeast. However, chimera levels fluctuate in response to microtubule dynamics, and disruption of microtubules leads to disappearance of the pattern. Numerical simulations confirm that the combined functionality of membrane anchoring and microtubule tip affinity is in principle sufficient to create polarized patterns. Our chimera protein may thus represent a simple molecular functionality that is able to polarize the membrane, onto which additional layers of molecular complexity may be built to provide the temporal robustness that is typical of natural polarity patterns. PMID:26831106

  5. The Dynamic Pollen Tube Cytoskeleton: Live Cell Studies Using Actin-Binding and Microtubule-Binding Reporter Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Y. Cheung; Qiao-hong Duan; Silvia Santos Costa; Barend H.J.de Graaf; Veronica S.Di Stilio; Jose Feijo; Hen-Ming Wu

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes elongate within the pistil to transport sperm cells to the embryo sac for fertilization.Growth occurs exclusively at the tube apex,rendering pollen tube elongation a most dramatic polar cell growth process.A hall-mark pollen tube feature is its cytoskeleton,which comprises elaborately organized and dynamic actin microfilaments and microtubules.Pollen tube growth is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton;its organization and regulation have been exalined extensively by various approaches.including fluorescent protein labeled actin-binding proteins in live cell studies.Using the previously described GFP-NtADF1 and GFP-LIADF1, and a new actin reporter protein NtPLIM2b-GFP,we re-affirm that the predominant actin structures in elongating tobacco and lily pollen tubes are long,streaming actin cables along the pollen tube shank,and a subapical structure comprising shorter actin cables.The subapical collection of actin microfilaments undergoes dynamic changes,giving rise to the appearance of structures that range from basket-or funnel-shaped,mesh-like to a subtle ring.NtPLIM2b-GFP is used in combination with a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPases,AtROP-GEF1,to illustrate the use of these actin reporter proteins to explore the linkage between the polar cell growth process and its actin cytoskeleton.Contrary to the actin cytoskeleton,microtubules appear not to play a direct role in supporting the polar cell growth process in angiosperm pollen tubes.Using a microtubule reporter protein based on the microtubule end-binding protein from Arabidopsis AtEB1,GFP-AtEB1,we show that the extensive microtubule network in elongating pollen tubes displays varying degrees of dynamics.These reporter proteins provide versatile tools to explore the functional connection between major structural and signaling components of the polar pollen tube growth process.

  6. Role of animal pole protuberance and microtubules during meiosis in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhenguo; Chang, Yaqing; Sun, Huiling; Yu, Jiaping

    2010-05-01

    Fully grown oocytes of Apostichopus japonicus have a cytoplasmic protuberance where the oocyte attaches to the follicle. The protuberance and the oolamina located on the opposite side of the oocyte indicate the animal-vegetal axis. Two pre-meiotic centrosomes are anchored to the protuberance by microtubules between centrosomes and protuberance. After meiosis reinitiation induced by DTT solution, the germinal vesicle (GV) migrates towards the protuberance. The GV breaks down after it migrates to the oocyte membrane on the protuberance side. The protuberance then contracts back into the oocyte and the first polar body extrudes from the site of the former protuberance. The second polar body forms beneath the first. Thus the oocyte protuberance indicates the presumptive animal pole well before maturation of the oocyte.

  7. Vertebrate Fidgetin Restrains Axonal Growth by Severing Labile Domains of Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanfranco Leo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individual microtubules (MTs in the axon consist of a stable domain that is highly acetylated and a labile domain that is not. Traditional MT-severing proteins preferentially cut the MT in the stable domain. In Drosophila, fidgetin behaves in this fashion, with targeted knockdown resulting in neurons with a higher fraction of acetylated (stable MT mass in their axons. Conversely, in a fidgetin knockout mouse, the fraction of MT mass that is acetylated is lower than in the control animal. When fidgetin is depleted from cultured rodent neurons, there is a 62% increase in axonal MT mass, all of which is labile. Concomitantly, there are more minor processes and a longer axon. Together with experimental data showing that vertebrate fidgetin targets unacetylated tubulin, these results indicate that vertebrate fidgetin (unlike its fly ortholog regulates neuronal development by tamping back the expansion of the labile domains of MTs.

  8. Modulation of Golgi-associated microtubule nucleation throughout the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Rita; Zhu, Xiaodong; Miller, Paul; Gu, Guoqiang; Maiato, Helder; Kaverina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    A microtubule (MT) sub-population that emanates from Golgi membrane has been recently shown to comprise a significant part of MT network in interphase cells. In this study, we address whether Golgi membrane, which is being extensively remodeled throughout the cell cycle, retains its ability to nucleate MTs at diverse cell cycle stages. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that Golgi-derived MTs form at multiple stages of the cell cycle, including G1, G2 and distinct phases of mitosis. However, the capacity of Golgi to nucleate MTs in mitosis is strongly down-regulated as compared to interphase, indicating that this property is cell-cycle regulated. We demonstrate that Golgi-derived MTs are indispensable for efficient Golgi assembly in telophase, and speculate that these non-centrosomal MTs may hold specific functions at other cell cycle stages. PMID:23027431

  9. Regulation of Microtubule Dynamics in Axon Regeneration: Insights from C. elegans [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngang Heok Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of an axon to regenerate is regulated by its external environment and by cell-intrinsic factors. Studies in a variety of organisms suggest that alterations in axonal microtubule (MT dynamics have potent effects on axon regeneration. We review recent findings on the regulation of MT dynamics during axon regeneration, focusing on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In C. elegans the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK promotes axon regeneration, whereas the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA-6 inhibits axon regeneration. Both DLK and EFA-6 respond to injury and control axon regeneration in part via MT dynamics. How the DLK and EFA-6 pathways are related is a topic of active investigation, as is the mechanism by which EFA-6 responds to axonal injury. We evaluate potential candidates, such as the MT affinity-regulating kinase PAR-1/MARK, in regulation of EFA-6 and axonal MT dynamics in regeneration.

  10. Measuring cohesion between macromolecular filaments, one pair at a time: Depletion-induced microtubule binding

    CERN Document Server

    Hilitski, Feodor; Cajamarca, Luis; Hagan, Michael F; Grason, Gregory M; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-01-01

    In presence of non-adsorbing polymers, colloidal particles experience a ubiquitous attractive interactions induced by the depletion mechanism. We measure the depletion interaction between a pair of microtubule filaments by a method that combines optical trapping, single molecule imaging and umbrella sampling. By quantifying the dependence of filament cohesion on both polymer concentration and solution ionic strength, we demonstrate that the minimal model of depletion based, on the Asakura-Oosawa theory, fails to describe the experimental data. By measuring the cohesion strength in two- and three- filament bundles we verify pairwise additivity of the depletion interaction for the specific experimental conditions. The described experimental technique can be used to measure pairwise interactions between various biological or synthetic filaments, thus complementing information extracted from bulk osmotic stress experiments.

  11. Structural centrosome aberrations favor proliferation by abrogating microtubule-dependent tissue integrity of breast epithelial mammospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerch, D; Nigg, E A

    2016-05-01

    Structural centrosome aberrations are frequently observed in early stage carcinomas, but their role in malignant transformation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the impact of overexpression of Ninein-like protein (Nlp) on the architecture of polarized epithelia in three-dimensional mammospheres. When Nlp was overexpressed to levels resembling those seen in human tumors, it formed striking centrosome-related bodies (CRBs), which sequestered Ninein and affected the kinetics of microtubule (MT) nucleation and release. In turn, the profound reorganization of the MT cytoskeleton resulted in mislocalization of several adhesion and junction proteins as well as the tumor suppressor Scribble, resulting in the disruption of epithelial polarity, cell-cell interactions and mammosphere architecture. Remarkably, cells harboring Nlp-CRBs displayed an enhanced proliferative response to epidermal growth factor. These results demonstrate that structural centrosome aberrations cause not only the disruption of epithelial polarity but also favor overproliferation, two phenotypes typically associated with human carcinomas. PMID:26364601

  12. Ultraviolet light microbeam irradiation of the microtubules in single heliozoan axopodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of single axopodia near their distal ends with ultraviolet light induces axopodial retraction which continues for a short period after irradiation has ceased and appears to depend on the reduction in length of a microtubular axoneme. Altering the target site of the microbeam to the mid-point of an axopodium and prolonging the irradiation time results in the amputation of the distal portion of the axopodium. Both retraction and amputation may involve an ultraviolet light dependent breakdown of cytoplasmic microtubules. Axopodia grow out again after retraction and after amputation. The rates of growth of axopodia shortened in both these ways have been compared. Axopodia which have been caused to retract grow at a mean rate which is faster than that of axopodia which have been amputated

  13. Biophysical Measurements of Cells, Microtubules, and DNA with an Atomic Force Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Devenica, Luka M; Cabrejo, Raysa; Kurek, Matthew; Deveney, Edward F; Carter, Ashley R

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are ubiquitous in research laboratories and have recently been priced for use in teaching laboratories. Here we review several AFM platforms (Dimension 3000 by Digital Instruments, EasyScan2 by Nanosurf, ezAFM by Nanomagnetics, and TKAFM by Thorlabs) and describe various biophysical experiments that could be done in the teaching laboratory using these instruments. In particular, we focus on experiments that image biological materials and quantify biophysical parameters: 1) imaging cells to determine membrane tension, 2) imaging microtubules to determine their persistence length, 3) imaging the random walk of DNA molecules to determine their contour length, and 4) imaging stretched DNA molecules to measure the tensional force.

  14. Quantum Mechanical Aspects of Cell Microtubules: Science Fiction or Realistic Possibility?

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental research with marine algae points towards quantum entanglement at ambient temperature, with correlations between essential biological units separated by distances as long as 20 Angstr\\"oms. The associated decoherence times, due to environmental influences, are found to be of order 400 fs. This prompted some authors to connect such findings with the possibility of some kind of quantum computation taking place in these biological entities: within the decoherence time scales, the cell "quantum calculates" the optimal "path" along which energy and signal would be transported more efficiently. Prompted by these experimental results, in this talk I remind the audience of a related topic proposed several years ago in connection with the possible r\\^ole of quantum mechanics and/or field theory on dissipation-free energy transfer in microtubules (MT), which constitute fundamental cell substructures. Quantum entanglement between tubulin dimers was argued to be possible, provided there exists suffici...

  15. Small angle neutron/x-ray scattering study of microtubules and polycations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cylindrical protein nanotubes with 25 nm diameter, composed of α/β-tubulin heterodimers with surface charge density ~ e/nm2. They are involved in many cellular functions such as cell division, maintaining cell shape, and intracellular trafficking. There have been studies about higher-order assemblies of MTs (e.g. Hexagonal bundle of MTs, inverted tubulin tubes, etc) in the presence of multivalent cations (e.g. Ca2+, spermine, etc). We show our recent findings on the assembly structures of MTs and cationic polymers, which have different structures as the concentration of the polycations changes. Various assemblies are studied both in real and reciprocal spaces using small angle Neutron/X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy.

  16. A new method for fibrous protein analysis illustrated by application to tubulin microtubule polymerisation and depolymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrington, Rachel; Seymour, Mark; Rodger, Alison

    2006-09-01

    A thermostatted micro volume Couette cell has been designed to enable linear dichroism (LD) data to be collected at a range of temperatures. The cell is a development of the traditional Couette flow LD cell and includes the recent development of micro-volume LD (20-40 microL) coupled with the addition of a heating element, temperature probe and controller. This new micro volume Couette LD cell opens the way not only to the LD analysis of systems where sample volume is critical, but also for the LD analysis of temperature sensitive samples. The polymerization of the microtubule protein tubulin has been followed in a range of different conditions using the thermostatted micro volume Couette LD cell. The focusing lenses on the cell, which are required for the microvolume cell, have the side benefit of significantly reducing the light-scattering artifacts caused by the large size of tubulin microtubules. It is now possible to monitor real-time polymerization and depolymerization kinetics, and any structural rearrangements of chromophores within the polymer. In the case of tubulin, the LD spectra revealed a greater change in the orientation of tryptophan residues at approximately 290 nm during polymerization compared to other contributing chromophores-guanine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. The improvements in instrumental design have also allowed LD spectra of tubulin to be collected down to approximately 230 nm (previous data have only been available from the near UV region), which means that some indication of protein backbone-orientation changes are now available. It was observed during this work that apparent LD intensity maxima are in fact artifacts when the high-tension voltage is high. The onset of such artifacts has been observed at much lower voltages with light-scattering fibrous proteins (including tubulin) than with nonscattering samples. Therefore, caution must be used when interpreting LD data collected with medium to high photomultiplier tube voltages

  17. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnalee Sarmah

    2013-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell, prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a, which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression.

  18. Computational modeling reveals optimal strategy for kinase transport by microtubules to nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Yen Ling; Koh, Cheng Gee; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins by motors along cytoskeletal filaments is crucial to the proper functioning of many eukaryotic cells. Since most proteins are synthesized at the cell body, mechanisms are required to deliver them to the growing periphery. In this article, we use computational modeling to study the strategies of protein transport in the context of JNK (c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase) transport along microtubules to the terminals of neuronal cells. One such strategy for protein transport is for the proteins of the JNK signaling cascade to bind to scaffolds, and to have the whole protein-scaffold cargo transported by kinesin motors along microtubules. We show how this strategy outperforms protein transport by diffusion alone, using metrics such as signaling rate and signal amplification. We find that there exists a range of scaffold concentrations for which JNK transport is optimal. Increase in scaffold concentration increases signaling rate and signal amplification but an excess of scaffolds results in the dilution of reactants. Similarly, there exists a range of kinesin motor speeds for which JNK transport is optimal. Signaling rate and signal amplification increases with kinesin motor speed until the speed of motor translocation becomes faster than kinase/scaffold-motor binding. Finally, we suggest experiments that can be performed to validate whether, in physiological conditions, neuronal cells do indeed adopt such an optimal strategy. Understanding cytoskeletal-assisted protein transport is crucial since axonal and cell body accumulation of organelles and proteins is a histological feature in many human neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we have shown that axonal transport performance changes with altered transport component concentrations and transport speeds wherein these aspects can be modulated to improve axonal efficiency and prevent or slowdown axonal deterioration. PMID:24691408

  19. A novel microtubule depolymerizing colchicine analogue triggers apoptosis and autophagy in HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Baljinder; Sharma, Parduman R; Bharate, Sandip B; Saxena, Ajit K; Mondhe, D M

    2016-03-01

    Colchicine is a tubulin-binding natural product isolated from Colchicum autumnale. Here we report the in vitro anticancer activity of C-ring modified semi-synthetic derivative of colchicine; N-[(7S)-1,2,3-trimethoxy-9-oxo-10-(4-phenyl-piperidin-1-yl)-5,6,7,9 tetrahydrobenzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]acetamide (4h) on colon cancer HCT-116 cell line. The compound 4h was screened for anti-proliferative activity against different human cancer cell lines and was found to exhibit higher cytotoxicity against colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and Colo-205 with IC50 of 1 and 0.8 μM respectively. Cytotoxicity of the compound to the normal fR2 breast epithelial cells and normal HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells was evaluated in concentration and time-dependent manner to estimate its selectivity for cancer cells which showed much better selectivity than that of colchicine. Compound 4h induced cell death in HCT-116 cells by activating apoptosis and autophagy pathways. Autophagy inhibitor 3-MA blocked the production of LC3-II and reduced the cytotoxicity in response to 4h, but did not affect apoptosis, suggesting thereby that these two were independent events. Reactive oxygen species scavenger ascorbic acid pretreatment not only decreased the reactive oxygen species level but also reversed 4h induced cytotoxicity. Treatment with compound 4h depolymerized microtubules and the majority of cells arrested at the G2/M transition. Together, these data suggest that 4h has better selectivity and is a microtubule depolymerizer, which activates dual cell-death machineries, and thus, it could be a potential novel therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26919061

  20. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. A.; Holland, D.; Bland, J.; Johnson, C. E.; Thomas, M. F.

    2003-02-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb2O3]x - [ZnCl2]1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb)2(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn)2(OSb)2].

  1. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb2O3]x - [ZnCl2]1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb)2(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn)2(OSb)2

  2. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J A [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Holland, D [Physics Department, Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bland, J [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Johnson, C E [Physics Department, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Thomas, M F [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-19

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sub x} - [ZnCl{sub 2}]{sub 1-x} where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb){sub 2}(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn){sub 2}(OSb){sub 2}].

  3. COCO: Conversion of Celestial Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The COCO program converts star coordinates from one system to another. Both the improved IAU system, post-1976, and the old pre-1976 system are supported. COCO can perform accurate transformations between multiple coordinate systems. COCO's user-interface is spartan but efficient and the program offers control over report resolution. All input is free-format, and defaults are provided where this is meaningful. COCO uses SLALIB (ascl:1403.025) and is distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

  4. Modelling coordination in biological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, D.G.; Oliveira Costa, D.F. de; Arbab, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present an application of the Reo coordination paradigm to provide a compositional formal model for describing and reasoning about the behaviour of biological systems, such as regulatory gene networks. Reo governs the interaction and flow of data between components by allowing the construction of

  5. Coordinate Geometric Approach to Spherometer

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Sameen Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The spherometer used for measuring radius of curvature of spherical surfaces is explicitly based on a geometric relation unique to circles and spheres. We present an alternate approach using coordinate geometry, which reproduces the well-known result for the spherometer and also leads to a scheme to study aspherical surfaces. We shall also briefly describe some of the modified spherometers.

  6. Coordinating talk and practical action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae; Streeck, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how talk and practical action are coordinated during one type of activity involving professional communication: the service-assessment sequence in hair salons. During this activity, a practical inspection of the haircut must be coupled with sequentially produced verbal acts...

  7. Information Sharing for Care Coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Ofra; Grosz, Barbara J.; Stern, Roni; Sanders, Lee M.

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork and care coordination are of increasing importance to health care delivery and patient safety and health. This paper describes our initial work on developing agents that are able to make intelligent information sharing decisions to support a diverse, evolving team of care providers in constructing and maintaining a shared plan that operates in uncertain environments and over a long time horizon.

  8. Motivic amplitudes and cluster coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study motivic amplitudes — objects which contain all of the essential mathematical content of scattering amplitudes in planar SYM theory in a completely canonical way, free from the ambiguities inherent in any attempt to choose particular functional representatives. We find that the cluster structure on the kinematic configuration space Confn(ℙ3) underlies the structure of motivic amplitudes. Specifically, we compute explicitly the coproduct of the two-loop seven-particle MHV motivic amplitude A7,2M and find that like the previously known six-particle amplitude, it depends only on certain preferred coordinates known in the mathematics literature as cluster X-coordinates on Confn(ℙ3). We also find intriguing relations between motivic amplitudes and the geometry of generalized associahedrons, to which cluster coordinates have a natural combinatoric connection. For example, the obstruction to A7,2M being expressible in terms of classical polylogarithms is most naturally represented by certain quadrilateral faces of the appropriate associahedron. We also find and prove the first known functional equation for the trilogarithm in which all 40 arguments are cluster X-coordinates of a single algebra. In this respect it is similar to Abel’s 5-term dilogarithm identity

  9. [Coordination in oncology, pivot nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The function of the pivot nurse was created when the Cancer Plans were first introduced to improve patient management and has constantly developed since then. It is an essential role for the coordination of care and the different players involved along the patient's care pathway. PMID:27338685

  10. Archimedes' Principle in General Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Archimedes' principle is well known to state that a body submerged in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. Herein, Archimedes' principle is derived from first principles by using conservation of the stress-energy-momentum tensor in general coordinates. The resulting expression for the force is…

  11. Kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule integrity and cell viability in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malea, Paraskevi; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2013-11-15

    The kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule cytoskeleton and cell viability in leaf blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were investigated under laboratory conditions in exposure concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 40 mg L(-1). An initial rapid accumulation of cadmium was followed by a steady state. The Michaelis-Menten model adequately described metal accumulation; equilibrium concentration and uptake velocity tended to increase, whereas bioconcentration factor at equilibrium to decrease, as the exposure concentration increased. Cadmium depolymerized microtubules after 3-9 d of exposure, depending on trace metal concentration, indicating that microtubules could be used as an early biomarker of cadmium stress; cell death, occurring at later time than microtubule disturbance, was also observed. Microtubule depolymerization expressed as percentage of reduction of fluorescence intensity and cell mortality expressed as percentage of live cells increased with time. The lowest experimental tissue concentration associated with the onset of microtubule depolymerization and cell death (98.5-128.9μgg(-1)drywt, 0.5 mg L(-1) treatment, 7th and 9th d) was within the wide range of reported cadmium concentrations in leaves of seagrass species from various geographical areas. This lowest tissue concentration was exceeded up to the 3rd d at higher exposure concentrations, but toxic effects were generally detected at later time. The time periods required for the onset of depolymerization and for 10 and 50% of cells to die tended to decrease as the uptake velocity increased; in particular, significant negative correlations were found between these variables. These results suggest that toxicity appears to be a function of cadmium uptake rate rather than of the total tissue metal concentration. Hence, tissue residues should be interpreted in relation to the time frame of the exposure, while the estimation of metal uptake velocity could be utilized for

  12. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  13. Maloriented Bivalents Have Metaphase Positions at the Spindle Equator with More Kinetochore Microtubules to One Pole than to the OtherV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    LaFountain, James R.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    To test the “traction fiber” model for metaphase positioning of bivalents during meiosis, kinetochore fibers of maloriented bivalents, induced during recovery from cold arrest, were analyzed with a liquid crystal polarizing microscope. The measured birefringence retardation of kinetochore fibers is proportional to the number of microtubules in a fiber. Five of the 11 maloriented bivalents analyzed exhibited bipolar malorientations that had at least four times more kinetochore microtubules to ...

  14. Microtubule plus-end and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is involved in the assembly of apico-basal arrays in polarised epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellett, Gemma; Carter, Jane M; Keynton, Jennifer; Goldspink, Deborah; James, Colin; Moss, David K; Mogensen, Mette M

    2009-10-01

    Apico-basal polarisation of epithelial cells involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The classic radial array of microtubules focused on a centrally located centrosome typical of many animal cells is lost or greatly reduced and a non-centrosomal apico-basal array develops. The molecules and mechanisms responsible for the assembly and positioning of these non-centrosomal microtubules have not been fully elucidated. Using a Nocodazole induced regrowth assay in invitro culture (MDCK) and in situ epithelial (cochlear Kolliker's) cell models we establish that the apico-basal array originates from the centrosome and that the non-centrosomal microtubule minus-end anchoring sites do not contribute significantly to their nucleation. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed that an extended radial array assembles with microtubule plus-ends targeting cadheren sites at adherens junctions and EB1 and CLIP-170 co-localising with beta-catenin and dynein clusters at the junction sites. The extended radial array is likely to be a vital intermediate step in the assembly process with cortical anchored dynein providing the mechanical force required for microtubule release, translocation and capture. Ultrastructural analyses of the apico-basal arrays in fully polarised MDCK and Kolliker's cells revealed microtubule minus-end association with the most apical adherens junction (Zonula adherens). We propose that a release and capture model involving both microtubule plus- and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is responsible for the generation of non-centrosomal apico-basal arrays in most centrosome containing polarised epithelial cells. PMID:19479825

  15. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  16. Paclitaxel-induced microtubule stabilization causes mitotic block and apoptotic-like cell death in a paclitaxel-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Foland, Travis B.; Dentler, William L.; SUPRENANT, KATHY A.; Gupta, Mohan L.; Himes, Richard H.

    2005-01-01

    Wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae tubulin does not bind the anti-mitotic microtubule stabilizing agent paclitaxel. Previously, we introduced mutations into the S. cerevisiae gene for β-tubulin that imparted paclitaxel binding to the protein, but the mutant strain was not sensitive to paclitaxel and other microtubule-stabilizing agents, due to the multiple ABC transporters in the membranes of budding yeast. Here, we introduced the mutated β-tubulin gene into a S. cerevisiae strain with dimini...

  17. Managing Coordinator, Educational or Entrepreneurial Coordinator: Course Coordinator Profile Analysis at Private HEIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Augusta de Araújo Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education dynamics is impacted by political, economic and financial interference. In parallel, the Ministry of Education and Culture (MEC is strict in its reviews to ensure Brazilian higher education is appreciated and promoted. The purpose of this study is to identify the profile of Course Coordinators and factors that might improve, at the surveyed HEIs, this professional´s relationship with students, teaching staff and Directors. Literature was searched and reviewed so as to collect subject matter pertaining issues. A quantitative research approach was employed and objectives were of exploratory descriptive nature since this technique ensures extended comprehension of the investigated phenomenon, whilst data was gathered via personal interviews. The object of investigation comprised all Course Coordinators of the Estácio/Natal Group in Brazil´s four units. The survey´s tool comprises: 13 closed questions to identify the Coordinator´s profile; 17 questions with a 5 point Likert score scale to identify the entrepreneurial profile; 42 also resorting to a 5 point Likert score scale to measure the dimensions of the Coordinator´s activities and 4 open, optional questions to measure difficulties and possibilities that impact the development of an entrepreneurial course management approach. The study employed both a statistical method (data analysis and descriptive statistics. Findings lead to the conclusion that information and knowledge gathered support researched HEIs in their overcoming of challenges, amongst which encouraging strategic course management and innovation, focused on implementing a new vision of the Course Coordinator, as professionals that master how to balance management and pedagogical skills, whilst innovating by resorting to entrepreneurial competencies.

  18. A coordination theory for intelligent machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    A formal model for the coordination level of intelligent machines is established. The framework of the coordination level investigated consists of one dispatcher and a number of coordinators. The model called coordination structure has been used to describe analytically the information structure and information flow for the coordination activities in the coordination level. Specifically, the coordination structure offers a formalism to (1) describe the task translation of the dispatcher and coordinators; (2) represent the individual process within the dispatcher and coordinators; (3) specify the cooperation and connection among the dispatcher and coordinators; (4) perform the process analysis and evaluation; and (5) provide a control and communication mechanism for the real-time monitor or simulation of the coordination process. A simple procedure for the task scheduling in the coordination structure is presented. The task translation is achieved by a stochastic learning algorithm. The learning process is measured with entropy and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally, a case study of the coordination structure with three coordinators and one dispatcher for a simple intelligent manipulator system illustrates the proposed model and the simulation of the task processes performed on the model verifies the soundness of the theory.

  19. Defective microtubule-dependent podosome organization in osteoclasts leads to increased bone density in Pyk2−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Henn, Hava; Destaing, Olivier; Sims, Natalie A.; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Alles, Neil; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Bruzzaniti, Angela; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 is highly expressed in osteoclasts, where it is primarily localized in podosomes. Deletion of Pyk2 in mice leads to mild osteopetrosis due to impairment in osteoclast function. Pyk2-null osteoclasts were unable to transform podosome clusters into a podosome belt at the cell periphery; instead of a sealing zone only small actin rings were formed, resulting in impaired bone resorption. Furthermore, in Pyk2-null osteoclasts, Rho activity was enhanced while microtubule acetylation and stability were significantly reduced. Rescue experiments by ectopic expression of wild-type or a variety of Pyk2 mutants in osteoclasts from Pyk2−/− mice have shown that the FAT domain of Pyk2 is essential for podosome belt and sealing zone formation as well as for bone resorption. These experiments underscore an important role of Pyk2 in microtubule-dependent podosome organization, bone resorption, and other osteoclast functions. PMID:17846174

  20. Defective microtubule-dependent podosome organization in osteoclasts leads to increased bone density in Pyk2(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Henn, Hava; Destaing, Olivier; Sims, Natalie A; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Alles, Neil; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Bruzzaniti, Angela; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2007-09-10

    The protein tyrosine kinase Pyk2 is highly expressed in osteoclasts, where it is primarily localized in podosomes. Deletion of Pyk2 in mice leads to mild osteopetrosis due to impairment in osteoclast function. Pyk2-null osteoclasts were unable to transform podosome clusters into a podosome belt at the cell periphery; instead of a sealing zone only small actin rings were formed, resulting in impaired bone resorption. Furthermore, in Pyk2-null osteoclasts, Rho activity was enhanced while microtubule acetylation and stability were significantly reduced. Rescue experiments by ectopic expression of wild-type or a variety of Pyk2 mutants in osteoclasts from Pyk2(-/-) mice have shown that the FAT domain of Pyk2 is essential for podosome belt and sealing zone formation as well as for bone resorption. These experiments underscore an important role of Pyk2 in microtubule-dependent podosome organization, bone resorption, and other osteoclast functions. PMID:17846174