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Sample records for atlas thin gap

  1. ATLAS Large Scale Thin Gap Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-04-29

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of the ATLAS sTGC New Small Wheel collaboration who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program.

  2. Understand ATLAS NSW Thin Gap Chamber from Garfield Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J; Diehl, E; Feng, H; Guan, L; Mikenberg, G; Smakhtin, V; Yu, J M; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zhao, Z

    2014-01-01

    The LHC will be upgraded in several phases with the goal of obtaining an instantaneous lumi- nosity of 5-7 x 10^34 cm-2s-s at the center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In order to profit from the high luminosity and high energy runs of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration plans to upgrade the present endcap small wheel muon spectrometer to im- prove the muon triggering as well as precision tracking. The proposed New Small Wheel (nSW) will be composed of two four-layer Micromegas detectors (MM) detector sandwiched between two four-layer small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) quadruplets, where MM for precision tracking and sTGC for Level-1 triggering. In this paper, we focus on the Garfield [ 1 ] simulation of the sTGC detector to understand its timing performance and charge production. We also stud- ied the sTGC timing under different magnetic fields and high voltages. These studies provide important guide lines for the sTGC detector and electronics development.

  3. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Codina, Estel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS muon system upgrade to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW), is designed to cope with the increased instantaneous luminosity in LHC Run 3. The small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) will provide the NSW with fast trigger and high precision tracking. The construction protocol has been validated by test beam experiments on a full-size prototype sTGC detector, showing the performance requirements are met. The intrinsic spatial resolution for a single layer has been found to be about 50$\\mu$m at perpendicular incident angle, and the pads transition region has been measured to be about 4mm.

  4. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Codina, Estel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For the forthcoming Phase-I upgrade to the LHC (2018/19), the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap system, Small Wheel, needs to be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have to operate in a high background radiation region while reconstructing muon tracks with high precision and providing information for the Level-1 trigger. In particular, the precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm, and the Level-1 trigger track segments have to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of approximately 1 mrad. The NSWs consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both providing trigger and tracking capabilities. The single sTGC planes of a quadruplet consists of an anode layer of 50μm gold plated tungsten wire sandwiched between two resistive cathode layers. Behind one of the resistive cathode layers, a PCB with precise machined strips (thus the name sTGC) spaced every 3.2mm allows to achieve a position resolution that ranges from 70...

  5. Techniques developed for the ATLAS Thin Gap Chambers mass production in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, S; Ishii, K; Iwasaki, H; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ishino, M; Kondo, T; Kobayashi, T; Kurashige, H; Mikenberg, G; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nanjo, H; Ikeno, M; Nozaki, M; Ochi, A; Sasaki, O; Shoa, M; Sugimoto, T; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    The Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) are used for the muon trigger system in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector. The TGC mass production phase at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) started in January 2001. As the anode-cathode distance is small, 1.4 mm, chamber flatness is essential to achieve a uniform gas gain over the chamber. In order to perform a stable production with high quality we developed a chamber closing system. When we glue two half-chambers together, we sandwich them between a granite table and an aluminum honeycomb panel to keep the chamber flat from both sides. By using silk screens, we control the quantity of epoxy adhesive that affects the chamber thickness. Due to these developments, we can achieve the flatness of less than 100 µm. Uniformity of detection efficiency of the TGC is measured with a cosmic-ray test bench at Kobe University. So far we have tested 300 TGCs. Position dependence of the efficiency is measured with a granularity of 5mm-by-5mm. The average efficiency...

  6. Cosmic ray test system for the ATLAS thin gap chamber modules at KOBE

    CERN Document Server

    Suigmoto, T; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ichimiya, R; Ikeno, M; Ishii, K; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Kurashige, H; Mima, T; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nakaune, Y; Nozaki, M; Ohshita, H; Okumura, K; Sasaki, O; Suzuki, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Uda, J; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    Thin gap chamber modules giving function of forward muon trigger to the ATLAS detector in the LHC experiment have been constructed at High Energy Research Organization (KEK) in Japan and their performances have been checked at Kobe University. A large-scale test system specially designed for measuring uniformity of the detection efficiencies and the timing resolution of 8 TGC modules at the same time was successfully operated. Each TGC module had 72 anode wire channels and 64 cathode strip channels (in total 1088 readout channels for 8 modules). Drift tubes consisted of 12 layers (total 428 tubes), between which the TGC modules are put, determined trajectories of cosmic rays. Hit pattern and timing of all detector signals (Trigger counter. Drift tubes and TGCs) were measured by using VME modules. In regular data acquisition situation, i.e. about effective 19 Hz trigger rate from scintillation counters and 73% tracking efficiency by the drift tubes, the detection efficiency of each layer by 5 mm * 5 mm region ...

  7. Development of mass-production technique of the ATLAS thin gap chamber in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, S; Ishii, K; Iwasaki, H; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ishino, M; Kondo, T; Kobayashi, T; Kurashige, H; Mikenberg, G; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nanjo, H; Ikeno, M; Nozaki, M; Ochi, A; Sasaki, O; Shoa, M; Sugimoto, T; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    The thin gap chambers (TGCs) are used for the muon trigger system in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector. As the anode-cathode distance is small, 1.4 mm, chamber flatness is essential to achieve a uniform gas gain over the chamber. The TGC mass production phase at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) started in January 2001. In order to perform a stable production with high quality we developed a chamber closing system. When we glue two half- chambers together, we sandwich them with a granite table and an aluminum honeycomb panel that keep the chamber flat from both sides. By using silk screens, we also control the quantity of epoxy adhesive that affects the chamber thickness. Owing to these developments, we can achieve the flatness of less than 100 mu m. Uniformity of detection efficiency of the TGC is measured with a cosmic-ray test bench at Kobe University. We have tested 300 TGCs so far. Position dependence of the efficiency is measured with a granularity of 5 mm- by-5 mm. The average...

  8. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased by up to seven times its design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019-2020. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55\\% of CO$_{2}$ and 45\\% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a 10~mCi~$^{90}$Sr source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height o...

  9. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019/20. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55% of CO_2 and 45% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a Sr-90 source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height of...

  10. Installation of the first of the big wheels of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, a thin gap chamber (TGC) wheel

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    The muon spectrometer will include four big moving wheels at each end, each measuring 25 metres in diameter. Of the eight wheels in total, six will be composed of thin gap chambers for the muon trigger system and the other two will consist of monitored drift tubes (MDTs) to measure the position of the muons

  11. Performance of a Full-Size Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber Prototype for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Muon Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Abusleme, Angel; Bellerive, A.; Benhammou, Y.; Botte, J.; Cohen, H.; Davies, M.; Du, Y.; Gauthier, L.; Koffas, T.; Kuleshov, S.; Lefebvre, B.; Li, C.; Lupu, N.; Mikenberg, G.; Mori, D.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J.P.; Perez Codina, E.; Rettie, S.; Robichaud-Véronneau, A.; Rojas, R.; Shoa, M.; Smakhtin, V.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Toro, A.; Torres, H.; Ulloa, P.; Vachon, B.; Vasquez, G.; Vdovin, A.; Viel, S.; Walker, P.; Weber, S.; Zhu, C.

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 $\\times$ $1.0\\, \\mathrm{m}^2$ consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a $32\\, \\mathrm{GeV}$ pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about $50\\,\\mathrm{\\mu m...

  12. The challenge of building large area, high precision small-strip Thin Gap Trigger Chambers for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maleev, Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon endcap system must be upgraded in 2018 and 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Large area small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) up to 2 m2 in size and totaling an active area of 1200 m2 will be employed for fast and precise triggering. The precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm to allow the Level-1 trigger track segments to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of 1mrad. The upgraded detector will consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and sTGC’s detectors together forming the ATLAS New Small Wheels. The position of each strip must be known with an accuracy of 30 µm along the precision coordinate and 80 µm along the beam. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision is a key point and then must be controlled and monitored all along the process of construction and integrati...

  13. The Challenge of Building Large Area, High Precision Small-Strip Thin Gap Trigger Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maleev, Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon end-cap system must be upgraded in 2018 and 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Large area small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) up to 2 $m^2$ in size and totaling an active area of 1200 $m^2$ will be employed for fast and precise triggering. The precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 $\\mu m$ while the Level-1 trigger track segments need to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of 1 mrad. The upgraded detector will consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and sTGC’s detectors together forming the ATLAS New Small Wheels. The position of each strip must be known with an accuracy of 40 $\\mu m$ along the precision coordinate and 80 $\\mu m$ along the beam. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision is a key point and then must be controlled and monitored all along the process of cons...

  14. Photonic band gap in thin wire metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Kai Meng

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the band structure of a class of photonic crystals made from only thin wires. Using a different method, we demonstrate that a complete photonic band gap is possible for such materials. Band gap materials normally consist of space filling dielectric or metal, whereas thin wires occupy a very small fraction of the volume. We show that this is related to the large increase in scattering at the Brillouin zone boundary. The method we developed brings together the calculation techniques in three different fields. The first is the calculation of scattering from periodic, tilted antennas, which we improve upon. The second is the standard technique for frequency selective surface design. The third is obtained directly from low energy electron diffraction theory. Good agreements with experiments for left handed materials, negative materials, and frequency selective surfaces are demonstrated.

  15. The Cosmic Ray Hodoscopes for Testing Thin Gap Chambers at the Technion and Tel Aviv University

    CERN Document Server

    Etzion, E; Amram, N; Benhammou, Ya; Ben-Moshe, M; Bella, G; Ginzburg, J; Gernitzky, Y; Harel, A; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Panikashvili, N; Rozen, Y; Tarem, S; Warszawski, E; Wasilewski, J; Levinson, L

    2004-01-01

    Thin gap chambers (TGCs) are built for the muon trigger chambers in the endcap region of the LHC experiment ATLAS. More than 2500 ATLAS TGCs are being produced at the Weizmann institute in Israel, and in Shandong University in China. Detailed testing of these chambers is performed at the Technion and at the Tel-Aviv University. Two cosmic ray hodoscopes for testing the operation of these detectors were built in Israel. In these hodoscopes the response of the chambers to energetic cosmic ray muons is recorded and analyzed. The hodoscopes measure the exact time and space location of the cosmic ray hit and read out the chambers which are being tested to verify that they produce a corresponding signal within the required time interval. The cosmic ray hodoscopes built at the Technion and at the Tel Aviv University for the test of ATLAS TGCs are described. The mechanical structure, readout electronics, data acquisition and operating scheme are presented. Typical TGC test results are presented and discussed.

  16. Rail-gap switch modifications and test data for the Atlas capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E.A.; Bennett, G.A.; Bartsch, R.R. [and others

    1997-09-01

    Atlas is a facility being designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform high energy-density experiments in support of weapons-physics and basic-research programs. The capacitor bank design consists of a 36-MJ array of 240-kV Marx modules. The system is designed to deliver a peak current of 45- to 50-MA with a 4- to 5-us risetime. Evaluation, testing and qualification of key components of the Marx module are being conducted. One key element of the Marx module is the low inductance, high-voltage, high-current, high-coulomb transfer spark-gap switch needed for this application, 304 of which will be used in the Atlas capacitor bank. Because of the Marx module configuration, overall system inductance requirements and the need for a triggered switch, the design team initially selected the Maxwell Technologies railgap switch. The switch has been used in other high-voltage, high-current, high-coulomb transfer applications and would meet the Atlas facility requirements with some modifications. Testing of the Maxwell rail-gap switch under expected Atlas conditions is in progress. For the Atlas application, the rail-gap switch required some mechanical design modifications, which are discussed. Maxwell provided to modified switches for testing and evaluation. Results of this testing, before and after modifications, and inherent maintenance improvements to meet overall system reliability will be discussed.

  17. Charge production in thin gap multi-wire chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Mincer, A I; Goldberg, J J; Gernitzky, Y; Lazic, D; Lupu, N Z; Robins, S; Rozen, Y; Tarem, S

    2000-01-01

    Resistive cathode thin gap chambers (TGCs) have been used as particle detectors in high-energy physics experiments for more than a decade. A quantitative understanding of charge production mechanisms in TGCs has been developed and a simulation program produced to accurately describe the expected response from a chamber as a function of its design and operating parameters. This simulation is based upon a description of the processes of electron cluster production, drift and avalanche effects and space charge contributions from residual ions. Improved measurements of chamber performance are presented, and the parameters of the simulation have been fitted to these data yielding values consistent with estimates based on the physical mechanisms involved. Sensitivity of chamber timing and amplification properties to operating parameters is discussed.

  18. Flexural vibration band gaps in thin plates with two-dimensional binary locally resonant structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Dian-Long; Wang Gang; Liu Yao-Zong; Wen Ji-Hong; Qiu Jing

    2006-01-01

    The complete flexural vibration band gaps are studied in the thin plates with two-dimensional binary locally resonant structures, i.e. the composite plate consisting of soft rubber cylindrical inclusions periodically placed in a host material. Numerical simulations show that the low-frequency gaps of flexural wave exist in the thin plates. The width of the first gap decreases monotonically as the matrix density increases. The frequency response of the finite periodic thin plates is simulated by the finite element method, which provides attenuations of over 20dB in the frequency range of the band gaps. The findings will be significant in the application of phononic crystals.

  19. Description of the ATLAS jet veto measurement and jet gap jet events at hadronic colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Royon, C

    2014-01-01

    We present a new QCD description of the ATLAS jet veto measurement, using the Banfi- Marchesini-Smye equation to constrain the inter-jet QCD radiation. This equation resums emis- sions of soft gluons at large angles and leads to a very good description of data. We also investigate jet gap jet events in hadron-hadron collisions, in which two jets are produced and separated by a large rapidity gap. Using a renormalisation-group improved NLL kernel implemented in the HERWIG Monte Carlo program, we show that the BFKL predictions are in good agreement with the Tevatron data, and present predictions that could be tested at the LHC.

  20. Optical band gap tuning of Sb-Se thin films for xerographic based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramandeep; Singh, Palwinder; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Akshay; Thakur, Anup

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper we have studied the effect of Sb addition on the optical band gap tuning of thermally evaporated SbxSe100-x (x = 0, 5, 20, 50 and 60) thin films. The structural investigations revealed that all thin films were amorphous in nature. Transmission spectrum was taken in the range 400-2500 nm shows that all films are highly transparent in the near infrared region. The fundamental absorption edge shifts towards longer wavelength with Sb incorporation. The optical band gap decreases with addition of antimony in a-Se thin films. A good correlation has been drawn between experimentally estimated and theoretically calculated optical band gap. The decrease in optical band gap of thin films has been explained using chemical bond approach and density of states model. Decrease in optical band gap with Sb addition increases the concentration of electron deep traps which increases the X-ray sensitivity of Sb-Se thin films. Thus by tuning the optical band gap of Sb-Se alloy, it could be utilized for xerographic based applications.

  1. Effect of Microstructure of TiO2 Thin Films on Optical Band Gap Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Guang-Lei; HE Hong-Bo; SHAO Jian-Da

    2005-01-01

    @@ TiO2 coatings are prepared on fused silica with conventional electron beam evaporation deposition. After annealed at different temperatures for four hours, the spectra and XRD patterns of TiO2 thin film are obtained. XRD patterns reveal that only anatase phase can be observed in TiO2 coatings regardless of the different annealing temperatures, and with the increasing annealing temperature, the grain size gradually increases. The relationship between the energy gap and microstructure of anatase is determined and discussed. The quantum confinement effect is observed that with the increasing grain size of TiO2 thin film, the band gap energy shifts from 3.4eV to 3.21 eV. Moreover, other possible influence of the TiO2 thin-film microstructure, such as surface roughness and thin film absorption, on band gap energy is also expected.

  2. Depth-resolved band gap in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar, M.; Nishiwaki, S.; Weinhardt, L.; Pookpanratana, S.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J. D.; Shafarman, W.; Heske, C.

    2008-06-24

    The surface composition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (?CIGSSe?) thin films intrinsically deviates from the corresponding bulk composition, which also modifies the electronic structure and thus the optical properties.We have used a combination of photon and electron spectroscopies with different information depths to gain depth-resolved information on the band gap energy (Eg) in CIG(S)Se thin films. We find an increasing Eg with decreasing information depth, indicating the formation of a surface region with significantly higher Eg. This Eg-widened surface region extends further into the bulk of the sulfur-free CIGSe thin film compared to the CIGSSe thin film.

  3. Depth-resolved band gap in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, M.; Nishiwaki, S.; Weinhardt, L.; Pookpanratana, S.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J. D.; Shafarman, W. N.; Heske, C.

    2008-12-01

    The surface composition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 ("CIGSSe") thin films intrinsically deviates from the corresponding bulk composition, which also modifies the electronic structure and thus the optical properties. We used a combination of photon and electron spectroscopies with different information depths to gain depth-resolved information on the band gap energy (Eg) in CIG(S)Se thin films. We find an increasing Eg with decreasing information depth, indicating the formation of a surface region with significantly higher Eg. This Eg-widened surface region extends further into the bulk of the sulfur-free CIGSe thin film compared to the CIGSSe thin film.

  4. Ultra-Thin Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array for Gap Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁天怀; 陈祥林; 黄毅平

    2004-01-01

    An ultra-thin flexible eddy current proximity sensor array was developed for online measurements of tiny gaps between large smooth metallic and nonmetallic surfaces of arbitrary shapes. The probe of the flexible eddy current sensor array, which includes a set of sensor coils, is fabricated on a thin flexible substrate using the flexible printed circuit board process which allows the probe to be very thin and flexible so that it can conform to the surface geometry of the measured objects. The sensor coils are connected to an inductance-capacitance oscillator, which converts the distance between the sensor coil and the metallic target to a frequency output. Experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the sensor system can reach ±0.5% for a 2-mm gap and the sensor system is suitable for online gap measurements.

  5. A Theoretical and Experimental Study for a Developing Flow in a Thin Fluid Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianhong; Lang, Ji; Jen, Kei-Peng; Nathan, Rungun; Vucbmss Team

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report a novel theoretical and experimental approach to examine a fast developing flow in a thin fluid gap. Although the phenomena are widely observed in industrial applications and biological systems, there is a lack of analytical approach that captures the instantaneous fluid response to a sudden impact. An experimental setup was developed that contains a piston instrumented with a laser displacement sensor and a pressure transducer. A sudden impact was imposed on the piston, creating a fast compaction on the thin fluid gap underneath. The motion of the piston was captured by the laser displacement sensor, and the fluid pressure build-up and relaxation was recorded by the pressure transducer. For this dynamic process, a novel analytical approach was developed. It starts with the inviscid limit when the viscous fluid effect has no time to appear. This short process is followed by a developing flow, in which the inviscid core flow region decreases and the viscous wall region increases until the entire fluid gap is filled with viscous fluid flow. A boundary layer integral method is used during the process. Lastly, the flow is completely viscous dominant featured by a typical squeeze flow in a thin gap. Excellent agreement between the theory and the experiment was achieved. The study presented herein, filling the gap in the literature, will have broad impact in industrial and biomedical applications. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award #1511096.

  6. Performance of a Full-Size Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber Prototype for the ALTAS New Small Wheel Muon Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Stephen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 × 1.0 m^2 consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a 32 GeV pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about 50 μm have been obtained, uniform along the sTGC ...

  7. Band gap and conductivity variations of ZnO thin films by doping with Aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattappalam, Sunil C.; Thomas, Deepu; T, Raju Mathew; Augustine, Simon; Mathew, Sunny

    2015-02-01

    Zinc Oxide thin films were prepared by Successive Ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique(SILAR). Aluminium was doped for different doping concentrations from 3 at.% to 12 at.% in steps of 3 at.%. Conductivity of the samples were taken at different temperatures. UV Spectrograph of the samples were taken and the band gap of each sample was found from the data. It was observed that as the doping concentration of Aluminium increases, the band gap of the samples decreases and concequently conductivity of the samples increases.

  8. Band gap and conductivity variations of ZnO nano structured thin films annealed under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattappalam, Sunil C.; Thomas, Deepu; T, Raju Mathew; Augustine, Simon; Mathew, Sunny

    2015-02-01

    Zinc Oxide thin films were prepared by Successive Ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique(SILAR). The samples were annealed under vacuum and conductivity of the samples were taken at different temperatures. UV Spectrograph of the samples were taken and the band gap of each sample was found from the data. All the results were compared with that of the sample annealed under air. It was observed that the band gap decreases and concequently conductivity of the samples increases when the samples are annealed under vacuum.

  9. Optical band gap of Sn0.2Bi1.8Te3 thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P H Soni; M V Hathi; C F Desai

    2003-12-01

    Sn0.2Bi1.8Te3 thin films were grown using the thermal evaporation technique on a (001) face of NaCl crystal as a substrate at room temperature. The optical absorption was measured in the wave number range 500–4000 cm-1. From the optical absorption data the band gap was evaluated and studied as a function of film thickness and deposition temperature. The data indicate absorption through direct interband transition with a band gap of around 0.216 eV. The detailed results are reported here.

  10. Engineering of the band gap and optical properties of thin films of yttrium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Chang Chuan; Mongstad, Trygve; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Karazhanov, Smagul, E-mail: smagulk@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2014-07-21

    Thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride show photochromic effect at room temperature. In this work, we have studied structural and optical properties of the films deposited at different deposition pressures, discovering the possibility of engineering the optical band gap by variation of the oxygen content. In sum, the transparency of the films and the wavelength range of photons triggering the photochromic effect can be controlled by variation of the deposition pressure.

  11. OPTICAL BAND GAP AND CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS OF POLYPYRROLE-CHITOSAN COMPOSITE THIN FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahnaz M.Abdi; H.N.M.Ekramul Mahmud; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Anuar Kassim; Mohamad Zaki Ab.Rahman; Josephine Liew Ying Chyi

    2012-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and optical properties of polypyrrole-chitosan (PPy-CHI) conducting polymer composites have been investigated to determine the optical transition characteristics and energy band gap of composite films.The two electrode method and Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristic technique were used to measure the conductivity of the PPy-CHI thin films,and the optical band gap was obtained from their ultraviolet absorption edges.Depending upon experimental parameter,the optical band gap (Eg) was found within 1.30-2.32 eV as estimated from optical absorption data.The band gap of the composite films decreased as the CHI content increased.The room temperature electrical conductivity of PPy-CHI thin films was found in the range of 5.84 × 10-7-15.25 × 10-7 S.cm-1 depending on the chitosan content.The thermogravimetry analysis (TGA)showed that the CHI can improve the thermal stability of PPy-CHI composite films.

  12. Band gap engineering of zinc selenide thin films through alloying with cadmium telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuhaili, M F; Kayani, A; Durrani, S M A; Bakhtiari, I A; Haider, M B

    2013-06-12

    This work investigates band gap engineering of zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films. This was achieved by mixing ZnSe with cadmium telluride (CdTe). The mass ratio (x) of CdTe in the starting material was varied in the range x = 0-0.333. The films were prepared using thermal evaporation. The chemical composition of the films was investigated through energy dispersive spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Structural analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Normal incidence transmittance and reflectance were measured over the wavelength range 300-1300 nm. The absorption coefficients and band gaps were determined from these spectrophotometric measurements. The band gap monotonically decreased from 2.58 eV (for x = 0) to 1.75 eV (for x = 0.333). Photocurrent measurements indicated that the maximum current density was obtained for films with x = 0.286. A figure of merit, based on crystallinity, band gap, and photocurrent, was defined. The optimum characteristics were obtained for the films with x = 0.231, for which the band gap was 2.14 eV.

  13. Thin n-in-p planar pixel modules for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00517212; Breuer, J.; La Rosa, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Terzo, S.

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will undergo a major upgrade of the tracker system in view of the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) foreseen to start around 2025. Thin planar pixel modules are promising candidates to instrument the new pixel system, thanks to the reduced contribution to the material budget and their high charge collection efficiency after irradiation. New designs of the pixel cells, with an optimized biasing structure, have been implemented in n-in-p planar pixel productions with sensor thicknesses of 270 um. Using beam tests, the gain in hit efficiency is investigated as a function of the received irradiation fluence. The outlook for future thin planar pixel sensor productions will be discussed, with a focus on thin sensors with a thickness of 100 and 150 um and a novel design with the optimized biasing structure and small pixel cells (50 um x 50 um and 25 um x 100 um). These dimensions are foreseen for the new ATLAS read-out chip in 65 nm CMOS technology and the fine segmentation will represen...

  14. Rapidity gap cross sections measured with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Imbault, Didier; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin–Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; 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Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; 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Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Pseudorapidity gap distributions in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are studied using a minimum bias data sample with an integrated luminosity of 7.1 inverse microbarns. Cross sections are measured differentially in terms of Delta eta F, the larger of the pseudorapidity regions extending to the limits of the ATLAS sensitivity, at eta = +/- 4.9, in which no final state particles are produced above a transverse momentum threshold p_T Cut. The measurements span the region 0 Xp), enhanced by double dissociation (pp -> XY) where the invariant mass of the lighter of the two dissociation systems satisfies M_Y ~ 3. The large rapidity gap data are used to constrain the value of the pomeron intercept appropriate to triple Regge models of soft diffraction. The cross section integrated over all gap sizes is compared with other LHC inelastic cross section measurements.

  15. Band Gap Tuning and Defect Tolerance of Atomically Thin Two- Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Organic−inorganic halide perovskites have proven highly successful for photovoltaics but suffer from low stability, which deteriorates their performance over time. Recent experiments have demonstrated that low dimensional phases of the hybrid perovskites may exhibit improved stability. Here we...... report first-principles calculations for isolated monolayers of the organometallic halide perovskites (C4H9NH3)2MX2Y2, where M = Pb, Ge, Sn and X,Y = Cl, Br, I. The band gaps computed using the GLLB-SC functional are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental photoluminescence data...... for the already synthesized perovskites. Finally, we study the effect of different defects on the band structure. We find that the most common defects only introduce shallow or no states in the band gap, indicating that these atomically thin 2D perovskites are likely to be defect tolerant....

  16. Tunable band gap photoluminescence from atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenide alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfeng; Xi, Jinyang; Dumcenco, Dumitru O; Liu, Zheng; Suenaga, Kazu; Wang, Dong; Shuai, Zhigang; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Xie, Liming

    2013-05-28

    Band gap engineering of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials is the key to their applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that in the 2D system, by alloying two materials with different band gaps (MoS2 and WS2), tunable band gap can be obtained in the 2D alloys (Mo(1-x)W(x)S(2) monolayers, x = 0-1). Atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy has revealed random arrangement of Mo and W atoms in the Mo(1-x)W(x)S(2) monolayer alloys. Photoluminescence characterization has shown tunable band gap emission continuously tuned from 1.82 eV (reached at x = 0.20) to 1.99 eV (reached at x = 1). Further, density functional theory calculations have been carried out to understand the composition-dependent electronic structures of Mo(1-x)W(x)S(2) monolayer alloys.

  17. Atomically thin arsenene and antimonene: semimetal-semiconductor and indirect-direct band-gap transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengli; Yan, Zhong; Li, Yafei; Chen, Zhongfang; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-03-01

    The typical two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 and black phosphorus have garnered tremendous interest for their unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. However, all 2D semiconductors reported thus far feature band gaps that are smaller than 2.0 eV, which has greatly restricted their applications, especially in optoelectronic devices with photoresponse in the blue and UV range. Novel 2D mono-elemental semiconductors, namely monolayered arsenene and antimonene, with wide band gaps and high stability were now developed based on first-principles calculations. Interestingly, although As and Sb are typically semimetals in the bulk, they are transformed into indirect semiconductors with band gaps of 2.49 and 2.28 eV when thinned to one atomic layer. Significantly, under small biaxial strain, these materials were transformed from indirect into direct band-gap semiconductors. Such dramatic changes in the electronic structure could pave the way for transistors with high on/off ratios, optoelectronic devices working under blue or UV light, and mechanical sensors based on new 2D crystals.

  18. Complete Band Gaps for Lamb Waves in Cubic Thin Plates with Periodically Placed Inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jiu-Jiu; QIN Bo; CHENG Jian-Chun

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present a theoretical study for propagation of Lamb waves in cubic thin plates consisting of solid inclusions placed periodically in the host material. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves propagating parallel to the surfaces of the plates are calculated based on the plane wave expansion method for triangular lattices. We realize the existence of full band gaps in the systems composed of W cylinders embedded in a Si matrix with filling ratio f = 0.176 for different thickness ratios of h/a, where h is the plate thickness and a is the lattice spacing.

  19. Band Gap Energies and Refractive Indices of Epitaxial Pb1-xSrxTe Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Bin-Bin; WU Hui-Zhen; SI Jian-Xiao; XU Tian-Ning

    2008-01-01

    Pb1-xSrx Te thin films with different strontium (St) compositions are grown on BaF2 (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Using high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD), we obtain Pb1-xSrx Te lattice constants,which vary in the range 6.462-6.492 A. According to the Vegard law and HRXRD data, Sr compositions in Pb1-xSrxTe thin films range from 0.0-8.0%. The Pb1-xSrx Te refractive index dispersions are attained from infrared transmission spectrum characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) transmission spectroscopy.It is found that refractive index decreases while Sr content increases in Pb1-xSrx Te. We also simulate the Pb1-xSrx Te transmission spectra theoretically to obtain the optical band gap energies which range between0.320 e V and 0.449 e V. The simulated results are in good agreement with the FTIR data. Finally, we determine the relation between Ph1-xSrx Te band gap energies and Sr compositions (Eg = 0.320+0.510x- 0.930x2 + 184x3 (e V) ).

  20. Thin n-in-p planar pixel modules for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, N.; Bergbreiter, L.; Breuer, J.; La Rosa, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Terzo, S.

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS experiment will undergo a major upgrade of the tracker system in view of the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) foreseen to start around 2025. Thin planar pixel modules are promising candidates to instrument the new pixel system, thanks to the reduced contribution to the material budget and their high charge collection efficiency after irradiation. New designs of the pixel cells, with an optimized biasing structure, have been implemented in n-in-p planar pixel productions with sensor thicknesses of 270 μm. Using beam tests, the gain in hit efficiency is investigated as a function of the received irradiation fluence. The outlook for future thin planar pixel sensor productions will be discussed, with a focus on thin sensors with a thickness of 100 and 150 μm and a novel design with the optimized biasing structure and small pixel cells (50×50 and 25×100 μm2). These dimensions are foreseen for the new ATLAS read-out chip in 65 nm CMOS technology and the fine segmentation will represent a challenge for the tracking in the forward region of the pixel system at HL-LHC. To predict the performance of 50×50 μm2 pixels at high η, FE-I4 compatible planar pixel sensors have been studied before and after irradiation in beam tests at high incidence angle with respect to the short pixel direction. Results on cluster shapes, charge collection- and hit efficiency will be shown.

  1. Temperature Dependent Switching Behavior of BFN Thin Films: a Wide Band Gap Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang D. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thin film of complex perovskite Ba(Fe0.5Nb0.5O3 (BFN was prepared through Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique. XRD and AFM studies show single cubic phase with well developed nano size grains of BFN compound. Swift Heavy Ion (SHI irradiation on BFN of O+7 ions up to 1 × 1013 ions per cc fluence does not show any crystal or morphological structural changes in the film, signifying materials stability up to the above ion dose. BFN compound exhibit its band gap in wide band semiconductor region (3.53 eV. A characteristic negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR to positive temperature coefficient of resistance (PTCR transition of large magnitude at ~ 350 °C makes BFN a promising candidate for electrical/magnetic switching device.

  2. The weakly nonlinear magnetorotational instability in a thin-gap Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S E

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a fundamental process of accretion disk physics, but its saturation mechanism remains poorly understood despite considerable theoretical and computational effort. We present a multiple scales analysis of the non-ideal MRI in the weakly nonlinear regime -- that is, when the most unstable MRI mode has a growth rate asymptotically approaching zero from above. Here, we develop our theory in a thin-gap, Cartesian channel. Our results confirm the finding by Umurhan et al. (2007) that the perturbation amplitude follows a Ginzburg-Landau equation. We extend these results by performing a detailed force balance for the saturated azimuthal velocity and vertical magnetic field, demonstrating that even when diffusive effects are important, the bulk flow saturates via the combined processes of reducing the background shear and rearranging and strengthening the background vertical magnetic field. We directly simulate the Ginzburg-Landau amplitude evolution for our system and demons...

  3. New Insights on the Burstein-Moss Shift and Band Gap Narrowing in Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The Burstein-Moss shift and band gap narrowing of sputtered indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films are investigated as a function of carrier concentrations. The optical band gap shifts below the carrier concentration of 5.61 × 1019 cm-3 are well-described by the Burstein-Moss model. For carrier concentrations higher than 8.71 × 1019 cm-3 the shift decreases, indicating that band gap narrowing mechanisms are increasingly significant and are competing with the Burstein-Moss effect. The incorp...

  4. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  5. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  6. The Dielectric Breakdown Model applied to explain various morphologies of deposited metallic structures in thin gap metal electro-deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Chowdhury

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of metal electro-deposition in thin-gap geometry leads to very interesting and diverse two dimensional morphologies. This varies from dense ramified growth to thin dendritic projections. In this paper, we have proposed a stochastic model that incorporates such diversity. We carried out thin-gap electro-deposition of Copper and Zinc with varying electrolytic concentrations. A well known model, that until this work was used to explain dielectric breakdown patterns, was employed to explain the variation in deposition morphology with concentration. The sole parameter in the model was varied and the numerically obtained patterns was seen to correlate well with those obtained from electro-deposition. A linear relationship between the parameter and molar concentration was established. The established relationship was then analysed and interpreted.

  7. Anomalous thickness-dependent optical energy gap of ALD-grown ultra-thin CuO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, T. S.; Terasaki, I.; Karppinen, M.

    2016-11-01

    Usually an inverse square relation between the optical energy gap and the size of crystallites is observed for semiconducting materials due to the strong quantum localization effect. Coulomb attraction that may lead to a proportional dependence is often ignored or considered less important to the optical energy gap when the crystallite size or the thickness of a thin film changes. Here we report a proportional dependence between the optical energy gap and the thickness of ALD-grown CuO thin films due to a strong Coulomb attraction. The ultrathin films deposited in the thickness range of 9-81 nm show a p-type semiconducting behavior when analyzed by Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity measurements. The indirect optical energy gap nature of the films is verified from UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. A progressive increase in the indirect optical energy gap from 1.06 to 1.24 eV is observed with the increase in the thickness of the films. The data are analyzed in the presence of Coulomb attractions using the Brus model. The optical energy gap when plotted against the cubic root of the thickness of the films shows a linear dependence.

  8. ALD grown nanostructured ZnO thin films: Effect of substrate temperature on thickness and energy band gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Iqbal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured ZnO thin films with high transparency have been grown on glass substrate by atomic layer deposition at various temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 300 °C. Efforts have been made to observe the effect of substrate temperature on the thickness of the deposited thin films and its consequences on the energy band gap. A remarkably high growth rate of 0.56 nm per cycle at a substrate temperature of 200 °C for ZnO thin films have been achieved. This is the maximum growth rate for ALD deposited ZnO thin films ever reported so far to the best of our knowledge. The studies of field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry patterns confirm the deposition of uniform and high quality nanosturtured ZnO thin films which have a polycrystalline nature with preferential orientation along (100 plane. The thickness of the films deposited at different substrate temperatures was measured by ellipsometry and surface profiling system while the UV–visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy studies have been used to evaluate the optical properties of the respective thin films. It has been observed that the thickness of the thin film depends on the substrate temperatures which ultimately affect the optical and structural parameters of the thin films.

  9. Effects of Controlling the AZO Thin Film's Optical Band Gap on AZO/MEH-PPV Devices with Buffer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehyoung Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells were fabricated incorporating aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO thin films of varying optical band gap in AZO/poly(2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy-p-phenylene vinylene structures. The band gaps were controlled by varying the flow rates of Ar and O2 used to deposit the AZO. Devices with CdS buffer layer were also fabricated for improved efficiency. The effects of AZO optical band gap were assessed by testing the I–V characteristics of devices with structures of glass/ITO/AZO/MEH-PPV/Ag under AM1.5 illumination (100 mW/cm2. Efficiency was improved about 30 times by decreasing the AZO optical band gap, except in devices deposited without oxygen. A power conversion efficiency of 0.102% was obtained with the incorporation of a CdS buffer layer.

  10. Determination of the Optical GAP in Thin Films of Amorphous Dilithium Phthalocyanine Using the Tauc and Cody Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry N. Reider-Burstin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting thin films were grown on quartz substrates and crystalline silicon wafers, using dilithium phthalocyanine and the organic ligands 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone and 2,6-diaminoanthraquinone as the starting compounds. The films, thus obtained, were characterized by Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR, fast atomic bombardment (FAB+ mass and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopies. The surface morphology of these films was analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that the temperature-dependent electric current in all cases showed a semiconductor behavior with conductivities on the order of 10−6·S cm−1, whereas the highest value corresponded to the thin film based upon the bidentate amine. The Tauc and Cody optical band gap values of thin films were calculated from the absorption coefficients and were found to be around 1.5 eV, with another strong band between 2.3 and 2.43 eV, arising from non-direct transitions. The curvature in the Tauc plot influencing the determination of the optical gap, the Tauc optical gap corresponding to the thicker film is smaller. The dependence of the Cody optical gap on the film thickness was negligible.

  11. Electron concentration dependence of optical band gap shift in Ga-doped ZnO thin films by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaqin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Tang, Wu, E-mail: tang@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang, Lan [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhao, Junliang [Shanghai Juntech Co. Ltd., 1378 Xingxian Road, Shanghai 201815 (China)

    2014-08-28

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by a radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The optical properties of the deposited GZO films were evaluated using an optical transmission measurement. The optical band gap increased from 3.32 eV to 3.45 eV with the increasing carrier density from 2.0 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} to 3.24 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Based on the experimental results, the optical band gap as a function of carrier density is systematically investigated with four available theoretical models taken into consideration. The blueshift of the optical band gap in GZO films can be well interpreted with a complex model which combines the Burstein–Moss effect, the band gap renormalization effect and the nonparabolic nature of conduction band. In addition, the BM contribution is almost offset by the BGR effect in both conduction band and valence band due to the approximate equality between electron and hole effective masses in GZO films with a nonparabolic conduction band. The tunability of optical band gap in GZO thin films by carrier density offers a number of potential advantages in the development of semiconductor optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • The effects of electron concentration on optical band gap were analyzed. • The measured optical band gap corresponded well with the calculated ones. • The Burstein–Moss (BM) and band gap renormalization (BGR) effects were considered. • Nonparabolic conduction band parameters were used in theoretical analysis. • The BM effect was offset by the BGR effect in both conduction band and valence band.

  12. Magnetism switching and band-gap narrowing in Ni-doped PbTiO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenliang; Yu, Lu; Yang, Pingxiong, E-mail: pxyang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Chu, Junhao [Key Laboratory of Polar Materials and Devices, Ministry of Education, Department of Electronic Engineering, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Deng, Hongmei [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2015-05-21

    Ions doping-driven structural phase transition accompanied by magnetism switching and band-gap narrowing effects has been observed in PbTi{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 3−δ} (xPTNO, x = 0.00, 0.06, and 0.33) thin films. With the increase of x, the xPTNO thin films exhibit not only a phase transition from the pseudotetragonal structure to a centrosymmetric cubic structure but also a drastic decrease of grain size. Moreover, the as-grown Ni-doped PbTiO{sub 3} (PTO) thin films show obvious room-temperature ferromagnetism and an increased saturation magnetization with increasing the Ni content, in contrast to undoped PTO, which shows diamagnetism. A bound magnetic polaron model was proposed to understand the observed ferromagnetic behavior of PTO-derived perovskite thin films. Furthermore, the 0.33PTNO thin film presents a narrowed band-gap, much smaller than that of PTO, which is attributed to new states of both the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in an electronic structure with the presence of Ni. These findings may open up a route to explore promising perovskite oxides as candidate materials for use in multiferroics and solar-energy devices.

  13. Band gap tuning of epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3-δ}/Si(001) thin films through strain engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottier, Ryan J.; Steinle, Nathan A.; Currie, Daniel A.; Theodoropoulou, Nikoleta, E-mail: ntheo@txstate.edu [Physics Department, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    We investigate the effect of strain and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) on the crystal and optical properties of oxygen deficient, ultra-thin (4–30 nm) films of SrTiO{sub 3-δ} (STO) grown heteroepitaxially on p-Si(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. We demonstrate that STO band gap tuning can be achieved through strain engineering and show that the energy shift of the direct energy gap transition of SrTiO{sub 3-δ}/Si films has a quantifiable dimensional and doping dependence that correlates well with the changes in crystal structure.

  14. A Study of Energy Band Gap Temperature Relationships for Cu2ZnSnS4 Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The temperature dependent band gap energy of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin film was studied in the temperature range of 77 to 410 K. Various relevant parameters which explain the temperature variation of the fundamental band gap have been calculated using empirical and semi-empirical models. Amongst the models evaluated, the Varshni and P\\"assler models show the best agreement with experimental data in the middle temperature range. However, the Bose-Einstein model fits reasonably well over the entire temper...

  15. Effect of thermal annealing on structure and optical band gap of Se66Te25In9 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D. K.; Pathak, H. P.; Shukla, Nitesh; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of a-Se66Te25In9 have been deposited onto a chemically cleaned glass substrate by thermal evaporation technique under vacuum. Glassy nature of the films has been ascertained by X-ray diffraction pattern. The analysis of absorption spectra, measured at normal incidence, in the spectral range 400-1100 nm has been used for the optical characterization of thin films under investigation. The effect of thermal annealing on structure and optical band gap (Eg) of a-Se66Te25In9 have been studied.

  16. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  17. The effect of FeCl{sub 3} on the optical constants and optical band gap of MBZMA-co-MMA polymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakuphanoglu, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Firat University, 23169 Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: fyhan@hotmail.com; Barim, G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Firat University, 23169 Elazig (Turkey); Erol, I. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Afyon Kocatepe University, Afyon (Turkey)

    2007-03-15

    The effects of the FeCl{sub 3} dopant on the optical constants and optical band gap of the methylbenzyl methacrylate (MBZMA)-co-methyl-methacrylate (MMA) polymer thin films have been investigated by the optical characterization. The optical constants of the thin films are changed with FeCl{sub 3} dopant. The refractive index dispersion curves of the thin films are fitted by Cauchy-Sellmeier model and dispersion parameters (a {sub 1} and n {sub 0}) change with FeCl{sub 3} dopant. The magnitude of the refractive index increases with increasing FeCl{sub 3} dopant. The electric susceptibility of the thin film materials was calculated and the electric susceptibility increases with FeCl{sub 3} content. The optical band gap values of the thin films were determined. The obtained band gap values are decreased with FeCl{sub 3} dopant. The FeCl{sub 3} dopant changes the width of localized states in the optical band gaps of the thin films. The optical band E {sub g} of the thin films changes from 3.52 to 3.05 eV with increasing FeCl{sub 3} dopant, while the width of localized states in optical band gap changes from 1101.47 to 596.3 meV. It is concluded that the optical constants and optical band gap of the MBZMA-co-MMA polymer thin films change by the FeCl{sub 3} dopant.

  18. Effect of stress on optical band gap of ZnO thin films with substrate temperature by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, T. Prasada, E-mail: prasadview@gmail.co [Department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Kumar, M.C. Santhosh, E-mail: santhoshmc@yahoo.co [Department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Angayarkanni, S. Anbumozhi; Ashok, M. [Department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India)

    2009-10-19

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited with various substrate temperatures by spray pyrolysis method onto glass substrates. The effects of substrate temperature on the crystallization behavior and optical properties of the films have been studied. The evolution of strain and stress effects in ZnO thin films on glass substrate has been studied using X-ray diffraction. The films deposited at low substrate temperature have large compressive stress of 1.77 GPa, which relaxed to 1.47 GPa as the substrate temperature increased to 450 deg. C. Optical parameters such as optical transmittance, reflectance, dielectric constant, refractive index and energy band gap have been studied and discussed with respect to substrate temperature. All films exhibit a transmittance of about 85% in the visible region. It was found that the compressive stress in the films causes a decrease in the optical band gap.

  19. Effect of thermal annealing on structure and optical band gap of amorphous Se72Te25Sb3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D. K.; Pathak, H. P.; Kumar, Vipin; Shukla, Nitesh

    2014-04-01

    Thin films of a-Se72Te25Sb3 were prepared by vacuum evaporation technique in a base pressure of 10-6 Torr on to well cleaned glass substrate. a-Se72Te25Sb3 thin films were annealed at different temperatures below their crystallization temperatures for 2h. The structural analysis of the films has been investigated using X-ray diffraction technique. The optical band gap of as prepared and annealed films as a function of photon energy in the wavelength range 400-1100 nm has been studied. It has been found that the optical band gap decreases with increasing annealing temperatures in the present system.

  20. Investigation of thin n-in-p planar pixel modules for the ATLAS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Savic, N

    2016-01-01

    In view of the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), planned to start around 2023-2025, the ATLAS experiment will undergo a replacement of the Inner Detector. A higher luminosity will imply higher irradiation levels and hence will demand more ra- diation hardness especially in the inner layers of the pixel system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to instrument this region, also thanks to its cost-effectiveness because it only requires a single sided processing in contrast to the n-in-n pixel technology presently employed in the LHC experiments. In addition, thin sensors were found to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. An overview is given of recent results obtained with not irradiated and irradiated n-in-p planar pixel modules. The focus will be on n-in-p planar pixel sensors with an active thickness of 100 and 150 {\\mu}m recently produced at ADVACAM. To maximize the active area of the sensors, slim and active edges are implemented. The performance of th...

  1. Subharmonic energy gap structure in the Josephson radiation at 35 GHz from a superconducting thin-film microbridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Levinsen, M. T.; Lindelof, Poul Erik;

    1979-01-01

    Nonresonant detection of the Josephson radiation 35 GHz from a superconducting thin-film microbridge is reported. The high frequency and the accuracy of these measurements lead to a new important observation: subharmonic energy gap structure in the detected integral power. The maximum integral po...... power measured was as large as 8×10−11 W. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Research on the Vibrational Gaps in Two-Dimensional Three-Component Composite Thin Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dian-Long; LIU Yao-Zong; QIU Jing; ZHAO Hong-Gang; LIU Zhi-Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the vibrational band gaps in a thin plate of two-dimensional phononic crystals with the locally resonant structure in theory and experiment. The experimental sample is optimized based on the simple analytical model. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation by the finite element method. The findings will be significant for applications of phononic crystals in the field of vibration isolation.

  3. Tuning the Band Gap of Cu₂ZnSn(S,Se)₄ Thin Films via Lithium Alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanchun; Kang, Xiaojiao; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2016-03-02

    Alkali metal doping plays a crucial role in fabricating high-performance Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells. In this study, we report the first experimental observation and characterizations of the alloyed Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films. It is found that Cu(+) ions in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films can be substituted with Li(+) ions, forming homogeneous Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.29) alloyed thin films. Consequently, the band gap, conduction band minimum, and valence band maximum of Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films are profoundly affected by Li/Cu ratios. The band alignment at the Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4/CdS interface can be tuned by changing the Li/Cu ratio. We found that the photovoltaic parameters of the Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cell devices are strongly influenced by the Li/Cu ratios. Besides, the lattice constant, carrier concentration, and crystal growth of Li(x)Cu(2-x)ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin films were studied in detail.

  4. Structure, band gap, and Mn-related mid-gap states in epitaxial single crystal (Zn1-xMgx)1-yMnyO thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dapeng; Liu, Guolei; Xiao, Shuqin; Yan, Shishen; He, Shumin; Cai, Li; Li, Qinghao; Cao, Qiang; Hu, Shujun; Chen, Yanxue; Kang, Shishou; Mei, Liangmo

    2013-05-01

    Epitaxial (Zn1-xMgx)1-yMnyO thin films were grown on c-Al2O3 substrates by radio frequency oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Single crystal structure of the (Zn1-xMgx)1-yMnyO films was revealed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction. The band gap of the films can be tuned dramatically with increasing the Mg concentration, while the onset energy of Mn-related mid-gap absorption band only shows a small blue shift. Photoconductivity measurements indicate the Mn-related mid-gap states in (Zn1-xMgx)1-yMnyO films can create free carriers and contribute to charge transfer transitions. The conduction band offset ΔEC = 0.13 eV and valence band offset ΔEV = 0.1 eV were obtained for ZnO/Zn0.8Mg0.2O heterostructures, which increase to ΔEC = 0.21 eV and ΔEV = 0.14 eV for ZnO/Zn0.7Mg0.3O heterostructures.

  5. Dijet production in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV pp collisions with large rapidity gaps at the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T. [et al.

    2016-01-18

    A 6.8 nb$^{-1}$ sample of $pp$ collision data collected under low-luminosity conditions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used to study diffractive dijet production. Events containing at least two jets with $p_T$ are selected and analysed in terms of variables which discriminate between diffractive and non-diffractive processes. Cross sections are measured differentially in $Δη^F$, the size of the observable forward region of pseudorapidity which is devoid of hadronic activity, and in an estimator, $\\bar{ξ}$, of the fractional momentum loss of the proton assuming single diffractive dissociation (pp→pX). Model comparisons indicate a dominant non-diffractive contribution up to moderately large $Δη^F$ and small $\\bar{ξ}$, with a diffractive contribution which is significant at the highest $Δη^F$ and the lowest $\\bar{ξ}$. The rapidity-gap survival probability is estimated from comparisons of the data in this latter region with predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions.

  6. Dijet production in $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV $pp$ collisions with large rapidity gaps at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; 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    2016-01-01

    A $6.8 \\ {\\mathrm nb^{-1}}$ sample of $pp$ collision data collected under low-luminosity conditions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used to study diffractive dijet production. Events containing at least two jets with $p_\\mathrm{T} > 20$ GeV are selected and analysed in terms of variables which discriminate between diffractive and non-diffractive processes. Cross sections are measured differentially in $\\Delta\\eta^F$, the size of the observable forward region of pseudorapidity which is devoid of hadronic activity, and in an estimator, $\\tilde{\\xi}$, of the fractional momentum loss of the proton assuming single diffractive dissociation ($pp \\rightarrow pX$). Model comparisons indicate a dominant non-diffractive contribution up to moderately large $\\Delta\\eta^F$ and small $\\tilde{\\xi}$, with a diffractive contribution which is significant at the highest $\\Delta\\eta^F$ and the lowest $\\tilde{\\xi}$. The rapidity-gap survival probability is estimated from comp...

  7. Dijet production in s=7 TeV pp collisions with large rapidity gaps at the ATLAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 6.8 nb−1 sample of pp collision data collected under low-luminosity conditions at s=7TeV by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used to study diffractive dijet production. Events containing at least two jets with pT>20GeV are selected and analysed in terms of variables which discriminate between diffractive and non-diffractive processes. Cross sections are measured differentially in ΔηF, the size of the observable forward region of pseudorapidity which is devoid of hadronic activity, and in an estimator, ξ˜, of the fractional momentum loss of the proton assuming single diffractive dissociation (pp→pX. Model comparisons indicate a dominant non-diffractive contribution up to moderately large ΔηF and small ξ˜, with a diffractive contribution which is significant at the highest ΔηF and the lowest ξ˜. The rapidity-gap survival probability is estimated from comparisons of the data in this latter region with predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions.

  8. TGC探测器的γ灵敏度测量%Measurement of γ-ray Sensitivity of Thin Gap Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶邦角; S.Tsuno

    2001-01-01

    欧洲核子中心的大型强子对撞机探测器预计工作在1034/(cm2*s)亮度,这将导致实验大厅的本底非常严重. 薄气隙室将作为ATLAS实验中的前端μ子触发器. 按照模拟计算,实验大厅薄气隙室周围的主要本底是中子和光子. 报告了薄气隙室探测器的γ灵敏度的实验测量. 使用γ能量从20 keV到1.8 MeV的放射性γ源. 目前测量的灵敏度小于1%,与用EGS4模拟计算结果相吻合.%The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) is expected to operate at the luminosity of 1034/(cm2*s), and the resulting background condition in the experimental hall would be quit severe. Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) will be used for forward muon triggering in the ATLAS experiment. According to a simulation, the main source of the background around TGC in the experimental hall is neutrons and photons. The sensitivity measurement for TGC to γ-rays is described. The measurement was performed for γ-ray energies between 20 keV and 1.8 MeV. The sensitivity was found to be less than 1%, and it shows good agreement with the simulation based on EGS4.

  9. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

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Wickens, F J; Martin, V J; Jackson, J N; Prichard, P; Kretzschmar, J; Martin, A J; Walker, C J; Potter, K M; Kourkoumelis, C; Tzamarias, S; Houiris, A G; Iliadis, D; Fanti, M; Bertolucci, F; Maleev, V; Sultanov, S; Rosenberg, E I; Krumnack, N E; Bieganek, C; Diehl, E B; Mc kee, S P; Eppig, A P; Harper, D R; Liu, C; Schwarz, T A; Mazor, B; Looper, K A; Wiedenmann, W; Huang, P; Stahlman, J M; Battaglia, M; Nielsen, J A; Zhao, T; Khanov, A; Kaushik, V S; Vichou, E; Liss, A M; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Parodi, F; Passaggio, S; Rossi, L; Kuzhir, P; Ignatenko, A; Ferrari, R; Spairani, M; Pianori, E; Sekula, S J; Firan, A I; Cao, T; Hetherly, J W; Gouighri, M; Vassilakopoulos, V; Long, M C; Shimojima, M; Sawyer, L H; Brummett, R E; Losada, M A; Schorlemmer, A L; Mantoani, M; Bawa, H S; Mornacchi, G; Nicquevert, B; Palestini, S; Stapnes, S; Veness, R; Kotamaki, M J; Sorde, C; Iengo, P; Campana, S; Goossens, L; Zajacova, Z; Pribyl, L; Poveda torres, J; Marzin, A; Conti, G; Carrillo montoya, G D; Kroseberg, J; Gonella, L; Velz, T; Schmitt, S; Lobodzinska, E M; Lovschall-jensen, A E; Galster, G; Perrot, G; Cailles, M; Berger, N; Barnovska, Z; Delsart, P; Lleres, A; Tisserant, S; Grivaz, J; Matricon, P; Bellagamba, L; Bertin, A; Bruschi, M; De castro, S; Semprini cesari, N; Fabbri, L; Rinaldi, L; Quayle, W B; Truong, T N L; Kondo, T; Haruyama, T; Ng, C; Do valle wemans, A; Almeida veloso, F M; Konovalov, S; Ziegler, J M; Su, D; Lukas, W; Prince, S; Ortega urrego, E J; Teuscher, R J; Knecht, N; Pretzl, K; Borer, C; Gadomski, S; Koch, B; Kuleshov, S; Brooks, W K; Antos, J; Kulkova, I; Chudoba, J; Chyla, J; Tomasek, L; Bazalova, M; Messmer, I; Tobias, J; Sundermann, J E; Kuehn, S S; Kluge, E; Scharf, V L; Barillari, T; Kluth, S; Menke, S; Weigell, P; Schwegler, P; Ziolkowski, M; Casado lechuga, P M; Garcia, C; Sanchez, J; Costa mezquita, M J; Valero biot, J A; Laporte, J; Nikolaidou, R; Virchaux, M; Nguyen, V T H; Charlton, D; Harrison, K; Slater, M W; Newman, P R; Parker, A M; Ward, P; 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Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; 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Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  10. Determination of band gap energy (Eg) of Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films: On the discrepancies of reported band gap values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, SeJin; Jung, Sunghun; Gwak, Jihye; Cho, Ara; Shin, Keeshik; Yoon, Kyunghoon; Park, Doyoung; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Yun, Jae Ho

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate experimental data to elucidate the reason for the discrepancies of reported band gap energy (Eg) of Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) thin films, i.e., 1.0 or 1.5 eV. Eg of the coevaporated CZTSe film synthesized at substrate temperature (Tsub) of 370 °C, which was apparently phase pure CZTSe confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, is found to be around 1 eV regardless of the measurement techniques. However, depth profile of the same sample reveals the formation of ZnSe at CZTSe/Mo interface. On the other hand, Eg of the coevaporated films increases with Tsub due to the ZnSe formation, from which we suggest that the existence of ZnSe, which is hardly distinguishable from CZTSe by XRD, is the possible reason for the overestimation of overall Eg.

  11. Effect of Thermal Annealing on the Band GAP and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited ZnSe Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezema, F. I.; Ekwealor, A. B. C.; Osuji, R. U.

    2006-05-01

    Zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films were deposited on glass substrate using the chemical bath deposition method at room temperature from aqueous solutions of zinc sulphate and sodium selenosulfate in which sodium hydroxide was employed as complexing agents. The `as-deposited' ZnSe thin films are red in color and annealed in oven at 473 K for 1 hour and on a hot plate in open air at 333 K for 5 minutes, affecting the morphological and optical properties. Optical properties such as absorption coefficient a and extinction coefficient k, were determined using the absorbance and transmission measurement from Unico UV-2102 PC spectrophotometer, at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range of 200-1000 nm. The films have transmittance in VIS-NIR regions that range between 26 and 87%. From absorbance and transmittance spectra, the band gap energy determined ranged between 1.60 eV and 1.75 for the `as deposited' samples, and the annealed samples exhibited a band gap shift of 0.15 eV. The high transmittance of the films together with its large band gap made them good materials for selective coatings for solar cells.

  12. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; Nisius, R.; Paschen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 $\\mu$m, produced at CiS, and 100-200 $\\mu$m thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The perfo...

  13. Investigation of optical band gap and device parameters of rubrene thin film prepared using spin coating technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuğluoğlu, Nihat, E-mail: tugluo@gmail.com [Department of Technology, Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey); Barış, Behzad; Gürel, Hatice [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Giresun University, Gazipaşa Campus, Giresun 28100 (Turkey); Karadeniz, Serdar [Department of Technology, Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey); Yüksel, Ömer Faruk [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Selçuk University, Campus Konya 42075 (Turkey)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Thin film of rubrene has been deposited by spin coating technique. • The band gap properties of the film were investigated in the range 200–700 nm. • The analysis of the absorption coefficient revealed indirect allowed transition. • The parameters such as barrier height and ideality factor were determined. -- Abstract: Rubrene thin film has been deposited by spin coating technique. The optical band gap properties of rubrene thin film have been investigated in the spectral range 200–700 nm. The results of the absorption coefficient (α) were analyzed in order to determine the optical band gap and Urbach energy of the film. The absorption spectra recorded in the UV–vis region shows two peaks at 250 nm and 300 nm. The analysis of the spectral behavior of the absorption coefficient (α) in the absorption region revealed indirect allowed transition with corresponding energy 2.31 eV. The value of Urbach energy (E{sub U}) was determined to be 1.169 eV. The current–voltage (I–V) characteristics and electrical conduction properties of rubrene/n-Si device fabricated by spin coating method have also been investigated. The I–V characteristic in dark was showed the rectification effect due to the formation of Schottky barrier at rubrene/silicon interface. From analyzing the I-V measurement for the device, the basic device parameters such as barrier height, ideality factor and series resistance were determined. At the low-voltage region, the current conduction in Au/rubrene/n-Si device is ohmic type. The charge transport phenomenon appears to be space charge limited current (SCLC) at higher-voltage regions.

  14. Final Report: Rational Design of Wide Band Gap Buffer Layers for High-Efficiency Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lordi, Vincenzo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The main objective of this project is to enable rational design of wide band gap buffer layer materials for CIGS thin-film PV by building understanding of the correlation of atomic-scale defects in the buffer layer and at the buffer/absorber interface with device electrical properties. Optimized wide band gap buffers are needed to reduce efficiency loss from parasitic absorption in the buffer. The approach uses first-principles materials simulations coupled with nanoscale analytical electron microscopy as well as device electrical characterization. Materials and devices are produced by an industrial partner in a manufacturing line to maximize relevance, with the goal of enabling R&D of new buffer layer compositions or deposition processes to push device efficiencies above 21%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is the reference material for analysis, as the prototypical high-performing buffer material.

  15. Band Gap Tuning and Defect Tolerance of Atomically Thin Two-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Jacobsen, Karsten W; Thygesen, Kristian S

    2016-11-03

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskites have proven highly successful for photovoltaics but suffer from low stability, which deteriorates their performance over time. Recent experiments have demonstrated that low dimensional phases of the hybrid perovskites may exhibit improved stability. Here we report first-principles calculations for isolated monolayers of the organometallic halide perovskites (C4H9NH3)2MX2Y2, where M = Pb, Ge, Sn and X,Y = Cl, Br, I. The band gaps computed using the GLLB-SC functional are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental photoluminescence data for the already synthesized perovskites. Finally, we study the effect of different defects on the band structure. We find that the most common defects only introduce shallow or no states in the band gap, indicating that these atomically thin 2D perovskites are likely to be defect tolerant.

  16. A study of energy band gap versus temperature for Cu 2ZnSnS 4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarswat, Prashant K.; Free, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependent band gap energy of Cu 2ZnSnS 4 thin film was studied in the temperature range of 77-410 K. Various relevant parameters, which explain the temperature variation of the fundamental band gap, have been calculated using empirical and semi-empirical models. Amongst the models evaluated, the Varshni and Pässler models show the best agreement with experimental data in the middle temperature range. However, the Bose-Einstein model fits reasonably well over the entire temperature range evaluated. The calculated fitting parameters are in good agreement with the estimated value of the Debye temperature calculated using the Madelung-Einstein approximation and the Hailing method.

  17. Band gap engineering of N-alloyed Ga2O3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyu Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the tuning of band gap of GaON ternary alloy in a wide range of 2.75 eV. The samples were prepared by a two-step nitridation method. First, the samples were deposited on 2-inch fused silica substrates by megnetron sputtering with NH3 and Ar gas for 60 minutes. Then they were annealed in NH3 ambience at different temperatures. The optical band gap energies are calculated from transmittance measurements. With the increase of nitridation temperature, the band gap gradually decreases from 4.8 eV to 2.05 eV. X-ray diffraction results indicate that as-deposited amorphous samples can crystallize into monoclinic and hexagonal structures after they were annealed in oxygen or ammonia ambience, respectively. The narrowing of the band gap is attributed to the enhanced repulsion of N2p -Ga3d orbits and formation of hexagonal structure.

  18. Development of thin sensors and a novel interconnection technology for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beimforde, Michael

    2010-07-19

    To extend the discovery potential of the experiments at the LHC accelerator a two phase luminosity upgrade towards the super LHC (sLHC) with a maximum instantaneous luminosity of 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}s{sup 1} is planned. Retaining the reconstruction efficiency and spatial resolution of the ATLAS tracking detector at the sLHC, new pixel modules have to be developed that have a higher granularity, can be placed closer to the interaction point, and allow for a cost-efficient coverage of a larger pixel detector volume compared to the present one. The reduced distance to the interaction point calls for more compact modules that have to be radiation hard to supply a sufficient charge collection efficiency up to an integrated particle fluence equivalent to that of (1-2).10{sup 16} 1-MeV-neutrons per square centimeter (n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}). Within this thesis a new module concept was partially realised and evaluated for the operation within an ATLAS pixel detector at the sLHC. This module concept utilizes a novel thin sensor production process for thin n-in-p silicon sensors which potentially allow for a higher radiation hardness at a reduced cost. Furthermore, the new 3D-integration technology ICV-SLID is explored which will allow for increasing the active area of the modules from 71% to about 90% and hence, for employing the modules in the innermost layer of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. A semiconductor simulation and measurements of irradiated test sensors are used to optimize the implantation parameters for the inter-pixel isolation of the thin sensors. These reduce the crosstalk between the pixel channels and should allow for operating the sensors during the whole runtime of the experiment without causing junction breakdowns. The characterization of the first production of sensors with active thicknesses of 75 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m proved that thin pixel sensors can be successfully produced with the new process technology. Thin pad sensors with a reduced inactive

  19. Effect of Ge Addition on the Optical Band Gap and Refractive Index of Thermally Evaporated As2Se3 Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj Sharma; S. C. Katyal

    2008-01-01

    The present paper reports the effect of Ge addition on the optical band gap and refractive index of A s 2 S e 3 thin films. Thin films of A s 2 S e 3 and ( A s 2 S e 3 ) 9 0 G e 1 0 were prepared by thermal evaporation technique at base pressure 1 0 − 4  Pa. Optical band gap and refractive index were calculated by analyzing the transmission spectrum in the spectral range 400–1500 nm. The optical band gap decreases while the refractive index increases with the addition of Ge to A s 2 S e 3 . T...

  20. Gap states in the electronic structure of SnO2 single crystals and amorphous SnOx thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberle, J.; Machulik, S.; Janowitz, C.; Manzke, R.; Gaspar, D.; Barquinha, P.; Schmeißer, D.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of a SnO2 single crystal is determined by employing resonant photoelectron spectroscopy. We determine the core level, valence band, and X-ray absorption (XAS) data and compare these with those of amorphous SnOx thin films. We find similar properties concerning the data of the core levels, the valence band features, and the absorption data at the O1s edge. We find strong signals arising from intrinsic in-gap states and discuss their origin in terms of polaronic and charge-transfer defects. We deduce from the XAS data recorded at the Sn3d edge that the Sn4d10 ground state has contributions of 4d9 and 4d8 states due to configuration interaction. We identify localized electronic states depending on the strength of the 4d-5s5p interaction and of the O2p-to-Sn4d charge-transfer processes, both appear separated from the extended band-like states of the conduction band. For the amorphous SnOx thin films, significant differences are found only in the absorption data at the Sn3d-edge due to a stronger localization of the in-gap states.

  1. Selective femtosecond laser structuring of dielectric thin films with different band gaps: a time-resolved study of ablation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have been increasingly gaining importance for the selective structuring of dielectric thin films in industrial applications. In a variety of works the ablation of thin SiO2 and SiNx films from Si substrates has been investigated with near infrared laser wavelengths with photon energies of about 1.2 eV where both dielectrics are transparent (E_{{gap,SiO2}}≈ 8 eV; E_{{gap,SiN}x}≈ 2.5 eV). In these works it was found that few 100 nm thick SiO2 films are selectively ablated with a "lift-off" initiated by confined laser ablation whereas the SiN_{{x}} films are ablated by a combination of confined and direct laser ablation. In the work at hand, ultrafast pump-probe imaging was applied to compare the laser ablation dynamics of the two thin film systems directly with the uncoated Si substrate—on the same setup and under identical parameters. On the SiO2 sample, results show the pulse absorption in the Si substrate, leading to the confined ablation of the SiO2 layer by the expansion of the substrate. On the SiN_{{x}} sample, direct absorption in the layer is observed leading to its removal by evaporation. The pump-probe measurements combined with reflectivity corrected threshold fluence investigations suggest that melting of the Si substrate is sufficient to initiate the lift-off of an overlaying transparent film—evaporation of the substrate seems not to be necessary.

  2. Nanostructured thin films for multiband-gap silicon triple junction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Rath, J.K.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schuttauf, J.A.; Stolk, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    By implementing nanostructure in multiband-gap proto-Si/proto-SiGe/nc-Si:H triple junction n–i–p solar cells, a considerable improvement in performance has been achieved. The unalloyed active layers in the top and bottom cell of these triple junction cells are deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. A significan

  3. Band gap and defect states of MgO thin films investigated using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Sung [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130, Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, S. Korea, 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746, S. Korea (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eunseog [CAE Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130, Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, S. Korea, 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Ik; Park, Gyeong Su [Analytical Engineering Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130, Samsung-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, S. Korea, 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, S. Korea (Korea, Republic of); Nagatomi, T. [Analysis & Simulation Center, Asahi Kasei Corporation, 2-1 Samejima, Fuji, Shizuoka 416-8501 (Japan); Choi, Pyungho; Choi, Byoung-Deog, E-mail: bdchoi@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Cheoncheon-dong 300, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746, S. Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The band gap and defect states of MgO thin films were investigated by using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) and high-energy resolution REELS (HR-REELS). HR-REELS with a primary electron energy of 0.3 keV revealed that the surface F center (FS) energy was located at approximately 4.2 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM) and the surface band gap width (E{sub g}{sup S}) was approximately 6.3 eV. The bulk F center (F{sub B}) energy was located approximately 4.9 eV above the VBM and the bulk band gap width was about 7.8 eV, when measured by REELS with 3 keV primary electrons. From a first-principles calculation, we confirmed that the 4.2 eV and 4.9 eV peaks were F{sub S} and F{sub B}, induced by oxygen vacancies. We also experimentally demonstrated that the HR-REELS peak height increases with increasing number of oxygen vacancies. Finally, we calculated the secondary electron emission yields (γ) for various noble gases. He and Ne were not influenced by the defect states owing to their higher ionization energies, but Ar, Kr, and Xe exhibited a stronger dependence on the defect states owing to their small ionization energies.

  4. Band gap and defect states of MgO thin films investigated using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Heo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The band gap and defect states of MgO thin films were investigated by using reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS and high-energy resolution REELS (HR-REELS. HR-REELS with a primary electron energy of 0.3 keV revealed that the surface F center (FS energy was located at approximately 4.2 eV above the valence band maximum (VBM and the surface band gap width (EgS was approximately 6.3 eV. The bulk F center (FB energy was located approximately 4.9 eV above the VBM and the bulk band gap width was about 7.8 eV, when measured by REELS with 3 keV primary electrons. From a first-principles calculation, we confirmed that the 4.2 eV and 4.9 eV peaks were FS and FB, induced by oxygen vacancies. We also experimentally demonstrated that the HR-REELS peak height increases with increasing number of oxygen vacancies. Finally, we calculated the secondary electron emission yields (γ for various noble gases. He and Ne were not influenced by the defect states owing to their higher ionization energies, but Ar, Kr, and Xe exhibited a stronger dependence on the defect states owing to their small ionization energies.

  5. New Insights on the Burstein-Moss Shift and Band Gap Narrowing in Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, K G; Aznan, N M; Yam, F K; Ng, S S; Pung, S Y

    2015-01-01

    The Burstein-Moss shift and band gap narrowing of sputtered indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films are investigated as a function of carrier concentrations. The optical band gap shifts below the carrier concentration of 5.61 × 1019 cm-3 are well-described by the Burstein-Moss model. For carrier concentrations higher than 8.71 × 1019 cm-3 the shift decreases, indicating that band gap narrowing mechanisms are increasingly significant and are competing with the Burstein-Moss effect. The incorporation of In causes the resistivity to decrease three orders of magnitude. As the mean-free path of carriers is less than the crystallite size, the resistivity is probably affected by ionized impurities as well as defect scattering mechanisms, but not grain boundary scattering. The c lattice constant as well as film stress is observed to increase in stages with increasing carrier concentration. The asymmetric XPS Zn 2p3/2 peak in the film with the highest carrier concentration of 7.02 × 1020 cm-3 suggests the presence of stacking defects in the ZnO lattice. The Raman peak at 274 cm-1 is attributed to lattice defects introduced by In dopants.

  6. New Insights on the Burstein-Moss Shift and Band Gap Narrowing in Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K G Saw

    Full Text Available The Burstein-Moss shift and band gap narrowing of sputtered indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO thin films are investigated as a function of carrier concentrations. The optical band gap shifts below the carrier concentration of 5.61 × 1019 cm-3 are well-described by the Burstein-Moss model. For carrier concentrations higher than 8.71 × 1019 cm-3 the shift decreases, indicating that band gap narrowing mechanisms are increasingly significant and are competing with the Burstein-Moss effect. The incorporation of In causes the resistivity to decrease three orders of magnitude. As the mean-free path of carriers is less than the crystallite size, the resistivity is probably affected by ionized impurities as well as defect scattering mechanisms, but not grain boundary scattering. The c lattice constant as well as film stress is observed to increase in stages with increasing carrier concentration. The asymmetric XPS Zn 2p3/2 peak in the film with the highest carrier concentration of 7.02 × 1020 cm-3 suggests the presence of stacking defects in the ZnO lattice. The Raman peak at 274 cm-1 is attributed to lattice defects introduced by In dopants.

  7. EFFECT OF THE DEFECT STATES DENSITY ON OPTICAL BAND GAP OF CdIn2O4 THIN FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.S. San; Z.G. Wu; B. Li; B.X. Feng

    2005-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxides CdIn2O4 thin films were prepared by radio-frequency reactive sputtering from a Cd-In alloy target in Ar+O2 atmosphere. By transmission spectrum and Hall measurement for different samples prepared at different substrate temperatures, it could be found that the carrier concentration would increase with the decrease of substrate temperature, but absorption edge showed an abrupt variation from a blue shift to a red shift.Theoretically, the paper formulated the effect of high-density point defects on band structures; it embodied the formation of band tailing, Burstein-Moss shift and band-gap narrowing. The density of holes will influence the magnitude of optical band gap and transmittance of light. Since extrapolation method does not fit degenerate semiconductor materials, a more accurate method of obtaining optical band gap is curve fitting. In addition, ionized impurities scattering is the main damping mechanism of the free electrons in CdIn2O4 films, the density of ionized impurities induced by altering substrate temperature will affect the carriers mobility.

  8. Structural, optical and electrical properties of tin oxide thin films for application as a wide band gap semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Riti; Ahmad, Shabir; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher Majid, E-mail: amsiddiqui@jmi.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Tin oxide (SnO) thin films were synthesized using thermal evaporation technique. Ultra pure metallic tin was deposited on glass substrates using thermal evaporator under high vacuum. The thickness of the tin deposited films was kept at 100nm. Subsequently, the as-deposited tin films were annealed under oxygen environment for a period of 3hrs to obtain tin oxide films. To analyse the suitability of the synthesized tin oxide films as a wide band gap semiconductor, various properties were studied. Structural parameters were studied using XRD and SEM-EDX. The optical properties were studied using UV-Vis Spectrophotometry and the electrical parameters were calculated using the Hall-setup. XRD and SEM confirmed the formation of SnO phase. Uniform texture of the film can be seen through the SEM images. Presence of traces of unoxidised Sn has also been confirmed through the XRD spectra. The band gap calculated was around 3.6eV and the optical transparency around 50%. The higher value of band gap and lower value of optical transparency can be attributed to the presence of unoxidised Sn. The values of resistivity and mobility as measured by the Hall setup were 78Ωcm and 2.92cm{sup 2}/Vs respectively. The reasonable optical and electrical parameters make SnO a suitable candidate for optoelectronic and electronic device applications.

  9. Annealing-induced optical and sub-band-gap absorption parameters of Sn-doped CdSe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of Sn-doped CdSe were prepared by thermal evaporation onto glass substrates in an argon gas atmosphere and annealed at different temperatures. Structural evaluation of the films was carried out using X-ray diffraction and their stoichiometry studied by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The films exhibit a preferred orientation along the hexagonal direction of CdSe. The optical transmittance of the films shows a red shift of the absorption edge with annealing. The fundamental absorption edge corresponds to a direct energy gap with a temperature coefficient of 3.34 × 10-3 eV K-1. The refractive index, optical conductivity and real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to increase after annealing. The sub-band gap absorption coefficient was evaluated using the constant photocurrent method. It varies exponentially with photon energy. The Urbach energy, the density of defect states, and the steepness of the density of localized states were evaluated from the sub-band-gap absorption.

  10. Novel wide band gap materials for highly efficient thin film tandem solar cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Peters, Craig H.

    2012-06-11

    Tandem solar cells (TSCs), which use two or more materials to absorb sunlight, have achieved power conversion efficiencies of >25% versus 11-20% for commercialized single junction solar cell modules. The key to widespread commercialization of TSCs is to develop the wide-band, top solar cell that is both cheap to fabricate and has a high open-circuit voltage (i.e. >1V). Previous work in TSCs has generally focused on using expensive processing techniques with slow growth rates resulting in costs that are two orders of magnitude too expensive to be used in conventional solar cell modules. The objective of the PLANT PV proposal was to investigate the feasibility of using Ag(In,Ga)Se2 (AIGS) as the wide-bandgap absorber in the top cell of a thin film tandem solar cell (TSC). Despite being studied by very few in the solar community, AIGS solar cells have achieved one of the highest open-circuit voltages within the chalcogenide material family with a Voc of 949 mV when grown with an expensive processing technique (i.e. Molecular Beam Epitaxy). PLANT PV's goal in Phase I of the DOE SBIR was to (1) develop the chemistry to grow AIGS thin films via solution processing techniques to reduce costs and (2) fabricate new device architectures with high open-circuit voltage to produce full tandem solar cells in Phase II. PLANT PV attempted to translate solution processing chemistries that were successful in producing >12% efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by replacing copper compounds with silver. The main thrust of the research was to determine if it was possible to make high quality AIGS thin films using solution processing and to fully characterize the materials properties. PLANT PV developed several different types of silver compounds in an attempt to fabricate high quality thin films from solution. We found that silver compounds that were similar to the copper based system did not result in high quality thin films. PLANT PV was able to deposit AIGS

  11. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in

  12. Optical band gap energy and ur bach tail of CdS:Pb2+ thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, M.; Juarez, H.; Pacio, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Instituto de Ciencias, Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Av. 14 Sur, Col. Jardines de San Manuel, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Gutierrez, R.; Chaltel, L.; Zamora, M.; Portillo, O. [Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Laboratorio de Materiales, Apdo. Postal 1067, 72001 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Mathew, X., E-mail: osporti@yahoo.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Energias Renovables, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    Pb S-doped CdS nano materials were successfully synthesized using chemical bath. Transmittance measurements were used to estimate the optical band gap energy. Tailing in the band gap was observed and found to obey Ur bach rule. The diffraction X-ray show that the size of crystallites is in the ∼33 nm to 12 nm range. The peaks belonging to primary phase are identified at 2θ = 26.5 degrees Celsius and 2θ = 26.00 degrees Celsius corresponding to CdS and Pb S respectively. Thus, a shift in maximum intensity peak from 2θ = 26.4 to 28.2 degrees Celsius is clear indication of possible transformation of cubic to hexagonal phase. Also peaks at 2θ = 13.57, 15.9 degrees Celsius correspond to lead perchlorate thiourea. The effects on films thickness and substrate doping on the band gap energy and the width on tail were investigated. Increasing doping give rise to a shift in optical absorption edge ∼0.4 eV. (Author)

  13. A Simulation of the Front End Signal Digitization for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer thin RPC trigger upgrade project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangting; Chapman, John; Levin, Daniel; Dai, Tiesheng; Zhu, Junjie; Zhou, Bing; Um Atlas Group Team

    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Phase-I (and Phase-II) upgrade includes the BIS78 muon trigger detector project: two sets of eight very thin Resistive Place Chambers (tRPCs) combined with small Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers in the pseudorapidity region 1Phase-I operation, a stringent latency requirement of 43 bunch crossings (1075 ns) is imposed. The latency budget for the front end digitization must be kept to a minimal value, ideally less than 350 ns. We conducted detailed HPTDC latency simulations using the Behavioral Verilog code from the CERN group. We will report the results of these simulations run for the anticipated detector operating environment and for various HPTDC configurations.

  14. Effect of Ge Addition on the Optical Band Gap and Refractive Index of Thermally Evaporated As2Se3 Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the effect of Ge addition on the optical band gap and refractive index of As2Se3 thin films. Thin films of As2Se3 and (As2Se390Ge10 were prepared by thermal evaporation technique at base pressure 10−4 Pa. Optical band gap and refractive index were calculated by analyzing the transmission spectrum in the spectral range 400–1500 nm. The optical band gap decreases while the refractive index increases with the addition of Ge to As2Se3. The decrease of optical band gap has been explained on the basis of density of states; and the increase in refractive index has been explained on the basis increase in disorder in the system.

  15. Construction and initial beam tests of the ATLAS tungsten forward calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, J.; Babukhadian, L.; Dixit, M.; Donkers, M.; Embry, T.; Gravelle, P.; Hamm, J.; Kamnitzer, J.; Khan, N.; Khovanskii, V.; Koolbeck, D.; Loch, P.; Losty, M.; Mazini, R.; Mayer, J.K.; O' Neill, M.; Oakham, F.G.; Orr, R.S.; Paterson, D.; Ryabin, M.; Rutherfoord, J.; Savin, A.; Seely, J.; Shatalov, P.; Shaver, L.; Shupe, M.; Stairs, G.G.; Tompkins, D.; Trischuk, W.; Vincent, K.; Waller, D.; Zayteev, Y

    1999-08-01

    Due to the severe radiation environment, the ATLAS experiment has chosen a compact tungsten/liquid argon forward hadronic calorimeter. The electrode design is unique and consists of hexagonally packed, tubular, thin gap electrodes running parallel to the beam direction. We describe the design criteria, the novel construction methods based on sintered tungsten components, and initial high energy beam tests at CERN.

  16. Band Gap Energy of Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cell Absorbers Determined by Soft X-Ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Pookpanratana, S.; Heske, C.; Nishiwaki, S.; Shafarman, W.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J.D.

    2008-05-11

    The chemical and electronic structure of high efficiency chalcopyrite thin film solar cell absorbers significantly differs between the surface and the bulk. While it is widely accepted that the absorber surface exhibits a Cu-poor surface phase with increased band gap (Eg), a direct access to the crucial information of the depth-dependency of Eg is still missing. In this paper, we demonstrate that a combination of x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy allows a determination of Eg in the surface-near bulk and thus complements the established surface- and bulk-sensitive techniques of Eg determination. As an example, we discuss the determination of Eg for a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber [(1.52 +- 0.20) eV].

  17. Field Dependence of π-Band Superconducting Gap in MgB2 Thin Films from Point-Contact Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan; XI Xiao-Xing; WANG Yong-Lei; SHAN Lei; JIA Ying; YANG Huan; WEN Hai-Hu; ZHUANG Cheng-Gang; LI Qi; CUI Yi

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of point-contact spectroscopy measurements on high-quality epitaxial MgB2 thin films with injected current along the c-axis. The temperature and field dependences of л-band properties with the field parallel to (H‖) or perpendicular to (H┴ ) the c-axis are investigated in detail. When a magnetic field is applied, either parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis, the density of the quasiparticle state (DOS) of the л-band proliferates quickly with increasing field, while the gap amplitude of the л-band decreases slowly, which is different from the recent theoretical calculations, showing a field dependent competition between the interband scattering and the pair-breaking effects.

  18. Metamorphosis of strain/stress on optical band gap energy of ZAO thin films via manipulation of thermal annealing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malek, M.F., E-mail: firz_solarzelle@yahoo.com [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Universiti Teknologi MARA UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Mamat, M.H. [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Musa, M.Z. [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Pulau Pinang, Jalan Permatang Pauh, 13500 Permatang Pauh, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Soga, T. [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech), Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Rahman, S.A. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Malaya (UM), 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Alrokayan, Salman A.H.; Khan, Haseeb A. [Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Rusop, M. [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Universiti Teknologi MARA UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-15

    We report on the growth of Al-doped ZnO (ZAO) thin films prepared by the sol–gel technique associated with dip-coating onto Corning 7740 glass substrates. The influence of varying thermal annealing (T{sub a}) temperature on crystallisation behaviour, optical and electrical properties of ZAO films has been systematically investigated. All films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite structure with a preferential orientation according to the direction 〈0 0 2〉. The metamorphosis of strain/stress effects in ZAO thin films has been investigated using X-ray diffraction. The as growth films have a large compressive stress of 0.55 GPa, which relaxed to 0.25 GPa as the T{sub a} was increased to 500 °C. Optical parameters such as optical transmittance, absorption coefficient, refractive index and optical band gap energy have been studied and discussed with respect to T{sub a}. All films exhibit a transmittance above 80–90% along the visible–NIR range up to 1500 nm and a sharp absorption onset below 400 nm corresponding to the fundamental absorption edge of ZnO. Experimental results show that the tensile stress in the films reveals an incline pattern with the optical band gap energy, while the compressive stress shows opposite relation. - Highlights: • Minimum stress of highly c-axis oriented ZAO was grown at suitable T{sub a} temperature. • The ZAO crystal orientation was influenced by strain/stress of the film. • Minimum stress/strain of ZAO film leads to lower defects. • Bandgap and defects were closely intertwined with strain/stress. • We report additional optical and electrical properties based on T{sub a} temperature.

  19. Band gap states in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M. B.; Kristiansen, P. T.; Duda, L.; Niklasson, G. A.; Österlund, L.

    2016-11-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering have been studied using soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements reveal band gap states in sub-stoichiometric γ-WO3-x with x  =  0.001-0.005. The energy positions of these states are in good agreement with recently reported density functional calculations. The results were compared with optical absorption measurements in the near infrared spectral region. An optical absorption peak at 0.74 eV is assigned to intervalence transfer of polarons between W sites. A less prominent peak at energies between 0.96 and 1.16 eV is assigned to electron excitation of oxygen vacancies. The latter results are supported by RIXS measurements, where an energy loss in this energy range was observed, and this suggests that electron transfer processes involving transitions from oxygen vacancy states can be observed in RIXS. Our results have implications for the interpretation of optical properties of WO3, and the optical transitions close to the band gap, which are important in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  20. Effect of Al Doping on Optical Band Gap Energy of Al-TiO2 Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yo-Seung; Kim, Bae-Yeon; Cho, Nam-Ihn; Lee, Deuk Yong

    2015-07-01

    Al-TiO2 thin films were prepared using a sol-gel derived spin coating by varying the Al/Ti molar ratio from 0 to 0.73 to investigate the effect of Al doping on the optical band gap energy (Eg) of the films. GAXRD results indicated that Al-TiO2 is composed of anatase and FTO phases when the Al/Ti molar ratio was less than 0.18. Above 0.38, no other peaks except FTO were found and transparency of the films was severely deteriorated. Eg of Al-TiO2 decreased from 3.20 eV to 2.07 eV when the Al/Ti ratio was raised from 0 to 0.38. Eg of 2.59 eV was found for the anatase Al-TiO2 films having the Al/Ti ratio of 0.18. The absorption band of Al-TiO2 coatings shifted dramatically from the UV region to the visible region with increasing the amount of Al dopant. The Al doping was mainly attributed to the optical band gap energy of Al-TiO2.

  1. Band gap states in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M B; Kristiansen, P T; Duda, L; Niklasson, G A; Österlund, L

    2016-11-30

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering have been studied using soft x-ray spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements reveal band gap states in sub-stoichiometric γ-WO3-x with x  =  0.001-0.005. The energy positions of these states are in good agreement with recently reported density functional calculations. The results were compared with optical absorption measurements in the near infrared spectral region. An optical absorption peak at 0.74 eV is assigned to intervalence transfer of polarons between W sites. A less prominent peak at energies between 0.96 and 1.16 eV is assigned to electron excitation of oxygen vacancies. The latter results are supported by RIXS measurements, where an energy loss in this energy range was observed, and this suggests that electron transfer processes involving transitions from oxygen vacancy states can be observed in RIXS. Our results have implications for the interpretation of optical properties of WO3, and the optical transitions close to the band gap, which are important in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  2. The big wheels of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS cavern is filling up at an impressive rate. The installation of the first of the big wheels of the muon spectrometer, a thin gap chamber (TGC) wheel, was completed in September. The muon spectrometer will include four big moving wheels at each end, each measuring 25 metres in diameter. Of the eight wheels in total, six will be composed of thin gap chambers for the muon trigger system and the other two will consist of monitored drift tubes (MDTs) to measure the position of the muons (see Bulletin No. 13/2006). The installation of the 688 muon chambers in the barrel is progressing well, with three-quarters of them already installed between the coils of the toroid magnet.

  3. Nanoscale probing of electronic band gap and topography of VO2 thin film surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.; Wolf, S.; Ko, C.; Ramanathan, S.; Reinke, P.

    2011-01-01

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide in the vicinity of room temperature makes it one of the most interesting materials for novel switching device applications. It is therefore essential to have a fundamental understanding of the VO2 surface when it is incorporated into multilayer structures or nanodevices. This study focuses on the surface modification of VO2 in response to the thermal treatment during phase transition. Vacuum annealing at temperatures in the vicinity of the MIT triggers a partial reduction in the surface, and thus initiates a chemical phase transition. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used to investigate the electronic properties and surface structure of the VO2 thin film on (0001) sapphire substrates. Band gap maps with a high spatial resolution and single point spectroscopy I-V curves are measured as the sample is cycled through the MIT, and thus provide a direct observation of the surface phase transition at the nanoscale. The VO2 surface exhibits a homogeneous insulating behavior with a typical band gap of ˜0.5 eV at room temperature, and the surface becomes more metallic and spatially inhomogeneous in conductivity during MIT, and wide range of surface oxides can be identified. The surface still remains partially metallic after cooling down from a long period anneal, and such irreversible surface electrical change is attributed to the loss of oxygen. The location of metallic islands after thermal cycling is strongly coupled to the topography of the film, and relaxation processes and continued modification of the spatial distribution of the metallic regions are recognized on a longer timescale. The impact of film morphology, strain, surface chemistry, and structural phase transition on the electronic characteristics of VO2 surfaces are discussed.

  4. Ballistic phonon and thermal radiation transport across a minute vacuum gap in between aluminum and silicon thin films: Effect of laser repetitive pulses on transport characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa; Ali, H.

    2016-08-15

    Short-pulse laser heating of aluminum and silicon thin films pair with presence of a minute vacuum gap in between them is considered and energy transfer across the thin films pair is predicted. The frequency dependent Boltzmann equation is used to predict the phonon intensity distribution along the films pair for three cycles of the repetitive short-pulse laser irradiation on the aluminum film surface. Since the gap size considered is within the Casimir limit, thermal radiation and ballistic phonon contributions to energy transfer across the vacuum gap is incorporated. The laser irradiated field is formulated in line with the Lambert's Beer law and it is considered as the volumetric source in the governing equations of energy transport. In order to assess the phonon intensity distribution in the films pair, equivalent equilibrium temperature is introduced. It is demonstrated that thermal separation of electron and lattice sub-systems in the aluminum film, due to the short-pulse laser irradiation, takes place and electron temperature remains high in the aluminum film while equivalent equilibrium temperature for phonons decays sharply in the close region of the aluminum film interface. This behavior is attributed to the phonon boundary scattering at the interface and the ballistic phonon transfer to the silicon film across the vacuum gap. Energy transfer due to the ballistic phonon contribution is significantly higher than that of the thermal radiation across the vacuum gap.

  5. Optimization of thin n-in-p planar pixel modules for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiolo, A.; Beyer, J.; La Rosa, A.; Nisius, R.; Savic, N.

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will undergo around the year 2025 a replacement of the tracker system in view of the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) with a new 5-layer pixel system. Thin planar pixel sensors are promising candidates to instrument the innermost region of the new pixel system, thanks to the reduced contribution to the material budget and their high charge collection efficiency after irradiation. The sensors of 50-150 μm thickness, interconnected to FE-I4 read-out chips, have been characterized with radioactive sources and beam tests. In particular active edge sensors have been investigated. The performance of two different versions of edge designs are compared: the first with a bias ring, and the second one where only a floating guard ring has been implemented. The hit efficiency at the edge has also been studied after irradiation at a fluence of 1015 neq/cm2. Highly segmented sensors will represent a challenge for the tracking in the forward region of the pixel system at HL-LHC. In order to reproduce the performance of 50x50 μm2 pixels at high pseudo-rapidity values, FE-I4 compatible planar pixel sensors have been studied before and after irradiation in beam tests at high incidence angles with respect to the short pixel direction. Results on the hit efficiency in this configuration are discussed for different sensor thicknesses.

  6. Data acquisition system for quality tests of the ATLAS muon endcap trigger chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, J; Napieralski, A

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration is building a general-purpose pp detector which is designed to exploit the full discovery potential of the high energy proton-proton interaction Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern. The LHC offers a large range of physics opportunities, among which the origin of mass at the electroweak scale is a major focus of interest of ATLAS. The Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) are detectors designed to detect the high transverse momentum muons in the endcap of the ATLAS detector. The short response time of the TGCs makes it an ideal trigger system for selecting interesting events in the highly packed environment of the LHC accelerator. The subject of this paper is the design and operation of the data acquisition system, which serves to automatize the procedure of the performance of the TGC detector, before are to be installed in the ATLAS experiment. (3 refs).

  7. Lunar Sample Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sample Atlas provides pictures of the Apollo samples taken in the Lunar Sample Laboratory, full-color views of the samples in microscopic thin-sections,...

  8. Probing optical band gaps at nanoscale from tetrahedral cation vacancy defects and variation of cation ordering in NiCo2O4 epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, K.; Loukya, B.; Silwal, P.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is utilized to probe the optical band gaps at the nanoscale in epitaxial NiCo2O4 (NCO) thin films with different structural order (cation/charge). The structure of NCO deviates from the ideal inverse spinel (non-magnetic and insulating) for films grown at higher temperatures (>500 °C) towards a mixed cation structure (magnetic with metallic conductivity) at lower deposition temperatures (<450 °C). This significantly modifies the electronic structure as well as the nature of the band gap of the material. Nanoscale regions with unoccupied tetrahedral A site cations are additionally observed in all the samples and direct measurement from such areas reveals considerably lower band gap values as compared to the ideal inverse spinel and mixed cation configurations. Experimental values of band gaps have been found to be in good agreement with the theoretical mBJLDA exchange potential based calculated band gaps for various cation ordering and consideration of A site cation vacancy defects. The origin of rich variation in cation ordering observed in this system is discussed.

  9. Structure, band gap, and Mn-related mid-gap states in epitaxial single crystal (Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}){sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Dapeng; Liu Guolei; Xiao Shuqin; Yan Shishen; He Shumin; Cai Li; Li Qinghao; Hu Shujun; Chen Yanxue; Kang Shishou; Mei Liangmo [School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Cao Qiang [School of Physics, National Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu, Shandong 273165 (China)

    2013-05-07

    Epitaxial (Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}){sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O thin films were grown on c-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates by radio frequency oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Single crystal structure of the (Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}){sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O films was revealed by reflection high energy electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction. The band gap of the films can be tuned dramatically with increasing the Mg concentration, while the onset energy of Mn-related mid-gap absorption band only shows a small blue shift. Photoconductivity measurements indicate the Mn-related mid-gap states in (Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}){sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O films can create free carriers and contribute to charge transfer transitions. The conduction band offset {Delta}E{sub C} = 0.13 eV and valence band offset {Delta}E{sub V} = 0.1 eV were obtained for ZnO/Zn{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O heterostructures, which increase to {Delta}E{sub C} = 0.21 eV and {Delta}E{sub V} = 0.14 eV for ZnO/Zn{sub 0.7}Mg{sub 0.3}O heterostructures.

  10. Microstructure and blueshift in optical band gap of nanocrystalline Al{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majeed Khan, M.A., E-mail: majeed_phys@rediffmail.com [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Kumar, Sushil [Materials ScienceLaboratory, Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Naziruddin Khan, M.; Ahamed, Maqusood [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Al Dwayyan, A.S. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Physics and Astronomy Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we report the structural and optical properties of Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films grown on glass substrates using the sol–gel process. To understand the effect of Al doping on the structural and optical response of ZnO nanoparticles thin films, the prepared samples have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL), UV–vis absorption and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results show that Al doped ZnO nanoparticles have hexagonal phase similar to ZnO nanoparticles. TEM images as well as XRD data exhibit the estimated size of nanoparticles to be in the range 35–45 nm. The optical band gap has been determined from optical absorption spectra. The band gap varied from 3.27 eV for undoped ZnO film to 3.87 eV for AZO film having 3 atwt% Al. The blue shift in energy band gap mainly related to carrier concentration induced by Al-donor doping, and to the degree of crystalline order. Photoluminescence study further confirms the blue shift in UV emission when Al doping concentration is increased, as a consequence of extension in band gap. - Highlights: • Undoped and Al doped ZnO nanoparticles has been synthesized by the sol–gel method. • Undoped and Al doped ZnO films have a (0 0 2) peak, indicating a hexagonal wurtzite structure. • The stacking faults induced by Al-doped provide another path for electron transfer. • Influence of Al doping on the physical properties of ZnO nanoparticles was investigated. • The quality and crystallinity of Al-doped ZnO films were investigated by varying the Al compositions.

  11. Construction and initial beam tests of the ATLAS tungsten forward calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Armitage, J; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Embry, T; Gravelle, P; Hamm, J; Kamnitzer, J; Khan, N A; Khovanskii, V D; Kookbeck, D; Loch, P; Losty, Michael J; Mazini, R; Mayer, J K; O'Neill, M; Oakham, F G; Orr, R S; Paterson, D; Ryabinin, M S; Rutherfoord, John P; Savin, A; Seely, J; Shatalov, P; Shaver, L; Shupe, M A; Stairs, G G; Tompkins, D H; Trischuk, W; Vincent, K; Waller, D; Zayteev, Y

    1998-01-01

    Due to the severe radiation environment, the ATLAS experiment has chosen a compact tungsten/liquid argon forward hadronic calorimeter. The electrode design is unique and consists of hexagonally packed, tubular, thin gap electrodes $9 running parallel to the beam direction. We describe the design criteria, the novel construction methods based on sintered tungsten components, and initial high energy beam tests at CERN. (3 refs).

  12. Time-resolved photoexcitation of the superconducting two-gap state in MgB2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Khafizov, M; Satrapinsky, L; Kús, P; Plecenik, A; Sobolewski, Roman

    2003-11-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe studies show that carrier dynamics in MgB2 films is governed by the sub-ps electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation present at all temperatures, the few-ps e-ph process well pronounced below 70 K, and the sub-ns superconducting relaxation below T(c). The amplitude of the superconducting component versus temperature follows the superposition of the isotropic dirty gap and the three-dimensional pi gap dependences, closing at two different T(c) values. The time constant of the few-ps relaxation exhibits a double divergence at temperatures corresponding to the T(c)'s of the two gaps.

  13. Band-gap narrowing and magnetic behavior of Ni-doped Ba(Ti0.875Ce0.125)O3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenliang; Deng, Hongmei; Yu, Lu; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Junhao

    2015-11-01

    Band-gap narrowing and magnetic effects have been observed in a Ni-doped Ba(Ti0.875Ce0.125)O3 (BTC) thin film. Structural characterizations and microstructural analysis show that the as-prepared Ba(Ti0.75Ce0.125Ni0.125)O3-δ (BTCN) thin film exhibits a cubic perovskite structure with an average grain size of 25 nm. The Ce doping at the Ti-site results in an increasing perovskite volume to favour an O-vacancy-stabilized Ni2+ substitution. Raman spectroscopy, however, shows the cubic symmetry of crystalline structures is locally lowered by the presence of dopants, significantly deviating from the ideal Pm3m space group. Moreover, BTCN presents a narrowed band-gap, much smaller than that of BaTiO3 and BTC, due to new states of both the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in an electronic structure with the presence of Ni. Also, magnetic enhancement driven by co-doping has been confirmed in the films, which mainly stems from the exchange interaction of Ni2+ ions via an electron trapped in a bridging oxygen vacancy. These findings may open an avenue to discover and design optimal perovskite compounds for solar-energy devices and information storage.

  14. High-frequency Lamb wave device composed of MEMS structure using LiNbO3 thin film and air gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Michio; Ogami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kansho; Tochishita, Hikari; Negoro, Yasuhiro

    2010-11-01

    High-frequency devices operating at 3 GHz or higher are required, for instance, for future 4th generation mobile phone systems in Japan. Using a substrate with a high acoustic velocity is one method to realize a high-frequency acoustic or elastic device. A Lamb wave has a high velocity when the substrate thickness is thin. To realize a high-frequency device operating at 3 GHz or higher using a Lamb wave, a very thin (less than 0.5 μm thick) single-crystal plate must be used. It is difficult to fabricate such a very thin single crystal plate. The authors have attempted to use a c-axis orientated epitaxial LiNbO(3) thin film deposited by a chemical vapor deposition system (CVD) instead of using a thin LiNbO(3) single crystal plate. Lamb wave resonators composed of a interdigital transducer (IDT)/the LiNbO(3) film/air gap/base substrate structure like micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) transducers were fabricated. These resonators have shown a high frequency of 4.5 and 6.3 GHz, which correspond to very high acoustic velocities of 14,000 and 12,500 m/s, respectively, have excellent characteristics such as a ratio of resonant and antiresonant impedance of 52 and 38 dB and a wide band of 7.2% and 3.7%, respectively, and do not have spurious responses caused by the 0th modes of shear horizontal (SH(0)) and symmetric (S(0)) modes.

  15. Determination of the optical band gap for amorphous and nanocrystalline copper oxide thin films prepared by SILAR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rafea, M.; Roushdy, N.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous copper oxide films were deposited using the SILAR technique. Both Cu2O and CuO crystallographic phases exist in deposited and annealed films. Crystallization and growth processes by annealing at temperatures up to 823 K form grains with nano- and micro-spherical shapes. The calculated crystallite size from the XRD measurement was found to be in the range 14-21 nm while nano-spheres in the diameter range 50-100 nm were observed by SEM micrographs. The band gap for amorphous film was found to be 2.3 eV which increased slowly to 2.4 eV by annealing the film at 373 K. This was explained by defect redistribution in amorphous films. Annealing in the temperature range 373-673 K decreased the band gap gradually to 1.85 eV. The decrease of the band gap with annealing temperature in the range 373-673 K agrees well with the Brus model of the energy gap confinement effect in nanostructured semiconducting materials. Annealing in the temperature range 673-823 K decreases the band gap slowly to 1.7 eV due to the smaller contribution of the confinement effect. Below 573 K, Cu2O is the most probable crystalline phase in the film, while Cu2O and CuO crystalline phases may coexist at annealing temperatures above 573 K due to further oxidation of Cu2O. A wider transmittance spectral window in the visible region was obtained by controlling the annealing conditions of the amorphous copper oxide film and its applicability to the window layer of solar cell was suggested.

  16. Determination of the optical band gap for amorphous and nanocrystalline copper oxide thin films prepared by SILAR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Rafea, M; Roushdy, N [Electronic Materials Department, Advanced Technologies and New Materials Institute, Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, PO Box 21934, New Borg El-Arab City, Alexandria (Egypt)], E-mail: m.abdelrafea@mucsat.sci.eg

    2009-01-07

    Amorphous copper oxide films were deposited using the SILAR technique. Both Cu{sub 2}O and CuO crystallographic phases exist in deposited and annealed films. Crystallization and growth processes by annealing at temperatures up to 823 K form grains with nano- and micro-spherical shapes. The calculated crystallite size from the XRD measurement was found to be in the range 14-21 nm while nano-spheres in the diameter range 50-100 nm were observed by SEM micrographs. The band gap for amorphous film was found to be 2.3 eV which increased slowly to 2.4 eV by annealing the film at 373 K. This was explained by defect redistribution in amorphous films. Annealing in the temperature range 373-673 K decreased the band gap gradually to 1.85 eV. The decrease of the band gap with annealing temperature in the range 373-673 K agrees well with the Brus model of the energy gap confinement effect in nanostructured semiconducting materials. Annealing in the temperature range 673-823 K decreases the band gap slowly to 1.7 eV due to the smaller contribution of the confinement effect. Below 573 K, Cu{sub 2}O is the most probable crystalline phase in the film, while Cu{sub 2}O and CuO crystalline phases may coexist at annealing temperatures above 573 K due to further oxidation of Cu{sub 2}O. A wider transmittance spectral window in the visible region was obtained by controlling the annealing conditions of the amorphous copper oxide film and its applicability to the window layer of solar cell was suggested.

  17. Induced changes in refractive index, optical band gap, and absorption edge of polycarbonate-SiO2 thin films by Vis-IR lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Hassan; Akhoondi, Somaieh

    2016-09-01

    In this experimental work, we have studied induced changes in refractive index, extinction coefficient, and optical band-gap of Bisphenol-A-polycarbonate (BPA-PC) coated with a uniform and thin, anti-scratch SiO2 film irradiated by visible to near-infrared lasers at 532 nm (green),650 nm(red), and 980 nm (IR)wavelength lasers with different energy densities. Our lasers sources are indium-gallium-aluminum-phosphide, second harmonic of neodymium-YAG-solid state lasers and gallium-aluminum-arsenide-semiconductor laser. The energy densities of our sources have been changed by changing the spot size of incident laser. samples transmission spectra were monitored by carry500 spectrophotometer and induced changes in optical properties are evaluated by using, extrapolation of the transmission spectrum through Swanepoel method and computer application

  18. Evidence of a Surface-Mediated Magnetically Induced Miscibility Gap in Co-Pt Alloy Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, P.W.; Shapiro, A.L.; Tran, M.Q.; Hellman, F. [Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    1995-08-28

    (100) and (111) oriented single-crystal CoPt{sub 3} films were deposited over a range of growth temperatures from {minus}50 to 800 {degree}C. The Curie temperature is increased by 200 {degree}C over the value expected for the homogeneous alloy in the as-deposited films (of both orientations) grown near 400 {degree}C. We interpret this as evidence for a previously unobserved, surface-mediated, magnetically driven miscibility gap in vapor-deposited CoPt{sub 3} films. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is also observed in the as-deposited films (of both orientations) grown near 400 {degree}C.

  19. Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer for Operation at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will increase the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to low-rate high-energy physics processes. In order to cope with the 10 times higher instantaneous luminosity compared to the LHC, the trigger system of ATLAS needs to be upgraded. The ATLAS experiment plans to increase the maximum rate capability of the first two trigger levels to 1 MHz at 6 µs latency. This requires new on- and off-chamber electronics for its muon spectrometer. The replacement of the precision chamber read-out electronics will make it possible to include their data in the first level trigger decision and thus to increase the selectivity of the first level muon trigger. The acceptance of the present RPC trigger system in the barrel will be increased from 75% to 95% by the installation of additional thin-gap RPC with a substantially increased high-rate capability compared to the current RPCs.

  20. Upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer for operation at the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortner, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    The High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider will increase the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to rare physics processes. In order to cope with a 10 times higher instantaneous luminosity compared to the LHC, the trigger system of ATLAS needs to be upgraded. The ATLAS experiment plans to increase the maximum rate capability of the 1st trigger level to 1 MHz at 6 μ s latency. This requires new on- and off-chamber electronics for its muon spectrometer. The replacement of the precision chamber read-out electronics will make it possible to include their data in the 1st level trigger decision and thus to increase the selectivity of the 1st level muon trigger. The acceptance of the present RPC trigger system in the barrel region will be increased from 75% to 95% by the installation of additional thin-gap RPC with a substantially increased high-rate capability compared to the current RPCs.

  1. Thin n-in-p pixel sensors and the SLID-ICV vertical integration technology for the ATLAS upgrade at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Macchiolo, A

    2013-01-01

    The R&D activity presented is focused on the development of new modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The performance after irradiation of n-in-p pixel sensors of different active thicknesses is studied, together with an investigation of a novel interconnection technique offered by the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT in Munich, the Solid-Liquid-InterDiffusion (SLID), which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding. The pixel modules are based on thin n-in-p sensors, with an active thickness of 75 um or 150 um, produced at the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory (MPI HLL) and on 100 um thick sensors with active edges, fabricated at VTT, Finland. Hit efficiencies are derived from beam test data for thin devices irradiated up to a fluence of 4e15 neq/cm^2. For the active edge devices, the charge collection properties of the edge pixels before irradiation is discussed in detail, with respect to the inner ones, using measurements with radioactive sources. Beyond ...

  2. Determination of optical constant and dispersion parameters of Se75Sb10In15 thin film characterized by wide band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elrahman, M. I.; Abu-Sehly, A. A.; El-sonbaty, Sherouk Sh.; Hafiz, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    Chalcogenide Se75Sb10In15 thin films of different thickness (50-300 nm) are deposited using thermal evaporation technique. The thermogram of the chalcogenide bulk Se75Sb10In15 is obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The crystallization temperature T c, peak crystallization temperature T p and melting temperature T m, are identified. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) examination indicates the crystallinity of the as-deposited film decreases with increasing of thickness. Optical transmission and reflection spectra are recorded in the wavelength range of the incident photons from 250 to 2500 nm. It is found that the film thickness affects the absorption coefficient, refractive index, extinction coefficient and the width of the tails of localized states in the gap region. The absorption mechanism of the as-deposited films is a direct allowed transition. The optical band gap energy ( E g) decreases from 3.31 to 2.51 eV with increasing the film thickness from 50 to 300 nm. The behavior of E g is explained on the basis of the structure disorders in the thicker films. The effect of the film thickness on the single-oscillator and dispersion energies is studied by the dispersion analyses of the refractive index.

  3. Effect of Al doping on microstructure and optical band gap of ZnO thin film synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mondal; S R Bhattacharyya; P Mitra

    2013-02-01

    Thin films of pure and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) were deposited on glass substrates from ammonium zincate bath following a chemical dipping technique called successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-rays (EDX) were used to investigate the effect of Al doping on the microstructure of AZO films. Particle size analysis using X-ray line broadening shows marginally increasing trend with increasing Al impurity. The average particle size for pure ZnO is 22.75 nm. It increases to 24.26 nm for 1% AZO film and 25.13 nm for 2% AZO film. Incorporation of Al was confirmed from elemental analysis using EDX. SEM micrograph shows that pure ZnO particles are spherical shaped. However, AZO films show particles with off-spherical shape with compact interconnected grains. The value of band gap for pure ZnO is 3.229 eV and it increases to 3.29 eV for 1% AZO indicating a blue-shift for 1% AZO film. However, for 2% AZO film, a decrease in band gap compared to pure ZnO is observed indicating a red-shift of fundamental absorption edge. Electrical resistance shows an initial decrease with increasing Al content. With further enhancement of Al incorporation, the resistance increases.

  4. Enhanced p-type conductivity and band gap narrowing in heavily Al doped NiO thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, S; Maiti, U N; Ghosh, C K; Chattopadhyay, K K

    2009-03-18

    Stoichiometric NiO, a Mott-Hubbard insulator at room temperature, shows p-type electrical conduction due to the introduction of Ni(2+) vacancies (V(Ni)('')) and self-doping of Ni(3+) ions in the presence of excess oxygen. The electrical conductivity of this important material is low and not sufficient for active device fabrication. Al doped NiO thin films were synthesized by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering on glass substrates at a substrate temperature of 250 °C in an oxygen + argon atmosphere in order to enhance the p-type electrical conductivity. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the correct phase formation and also oriented growth of NiO thin films. Al doping was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the films were investigated as a function of Al doping (0-4 wt%) in the target. The room temperature electrical conductivity increased from 0.01-0.32 S cm (-1) for 0-4% Al doping. With increasing Al doping, above the Mott critical carrier density, energy band gap shrinkage was observed. This was explained by the shift of the band edges due to the existence of exchange and correlation energies amongst the electron-electron and hole-hole systems and also by the interaction between the impurity quasi-particle system.

  5. Se concentration dependent band gap engineering in ZnO{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} thin film for optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-chul [Physics Department of Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Quantum Functional Semiconductor Research Center, Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji-eun [Physics Department of Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-won; Lee, Jae-choon [Quantum Functional Semiconductor Research Center, Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Subramaniam, N.G., E-mail: ganapathi@dongguk.edu [Quantum Functional Semiconductor Research Center, Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Nano Information Technology Academy, Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-won, E-mail: twkang@dongguk.edu [Physics Department of Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Quantum Functional Semiconductor Research Center, Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Nano Information Technology Academy, Dongguk University, 26 Phil dong 3 ga Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Ahuja, Rajeev [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • ZnO{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} thin films grown using Pulsed laser deposition technique. • Selenium is not commonly used to reduce bandgap in ZnO. • Publications in this direction using Se as dopant in ZnO was published by, Iwata et al. [8] and Mayer et al. [9]. • Single target was used to obtain single phase material. -- Abstract: ZnO{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} films with various selenium concentrations are deposited on the sapphire substrate (0 0 0 1) by pulsed laser deposition technique. Structural properties of the thin films studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical bonding studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that Se is substituted in O site during the growth of ZnO{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} films. Optical properties are analyzed by UV–Visible spectrometer. From the plot for (αhυ){sup 2} vs photon energy, it is inferred that the band gap energy of ZnO{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} gradually reduces to 2.85 eV with increasing Se concentration.

  6. Discrimination of the wall effect in a thin counter with micro-gap structure for neutron position sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakae, Takeji; Manabe, Tohru; Kitamura, Yasunori; Nohtomi, Akihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Sakamoto, Sigeyasu

    1996-07-01

    Simulation by the Monte Carlo method is applied to estimate the wall effect in a thermal neutron counter having a new function for discriminating the effect. The counter is designed to have paralleled electrodes with micro-gap structure. A resistive anode is used for position sensing on the center of a set of the three electrode. The structure can be made by simple arrangement of anode and cathode wires on an insulator plane. The calculation shows discrimination of the wall effect can be achieved by coincident counting of two or three elements included in the counter. By using the coincident counting, the thickness of the neutron counter can be made into 1 mm with the information of the total energy created in the neutron detection. (author)

  7. A Compact Fiber Inclinometer Using a Thin-Core Fiber with Incorporated an Air-Gap Microcavity Fiber Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiacheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact fiber-optic inclinometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a Fabry-Perot interference (FFPI. The sensing head consists of a short segment of thin-core fiber (TCF following with a piece of hollow-core fiber (HCF. High-order cladding modes have been excited because of core diameter mismatch. A clear interference spectrum has been obtained as the consequence of interference among the reflected core modes and cladding modes. Fringe contrast of the interference spectrum is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction independence, and good linearity has been observed during the bending range from 1° to 3° with a sensitivity of 2.71 dB/deg.

  8. Trigger Algorithms and Electronics for the ATLAS Muon NSW Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Liang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW), comprising MicroMegas (MMs) and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGCs), will upgrade the ATLAS muon system for a high background environment. Particularly, the NSW trigger will reduce the rate of fake triggers coming from background tracks in the endcap. We will present an overview of the FPGA-based trigger processor for NSW and trigger algorithms for sTGC and Micromegas detector sub systems. In additional, we will present development of NSW trigger electronics, in particular, the sTGC Trigger Data Serializer (TDS) ASIC, sTGC Pad Trigger board, the sTGC data packet router and L1 Data Driver Card. Finally, we will detail the challenges of meeting the low latency requirements of the trigger system and coping with the high background rates of the HL-LHC.

  9. Incomplete pulmonary fissures evaluated by volumetric thin-section CT: Semi-quantitative evaluation for small fissure gaps identification, description of prevalence and severity of fissural defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto – University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048900 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Paula, Wagner Diniz de, E-mail: wdpaula@unb.br [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the University of Brasilia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Owsijewitsch, Michael, E-mail: michael.owsijewitsch@med.uniheidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Wielpütz, Mark Oliver, E-mail: mark.wielpuetz@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gompelmann, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.gompelmann@thoraxklinik-heidelberg.de [Pneumology and Respiratory Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik) at University of Heidelberg, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter, E-mail: h.schlemmer@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To assess the interobserver agreement for a semi-quantitative evaluation of the interlobar fissures integrity in volumetric thin-section CT images, looking for more detailed information regarding fissural defects; and describe prevalence and severity of fissural defects between the different functional groups of subjects. Materials and methods: Volumetric scans of 247 individuals exposed to tobacco with different functional status (normal to severe COPD), were retrospectively and independently evaluated by 2 chest radiologists, with a consensual reading additionally with a third reader in disagreement cases. Right oblique (RO), right horizontal (RH) and left oblique fissures (LO) integrity was estimated using a 5% scale. GOLD classification was available for all subjects. Results: Interobserver agreement (weighted Kappa-index) for fissural categorization was 0.76, 0.70 and 0.75, for RO, RH and LO, respectively. Final evaluation found 81%, 89% and 50% of RO, RH and LO to be incomplete, with respective mean integrity of 80%, 58% and 80%. Small fissure gaps (<10%) were present in 30% of patients. Prevalence and severity of fissural defects were not different between the GOLD categories. Conclusions: A substantial agreement between readers was found in the analysis of interlobar fissures integrity. The semi-quantitative method allowed a detailed description of the fissural defects, information that can be important, for example, in endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies for emphysema. Small fissure gaps, overlooked in previous studies, were found in almost a third of the patients. A higher than previously described prevalence of fissural defects was described, but without significant differences among the distinct functional groups.

  10. Dependency of the band gap of electrodeposited Copper oxide thin films on the concentration of copper sulfate (CuSO4.5H2O) and pH in bath solution for photovoltaic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Islam, Md. Anisul

    2016-03-10

    In this study, Copper oxide thin films were deposited on copper plate by electrodeposition process in an electrolytic bath containing CuSO4.5H2O, 3M lactic acid and NaOH. Copper oxide films were electrodeposited at different pH and different concentration of CuSO4.5H2O and the optical band gap was determined from their absorption spectrum which was obtained from UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. It was found that copper oxide films which were deposited at low concentration of CuSO4.5H2O have higher band gap than those deposited at higher bath concentration. The band gap of copper oxide films also significantly changes with pH of the bath solution. It was also observed that with the increase of the pH of bath solution band gap of copper oxide film decreased. © 2015 IEEE.

  11. Band gap energy in Zn-rich Zn{sub 1-x} Cd{sub x} Te thin films grown by r.f. sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerril, M.; Silva L, H.; Zelaya A, O. [Depto. de Fisica, CINVESTAV, A.P. 14-740, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Ternary Zn{sub 1-x} Cd{sub x} Te semiconducting thin films were grown on 7059 Corning glass substrates at room temperature by co-sputtering from a Zn Te-Cd target. The visible Cd-area onto Zn Te target was varied to cover 0% - 4% of the total area. The optical and structural properties of the films were analysed as a function of the Cd concentration (x) on the layers. The sharp diffraction lines indicate mainly the Zn Te in cubic phase. When the cadmium was incorporated into the Zn Te lattice, the band gap energy (E{sub g}) decreased from 2.2748 eV (x = 0) to 2.2226 eV (x = 0.081). We found a linear relationship between E{sub g} and (x) in the interval of (x) studied, that predicts a value of the bowing parameter b in the E{sub g} (x) = E{sub g0} + ax + bx{sup 2} relationship, which coincides with the value of b calculated by making the same study for Cd-rich Cd Zn Te. This result becomes interesting given the large number of values reported for b and a for E{sub g} (x) of this ternary material. (Author) 17 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  12. Response to simulated typical daily outdoor irradiation conditions of thin-film silicon-based triple-band-gap, triple-junction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, P.; Schuettauf, J.W.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Houshyani Hassanzadeh, B.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Department of Chemistry, Science, Technology and Society, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    We studied the response to various realistic outdoor conditions of thin-film silicon-based triple-band-gap, triple-junction cells that were made in house. The triple-junction cells consist of a stack of proto-Si:H/proto-SiGe:H/nanocrystalline (nc)-Si:H cells in an n-i-p configuration, fabricated using hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Current matching was determined for modeled spectra of four different days of the year that are typical for the northwestern European climate. Spectral modeling was based on measured irradiation data. The results showed that on a clear day in June, when the actual spectrum was closest to the reference AM1.5 spectrum, the matching was ideal. As the spectral shape varied during the course of the day with respect to the AM1.5 reference the matching became progressively worse. We found that the top cell (1.8 eV) and bottom cell (1.1 eV) are most sensitive to spectral changes, whereas the middle cell (1.5 eV) is less sensitive. Overall, it was evident that either cloudiness or seasonal variations led to an increase in current mismatch between the cells. If the sub-cells are closely matched, it may even occur that a cell designed to be current limiting no longer fulfills that role. (author)

  13. Influence of Oxygen to Argon Ratio on the Optical Band Gap of Bi3.25La0.75Fe1Ti2O12 Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun Young; Bark, Chung Wung

    2015-10-01

    Achieving wide band gap tunability in ferroelectric perovskite oxides is desirable for the development of photovoltaic device applications and solar cells. To tune the wide band gap of perovskite oxides, ferroelectric iron doped BLT thin films (BLFT) on SrTiO3 substrates were fabricated by RF sputtering with simple control of the oxygen content. The structural and optical properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. As the oxygen content in the mixed Ar+O2 atmosphere was increased from 0% to 50%, the optical band gap of the thin films were decreased from 2.8 eV to 2.64 eV. The BLFT film deposited at an Ar/O2 ratio of 1/1 exhibited a significantly lower optical band gap than the other samples. This simple sputtering approach to controlling the band gap with a simple method can provide a new candidate tool for manipulating optoelectronics devices.

  14. The effect of Al content, substrate temperature and nitrogen flow rate on optical band gap and optical features of nanostructured TiAlN thin films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Reza; Parhizkar, Mojtaba; Bidadi, Hassan; Naghshara, Hamid; Hosseini, Seyd Reza; Jafari, Majid

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, TiAlN thin films were prepared by using a dual reactive magnetron sputtering system on fused quartz substrates kept at room temperature and 400 °C; keeping nitrogen flow at 0.51 and 2.78 sccm, various DC and RF powers and the effect of these factors have been studied on the optical properties of the layers. The optical properties including absorption and transmission were studied by a UV-Visible spectrophotometer in the wavelength region (200-1100) nm. By plotting ( αhν)2 and ( αhν)1/2 versus the photon energy hυ, the optical band gap was evaluated. Experimental results show that layers with high percentage of aluminum and nitrogen have higher gap with respect to layers having high titanium percentage. TiAlN thin films deposited with 2.78 sccm nitrogen flow rate possess optical direct band gap in the range of 3.8-5.1 eV and optical indirect band gap in the range of 1.1-3.4 eV. The variation of optical band gap of the films that deposited on the substrate with 400 °C and nitrogen flow rate of 2.78 sccm was different from other layers.

  15. GAP Analysis Program (GAP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas GAP Analysis Land Cover database depicts 43 land cover classes for the state of Kansas. The database was generated using a two-stage hybrid classification...

  16. Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer for Operation at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kortner, Oliver; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will increase the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to low-rate high-energy physics processes. In order to cope with the 10 times higher instantaneous luminosity compared to the LHC, the trigger system of ATLAS needs to be upgraded. The ATLAS experiment plans to increase the maximum rate capability of the first two trigger levels to 1 MHz at 6 $\\mu$s latency and 400 kHz at 30 $\\mu$s latency, respectively. This requires new trigger and read-out electronics for the RPC (resistive plate) and TGC (thin gap) trigger chambers, and the replacement of the read-out electronics of the MDT (monitored drift tube) precision chambers. The replacement of the MDT read-out electronics will make it possible to include their data in the first level trigger decision and thus to increase the selectivity of the first level muon trigger. The RPC trigger system in the barrel will have to be reinforced by the installation of additional thin-gap RPC with a substantially increased hi...

  17. ATLAS forward physics program

    CERN Document Server

    HELLER, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The variety of forward detectors installed in the vicinity of the ATLAS experiment allows to look over a wide range of forward physics topics. They ensure a good information about rapidity gaps, and the installation of very forward detectors (ALFA and AFP) will allow to tag the leading proton(s) remaining from the different processes studied. Most of the studies have to be done at low luminosity to avoid pile-up, but the AFP project offers a really exiting future for the ATLAS forward physics program. We also present how these forward detectors can be used to measure the relative and absolute luminosity.

  18. ATLAS Muon DCS Upgrades and Optimizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bakalis, Christos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Muon subsystem is comprised of four detector types: Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) for trigger purposes, and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) and Muon Drift Tubes (MDT) for muon track reconstruction. The MDTs cover a large area at the outer part of the detector. In total, there are over a 1’000 MDT chambers, which are made of about 350’000 tubes. The luminosity upgrade of the HL-LHC is expected to pose a serious challenge to the MDTs. The expected increase of particle flux will set new, higher standards regarding the operation and control of the chambers. A step towards optimizing the ATLAS Muon Detector Control System (DCS) was to develop several DCS tools, namely a High Luminosity vs Trip Limit panel with its accompanying scripts and managers. The ultimate goal of this tool is to protect the MDT chambers from the rising particle flux and its associated increase in chamber current. In addition to optimizing the ATLAS Muon DCS, several tasks to accommodate the newly installed B...

  19. Anatomy atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosse, C

    1999-01-01

    Anatomy atlases are unlike other knowledge sources in the health sciences in that they communicate knowledge through annotated images without the support of narrative text. An analysis of the knowledge component represented by images and the history of anatomy atlases suggest some distinctions that should be made between atlas and textbook illustrations. Textbook and atlas should synergistically promote the generation of a mental model of anatomy. The objective of such a model is to support anatomical reasoning and thereby replace memorization of anatomical facts. Criteria are suggested for selecting anatomy texts and atlases that complement one another, and the advantages and disadvantages of hard copy and computer-based anatomy atlases are considered.

  20. Improved laser-induced forward transfer of organic semiconductor thin films by reducing the environmental pressure and controlling the substrate-substrate gap width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw-Stewart, James [Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut, Materials Group, General Energies Department, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Chu, Bryan; Maniglio, Ylenia; Nagel, Matthias; Nueesch, Frank [Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Functional Polymers, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander [Paul Scherrer Institut, Materials Group, General Energies Department, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been investigated for bilayer transfer material systems: silver/organic film (Alq{sub 3} or PFO). The LIFT process uses an intermediate dynamic release layer of a triazene polymer. This study focuses on the effect of introducing a controlled donor-receiver substrate gap distance and the effect of doing the transfer at reduced air pressures, whilst varying the fluence up to {proportional_to}200 mJ/cm{sup 2}. The gap between 'in-contact' substrates has been measured to be a minimum of 2-3 {mu}m. A linear variation in the gap width from 'in contact' to 40 {mu}m has been achieved by adding a spacer at one side of the substrate-substrate sandwich. At atmospheric pressure, very little transfer is achieved for Alq{sub 3}, although PFO shows some signs of successful doughnut transfer (with a large hole in the middle) in a narrow fluence range, at gaps greater than 20 {mu}m. For the transfer of Ag/PFO bilayers at atmospheric pressure, the addition of a PFO layer onto the receiver substrate improved the transfer enormously at smaller gaps and higher fluences. However, the best transfer results were obtained at reduced pressures where a 100% transfer success rate is obtained within a certain fluence window. The quality of the pixel morphology at less than 100 mbar is much higher than at atmospheric pressure, particularly when the gap width is less than 20 {mu}m. These results show the promise of LIFT for industrial deposition processes where a gap between the substrates will improve the throughput. (orig.)

  1. Study of the Mg incorporation in CdTe for developing wide band gap Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te thin films for possible use as top-cell absorber in a tandem solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Omar S. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Universidad Politecnica del Estado de Guerrero, Comunidad de Puente Campuzano, C.P. 40325 Taxco de Alarcon, Guerrero (Mexico); Millan, Aduljay Remolina [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Huerta, L.; Santana, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. C.P 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mathews, N.R.; Ramon-Garcia, M.L.; Morales, Erik R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Mathew, X., E-mail: xm@cie.unam.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te with high spatial uniformity and band gap in the range of 1.6-1.96 eV were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Obtained Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te films have the structural characteristics of the CdTe, evidence of the change in atomic scattering due to incorporation of Mg was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD and XPS data confirmed the incorporation of Mg in the lattice of CdTe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM images revealed the impact of Mg incorporation on the morphology of the films, the changes in grain size and grain morphology are noticeable. - Abstract: Thin films of Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te with band gap in the range of 1.6-1.96 eV were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg on glass substrates heated at 300 Degree-Sign C. Different experimental techniques such as XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy, SEM, and XPS were used to study the effect of Mg incorporation into the lattice of CdTe. The band gap of the films showed a clear tendency to increase as the Mg content in the film is increased. The Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te films maintain all the structural characteristics of the CdTe, however, diminishing of intensity for the XRD patterns is observed due to both change in preferential orientation and change in atomic scattering due to the incorporation of Mg. SEM images showed significant evidences of morphological changes due to the presence of Mg. XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy, and XPS data confirmed the incorporation of Mg in the lattice of CdTe. The significant increase in band gap of CdTe due to incorporation of Mg suggests that the Cd{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Te thin film is a candidate material to use as absorber layer in the top-cell of a tandem solar cell.

  2. Dielectric functions and energy band gap variation studies of manganese doped Bi{sub 3.25}La{sub 0.75}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Prikshit, E-mail: pgautam.phy.du@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi (DU), Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Physics Kirori Mal College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Sachdeva, Anupama [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi (DU), Delhi 110007 (India); Singh, Sushil K. [Functional Materials Division, SSPL, Timarpur, New Delhi 110054 (India); Tandon, R.P., E-mail: ram_tandon@hotmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi (DU), Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Mn Doped Bi{sub 3.25}La{sub 0.75}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BLT) thin films prepared by chemical solution deposition technique. • Raman spectroscopy of these films shows that Mn{sup 3+} is well substituted at Ti{sup 4+} site. • The optical properties of BLT and Mn modified BLT thin films were investigated by using spectroscopic ellipsometry. • A double Tauc–Lorentz (DTL) dispersion relation was successfully used to model the dielectric functions. • The direct optical band gap (Eg{sup d}) is found to decrease with increase in Mn content. - Abstract: Single phase polycrystalline Mn-modified Bi{sub 3.25}La{sub 0.75}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BLT) thin films were prepared by chemical solution deposition method using spin coating technique on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si (1 0 0) substrates. Raman spectroscopy of these films shows that Mn{sup 3+} is well substituted at Ti{sup 4+} site. The optical properties of BLT and Mn modified BLT thin films were investigated at room temperature by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the energy range 0.72–6.2 eV. A double Tauc–Lorentz (DTL) dispersion relation was successfully used to model the dielectric functions of these films where a shift to the lower energy side with Mn doping is seen. The full width at half maxima (FWHM) (Γ) of dielectric function is found to increase with Mn doping. This increase in FWHM may be attributed to the increase in the trap density in forbidden band which consequently decreases the value of direct optical band gap (Eg{sup d}). The direct optical band gap (Eg{sup d}) is found to decrease with increase in Mn content in the studied composition range. This decrease in Eg{sup d} with doping may be attributed to the variation in the defect concentration present in the structure.

  3. Gap Opening in 3D: Single Planet Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Giant planets can clear deep gaps when embedded in 2D (razor-thin) viscous circumstellar disks. We show by direct simulation that giant planets are just as capable of carving out gaps in 3D. Surface density maps are similar between 2D and 3D, even in detail. In particular, the scaling $\\Sigma_{\\rm gap} \\propto q^{-2}$ of gap surface density with planet mass, derived from a global "zero-dimensional" balance of Lindblad and viscous torques, applies equally well to results obtained at higher dimensions. Our 3D simulations reveal extensive, near-sonic, meridional flows both inside and outside the gaps; these large-scale circulations might bear on disk compositional gradients, in dust or other chemical species. At high planet mass, gap edges are mildly Rayleigh unstable and intermittently shed streams of material into the gap - less so in 3D than in 2D.

  4. Novel wide band gap alloyed semiconductors, x(LiGaO2)1/2-(1-x)ZnO, and fabrication of their thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.; OMATA; K.; TANAKA; A.; TAZUKE; K.; NOSE; S.; OTSUKA-YAO-MATSUO

    2009-01-01

    Oxide semiconductor alloys of x(LiGaO2)1/2-(1-x)ZnO were fabricated by the solid state reaction between β-LiGaO2 and ZnO and rf-magnetron sputtering. For the solid state reaction, the wurtzite-type single phases were obtained in the composition range of x≤0.38. The formation range of the alloys was wider than that of the (Mg1-xZnx)O system, because the β-LiGaO2 possesses a wurtzite-derived structure and approximately the same lattice constants with ZnO. The electrical resistivity and energy band gap of the 0.38(LiGaO2)1/2-0.62ZnO alloyed ceramic were 0.45 Ωcm and 3.7 eV, respectively, at room temperature. For the alloying by sputtering, the films consisting of the wurtzite-type single phase were obtained over the entire composition range of x(LiGaO2)1/2-(1-x)ZnO. The energy band gap was controllable in the range from 3.3 to 5.6 eV. For the as-deposited film fabricated using the 0.4(LiGaO2)1/2- 0.6ZnO alloyed ceramic target, the energy band gap was 3.74 eV, and the electrical resistivity, carrier density and the Hall mobility at room temperature were 3.6 Ωcm, 3.4×1017 cm?3 and 5.6 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively.

  5. EnviroAtlas - Rare Ecosystems in the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset identifies rare ecosystems using base landcover data from the USGS GAP Analysis Program (Version 2, 2011) combined with landscape ecology...

  6. High Speed and Ultra-Low-Power Phase Change Line Cell Memory Based on SiSb Thin Films with Nanoscale Gap of Electrodes Less Than 100 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Shi-Long; SONG Zhi-Tang; ZHANG Ting; FENG Song-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Si16Sb84-based line cell phase change random access memory (PCRAM), in which the Si16Sb84 phase change line is contacted by TiN electrodes with a nanoscale gap, is fabricated by electron beam lithography. The lowest current and measured pulse width for RESET operation are 115μA and 18 ns, respectively. The measured shortest pulse width for recrystallization is 110ns, with applied pulse amplitude of 1.5 V. SET and RESET currents for line cells with different line lengths are determined. Endurance of 106 cycles with a resistance ratio of above 800 has been achieved.

  7. Knowledge Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Marjorie; Pedersen, Torben; Petersen, Bent

    2003-01-01

    , assimilating, and utilizing knowledge - are crucial determinants ofknowledge gap elimination. In contrast, the two factors deemed essential in traditionalinternationalization process theory - elapsed time of operations and experientiallearning - are found to have no or limited effect.Key words......: Internationalization, knowledge gap, absorptive capacity, learning box....

  8. The relationship between refractive index-energy gap and the film thickness effect on the characteristic parameters of CdSe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaltun, Yunus; Yıldırım, M. Ali; Ateş, Aytunç; Yıldırım, Muhammet

    2011-05-01

    CdSe thin films were deposited on glass substrates using Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method at room temperature and ambient pressure. The relationship between refractive index and energy bandgap was investigated. The film thickness effect on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of CdSe thin films was investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that all the films exhibit polycrystalline nature with hexagonal structure and are covered well with glass substrates. The crystalline and surface properties of the films improved with increasing film thickness. The optical absorption studies revealed that the films are found to be a direct allowed transition. The energy bandgap values were changed from 1.93 to 1.87 eV depending on the film thickness. The electron effective mass (m e*/m o), refractive index ( n), optical static and high frequency dielectric constant (ɛ o, ɛ ∞) values were calculated by using the energy bandgap values as a function of the film thickness. The resistivity of the films changed between 10 6 and 10 2 Ω-cm with increasing film thickness at room temperature.

  9. The ATLAS positive ion injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Bollinger, L.M.; Pardo, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the design, construction status, and beam tests to date of the positive ion injector (PII) which is replacing the tandem injector for the ATLAS heavy-ion facility. PII consists of an ECR ion source on a 350 KV platform injecting a very low velocity superconducting linac. The linac is composed of an independently-phased array of superconducting four-gap interdigital resonators which accelerate over a velocity range of .006 to .05c. In finished form, PII will be able to inject ions as heavy as uranium into the existing ATLAS linac. Although at the present time little more than 50% of the linac is operational, the indenpently-phased array is sufficiently flexible that ions in the lower half of the periodic table can be accelerated and injected into ATLAS. Results of recent operational experience will be discussed. 5 refs.

  10. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  11. Data Acquisition System for Quality Tests of the ATLAS Muon Endcap Trigger Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, Jasilewski; Kulesza, Z

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS The Collaboration is building a general-purpose pp detector which is design to exploit the full discovery potential of the high energy proton-proton interaction Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The LHC offers a large range of physics opportunities, among which the origin of mass at the electroweak scale is a major focus of interest for ATLAS. The detector optimization is therefore guided by physics issues such a sensitivity to the largest possible Higgs mass range. The Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) are detectors designed to detect the high transverse momentum muons in the endcaps of the ATLAS detector. The short response time of the TGCs makes it an ideal trigger system for selecting interesting events in the highly packed environment of the LHC accelerator. The TGCs are designed and built in Weizmann Institute and are tested at the Tel-Aviv University and at the Technion. The subject of this dissertation is the design and operation of the data acqusition system, which serves to automatize the proced...

  12. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  13. Gap Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  14. Mythic gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hansen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Different kinds of omissions sometimes occur, or are perceived to occur, in traditional narratives and in tradition-inspired literature. A familiar instance is when a narrator realizes that he or she does not fully remember the story that he or she has begun to tell, and so leaves out part of it, which for listeners may possibly result in an unintelligible narrative. But many instances of narrative gap are not so obvious. From straightforward, objective gaps one can distinguish less-obvious subjective gaps: in many cases narrators do not leave out anything crucial or truly relevant from their exposition, and yet readers perceive gaps and take steps to fill them. The present paper considers four examples of subjective gaps drawn from ancient Greek literature (the Pandora myth, ancient Roman literature (the Pygmalion legend, ancient Hebrew literature (the Joseph legend, and early Christian literature (the Jesus legend. I consider the quite varied ways in which interpreters expand the inherited texts of these stories, such as by devising names, manufacturing motives, creating backstories, and in general filling in biographical ellipses. Finally, I suggest an explanation for the phenomenon of subjective gaps, arguing that, despite their variety, they have a single cause.

  15. Direct spectroscopic evidence of ultrafast electron transfer from a low band gap polymer to CdSe quantum dots in hybrid photovoltaic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couderc, Elsa; Greaney, Matthew J; Brutchey, Richard L; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2013-12-11

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is used to study charge transfer dynamics in hybrid films composed of the low band gap polymer PCPDTBT and CdSe quantum dots capped with tert-butylthiol ligands. By selectively exciting the polymer, a spectral signature for electrons on the quantum dots appears on ultrafast time scales (≲ 65 fs), which indicates ultrafast electron transfer. From this time scale, the coupling between the polymer chains and the quantum dots is estimated to be J ≳ 17 meV. The reduced quantum dot acceptors exhibit an unambiguous spectral bleach signature, whose amplitude allows for the first direct calculation of the absolute electron transfer yield in a hybrid solar cell (82 ± 5%). We also show that a limitation of the hybrid system is rapid and measurable geminate recombination due to the small separation of the initial charge pair. The fast recombination is consistent with the internal quantum efficiency of the corresponding solar cell. We therefore have identified and quantified a main loss mechanism in this type of third generation solar cell.

  16. GAP Analysis Program (GAP) Raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas GAP Land Cover database depicts 43 land cover classes for the state of Kansas. The database was generated using a two-stage hybrid classification of...

  17. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  18. Structural modification and band gap engineering of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn$_{0.75}$Mg$_{0.25}$O alloy under vacuum annealing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NRIPASREE NARAYANAN; N K DEEPAK

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of vacuum annealing on the structural and optical properties of sol–gel dip-coated thin films of Zn$_{0.75}$Mg$_{0.25}$O alloy. XRD studies revealed that all these films werepolycrystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure and there was no trace of additional phases other than ZnO.With increase in annealing temperature, the samples showed preferred orientation along the c-axis, (0 0 2) plane andalso peak narrowing and peak shift towards higher angles. The calculated values of mean crystallite size increased with annealing temperature indicating the improvement in crystallinity. Heat treatment caused lattice contractionand a decrease in film thickness. The optical transmittance in the visible spectral range enhanced with increase in annealing temperature while the fundamental absorption edge in the near ultra-violet region got red-shifted with annealing. The calculated values of optical energy gap of the samples showed a decrease with heat treatment due to the improvement in crystallinity during annealing and hence the subsequent decrease in quantum size effect.

  19. Tuning the effective band gap and finding the optimal growth condition of InN thin films on GaN/sapphire substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kankat; Rathore, Jaswant Singh; Laha, Apurba

    2017-01-01

    InN thin films are grown on GaN/sapphire substrates with varying the nitrogen plasma power in plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) system. In order to evaluate the effect of nitrogen plasma power on the different properties of the InN films, several characterization viz. x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence measurement, infra-red spectroscopy and Hall measurement were performed. Two interesting phenomena observed from the measurements are described in this paper. Firstly, it is found from both the photoluminescence and infrared spectroscopy that only by varying the nitrogen plasma power (thus the III/V ratio), one can fine tune the optical absorption edge, i.e., the effective band gap of InN from ∼0.72 eV to ∼ 0.77 eV. Secondly, it is inferred that the film grown with stoichiometric condition (III/V ∼ 1) exhibits the best structural and electrical properties.

  20. Trigger Algorithms and Electronics for the ATLAS Muon New Small Wheel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Guan, Liang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The New Small Wheel Upgrade for the ATLAS experiment will replace the innermost station of the Muon Spectrometer in the forward region in order to maintain its current performance during high luminosity data-taking after the LHC Phase-I upgrade. The New Small Wheel, comprising Micromegas and small Thin Gap Chambers, will reduce the rate of fake triggers coming from backgrounds in the forward region and significantly improve the Level-1 muon trigger selectivity by providing precise on-line segment measurements with $\\sim$1 mrad angular resolution. Such demanding precision, together with the short time ($\\sim$ 1 $\\mu$s) to prepare trigger data and perform on-line reconstruction, implies very stringent requirements on the design of trigger system and trigger electronics. This paper presents an overview of the design of the New Small Wheel trigger system, trigger algorithms and processor hardware.

  1. EnviroAtlas - Ecosystem Rarity Metrics by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset identifies rare ecosystems using base landcover data from the USGS GAP Analysis Program (Version 2, 2011) combined with landscape ecology...

  2. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  3. ATLAS DBM Module Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gorisek, Andrej [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, Marko [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sokhranyi, Grygorii [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); McGoldrick, Garrin [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Cerv, Matevz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-18

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Jozef Stefan Institute, CERN, and University of Toronto who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond has a number of properties that make it attractive for high energy physics detector applications. Its large band-gap (5.5 eV) and large displacement energy (42 eV/atom) make it a material that is inherently radiation tolerant with very low leakage currents and high thermal conductivity. CVD diamond is being investigated by the RD42 Collaboration for use very close to LHC interaction regions, where the most extreme radiation conditions are found. This document builds on that work and proposes a highly spatially segmented diamond based luminosity monitor to complement the time segmented ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) so that when Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MTBS) and LUCID (LUminosity measurement using a Cherenkov Integrating Detector) have difficulty functioning the ATLAS luminosity measurement is not compromised.

  4. ATLAS DBM Module Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gorisek, Andrej [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, Marko [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sokhranyi, Grygorii [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); McGoldrick, Garrin [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Cerv, Matevz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-18

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Jozef Stefan Institute, CERN, and University of Toronto who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond has a number of properties that make it attractive for high energy physics detector applications. Its large band-gap (5.5 eV) and large displacement energy (42 eV/atom) make it a material that is inherently radiation tolerant with very low leakage currents and high thermal conductivity. CVD diamond is being investigated by the RD42 Collaboration for use very close to LHC interaction regions, where the most extreme radiation conditions are found. This document builds on that work and proposes a highly spatially segmented diamond-based luminosity monitor to complement the time-segmented ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) so that, when Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MTBS) and LUCID (LUminosity measurement using a Cherenkov Integrating Detector) have difficulty functioning, the ATLAS luminosity measurement is not compromised.

  5. ATLAS Story

    CERN Multimedia

    Nordberg, Markus

    2012-01-01

    This film produced in July 2012 explains how fundamental research connects to Society and what benefits collaborative way of working can and may generate in the future, using ATLAS Collaboration as a case study. The film is intellectually inspired by the book "Collisions and Collaboration" (OUP) by Max Boisot (ed.), see: collisionsandcollaboration.com. The film is directed by Andrew Millington (OMNI Communications)

  6. Probabilistic liver atlas construction

    OpenAIRE

    Dura, Esther; Domingo, Juan; Ayala, Guillermo; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Goceri, E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Anatomical atlases are 3D volumes or shapes representing an organ or structure of the human body. They contain either the prototypical shape of the object of interest together with other shapes representing its statistical variations (statistical atlas) or a probability map of belonging to the object (probabilistic atlas). Probabilistic atlases are mostly built with simple estimations only involving the data at each spatial location. Results A new method for probabilistic atlas con...

  7. Status of the uranium upgrade of ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Billquist, P.J.; Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Markovich, P.; Munson, F.H.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    The ATLAS Positive Ion Injector (PII) is designed to replace the tandem injector for the ATLAS heavy-ion facility. When the PII project is complete, ATLAS will be able to accelerate all ions through uranium to energies above the Coulomb barrier. PII consists of an ECR ion source on a 350 KV platform and a very low-velocity superconducting linac. The linac is composed of an independently-phased array of superconducting four-gap interdigital resonators which accelerate over a velocity range of .007c to .05c. the PII project is approximately 75% complete. Beam tests and experiments using the partially completed PII have demonstrated that the technical design goals are being met. The design, construction status, and results of recent operational experience using the PII will be discussed. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Electronics Design and Layout Complexity of the ATLAS New Small Wheels

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00529702; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrades of the LHC accelerator and the experiments in 2019/20 and 2023/24 will allow to increase the luminosity to 2×1034 cm−2s−1 and 5×1034 cm−2s−1, respectively. For the ultimate HL-LHC phase the expected mean number of interactions per bunch crossing will increase from 55 at 2×1034 cm−2s−1 to ∼140 at 5×1034 cm−2s−1. This increase, drastically impacts the ATLAS trigger and trigger rates. For the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, a replacement of the innermost endcap stations, the so called “Small Wheels” operating in a magnetic field, is therefore planned for 2019/20 to be able to maintain a low pT threshold for single muon and excellent tracking capability in the HL-LHC regime. The New Small Wheels will feature two new detector technologies, Resistive Micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers conforming a system of ~2.4 million readout channels. Both detector technologies will provide trigger and tracking primitives fully compliant with the post-2024 HL-LHC operation. To allow for ...

  9. Frontend and Backend Electronics for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Phase-I and Phase-II upgrades of the LHC accelerator will increase the LHC instantaneous luminosity to 2×1034 cm-2s-1 and 7.5×1034 cm-2s-1, respectively. The luminosity increase drastically impacts the ATLAS trigger and readout data rates. The present ATLAS small wheel muon detector will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector in 2019. The NSW will feature two new detector technologies, Resistive Micromegas (MM) and small strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) conforming a system of ~2.4 million readout channels. Both detectors will be used for muon triggering and precision tracking. A common readout path and two separate trigger paths are developed for these two detector technologies. The frontend electronics will be implemented in about 8000 boards including the design of 4 custom ASICs capable of driving trigger and tracking primitives to the backend trigger processor and readout system. The readout data flow is designed through a high-throughput network approach. The large number of readout channe...

  10. The Trigger Processor and Trigger Processor Algorithms for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lazovich, Tomo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW) is an upgrade to the ATLAS muon endcap detectors that will be installed during the next long shutdown of the LHC. Comprising both MicroMegas (MMs) and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGCs), this system will drastically improve the performance of the muon system in a high cavern background environment. The NSW trigger, in particular, will significantly reduce the rate of fake triggers coming from track segments in the endcap not originating from the interaction point. We will present an overview of the trigger, the proposed sTGC and MM trigger algorithms, and the hardware implementation of the trigger. In particular, we will discuss both the heart of the trigger, an ATCA system with FPGA-based trigger processors (using the same hardware platform for both MM and sTGC triggers), as well as the full trigger electronics chain, including dedicated cards for transmission of data via GBT optical links. Finally, we will detail the challenges of ensuring that the trigger electronics can ...

  11. Micromegas Detectors for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Michele; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas (MM) detectors will be employed for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A total surface of about 150 m2 of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer will be equipped with 8 layers of MM modules. Each module covers a surface area of approximately 2 to 3 m$^{2}$ for a total active area of 1200 m$^{2}$. Together with the small-strips Thin Gap Chambers, they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS Endcap Muon tracking system in the planned 2018/19 shutdown. This upgrade will maintain a low pt threshold for single muons and provides excellent tracking capabilities for the HL- LHC phase. The NSW project requires fully efficient MM chambers with spatial resolution down to 100 $ \\mu m$, a rate capability up to about 15 kHz/cm$^{2}$ and operation in a moderate (highly inhomogeneous) magnetic field up to B=0.3 T. The required tracking capability is provided by the intrinsic spatial resolution combined with a cha...

  12. Micromegas Detectors for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211509

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas (MM) detectors will be employed for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A total surface of about $150m^2$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer will be equipped with 8 layers of MM modules. Each module covers a surface area of approximately 2 to $3 m^2$ for a total active area of $1200 m^2$. Together with the small- strips Thin Gap Chambers, they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS Endcap Muon tracking system in the planned 2018/19 shutdown. This upgrade will mantain a low pt threshold for single muons and provides excellent tracking capabilities for the HL-LHC phase. The NSW project requires fully efficient MM chambers with spatial resolution down to $100 \\mu m$, at rate capability up to about $15kHz/cm^2$ and operation in a moderate (highly inhomogeneous) magnetic field up to B=0.3 T. The required tracking capability is provided by the intrinsic spatial resolution combined with a challengi...

  13. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lösel, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about $\\mathbf{150~m^2}$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each layer covers more than $\\mathbf{2~m^2}$ for a total active area of $\\mathbf{1200~m^2}$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15$\\mathbf{\\%}$ transverse momentum resolution for $\\mathbf{1~TeV}$ muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as $\\mathbf{30~\\mu m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\mathbf{80~\\mu m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the Micromegas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly ...

  14. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the ATLAS Upgrade of the Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Losel, Philipp Jonathan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed fo r the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about 150 m$^2$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each module extends over a surface from 2 to 3 m$^2$ for a total active area of 1200 m$^2$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resol ution for 1 TeV muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical prec ision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as 30 $\\mu$m along the precision coordi nate and 80 $\\mu$m perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the microm egas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly of modules onto the New Small Wheel. Emphasis wi...

  15. Electronics Design and System Integration of the ATLAS New Small Wheels

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrades of the LHC accelerator and the experiments in 2019/20 and 2023/24 will allow to in-crease the luminosity to 2×1034 cm−2s−1 and 5-7×1034 cm−2s−1, respectively. For the HL-LHC phase, the expected mean number of interactions per bunch crossing will be 55 at 2×1034 cm−2s−1 and ~140 at 5×1034 cm−2s−1. This increase drastically impacts the ATLAS trigger and trigger rates. For the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, a replacement of the innermost endcap stations, the so-called “Small Wheels” operating in a magnetic field, is therefore planned for 2019/20 to be able to maintain a low pT threshold for single muon and excellent tracking capability in the HL-LHC regime. The New Small Wheels will feature two new detector technologies: Resistive Micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers comprising a system of ~2.4 million readout channels. Both detector technologies will provide trigger and tracking primitives fully compliant with the post-2024 HL-LHC operation. To al-low for some safety margi...

  16. Electronics Design and Layout Complexity of the ATLAS New Small Wheels

    CERN Document Server

    Yacoob, Sahal; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The LHC resumes its operation in 2015 aiming to deliver an average luminosity of 1×10^34 cm^−2 s^−1. Further upgrades of the experiments and the accelerator in 2018/19 and 2022/23 will allow to further increase the luminosity to 2×10^34 cm^−2s^−1 and 5×10^34 cm^−2s^−1, respectively. For the ultimate HL-LHC phase the expected mean number of interactions per bunch crossing will increase from 55 at 2×10^34 cm^−2s^−1 to ∼140 at 5×10^34 cm^−2s^−1. This increase, drastically impacts the ATLAS trigger rates. For the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, a replacement of the innermost endcap stations, the so called “Small Wheels”, is therefore planned for 2018/19 to be able to maintain a low pT threshold for single muon and excellent tracking capability also in the HL-LHC regime. The New Small Wheels will feature two new detector technologies, Resistive Micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers conforming a system of ~2.4 million readout channels. Both detector technologies will provide trigger a...

  17. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the ATLAS Upgrade of the Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneau, Fabien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about 150 m2 of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each module extends over a surface from 2 to 3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as 30 μm along the precision coordinate and 80 μm perpendicular to the chamber. In the prototyping towards the final configuration two similar quadruplets with dimensions 1.2×0.5 m2 have been built with the same structure as foreseen for the NSW upgrade. It represents ...

  18. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the ATLAS Upgrade of the Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneau, Fabien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about 150 m2 of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each module extends over a surface from 2 to 3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as 30 μm along the precision coordinate and 80 μm perpendicular to the chamber. All readout planes are segmented into strips with a pitch of 400 μm for a total of 4096 strips. In two of the four planes the strips are inclined by 1.5 ◦ and provide a measurement of the...

  19. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the ATLAS Upgrade of the Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneau, Fabien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface area of about 150 m$^2$ of the forward regions (pseudo-rapidity coverage -- 1.3 $\\boldsymbol{< |\\eta| <}$ 2.7) of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each module extends over a surface from 2 to 3 m$^2$ for a total active area of 1200 m$^2$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels (NSW), which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15\\% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic position resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be $\\boldsymbol{30{\\mu}m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\boldsymbol{80{\\mu}m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. All readout planes are segmented into strips with a pitch of $\\bold...

  20. A Muon Trigger with high pT-resolution for Phase-II of the LHC Upgrade, based on the ATLAS Muon Drift Tube Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Trigger in the ATLAS end-cap region is based on Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) which have an excellent time resolution but a moderate spatial resolution. The Muon Trigger efficiency curves show that for a transverse momentum ($p_{t}$) threshold of 20 GeVc$^{-1}$ the trigger rate is mainly dominated by muons with a $p_{t}$ between 10 GeVc$^{-1}$ and 20 GeVc$^{-1}$. To cope with the expected Muon Trigger rate at HL-LHC luminosities, we propose to include the precision tracking chambers (MDT) in the Muon Trigger. According to a potential study based on ATLAS data and assuming the HL-LHC scenario, this leads to a dramatical reduction of the Muon Trigger rate below the nominal threshold. As the already existing MDT chamber read-out chain is not capable of reading out the MDT fast enough to be used for the Muon Trigger, an additional fast read-out (FRO) chain with moderate spatial resolution but low latency is necessary. To conduct fast track reconstruction and muon $p_{t}$ determination with the data acqui...

  1. Recent QCD Results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sinervo, Pekka; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has performed studies of a wide range of QCD phenomena, from soft particle to hard photon and jet production. Among recent results are the measurement of Z event shape observables sensitive to the modelling of the underlying event, and the measurement of diffractive dijet production with a large rapidity gap, which tests the interplay of soft and hard phenomena. The inelastic pp cross section, a fundamental property of the strong interaction, is measured. Precision measurements of the isolated high pT inclusive photon cross section at cms energies of 8TeV test the theoretical predictions and constrain parton density functions. An overview of these results is given.

  2. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  3. ATLAS UPGRADES

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasta, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for ...

  4. Atlases: Complex models of geospace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikonović Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Atlas is modeled contexture contents of treated thematic of space on optimal map union. Atlases are higher form of cartography. Atlases content composition of maps which are different by projection, scale, format methods, contents, usage and so. Atlases can be classified by multi criteria. Modern classification of atlases by technology of making would be on: 1. classical or traditional (printed on paper and 2. electronic (made on electronic media - computer or computer station. Electronic atlases divided in three large groups: view-only electronic atlases, 2. interactive electronic atlases and 3. analytical electronic atlases.

  5. The Read Out Controller for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Coliban, Radu Mihai; The ATLAS collaboration; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Ivanovici, Mihail; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Levinson, Lorne; Vermeulen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    In the upgrade process of the ATLAS detector, the innermost stations of the endcaps (Small Wheels, SW) will be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have two chamber technologies, one for the Level-1 trigger function (small-strip Thin Gap Chambers, sTGC) and one primarily dedicated to precision tracking (Micromegas detectors, MM). Custom front-end Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) will be used to read and filter information from both the sTGC and MM detectors. In the context of the New Small Wheel data path, we designed the Read Out Controller (ROC) ASIC for handling, preprocessing and formatting the data generated by the NSW VMM upstream chips. The ROC will concentrate the data streams from 8 VMMs, filter data based on the BCID and transmit the data to FELIX via the L1DDC. ROC is composed of 8 VMM Capture modules, a cross-bar and 4 SubROC modules. The output data is sent via 4 high-speed e-links.

  6. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  7. Report to users of ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Glagola, B. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report contains discussing in the following areas: Status of the Atlas accelerator; highlights of recent research at Atlas; concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on Atlas; program advisory committee; Atlas executive committee; and Atlas and ANL physics division on the world wide web.

  8. ATLAS Data Access Policy

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS has fully supported the principle of open access in its publication policy. This document outlines the policy of ATLAS as regards open access to data at different levels as described in the DPHEP model. The main objective is to make the data available in a usable way to people external to the ATLAS collaboration.

  9. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, OR Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  10. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Green Bay, WI Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  11. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Paterson, NJ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  12. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Austin, TX Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Phoenix, AZ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  14. [Atlas fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  15. Producing gapped-ferrite transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Improved manufacturing techniques make reproducible gaps and minimize cracking. Molded, unfired transformer cores are cut with thin saw and then fired. Hardened semicircular core sections are bonded together, placed in aluminum core box, and fluidized-coated. After winding is run over box, core is potted. Economical method significantly reduces number of rejects.

  16. ATLAS experimentet

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    Filmen innehåller mycket information om fysik och varför LHC behövs tilsammans med stora detektorer och specielt om behovet av ATLAS Experimentet. Mycket bra film för att förklara det okända- som man undersöker i CERN för att ge svar på frågor som människor har försökt förklara under flere tusen år.

  17. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Document Server

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  18. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  19. ATLAS Transition Region Upgrade at Phase-1

    CERN Document Server

    Song, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the L1 Muon trigger transition region (1.0<|ƞ|<1.3) upgrade of ATLAS Detector at phase-1. The high fake trigger rate in the Endcap region 1.0<|ƞ|<2.4 would become a serious problem for the ATLAS L1 Muon trigger system at high luminosity. For the region 1.3<|ƞ|<2.4, covered by the Small Wheel, ATLAS is enhancing the present muon trigger by adding local fake rejection and track angle measurement capabilities. To reduce the rate in the remaining ƞ interval it has been proposed a similar enhancement by adding at the edge of the inner barrel a structure of 3-layers RPCs of a new generation. These RPCs will be based on a thinner gas gap and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standards, a new high performance Front End, integrating fast TDC capabilities, and a new low profile and light mechanical structure allowing the installation in the tiny space available.This design effectively suppresses fake triggers by making the coincidence with both end-cap and interaction point...

  20. Probing the BFKL Pomeron with Future ATLAS Forward Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Trzebinski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    The Jet-Gap-Jet (JGJ) process as a way to test the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov Pomeron is introduced. The comparison with the Tevatron data as well as the predictions for the LHC are presented. In the second part, the possibility to measure the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) Jet-Gap-Jet process in the ATLAS experiment with additional AFP detectors is described. The ratio of the DPE jet-gap-jet cross section to the DPE jet cross section is presented.

  1. Diffraction and Forward Physics in ATLAS: results and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The present and future potential of ATLAS for diffraction and forward physics is presented. As recent results the rapidity gap cross section and elastic and total pp cross sections are reported. The phase 1 upgrade project AFP is presented and it is shown how it will complement the ALFA acceptance for diffractive physics in measurements taken with beta*=90m. Moreover, the AFP detector will guarantee good acceptance on diffractive events also with normal running conditions optics allowing not only to improve the ATLAS detector performances, but also being fundamental for potential discoveries (for instance, extra dimensions) in case the high luminosity program will be feasible.

  2. Diffraction and Forward Physics in ATLAS: results and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The present and future potential of ATLAS for diffraction and forward physics is presented. As recent results the rapidity gap cross section and elastic and total pp cross sections are reported. The upgrade project AFP is presented and it is shown how it will complement the ALFA acceptance for diffractive physics in measurements taken with \\(\\beta^{*}\\)=90 m LHC\\ beam optics. Moreover, the AFP detector will guarantee good acceptance on diffractive events also with normal running conditions optics allowing not only to improve the ATLAS detector performances, but also being fundamental for potential discoveries (for instance, extra dimensions) in case the high luminosity program will be feasible.

  3. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  4. Forward energy flow and diffraction at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Staroba, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    First measurements of forward energy flow and diffractive dissociation processes at ATLAS are presented. Measurements are based on 7 TeV minimum bias (7.1μb−1) and dijet (585μb−1) data samples taken during March-May 2010 in the low pileup accelerator setup. Measurement of transverse energy density as a function of pseudorapidity was performed using the full acceptance of ATLAS detectors. Stable charged particles with PT > 500 MeV and stable neutral particles with PT > 200 MeV were included. Manifestation of diffractive processes of three classes (single, double and central diffractive dissociation) was studied using inelastic differential cross section in forward rapidity gap size ΔηF bins. Experimental distributions are compared with several Monte Carlo predictions (PYTHIA6, PYTHIA8, PHOJET, HERWIG++ and EPOS) using different tunes.

  5. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R. [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  6. Towards smaller gap microbulks

    CERN Document Server

    Attié, D.; Dafni, T; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferry, S; Giomataris, Y; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Kebbiri, M; Papaevangelou, T; de Oliveira, R; Seguí, L; Tomás, A

    2014-01-01

    Small gap Micromegas detectors ( < 50 μm) are expected to be optimal for high pressure applications. Combining the microbulk manufacturing technique with a small gap can result in attractive detectors for rare event detection, in particular double beta decay or dark matter searches. We present novel results obtained with small gap microbulks (25 and 12.5 μm) that have been manufactured recently. For the first time for this type of detectors, we show experimentally that for each amplification gap there is an optimal pressure and that smaller gaps are more suitable for higher pressures.

  7. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  8. Measurement of diffractive and exclusive processes with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gach, Grzegorz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has carried out a study diffractive dijet production at 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC, i.e. events with a hadronic system containing at least two jets in addition to a large region of pseudorapidity devoid of hadronic activity. The data distributions are compared with Monte Carlo models and the rapidity gap survival probability has been estimated in the kinematic region with high diffractive contribution. Prospects for exclusive jet production studies with the forward proton tagging capability of the AFP sub-detector of ATLAS will be discussed. A first look at data taken jointly with the ATLAS and LHCf detectors in a p+Pb run will also be shown. In addition the measurement of the exclusive $\\gamma+\\gamma \\rightarrow ll$ production cross-section in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV has been carried out.

  9. Measurement of diffractive and exclusive processes with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gach Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS Collaboration has carried out a study of diffractive dijet production in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV at the LHC. The data distributions are compared with Monte Carlo models and the rapidity gap survival probability has been estimated in the kinematic region with high diffractive contribution. Prospects for exclusive jet production studies with the forward proton tagging capability of the AFP sub-detector of ATLAS are also discussed. First results based on data taken jointly with the ATLAS and the LHCf detectors in a p+Pb run will also be shown. In addition, the measurement of the cross-section for the exclusive production of di-lepton pairs in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV is discussed.

  10. Medical image segmentation using object atlas versus object cloud models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is crucial for quantitative organ analysis and surgical planning. Since interactive segmentation is not practical in a production-mode clinical setting, automatic methods based on 3D object appearance models have been proposed. Among them, approaches based on object atlas are the most actively investigated. A key drawback of these approaches is that they require a time-costly image registration process to build and deploy the atlas. Object cloud models (OCM) have been introduced to avoid registration, considerably speeding up the whole process, but they have not been compared to object atlas models (OAM). The present paper fills this gap by presenting a comparative analysis of the two approaches in the task of individually segmenting nine anatomical structures of the human body. Our results indicate that OCM achieve a statistically significant better accuracy for seven anatomical structures, in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient and Average Symmetric Surface Distance.

  11. Measurement of diffractive and exclusive processes with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has carried out a study of diffractive dijet production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV at the LHC. The data distributions are compared with Monte Carlo models and the rapidity gap survival probability has been estimated in the kinematic region with high diffractive contribution. Prospects for exclusive jet production studies with the forward proton tagging capability of the AFP sub-detector of ATLAS are also discussed. First results based on data taken jointly with the ATLAS and the LHCf detectors in a p+Pb run will also be shown. In addition, the measurement of the cross-section for the exclusive production of di-lepton pairs in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV is discussed.

  12. Micromegas detectors for the muon spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, M.

    2016-07-01

    Large area Micromegas (MM) detectors will be employed for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A total surface of about 150 m2of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer will be equipped with 8 layers of MM modules. Each module covers a surface area of approximately 2-3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2. Together with the small-strips Thin Gap Chambers, they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS Endcap Muon tracking system in the planned 2018/2019 shutdown. This upgrade will maintain a low pT threshold for single muons and provide excellent tracking capabilities for the HL-LHC phase. The New Small Wheel (NSW) project requires fully efficient MM chambers with spatial resolution down to 100 μm, at rate capability up to about 15 kHz/cm2 and operation in a moderate (highly inhomogeneous) magnetic field up to B=0.3 T. The required tracking capability is provided by the intrinsic spatial resolution combined with a challenging mechanical precision. The design, recent progress in the construction and results from the substantial R& D phase (with a focus on novel technical solutions) is presented. In the R& D phase, small and medium size single layer prototypes have been built, along with, more recently, the first two MM quadruplets in a configuration very close to the final one chosen for the NSW. Several tests have been performed on these prototypes at a high-energy test-beam at CERN, to demonstrate that the achieved performances fulfil the requirements. Recent tests applying various configuration and operating conditions are presented.

  13. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  14. ATLAS Brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  15. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  16. ATLAS brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  17. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  18. ATLAS Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  19. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  20. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  1. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  2. Searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrashova, Nataliia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new phenomena accessible by the LHC. Searches for new physics models are performed using the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The results reported here use the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  3. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  4. ATLAS brochure (Norwegian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter. Français

  5. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    La Givrine near St Cergue Cross Country Skiing and Fondue at Basse Ruche with M Nordberg, P Jenni, M Nessi, F Gianotti and Co. ATLAS Management Fondu dinner, reviewing state of play of the experiment Many fun scenes from cross country skiing and after 41 minutes of the film starts the fondue dinner in a nice chalet with many persons working for ATLAS experiment

  6. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  7. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  8. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  9. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  10. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Shots of aircraft factory where machining for ATLAS is done Shots of aircraft Work on components for ATLAS big wheel Discussions between Tikhonov and Nordberg in workshop Sequence 2 Shots of downtown Novosibirsk, including little church which is mid-point of Russian Federation Sequence 3 Interview of Yuri Tikhonov by Andrew Millington

  11. Higgs searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lafaye, R

    2002-01-01

    This proceeding is an overview of ATLAS capabilities on Higgs studies. After a short introduction on LEP and Tevatron searches on this subject, the ATLAS potential on a standard model and a supersymmetric Higgs discovery are summarized. Last, a section presents the Higgs parameters measurement that will be possible at LHC. (6 refs).

  12. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  13. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  14. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  15. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  16. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  17. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  18. Drift time measurement in the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter using cosmic muons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aad..[], G.; Dam, Mogens; Hansen, Jørgen Beck

    2010-01-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the co......The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact...

  19. Bridging the Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Monika Luniewska; Murdock, Karen; Schmidt, Iben Julie

    2015-01-01

    Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures. Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ve...

  20. Bridging the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Monika Luniewska;

    Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures.......Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures....

  1. Ellipsometric Studies on Silver Telluride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandiaraman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver telluride thin films of thickness between 45 nm and 145 nm were thermally evaporated on well cleaned glass substrates at high vacuum better than 10 – 5 mbar. Silver telluride thin films are polycrystalline with monoclinic structure was confirmed by X-ray diffractogram studies. AFM and SEM images of these films are also recorded. The phase ratio and amplitude ratio of these films were recorded in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 700 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and analysed to determine its optical band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dielectric functions. High absorption coefficient determined from the analysis of recorded spectra indicates the presence of direct band transition. The optical band gap of silver telluride thin films is thickness dependent and proportional to square of reciprocal of thickness. The dependence of optical band gap of silver telluride thin films on film thickness has been explained through quantum size effect.

  2. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  3. ATLAS Virtual Visits

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  4. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  5. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  6. Bridging a Cultural Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Talma

    2008-01-01

    There has been a broad wave of change in tertiary calculus courses in the past decade. However, the much-needed change in tertiary pre-calculus programmes--aimed at bridging the gap between high-school mathematics and tertiary mathematics--is happening at a far slower pace. Following a discussion on the nature of the gap and the objectives of a…

  7. Thickness-shear vibration of a circular cylindrical ceramic cylinder with unattached electrodes and air gaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We analyze thickness-shear vibration of an axially poled circular cylindrical tube with unattached electrodes and air gaps. Both free and electrically forced vibrations are studied. Exact solutions are obtained from the equations of linear piezoelectricity. Resonant frequencies and the impedance of the transducer are calculated from the solution. Results show that the resonant frequencies are sensitive to the dimensions of the air gaps when the gaps are thin. The impedance depends strongly on the air gaps.

  8. ATLAS gets its own luminosity detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    During the winter shutdown, the ATLAS collaboration has completed the installation of ALFA, the detector system that aims at the LHC absolute luminosity at Point 1 analysing the elastic scattering of protons at small angles.   Upper and lower ALFA Roman Pots as installed in sector 8-1 of the LHC tunnel, 240 metres from the ATLAS Interaction Point. The detectors of the ALFA system are installed at ± 240 meters from the interaction point 1, on either side of the ATLAS detector. The whole system consists of four stations, two on each side of the interaction point. Each station is equipped with two Roman Pots; each pot – that is separated from the vacuum of the accelerator by a thin window but is connected with bellows to the beam-pipe – can be moved very close to the beam. “The Roman Pot technique has been used successfully in the past for the measurement of elastic scattering very close to the circulating beam,” says Patrick Fassn...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Des Moines, IA - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Des Moines, IA EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  11. Indium gallium nitride multijunction solar cell simulation using silvaco atlas

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Baldomero

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential use of wurtzite Indium Gallium Nitride as photovoltaic material. Silvaco Atlas was used to simulate a quad-junction solar cell. Each of the junctions was made up of Indium Gallium Nitride. The band gap of each junction was dependent on the composition percentage of Indium Nitride and Gallium Nitride within Indium Gallium Nitride. The findings of this research show that Indium Gallium Nitride is a promising semiconductor for solar cell use. United...

  12. ATLAS Event - First Splash of Particles in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2008-01-01

    A simulated event. September 10, 2008 - The ATLAS detector lit up as a flood of particles traversed the detector when the beam was occasionally directed at a target near ATLAS. This allowed ATLAS physicists to study how well the various components of the detector were functioning in preparation for the forthcoming collisions. The first ATLAS data recorded on September 10, 2008 is seen here. Running time 24 seconds

  13. Estimation of the band gap of InPO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, J. F.; Wilmsen, C. W.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    1983-04-01

    The band gap of a thin layer of InPO4 was estimated to be 4.5 eV using a novel approach employing ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The technique measures the conduction-band minimum and valence-band maximum referenced to the In 4d core line energy. Since this technique is highly surface sensitive, it can be used to measure the band gap of a thin layer. This parameter is difficult to measure in such layers using conventional techniques.

  14. ATLAS Inner Detector Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a multi-purpose particle detector that will study high-energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In order to achieve its physics goals, the ATLAS tracking requires that the positions of the silicon detector elements have to be known to a precision better than 10 μm. Several track-based alignment algorithms have been developed for the Inner Detector. An extensive validation has been performed with simulated events and real data coming from the ATLAS. Results from such validation are reported in this paper.

  15. Ceremony for ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Wednesday 4 June will be a special day for CERN. The President of the Swiss Confederation, Pascal Couchepin, will officially inaugurate the huge ATLAS cavern now that the civil engineering works have ended. The inauguration ceremony will be held in the ATLAS surface building, with speeches by Pascal Couchepin and CERN, ATLAS and civil engineering personalities. This ceremony will be Webcast live. To access the Webcast on 4 June at 18h00 go to CERN Intranet home page or the following address : http://webcast.cern.ch/live.php

  16. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  17. The calculation of band gap energy in zinc oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Ali; Belahssen, Okba; Gareh, Salim; Benramache, Said

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of undoped zinc oxide thin films as the n-type semiconductor; the thin films were deposited at different precursor molarities by ultrasonic spray and spray pyrolysis techniques. The thin films were deposited at different substrate temperatures ranging between 200 and 500 °C. In this paper, we present a new approach to control the optical gap energy of ZnO thin films by concentration of the ZnO solution and substrate temperatures from experimental data, which were published in international journals. The model proposed to calculate the band gap energy with the Urbach energy was investigated. The relation between the experimental data and theoretical calculation suggests that the band gap energies are predominantly estimated by the Urbach energies, film transparency, and concentration of the ZnO solution and substrate temperatures. The measurements by these proposal models are in qualitative agreements with the experimental data; the correlation coefficient values were varied in the range 0.96-0.99999, indicating high quality representation of data based on Equation (2), so that the relative errors of all calculation are smaller than 4%. Thus, one can suppose that the undoped ZnO thin films are chemically purer and have many fewer defects and less disorder owing to an almost complete chemical decomposition and contained higher optical band gap energy.

  18. Filling the Income Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Income distribution has become one of the people's main concerns in China where more than 30years of reform and opening up have also resulted in an ever-expanding wealth gap.But narrowing down the rich-poor disparity will prove to be no easy task.Wei Zhong,a researcher with the Institute of Economics under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences,elaborated on the origins and trends of China's widening income gap,and discussed solutions to curb the gap,in a recent article.Edited excerpts follow:

  19. Small-Gap Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    34’OF CALIFORNIA# BERKELEY, CA 5.1720 ft (45 642-141 SMALL- GAP FLOWS BY E. 0. TUCK REPORT No. NAUE 84-1 CONTRACT N00014-84-K-OU26 APRIL i984...Mechanics, 41 (1970) 769-792. 11 3. Shallow-Water Waves at Discontinuities Shallow-water waves represent perhaps the prototype small- gap flow , the...solving (4.4) we need "initial" conditions at the starting station z = 0, and "exit" conditions at the station z = L where the gap flow merges with the

  20. Modelling Gender Pay Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARYIntroductionThere has been little change in the full-time gender pay gap since the mid 1990s andin the female part-time/male full-time pay gap since the mid 1970s. The gender gapin hourly earnings for those employed full-time in Britain in 2003 was 18 per cent,while that between women working part-time and men working full-time was 40 percent.This research uses statistical methods to identify how much of the gender pay gap isassociated with different factors. The data set ana...

  1. Atlas Skills for Learning Rather than Learning Atlas Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, R. J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model for visual learning and describes an approach to skills instruction which aids students in using atlases. Maintains that teachers must help students see atlases as tools capable of providing useful information rather than experiencing atlas learning as an empty exercise with little relevance to their lives. (JDH)

  2. Trigger and readout electronics for the Phase-I upgrade of the ATLAS forward muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Moschovakos, Paris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrades of the LHC accelerator and the experiments in 2019/20 and 2023/24 will increase the instantaneous and integrated luminosity, but also will drastically increase the data and trigger rates. To cope with the huge data flow while maintaining high muon detection efficiency and reducing fake muons found at Level-1, the present ATLAS small wheel muon detector will be replaced with a New Small Wheel (NSW) detector for high luminosity LHC runs. The NSW will feature two new detector technologies: resistive micromegas and small strip Thin Gap Chambers conforming a system of ~2.4 million readout channels. Both detector technologies will provide trigger and tracking primitives. A common readout path and a separate trigger path are developed for each detector technology. The electronics design of such a system will be implemented in about 8000 front-end boards, including the design of a number of custom radiation tolerant Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), capable of driving trigger and tracking...

  3. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas (Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors have proven along the years to be a reliable high rate capable detector technology characterised by an excellent spatial resolution. The ATLAS collaboration at LHC has chosen the resistive Micromegas technology (mainly for tracking), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC, mainly for triggering), for the high luminosity upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. The NSW requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers with spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$ independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field ($B<0.3\\,\\mathrm{T}$), with a rate capability up to $\\sim10\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$. Moreover, together with the precise tracking capability the Micromegas chambers should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small ($10\\times10\\,\\...

  4. Study of the performance of the MicroMegas chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Micromegas is one of the detector technologies (along with the TGC Thin Gap Chambers) that has been chosen for precision tracking and trigger capabilities for the upgrade of the forw ard muon detectors of the ATLAS experiment, covering an area of more than 1200 m2. The chambers have been designed to allow operation in a high rate environment, to guarantee a resolution below 100μm per point on a large area and to provide a fast trigger signal. In the last months several tests have been done on small area prototypes in order to verify that the requirements on resolution and rate capabilities are well matched. In parallel, a particular effort has been devoted to develop construction procedures for large area chambers able to guarantee the required precision properties. We present the results of the performance studies done on beams at CERN and in other laboratories. Track reconstruction is performed using the charge centroid and the μ TPC method. Results include space and angular resolution for perpendicular a...

  5. Trigger Data Serializer ASIC chip for the ATLAS New Small Wheel sTGC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jinhong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The small-strip Thin-Gap Chambers (sTGC) will be used as both trigger and precision tracking muon detectors for the Phase-I upgrade of the ATLAS New Small Wheel (NSW) muon detector. Signals from both the sTGC pad and strip detectors will be first read out by the Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator (ASD) chip designed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and then collected and transmitted by a Trigger Data Serializer (TDS) chip at a rate of 4.8 Gbps to other related circuits. The pad-TDS chip checks the presence of pad hits and sends the information together with Bunching Crossing ID to the pad-trigger logic to define roads of interest. The strip-TDS chip collects and buffers strip charge information and transmits a range of strips within the road of interest to the router board located on the rim of the NSW. The large number of input channels (128 differential input channels), short time available to prepare and transmit trigger data (<100 ns), high speed output data rate (4.8 Gbps), harsh radiation environme...

  6. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas (Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors have proven along the years to be a reliable high rate capable detector techno- logy characterised by an excellent spatial resolution. The ATLAS colla- boration at LHC has chosen the resistive Micromegas technology (mainly for tracking), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC, mainly for triggering), for the high luminosity upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. The NSW requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers with spatial resolution better than 100μm independent of the track inci- dence angle and the magnetic field (B < 0.3 T), with a rate capability up to ∼ 10kHz/cm2. Along with the precise tracking the Micromegas chambers should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small (10×10cm2) and medium size (1×0.5m2) resistive Micromegas chambers (b...

  7. Resistive Micromegas for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iodice, Mauro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Large size resistive Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The current innermost stations of the muon endcap system, the Small Wheel, will be upgraded in 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) the “New Small Wheel” will be equipped with eight layers of Micromegas (MM) detectors arranged in multilayers of two quadruplets, for a total of about 1200 m$^2$ detection planes. All quadruplets have trapezoidal shapes with surface areas between 2 and 3 m$^2$. The Micromegas system will provide both trigger and tracking capabilities. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, a challenging mechanical precision is required in the construction for each plane of the assembled modules, with an alig...

  8. Resistive Micromegas for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iodice, Mauro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Large size resistive micromegas detectors (MM) will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The current innermost stations of the muon endcap system, the Small Wheel, will be upgraded in 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) the ``New Small Wheel'' will be equipped with eight layers of MM detectors arranged in multilayers of two quadruplets, for a total of about 1200 m$^2$ detection planes. All quadruplets have trapezoidal shapes with surface areas between 2 and 3 m$^2$. The MM system will provide both trigger and tracking capabilities. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, a challenging mechanical precision is required in the construction for each plane of the assembled modules, with an alignment of the reado...

  9. Recent results from ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Sergei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in 2015 with a pp centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV and ATLAS has taken more than 20 fb-1 of data at the new energy by 2016 summer. In this talk, an overview is given on the ATLAS data taking and the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment during the 2-year shutdown 2013/2014. Selected new results from the recent data analysis from ATLAS is also presented.

  10. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: June ATLAS Plenary Meeting Tutorial on Physics EDM and Tools (June) Freiburg Overview Week Ketevi Assamagan's Tutorial on Analysis Tools Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  11. ATLAS results on diffraction and exclusive production

    CERN Document Server

    Tasevsky, Marek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has carried out a study of diffractive dijet production at 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC, i.e. events with a hadronic system containing at least two jets in addition to a large region of pseudorapidity devoid of hadronic activity. The data distributions are compared with Monte Carlo models and the rapidity gap survival probability has been estimated in the kinematic region with high diffractive contribution. In the absence of forward proton tagging, exclusive processes can be distinguished in the central part of the ATLAS detector exploiting the large rapidity gap in the central region and the absence of charged particles reconstructed in the inner tracking detector. This strategy has been exploited to study the exclusive production of dilepton pairs in the data taken at centreofmass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The 7 TeV study concentrates on a precision measurement of the dielectron and dimuon process, while the 8 TeV measurement explores the exclusive production of WW pairs in the elec...

  12. Filling the Income Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Income distribution has become one of the people’s main concerns in China where more than 30 years of reform and opening up have also resulted in an ever-expanding wealth gap. But narrowing down the

  13. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1999-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. The film has original working sound.

  14. Vermont Natural Resources Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The purpose of the Natural Resources Atlas is to provide geographic information about environmental features and sites that the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources...

  15. Higgs measurements with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The final Run 1 and first Run 2 results with the ATLAS detector on the measurement of the cross sections, couplings and properties of the Higgs boson in individual final states and their combination are presented.

  16. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN, Building 40 Interview with theorist Mr. Philip Hinchliffe (Berkeley) as well an interview with his wife Mrs. Hinchliffe who is also Physics Department head at Berkeley. They are both working in ATLAS Experiment.

  17. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  18. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  19. The Latest from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Since November 2008, ATLAS has undertaken detailed maintenance, consolidation and repair work on the detector (see Bulletin of 20 July 2009). Today, the fraction of the detector that is operational has increased compared to last year: less than 1% of dead channels for most of the sub-systems. "We are going to start taking data this year with a detector which is even more efficient than it was last year," agrees ATLAS Spokesperson, Fabiola Gianotti. By mid-September the detector was fully closed again, and the cavern sealed. The magnet system has been operated at nominal current for extensive periods over recent months. Once the cavern was sealed, ATLAS began two weeks of combined running. Right now, subsystems are joining the run incrementally until the point where the whole detector is integrated and running as one. In the words of ATLAS Technical Coordinator, Marzio Nessi: "Now we really start physics." In parallel, the analysis ...

  20. ATLAS Cavern baseplate

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This video shows the incredible amounth of iron used for ATLAS cavern. Please look at the related links and also videos that are concerning the civil engineering where you can see even more detailed cavern excavation work.

  1. ATLAS DAQ Configuration Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.Alexandrov; A.Amorim; 等

    2001-01-01

    The configuration databases are an important part of the Trigger/DAQ system of the future ATLAS experiment .This paper describes their current status giving details of architecture,implementation,test results and plans for future work.

  2. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    ATLAS Physics Workshop at the University of Roma Tre held from Monday 06 June 2005 to Saturday 11 June 2005. Experts establishing workshop, poster, people milling Shots of Peter Jenni introduction Many audience shots Sequences from various talks

  3. Budker INP in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Novosibirsk group has proposed a new design for the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter with a constant thickness of absorber plates. This design has signifi- cant advantages compared to one in the Technical Proposal and it has been accepted by the ATLAS Collaboration. The Novosibirsk group is responsible for the fabrication of the precision aluminium structure for the e.m.end-cap calorimeter.

  4. The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Michel Mathieu, a technician for the ATLAS collaboration, is cabling the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter's first end-cap, before insertion into its cryostat. Millions of wires are connected to the electromagnetic calorimeter on this end-cap that must be carefully fed out from the detector so that data can be read out. Every element on the detector will be attached to one of these wires so that a full digital map of the end-cap can be recreated.

  5. ATLAS physics results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074312

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been successfully taking data since the end of 2009 in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and in heavy ion collisions. In these lectures, some of the most recent ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results.

  6. ATLAS Transitional Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the transitional radiation tracker within the ATLAS detector. Subjects covered include what the tracker is used to measure, its structure, what happens when particles pass through the tracker, how it distinguishes between different types of particles within it.

  7. ATLAS construction status

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, P

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is being constructed at the LHC, in view of a data-taking start-up in 2007. This report concentrates on the progress and the technical challenges of the detector construction, and summarizes the status of the work as of August 2004. The project is on track to allow the highly motivated ATLAS collaboration to enter into a new exploratory domain of high-energy physics in 2007.

  8. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Cleveland, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Austin, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  10. EnviroAtlas Community Boundaries Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundaries of all EnviroAtlas Communities. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in each EnviroAtlas...

  11. Microwave resonant activation in hybrid single-gap/two-gap Josephson tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabello, Steven; Lambert, Joseph G.; Mlack, Jerome; Dai, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Chen, Ke; Cunnane, Daniel; Xi, X. X.; Ramos, Roberto C.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave resonant activation is a powerful, straightforward technique to study classical and quantum systems, experimentally realized in Josephson junction devices cooled to very low temperatures. These devices typically consist of two single-gap superconductors separated by a weak link. We report the results of the first resonant activation experiments on hybrid thin film Josephson junctions consisting of a multi-gap superconductor (MgB2) and a single-gap superconductor (Pb or Sn). We can interpret the plasma frequency in terms of theories both for conventional and hybrid junctions. Using these models, we determine the junction parameters including critical current, resistance, and capacitance and find moderately high quality factors of Q0˜ 100 for these junctions.

  12. Missing the gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene; Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    creative learning at the borders need not minimize differences, but handle and learn from them? If not, schools and educational institutions risk becoming bad copies of the labour marked instead of enabling students to enter the market with something new, something radically dissimilar from what......Missing the gap This paper is focused on an exploration of creative learning involved in boundary crossing (Tanggaard, 2007). Our aim is to explore the trajectories and pathways realised by students as they move from education to work and vice versa (Tanggaard & Beghetto, 2015), guided...... by the premise that difference and gaps are places where creative learning is intensified (Glaveanu & Gillespie, 2015). The public discourse around education is often concerned with minding or avoiding the gap by making education more relevant for or similar to the labour market, but what if facilitating...

  13. Gap Cycling for SWIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Corum, Curtis A; Snyder, Carl J; Garwood, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) is a non- Cartesian MRI method with unique features and capabilities. In SWIFT, radiofrequency (RF) excitation and reception are performed nearly simultaneously, by rapidly switching between transmit and receive during a frequency-swept RF pulse. Because both the transmitted pulse and data acquisition are simultaneously amplitude-modulated in SWIFT (in contrast to continuous RF excitation and uninterrupted data acquisition in more familiar MRI sequences), crosstalk between different frequency bands occurs in the data. This crosstalk leads to a "bulls-eye" artifact in SWIFT images. We present a method to cancel this inter-band crosstalk by cycling the pulse and receive gap positions relative to the un-gapped pulse shape. We call this strategy "gap cycling." Methods: We carry out theoretical analysis, simulation and experiments to characterize the signal chain, resulting artifacts, and their elimination for SWIFT. Results: Theoretical analysis reveals t...

  14. Semantic Gaps Are Dangerous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Michael; le Fevre Jakobsen, Bjarne

    Semantic gaps are dangerous Language adapts to the environment where it serves as a tool to communication. Language is a social agreement, and we all have to stick to both grammaticalized and non-grammaticalized rules in order to pass information about the world around us. As such language develops...... unpolite language and tend to create dangerous relations where specialy language creates problems and trouble that could be avoided if we had better language tools at hand. But we have not these tools of communication, and we are in a situation today where media and specially digital and social media......, supported by new possibilities of migration, create dangerous situations. How can we avoid these accidental gaps in language and specially the gaps in semantic and metaphoric tools. Do we have to keep silent and stop discusing certain isues, or do we have other ways to get acces to sufficient language tools...

  15. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Document Server

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  16. The longevity gender gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aviv, Abraham; Shay, Jerry; Christensen, Kaare

    2005-01-01

    In this Perspective, we focus on the greater longevity of women as compared with men. We propose that, like aging itself, the longevity gender gap is exceedingly complex and argue that it may arise from sex-related hormonal differences and from somatic cell selection that favors cells more...... resistant to the ravages of time. We discuss the interplay of these factors with telomere biology and oxidative stress and suggest that an explanation for the longevity gender gap may arise from a better understanding of the differences in telomere dynamics between men and women....

  17. 'Mind the Gap!'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Karl Gunnar

    This paper challenges the widely held view that sharply falling real transport costs closed the transatlantic gap in grain prices in the second half of the 19th century. Several new results emerge from an analysis of a new data set of weekly wheat prices and freight costs from New York to UK mark...

  18. Bridging the Technological Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazow, Robert; And Others

    The aim of "Bridging the Technological Gap" (BTG), a federally funded demonstration project, is to use microcomputer technology in the rehabilitation of the psychiatrically disabled. Through the use of a custom designed microcomputer software package, clients receive remediation in areas of specific cognitive and behavioral deficits. The project…

  19. Closing the Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China's recent economic success has brought positive changes to its urban population,but left those in the countryside way behind.The gap in income and living standrs that always existed between urban and rural dwellers has widened alarmingly in the past two decades,causing serious problems.

  20. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  1. Structuring the Information Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Julian

    1984-01-01

    Describes an information gap procedure to teach a new structure which requires students to look for and exchange information in order to complete a task in an English as a second language class. Illustrates the method with a set of materials and suggests ways for teachers to produce similar materials. (SED)

  2. ATLAS Review Office

    CERN Multimedia

    Szeless, B

    The ATLAS internal reviews, be it the mandatory Production Readiness Reviews, the now newly installed Production Advancement Reviews, or the more and more requested different Design Reviews, have become a part of our ATLAS culture over the past years. The Activity Systems Status Overviews are, for the time being, a one in time event and should be held for each system as soon as possible to have some meaning. There seems to a consensus that the reviews have become a useful project tool for the ATLAS management but even more so for the sub-systems themselves making achievements as well as possible shortcomings visible. One other recognized byproduct is the increasing cross talk between the systems, a very important ingredient to make profit all the systems from the large collective knowledge we dispose of in ATLAS. In the last two months, the first two PARs were organized for the MDT End Caps and the TRT Barrel Modules, both part of the US contribution to the ATLAS Project. Furthermore several different design...

  3. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  4. OCCIPITALIZATION OF ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sween Walia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Occipitalization of atlas is an osseous anomaly of the craniovertebral junction which occurs at the base of the skull in the region of the foramen magnum. The knowledge of such a fusion is important because skeletal abnormalities at the craniocervical junction may result in sudden death. During bone cleaning procedure and routine undergraduate osteology teaching, three skulls with Occipitalization of atlas were encountered in the department of Anatomy at MMIMSR, Mullana, India. In one skull, both anterior and posterior arch were completely fused with occipital bone while the transverse process on the right side was not fused whereas left transverse process was fused with occipital bone. Both anterior and posterior arch were completely fused whereas transverse process on both sides were not fused in other skull. In another skull, partial and asymmetrical Occipitalization of atlas vertebra with occipital bone was found with bifid posterior arch of atlas at the level of posterior tubercle. Anterior arch was completely fused with basilar part of occipital bone but both the transverse processes were not fused. Reduced diameter of foramen magnum due to the atlanto-occipital fusion might cause neurological complications due to compression of spinal cord or medulla oblongata, vertebral vessels, 1st cervical nerve, thus, knowledge of occipitalization of the atlas may be of substantial importance to orthopaedicians, neurosurgeons, physicians and radiologists dealing with abnormalities of the cervical spine.

  5. Distributed analysis in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Legger, Federica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment accumulated more than 140 PB of data during the first run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The analysis of such an amount of data for the distributed physics community is a challenging task. The Distributed Analysis (DA) system of the ATLAS experiment is an established and stable component of the ATLAS distributed computing operations. About half a million user jobs are daily running on DA resources, submitted by more than 1500 ATLAS physicists. The reliability of the DA system during the first run of the LHC and the following shutdown period has been high thanks to the continuous automatic validation of the distributed analysis sites and the user support provided by a dedicated team of expert shifters. During the LHC shutdown, the ATLAS computing model has undergone several changes to improve the analysis workflows, including the re-design of the production system, a new analysis data format and event model, and the development of common reduction and analysis frameworks. We r...

  6. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, O; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Alexandre, G; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bee, C; Behera, P; Bell, P; Bendel, M; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I, P; Brelier, B; Brooks, W; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Casadei, D; Casado, P; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; De Santo, A; Degenhardt, J; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Diaz, M; Djilkibaev, R; Dobson, E; Dova, M, T; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Faulkner, P J W; Ferland, J; Flacher, H; Fleckner, J E; Flowerdew, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Fratina, S; Fhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Gallacher, M P; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gee, C N P; George, S; Gillman, A R; Goncalo, R; Grabowska-Bold, I; Groll, M; Gringer, C; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hauser, R; Hellman, S; Hidvgi, A; Hillier, S J; Hryn'ova, T; Idarraga, J; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Kalinowski, A; Khoriauli, G; Kirk, J; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Koeneke, K; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kwee, R; Landon, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit, F; Lei, X; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Losada, M; Maettig, S; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Maltrana, D; Marino, C; Masik, J; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Mincer, A; Moa, T; Monticelli, F; Moreno, D; Morris, J D; Mller, F; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nemethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Oltmann, B; Olvito, D; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Parodi, F; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Perez Reale, V; Petersen, B; Pinzon, G; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Prokishin, F; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reinsch, A; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Rodriguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Rhr, F; Saavedra, A; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina Rios, C; Scannicchio, D; Schiavi, C; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schfer, U; Segura, E; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S; Sivoklokov, S; Sjlin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strom, D; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Torrence, E; Tripiana, M; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Vachon, B; Vercesi, V; Vorwerk, V; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Weidberg, T; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Whiteson, D; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wildt, M; Winklmeier, F; Wu, X; Xella, S; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; de Seixas, J M; dos Anjos, A; Asman, B; Özcan, E

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 105 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  7. ATLAS production system

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Klimentov, Alexei; Golubkov, Dmitry; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Wenaus, Torre; Padolski, Siarhei

    2016-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS production system called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager which used by thousands of physicists to analyze the data remotely, with the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, across a more than hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based on many criterias, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kind of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteering computers. Besides jobs definition Production System also includes flexible web user interface, which implements user-friendly environment for main ATLAS workflows, e.g. simple way of combining different data flows, and real-time monitoring, optimised for using with huge amount of information to present. We present an overview of the ATLAS Production System major components: job and task definition, workflow manager web user i...

  8. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Showing excellence in mechanics, electronics and cryogenics, three industries are honoured for their contributions to the ATLAS experiment. Representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony. For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Close interaction with CERN was a key factor in the selection of each rewarded company, in addition to the high-quality products they delivered to the experiment. Alu Menziken Industrie AG, of Switzerland, was honoured for the production of 380,000 aluminium tubes for the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). As Giora Mikenberg, the Muon System Project Leader stressed, the aluminium tubes were delivered on time with an extraordinary quality and precision. Between October 2000 and Jan...

  9. Two ATLAS suppliers honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recognised the outstanding contribution of two firms to the pixel detector. Recipients of the supplier award with Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, and Maximilian Metzger, CERN Secretary-General.At a ceremony held at CERN on 28 November, the ATLAS collaboration presented awards to two of its suppliers that had produced sensor wafers for the pixel detector. The CiS Institut für Mikrosensorik of Erfurt in Germany has supplied 655 sensor wafers containing a total of 1652 sensor tiles and the firm ON Semiconductor has supplied 515 sensor wafers (1177 sensor tiles) from its foundry at Roznov in the Czech Republic. Both firms have successfully met the very demanding requirements. ATLAS’s huge pixel detector is very complicated, requiring expertise in highly specialised integrated microelectronics and precision mechanics. Pixel detector project leader Kevin Einsweiler admits that when the project was first propo...

  10. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  11. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration:

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Christopher Jon; The ATLAS collaboration; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Ballestrero, Sergio; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Voronkov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of ̃3000 servers, processing the data readout from ̃100 million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. During the data taking only critical security updates are applied and broken hardware is replaced to ensure a stable operational environment. The LS1 provided an excellent opportunity to look into new technologies and applications that would help to improve and streamline the daily tasks of not only the System Administrators, but also of the scientists who wil...

  12. How empty are disk gaps opened by giant planets?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Jeffrey [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Shi, Ji-Ming; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: fung@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    Gap clearing by giant planets has been proposed to explain the optically thin cavities observed in many protoplanetary disks. How much material remains in the gap determines not only how detectable young planets are in their birth environments, but also how strong co-rotation torques are, which impacts how planets can survive fast orbital migration. We determine numerically how the average surface density inside the gap, Σ{sub gap}, depends on planet-to-star mass ratio q, Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter α, and disk height-to-radius aspect ratio h/r. Our results are derived from our new graphics processing unit accelerated Lagrangian hydrodynamical code PEnGUIn and are verified by independent simulations with ZEUS90. For Jupiter-like planets, we find Σ{sub gap}∝q {sup –2.2}α{sup 1.4}(h/r){sup 6.6}, and for near brown dwarf masses, Σ{sub gap}∝q {sup –1}α{sup 1.3}(h/r){sup 6.1}. Surface density contrasts inside and outside gaps can be as large as 10{sup 4}, even when the planet does not accrete. We derive a simple analytic scaling, Σ{sub gap}∝q {sup –2}α{sup 1}(h/r){sup 5}, that compares reasonably well to empirical results, especially at low Neptune-like masses, and use discrepancies to highlight areas for progress.

  13. Augmenting atlas-based liver segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning by incorporating image features proximal to the atlas contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Chen, Jinhu; Li, Hongsheng; Yin, Yong; Ibragimov, Bulat; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Atlas-based segmentation utilizes a library of previously delineated contours of similar cases to facilitate automatic segmentation. The problem, however, remains challenging because of limited information carried by the contours in the library. In this studying, we developed a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. This study presented a new concept of atlas based segmentation method. Instead of using the complete volume of the target organs, only information along the organ contours from the atlas images was used for guiding segmentation of the new image. In setting up an atlas-based library, we included not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. In this work, 139 CT images with normal appearing livers collected for radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were first registered to each other using affine registration. The nonlinear narrow shell was generated alongside the object contours of registered images. Matching voxels were selected inside common narrow shell image features of a library case and a new case using a speed-up robust features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the new image by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy optimization within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by physicians. A novel atlas-based segmentation technique with inclusion of neighborhood image features through the introduction of a narrow-shell surrounding the target objects was established. Application of the technique to

  14. Local atlas selection for discrete multi-atlas segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Alchatzidis, Stavros; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Paragios, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Multi-atlas segmentation is commonly performed in two separate steps: i) multiple pairwise registrations, and ii) fusion of the deformed segmentation masks towards labeling objects of interest. In this paper we propose an approach for integrated volume segmentation through multi-atlas registration. To tackle this problem, we opt for a graphical model where registration and segmentation nodes are coupled. The aim is to recover simultaneously all atlas deformations along...

  15. Thin book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    En lille bog om teater og organisationer, med bidrag fra 19 teoretikere og praktikere, der deltog i en "Thin Book Summit" i Danmark i 2005. Bogen bidrager med en state-of-the-art antologi om forskellige former for samarbejde imellem teater og organisationer. Bogen fokuserer både på muligheder og...

  16. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adorisio, Cristina; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmed, Hossain; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov , Andrei; Aktas, Adil; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Antunovic, Bijana; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Arutinov, David; Asai, Makoto; Asai, Shoji; Silva, José; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asner, David; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Mark; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Baranov, Sergey; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Bazalova, Magdalena; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Becerici, Neslihan; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Graham; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Ayda; Beddall, Andrew; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benincasa, Gianpaolo; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bocci, Andrea; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodet, Eyal; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, Françcois; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Byatt, Tom; Caballero, Jose; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D.; Carron Montero, Sebastian; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Tcherniatine, Valeri; Chesneanu, Daniela; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Citterio, Mauro; Clark, Allan G.; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H.; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cranshaw, Jack; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Daly, Colin; Dam, Mogens; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawson, Ian; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De Mora, Lee; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Deng, Wensheng; Denisov, Sergey; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen , Michael; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Dushkin, Andrei; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Egorov, Kirill; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ermoline, Iouri; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Fayard, Louis; Fayette, Florent; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; Freestone, Julian; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, K K; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gautard, Valerie; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; Georgatos, Fotios; George, Simon; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Girtler, Peter; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goggi, Virginio; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçcalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gong, Chenwei; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Green, Barry; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Groh, Manfred; Groll, Marius; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Härtel, Roland; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansl-Kozanecka, Traudl; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hashemi, Kevan; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Hemperek, Tomasz; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Hori, Takuya; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howe, Travis; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issakov, Vladimir; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kalinowski, Artur; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karagoz, Muge; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kastoryano, Michael; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kayumov, Fred; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kind, Oliver; Kind, Peter; King, Barry; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Klute, Markus; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kolos, Serguei; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konovalov, Serguei; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostka, Peter; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotov, Konstantin; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Henri; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurchaninov, Leonid; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kwee, Regina; La Rotonda, Laura; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lane, Jenna; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; Le Vine, Micheal; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Leyton, Michael; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shumin; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lilley, Joseph; Lim, Heuijin; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Tiankuan; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Lovas, Lubomir; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Luehring, Frederick; Luisa, Luca; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahmood, A.; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makouski, Mikhail; Makovec, Nikola; Malecki, Piotr; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mambelli, Marco; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March , Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Alex; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martini, Agnese; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W. Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Mills, Bill; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Misawa, Shigeki; Miscetti, Stefano; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mladenov, Dimitar; Moa, Torbjoern; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Garcia, Raul; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nderitu, Simon Kirichu; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Notz, Dieter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver, John; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Ottersbach, John; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozone, Kenji; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Park, Su-Jung; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parker, Sherwood; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor , Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Patwa, Abid; Pauly, Thilo; Peak, Lawrence; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poffenberger, Paul; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Ponsot, Patrick; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Popule, Jiri; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potekhin, Maxim; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Potter, Keith; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puigdengoles, Carles; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qi, Ming; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Weiming; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renkel, Peter; Rescia, Sergio; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richards, Ronald; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Roa Romero, Diego Alejandro; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryan, Patrick; Rybkin, Grigori; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sanny, Bernd; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Savard, Pierre; Savine, Alexandre; Savinov, Vladimir; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R.~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schreiner, Alexander; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schroers, Marcel; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Sluka, Tomas; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yuri; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soluk, Richard; Sondericker, John; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spencer, Edwin; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stancu, Stefan Nicolae; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stastny, Jan; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Su, Dong; Soh, Dart-yin; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Takuya; Suzuki, Yu; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szymocha, Tadeusz; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Ryan P.; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Stan; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thomson, Evelyn; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomasek, Lukas; Tomasek, Michal; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuggle, Joseph; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasilyeva, Lidia; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Villa, Mauro; Villani, Giulio; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale , Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vudragovic, Dusan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Peter; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jin; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Wastie, Roy; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Marc; Weber, Manuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Dennis; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xu, Da; Xu, Neng; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zambrano, Valentina; Zanello, Lucia; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Qizhi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  17. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  18. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karsten Köneke; on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is recording data from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV since the spring of 2010. The integrated luminosity has grown nearly exponentially since then and continues to rise fast. The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking). Hints of potentially interesting physics signals obtained this way are followed up by physics groups.

  19. ATLAS SCT Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Limper, Maaike

    2007-01-01

    The Barrel and End-Cap SCT detectors are installed in the ATLAS cavern. This paper will focus on the assembly, installation and first tests of the SCT in-situ. The thermal, electrical and optical services were tested and the results will be reviewed. Problems with the cooling have led to a modification for the heaters on the cooling return lines. The first tests of the SCT in-situ will be described using the calibration scans. The performance of the SCT, in particular the fraction of working channels and the noise performance, is well within the ATLAS specification.

  20. The Herschel ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; Negrello, M.; Serjeant, S.; Thompson, M. A.; Van Kampen, E.; Amblard, A.; Andreani, P.; Baes, M.; Beelen, A.; Bendo, G. J.; Bertoldi, F.; Benford, D.; Bock, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  1. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. 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R.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Meng, Z.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A. M.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miao, J.; Michal, S.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C. M.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morais, A.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morii, M.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, J. D.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nakatsuka, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nožička, M.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliveira Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Park, S. J.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S. I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L. S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M. S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X. H.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  2. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CAMERA ON TOROID The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The video is about the slow lowering of the toroid down to the cavern of ATLAS. It is very demanding task. The camera is placed on top of the toroid.

  3. ATLAS/CMS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00370685; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Precision studies of the Standard Model (SM) and the searches of the physics beyond the SM are ongoing at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A luminosity upgrade of LHC is planned, which provides a significant challenge for the experiments. In this report, the plans of the ATLAS and CMS upgrades are introduced. Physics prospects for selected topics, including Higgs coupling measurements, Bs,d -> mumu decays, and top quark decays through flavor changing neutral current, are also shown.

  4. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  5. Optimized grid design for thin film solar panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Klerk, L.; Barink, M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a gap in efficiency between record thin film cells and mass produced thin film solar panels. In this paper we quantify the effect of monolithic integration on power output for various configurations by modeling and present metallization as a way to improve efficiency of solar panels. Grid d

  6. Small Generation Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANE SHAW

    1994-01-01

    IT was while I was making milk for my son that I discovered the generation gap between us. A little thing of two years and three months, my son stood on a big chair I brought him and joined me to make milk. Holding a small spoon in his plump little hand, he scooped flour out of a jar and poured it into the feeding bottle and then scooped milk powder and

  7. Minding the Gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Millicent Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  8. Thin-Film Evaporative Cooling for Side-Pumped Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method are provided for cooling a crystal rod of a side-pumped laser. A transparent housing receives the crystal rod therethrough so that an annular gap is defined between the housing and the radial surface of the crystal rod. A fluid coolant is injected into the annular gap such the annular gap is partially filled with the fluid coolant while the radial surface of the crystal rod is wetted as a thin film all along the axial length thereof.

  9. Results and Perspectives in Forward Physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Giacobbe, Benedetto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A review of the ATLAS forward physics results is given with particular emphasis on the aspects of relevance for the cosmic rays community. These include proton-proton cross section measurements at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$~TeV, diffractive physics studies using rapidity gaps, measurements of energy flow as a function of pseudorapidity, and the first cross section measurement performed in the recently started Run 2 at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$~TeV. The ATLAS future perspectives will also be discussed, focused on the phase 1 upgrade project AFP, underlying its complementarity with the existing ALFA detector in terms of acceptance for diffractive processes, and its potential for a wide forward physics program both at low and high luminosity.

  10. QCD and Diffraction in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kepka, Oldrich; Kupco, A

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to study the hard diffractive and exclusive events at the experiment ATLAS. Right after the start-up of a new proton accelerator LHC in CERN they will be identified using the rapidity gap method. We therefore developed an alternative definition of the observed energy in the ATLAS calorimeter to identify diffractive and exclusive events. During the high luminosity operation of the accelerator, forward detectors (AFP) recently proposed to be installed far from the interaction point approaching the beam at few millimeters will allow to tag the intact scattered protons in these events unambiguously. The simplest exclusive production is due to the exchange of two photons. We implemented two-photon exchanges in FPMC generator and analyzed the two-photon production of $W$ and $Z$-pairs decaying leptonically to calculate sensitivities on triple and quartic anomalous gauge couplings of electroweak boson to photons. The obtained results are remarkable mainly for the quartic couplings. Their curre...

  11. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00390105

    2016-01-01

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC instantaneous luminosity in Run 1. The first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the moderate momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be su?ciently reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6 microseconds. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the HL-LHC operating conditions at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fast trigger processor.

  12. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC design luminosity. The Level-1 muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the limited momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be sufficient reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6~$\\mu$s. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the high HL-LHC background rates at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fas trigger processor.

  13. Design and Test of a Signal Packet Router Prototype for the ATLAS NSW sTGC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Xueye; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Abstract– The New Small Wheel (NSW) small-strip thin-gap chambers (sTGC) detector will be installed in Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during ATLAS Phase-I upgrade. For sTGC detector, it requires very high-speed electronic triggering of signal events. On detecting a signal peak, sTGC front-end trigger logic will send out serialized track information on twinax fast serial copper wires to the signal packet Router on the periphery of the new small wheel. The signal packet Router boards handle all incoming traffic from the TDS chips (4.8 Gbps), serving as a very fast switching-yard between incoming active TDS signals and a limited number of optoelectronic outputs. There are several design requirements on router: radiation-hard (9kRad), high-speed serial link and low fixed latency in FPGA (field-programmable gate array) data processing. To meet those requirements, a router prototype has been developed for demonstration purpose. The components used in router prototype have been tested in radiation environment to m...

  14. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    Strizenec, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then...

  15. Testing sTGC with small angle wire edges for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Muon Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, Itamar; Duchovni, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The LHC upgrade scheduled for 2018 is expected to significantly increase the accelerator's luminosity, and as a result the radiation background rates in the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer will increase too. Some of its components will have to be replaced in order to cope with these high rates. Newly designed small-strip Thin Gap chambers (sTGC) will replace them at the small wheel region. One of the differences between the sTGC and the currently used TGC is the alignment of the wires along the azimuthal direction. As a result, the outermost wires approach the detector's edge with a small angle. Such a configuration may be a cause for various problems. Two small dedicated chambers were built and tested in order to study possible edge effects that may arise from the new configuration. The sTGC appears to be stable and no spark have been observed, yet some differences in the detector response near the edge is seen and further studies should be carried out.

  16. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. When passing throw the walls the succeeding can be heard and seen. The film has original working sound.

  17. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  18. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo H C G de Sá

    Full Text Available The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  19. Welding Wires To Thin Thermocouple Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Danzey, Gerald A.; Pencil, Eric; Wadel, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Parallel-gap resistance welding yields joints surviving temperatures of about 1,000 degrees C. Much faster than thermocompression bonding. Also exceeds conductive-paste bonding and sputtering thin films through porous flame-sprayed insulation on prewelded lead wires. Introduces no foreign material into thermocouple circuit and does not require careful control of thickness of flame-sprayed material.

  20. Taking ATLAS to new heights

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo, ATLAS experiment

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this month, 51 members of the ATLAS collaboration trekked up to the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains, Mt. Toubkal (4,167m), in North Africa.    The physicists were in Marrakech, Morocco, attending the ATLAS Overview Week (7 - 11 October), which was held for the first time on the African continent. Around 300 members of the collaboration met to discuss the status of the LS1 upgrades and plans for the next run of the LHC. Besides the trek, 42 ATLAS members explored the Saharan sand dunes of Morocco on camels.  Photos courtesy of Patrick Jussel.

  1. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m...

  2. HWW in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, Pere; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The H-->WW channel plays an important role in Higgs boson property measurements, searches for rare decay modes, and searches for possible extended Higgs sectors. In this talk the latest H-->WW results from ATLAS will be briefly summarised.

  3. ATLAS Supersymmetry Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Ughetto, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV.

  4. Exotic searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Turra, Ruggero; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS detector has collected 3.2 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy during the 2015 LHC run. A selected review of the recent result are presented in the context of the direct search for BSM, not SUSY, not BSM Higgs.

  5. Prototype ATLAS straw tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This is an early prototype of the straw tracking device for the ATLAS detector at CERN. This detector will be part of the LHC project, scheduled to start operation in 2008. The straw tracker will consist of thousands of gas-filled straws, each containing a wire, allowing the tracks of particles to be followed.

  6. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  7. Higgs searches with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Price, J D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Summary of the ATLAS analyses for the rarer SM Higgs decay channels, and the limits of the SM Higgs invisible decay width. Analyses included are the VH->Vbb, H->tautau, VH->VWW, H->Zy, H->mumu, ttH->ttyy and ZH->ll+inv.

  8. ATLAS Experiment Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00085461

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  9. A thermosiphon for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2013-01-01

    A new thermosiphon cooling system, designed for the ATLAS silicon detectors by CERN’s EN-CV team in collaboration with the experiment, will replace the current system in the next LHC run in 2015. Using the basic properties of density difference and making gravity do the hard work, the thermosiphon promises to be a very reliable solution that will ensure the long-term stability of the whole system.   Former compressor-based cooling system of the ATLAS inner detectors. The system is currently being replaced by the innovative thermosiphon. (Photo courtesy of Olivier Crespo-Lopez). Reliability is the major issue for the present cooling system of the ATLAS silicon detectors. The system was designed 13 years ago using a compressor-based cooling cycle. “The current cooling system uses oil-free compressors to avoid fluid pollution in the delicate parts of the silicon detectors,” says Michele Battistin, EN-CV-PJ section leader and project leader of the ATLAS thermosiphon....

  10. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  11. Prime wires for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In an award ceremony on 3 September, ATLAS honoured the French company Axon Cable for its special coaxial cables, which were purpose-built for the Liquid Argon calorimeter modules. Working for CERN since the 1970s, Axon' Cable received the ATLAS supplier award last week for its contribution to the liquid argon calorimeter cables of ATLAS (LAL/Orsay, France and University of Victoria, Canada), started in 1996. Its two sets of minicoaxial cables, called harnesses "A" and "B", are designed to function in the harsh conditions in the liquid argon (at 90 Kelvin or -183°C) and under extreme radiation (up to several Mrads). The cables are mainly used for the readout of the calorimeters, and are connected to the outside world by 114 signal feedthroughs with 1920 channels each. The signal from the detectors is transmitted directly without any amplification, which imposes tight restrictions on the impedance and on the signal propagation time of the cables. Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, gives the award for best s...

  12. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, M.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC was ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will deliver of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb ‑1 expected for LHC running by the end of 2018 to 3000 fb ‑1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next. A brief overview is also given on physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV.

  13. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1 March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day.

  14. Atlas of NATO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Harry F.

    This atlas provides basic information about the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Formed in response to growing concern for the security of Western Europe after World War II, NATO is a vehicle for Western efforts to reduce East-West tensions and the level of armaments. NATO promotes political and economic collaboration as well as military…

  15. Closing the stop gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czakon, Michal [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchnphysik und Kosmologie; Mitov, Alexander [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab.; Papucci, Michele [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ruderman, Joshua T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; New York Univ., NY (United States). Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics; Weiler, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.

    2014-07-15

    Light stops are a hallmark of the most natural realizations of weak-scale supersymmetry. While stops have been extensively searched for, there remain open gaps around and below the top mass, due to similarities of stop and top signals with current statistics. We propose a new fast-track avenue to improve light stop searches for R-parity conserving supersymmetry, by comparing top cross section measurements to the theoretical prediction. Stop masses below ∝180 GeV can now be ruled out for a light neutralino. The possibility of a stop signal contaminating the top mass measurement is also briefly addressed.

  16. Mind the Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    While a growing number of Chinese people are enjoying the benefits brought by economic reform and social development, some are being left behind. The divide between the rich and the poor is widening in China, resulting in an increasingly dissatisfied populace. Some argue that a wealth gap is not a big deal in a market economy and that the problem in China has been exaggerated. But in an article published by China Economic Times, Wu Zhongmin, a sociology professor at the Central Party School of the Commun...

  17. Photonic band gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  18. Mind the gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagwat, M.S.; Roberts, C.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Krassnigg, A. [Universitaet Graz, Fachbereich Theoretische Physik, Graz (Austria); Maris, P. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PA (United States)

    2007-03-15

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors. (orig.)

  19. Mind the gap.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics; Univ. Graz; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  20. Unveiling the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensson, Pall; Rokkjær, Ole; Nørgaard, Bente

    discussing their NQF and Sweden has decided not to adjust to the EQF for the moment. Analysis of the subject focus for the individual programmes showed a high degree of variation. In the context of CDIO this means that what seems to be a well-known and commonly accepted definition of a discipline like IE...... needs, how universities decide what to teach, and how to bridge the gap. Do the university programs simply reflect the expertise of the faculty members? Is there need for increasing emphasis on continuing education? Is life-long education the answer, and has this been addressed by the CDIO community?...

  1. How Empty are Disk Gaps Opened by Giant Planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Gap clearing by giant planets has been proposed to explain the optically thin cavities observed in many protoplanetary disks. How much material remains in the gap determines not only how detectable young planets are in their birth environments, but also how strong corotation torques are, which impacts how planets can survive fast orbital migration. We determine numerically how the average surface density inside the gap, sigma_gap, depends on planet-to-star mass ratio q, Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter alpha, and disk height-to-radius aspect ratio h/r. Our results are derived from our new GPU-accelerated Lagrangian hydrodynamical code PEnGUIn, and are verified by independent simulations with ZEUS90. For Jupiter-like planets, we find sigma_gap \\propto q^-2.2 alpha^1.4 (h/r)^6.6, and for near brown dwarf masses, sigma_gap \\propto q^-1 alpha^1.3 (h/r)^6.1. Surface density contrasts inside and outside gaps can be as large as 10^4, even when the planet does not accrete. We derive a simple analytic scaling, sigm...

  2. An Atlas of Galaxy Spectral Energy Distributions from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J I; Smith, J -D T; da Cunha, Elisabete; Jarrett, T H; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Armus, Lee; Brandl, Bernhard R; Peek, J E G

    2013-01-01

    We present an atlas of 129 spectral energy distributions for nearby galaxies, with wavelength coverage spanning from the UV to the mid-infrared. Our atlas spans a broad range of galaxy types, including ellipticals, spirals, merging galaxies, blue compact dwarfs and luminous infrared galaxies. We have combined ground-based optical drift-scan spectrophotometry with infrared spectroscopy from Spitzer and Akari, with gaps in spectral coverage being filled using MAGPHYS spectral energy distribution models. The spectroscopy and models were normalized, constrained and verified with matched-aperture photometry measured from Swift, GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, Spitzer and WISE images. The availability of 26 photometric bands allowed us to identify and mitigate systematic errors present in the data. Comparison of our spectral energy distributions with other template libraries and the observed colors of galaxies indicates that we have smaller systematic errors than existing atlases, while spanning a broader range of galaxy types...

  3. Board affiliation and pay gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenglan; Chen; Hui; Ma; Danlu; Bu

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of board affiliation on the corporate pay gap.Using a sample of Chinese listed firms from 2005 to 2011, we find that boards with a greater presence of directors appointed by block shareholders have lower pay gaps. Furthermore, the governance effects of board affiliation with and without pay are distinguished. The empirical results show that board affiliation without pay is negatively related to the pay gap, while board affiliation with pay is positively related to the pay gap. Overall, the results shed light on how block shareholders affect their companies’ pay gaps through board affiliation.

  4. Improving atlas methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.A.; O'Brien, J.

    1987-01-01

    We are studying a sample of Maryland (2 %) and New Hampshire (4 %) Atlas blocks and a small sample in Maine. These three States used different sampling methods and block sizes. We compare sampling techniques, roadside with off-road coverage, our coverage with that of the volunteers, and different methods of quantifying Atlas results. The 7 1/2' (12-km) blocks used in the Maine Atlas are satisfactory for coarse mapping, but are too large to enable changes to be detected in the future. Most states are subdividing the standard 7 1/2' maps into six 5-km blocks. The random 1/6 sample of 5-km blocks used in New Hampshire, Vermont (published 1985), and many other states has the advantage of permitting detection of some changes in the future, but the disadvantage of leaving important habitats unsampled. The Maryland system of atlasing all 1,200 5-km blocks and covering one out of each six by quarterblocks (2 1/2-km) is far superior if enough observers can be found. A good compromise, not yet attempted, would be to Atlas a 1/6 random sample of 5-km blocks and also one other carefully selected (non-random) block on the same 7 1/2' map--the block that would include the best sample of habitats or elevations not in the random block. In our sample the second block raised the percentage of birds found from 86% of the birds recorded in the 7 1/2' quadrangle to 93%. It was helpful to list the expected species in each block and to revise this list annually. We estimate that 90-100 species could be found with intensive effort in most Maryland blocks; perhaps 95-105 in New Hampshire. It was also helpful to know which species were under-sampled so we could make a special effort to search for these. A total of 75 species per block (or 75% of the expected species in blocks with very restricted habitat diversity) is considered a practical and adequate goal in these States. When fewer than 60 species are found per block, a high proportion of the rarer species are missed, as well as some of

  5. ATLAS: civil engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. Nice view from the surface to the cavern from the pit side - all the big machines looked very small. The film has original working sound.

  6. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance has just been attributed to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months ago at their headquarters in Japan.

  7. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  8. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  9. Closing the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Kobiella, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    The e4d design series is looking for an innovative use of digital technology in architectural education to overcome the gap between design development and the acquisition of digital skills. Digital design approaches include multimedia technology, the crossover of analogue and digital techniques......, rapid-prototyping, visualization, and the presentation in artistic movies. Over the past two years a problem- based design approach was developed, which enabled students to learn digital and architectural skills simultaneously and efficiently. The educational concept consisted generally of four steps......, which, though independent of each other, are determined by questions of the ongoing design process. The first step consists of an abstract or subjective research phase; in the second step the findings are transferred into dynamic spatial structures. Later, the detected qualities are used to develop...

  10. The GAP-TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, B; Boiano, A; Catalanotti, S; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; Di Meo, P; Longo, G; Vanzanella, A; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Fiorillo, G

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency

  11. The Gap-Tpc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  12. Closing the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Kobiella, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    The e4d design series is looking for an innovative use of digital technology in architectural education to overcome the gap between design development and the acquisition of digital skills. Digital design approaches include multimedia technology, the crossover of analogue and digital techniques...... architectural projects can be discussed; in addition, a competent monitoring of the process and outcome of innovative and efficient design strategies in architectural and pedagogical aspect is included......., rapid-prototyping, visualization, and the presentation in artistic movies. Over the past two years a problem- based design approach was developed, which enabled students to learn digital and architectural skills simultaneously and efficiently. The educational concept consisted generally of four steps...

  13. Gaps in Political Interest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    sought to measure respondents’ general interest in politics by asking them how often they follow public affairs. In this article, we uncover novel sources of measurement error concerning this question. We first show that other nationally representative surveys that frequently use this item deliver......Political interest fundamentally influences political behavior, knowledge, and persuasion (Brady, Verba, & Schlozman, 1995; Delli Carpini & Keeter, 1996; Luskin, 1990; Zukin, Andolina, Keeter, Jenkins, & Delli Carpini, 2006). Since the early 1960s, the American National Election Studies (ANES) has...... drastically higher estimates of mass interest. We then use a survey experiment included on a wave of the ANES’ Evaluating Government and Society Surveys (EGSS) to explore the influence of question order in explaining this systemic gap in survey results. We show that placing batteries of political...

  14. Critical Heat Flux in Inclined Rectangular Narrow Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong J. Kim; Yong H. Kim; Seong J. Kim; Sang W. Noh; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    In light of the TMI-2 accident, in which the reactor vessel lower head survived the attack by molten core material, the in-vessel retention strategy was suggested to benefit from cooling the debris through a gap between the lower head and the core material. The GAMMA 1D (Gap Apparatus Mitigating Melt Attack One Dimensional) tests were conducted to investigate the critical heat flux (CHF) in narrow gaps with varying surface orientations. The CHF in an inclined gap, especially in case of the downward-facing narrow gap, is dictated by bubble behavior because the departing bubbles are squeezed. The orientation angle affects the bubble layer and escape of the bubbles from the narrow gap. The test parameters include gap sizes of 1, 2, 5 and 10 mm and the open periphery, and the orientation angles range from the fully downward-facing (180o) to the vertical (90o) position. The 15 ×35 mm copper test section was electrically heated by the thin film resistor on the back. The heater assembly was installed to the tip of the rotating arm in the heated water pool at the atmospheric pressure. The bubble behavior was photographed utilizing a high-speed camera through the Pyrex glass spacer. It was observed that the CHF decreased as the surface inclination angle increased and as the gap size decreased in most of the cases. However, the opposing results were obtained at certain surface orientations and gap sizes. Transition angles, at which the CHF changed in a rapid slope, were also detected, which is consistent with the existing literature. A semi-empirical CHF correlation was developed for the inclined narrow rectangular channels through dimensional analysis. The correlation provides with best-estimate CHF values for realistically assessing the thermal margin to failure of the lower head during a severe accident involving relocation of the core material.

  15. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  16. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  17. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  18. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  19. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS transition radiation tracker is made of 300'000 straw tubes, up to 144cm long. Filled with a gas mixture and threaded with a wire, each straw is a complete mini-detector in its own right. An electric field is applied between the wire and the outside wall of the straw. As particles pass through, they collide with atoms in the gas, knocking out electrons. The avalanche of electrons is detected as an electrical signal on the wire in the centre. The tracker plays two important roles. Firstly, it makes more position measurements, giving more dots for the computers to join up to recreate the particle tracks. Also, together with the ATLAS calorimeters, it distinguishes between different types of particles depending on whether they emit radiation as they make the transition from the surrounding foil into the straws.

  20. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    Takubo, Yosuke; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  1. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation periods allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  2. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  3. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  4. A time for atlases and atlases for time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Livneh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism’s experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases.

  5. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb̄, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  6. Hybrid Atlas Models

    CERN Document Server

    Ichiba, Tomoyuki; Banner, Adrian; Karatzas, Ioannis; Fernholz, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We study Atlas-type models of equity markets with local characteristics that depend on both name and rank, and in ways that induce a stability of the capital distribution. Ergodic properties and rankings of processes are examined with reference to the theory of reflected Brownian motions in polyhedral domains. In the context of such models, we discuss properties of various investment strategies, including the so-called growth-optimal and universal portfolios.

  7. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Torro Pastor, Emma; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  8. ATLAS support rails

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These supports will hold the 7000 tonne ATLAS detector in its cavern at the LHC. The huge toroid will be assembled from eight coils that will house some of the muon chambers. Supported within the toroid will be the inner detector, containing tracking devices, as well as devices to measure the energies of the particles produced in the 14 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

  9. SUSY Searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Xuai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV using 2015+2016 data. The searches with final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons will be presented.

  10. The ATLAS Experiment Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  11. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  12. ATLAS reliability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, R.R.

    1995-09-01

    Key elements of the 36 MJ ATLAS capacitor bank have been evaluated for individual probabilities of failure. These have been combined to estimate system reliability which is to be greater than 95% on each experimental shot. This analysis utilizes Weibull or Weibull-like distributions with increasing probability of failure with the number of shots. For transmission line insulation, a minimum thickness is obtained and for the railgaps, a method for obtaining a maintenance interval from forthcoming life tests is suggested.

  13. El experimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  14. L'esperimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  15. The Adaptation Finance Gap Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report series focuses on Finance, Technology and Knowledge gaps in climate change adaptation. It compliments the Emissions Gap Report series, and explores the implications of failing to close the emissions gap. The report builds on a 2014 assessment by the United Nations...... Environment Programme (UNEP), which laid out the concept of ‘adaptation gaps’ and outlined three such gaps: technology, finance and knowledge. The 2016 Adaptation Gap Report assesses the difference between the financial costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries and the amount of money...... actually available to meet these costs – a difference known as the “adaptation finance gap”. Like the 2014 report, the 2016 report focuses on developing countries, where adaptation capacity is often the lowest and needs the highest, and concentrates on the period up to 2050. The report identifies trends...

  16. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tube Gaseous Detectors at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. The ATLAS detector is located at LHC/CERN. We report on how these gaseous detectors (“straw tubes”) are performing during the ATLAS 2011 and 2012 runs where the TRT experiences higher rates than previously encountered. The TRT contains ~300000 thin-walled proportional-mode drift tubes providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with ~130 µm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, the TRT provides electron identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons. During the ATLAS 2012 proton-proton data runs, the TRT is operating successfully while being subjected to the highest rates of incident particles ever experienced by a large scale gaseous tracking system. In the second half of 2012, the TRT has collected data in an environment with instantaneous proton-proton luminosity of ~0.8 × 10³�...

  17. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT): Straw Tube Gaseous Detectors at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. The ATLAS detector is located at LHC/CERN. We report on how these gaseous detectors (“straw tubes”) are performing during the ATLAS 2011 and 2012 runs where the TRT experiences higher rates than previously encountered. The TRT contains ~300000 thin-walled proportional-mode drift tubes providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with ~130 µm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η|  0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, the TRT provides electron identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons. During the ATLAS 2012 proton-proton data runs, the TRT is operating successfully while being subjected to the highest rates of incident particles ever experienced by a large scale gaseous tracking system. As of the submission date of this abstract, the TRT has collected data in an environment with instantaneous proton-proton luminosi...

  18. Influence of process parameters on band gap of AI-doped ZnO film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diqiu HUANG; Xiangbin ZENG; Yajuan ZHENG; Xiaojin WANG; Yanyan YANG

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the influence of process parameters, such as argon (Ar) flow rate, sputtering power and substrate temperature on the band gap of Al-doped ZnO film, Al-doped ZnO thin films were fabricated by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technology and deposited on polyimide and glass substrates. Under different Ar flow rates varied from 30 to 70 sccm, the band gap of thin films were changed from 3.56 to 3.67 eV. As sputtering power ranged from 125 to 200 W, the band gap was varied from 3.28 to 3.82 eV; the band gap was between 3.41 and 3.88 eV as substrate temperature increases from 150℃ to 300℃. Furthermore, the correlation between carrier concentration and band gap was investigated by HALL. These results demonstrate that the band gap of the Al-doped ZnO thin film can be adjusted by changing the Ar flow rate, sputtering power and substrate temperature, which can improve the performance of semiconductor devices related to Al-doped ZnO thin film.

  19. ATLAS overview week highlights

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Froidevaux

    2005-01-01

    A warm and early October afternoon saw the beginning of the 2005 ATLAS overview week, which took place Rue de La Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the heart of the Quartier Latin in Paris. All visitors had been warned many times by the ATLAS management and the organisers that the premises would be the subject of strict security clearance because of the "plan Vigipirate", which remains at some level of alert in all public buildings across France. The public building in question is now part of the Ministère de La Recherche, but used to host one of the so-called French "Grandes Ecoles", called l'Ecole Polytechnique (in France there is only one Ecole Polytechnique, whereas there are two in Switzerland) until the end of the seventies, a little while after it opened its doors also to women. In fact, the setting chosen for this ATLAS overview week by our hosts from LPNHE Paris has turned out to be ideal and the security was never an ordeal. For those seeing Paris for the first time, there we...

  20. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to `transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  1. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to 'transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  2. Atlas du Liban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramez Philippe Maalouf

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Compte-rendu de l’ouvrage Atlas du Liban: territoires et société, sous la direction d’Éric Verdeil, Ghaleb Faour et Sébastien Velut, édition franco-libanaise de l’IFPO (Institut Français du Proche-Orient et du CNRS Liban (Conseil National de la Recherche Scientifique – Liban, Beyrouth 2007.Resenha do livro Atlas du Liban: territoires et société, sob a direção de Éric Verdeil, Ghaleb Faour e Sébastien Velut, editado por iniciativa franco-libanesa do IFPO (Institut Français du Proche-Orient e pelo CNRS Liban (Conseil National de la Recherche Scientifique – Liban, Beirute, 2007.Review of Atlas du Liban: territoires et société, edited by Éric Verdeil, Ghaleb Faour and Sébastien Velut, french-lebanese edition by IFPO (Institut Français du Proche-Orient and CNRS Liban (Conseil National de la Recherche Scientifique – Liban Beirut, 2007.

  3. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred f b −1 expected for LHC running to 3000 f b −1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of ext...

  4. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extens...

  5. ATLAS Upgrade Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000/fb by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new...

  6. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  7. Understanding the Tax Gap1

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur, Mark J.; Plumley, Alan H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tax Gap is defined as the difference between the amount of tax imposed by the Tax Code and the amount that is reported and paid with timely filed returns. For the federal government, the gross tax gap is estimated at $345 billion for Tax Year 2001 (after the collection of late and enforced payments, the net tax gap is estimated at $290 billion for Tax Year 2001). This paper explains the concept of the tax gap, discusses how it is estimated, and points out some limitations with the estimates.

  8. An application of small-gap equations in sealing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, Carlos A.; Heinrich, Juan C.

    1993-01-01

    The study of a thin, incompressible Newtonian fluid layer trapped between two almost parallel, sliding surfaces has been actively pursued in the last decades. This subject includes lubrication applications such as slider bearings or the sealing of non-pressurized fluids with rubber rotary shaft seals. In the present work we analyze numerically the flow of lubricant fluid through a micro-gap of sealing devices. The first stage of this study is carried out assuming that a 'small-gap' parameter delta attains an extreme value in the Navier-Stokes equations. The precise meaning of small-gap is achieved by the particular limit delta = 0 which, within the bounds of the hypotheses, predicts transport of lubricant through the sealed area by centrifugal instabilities. Numerical results obtained with the penalty function approximation in the finite element method are presented. In particular, the influence of inflow and outflow boundary conditions, and their impact in the simulated flow, are discussed.

  9. ATLAS: Forecasting Falling Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Aren; Tonry, John L.; Denneau, Larry; Stalder, Brian; Sherstyuk, Andrei

    2016-10-01

    The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS) is a new asteroid survey aimed at detecting small (10-100 meter) asteroids inbound for impact with Earth. Relative to the larger objects targeted by most surveys, these small asteroids pose very different threats to our planet. Large asteroids can be seen at great distances and measured over many years, resulting in precise orbits that enable long-term impact predictions. If an impact were predicted, a costly deflection mission would be warranted to avert global catastrophe -- but a large asteroid impact is very unlikely in the next century. By contrast, impacts from small asteroids are inevitable. Such objects can be detected only during close encounters with Earth -- encounters too brief to yield long-term predictions. Only a few days' warning could be expected for an impactor in the 10-100 meter range, but fortunately the impact of such an asteroid would cause only regional damage. As in the case of a hurricane, a quixotic attempt to deflect or destroy it would be more expensive than the damage from its impact. A better response is to save human lives by evacuating the impact zone, and then rebuild. Only a few days warning are needed for this purpose, and ATLAS is unique among asteroid surveys in being optimized to provide it. While the optimization has many facets, the most important is rapidly surveying the entire accessible sky. A small asteroid could come from any direction and go from invisibility to impact in less than a week: ATLAS must look everywhere, all the time. Sky coverage is more important than exquisite sensitivity to faint objects, because asteroids inbound for impact will eventually become quite bright. This makes ATLAS complementary to other surveys, which scan the sky at a more leisurely pace but are able to detect asteroids at greater distances. We report on ATLAS' first year of survey operations, including the maturing of robotic observation and detection strategies, and asteroid and

  10. The time evolution of gaps in tidal streams

    CERN Document Server

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    We model the time evolution of gaps in tidal streams caused by the impact of a dark matter subhalo, while both orbit a spherical gravitational potential. To this end, we make use of the simple behaviour of orbits in action-angle space. A gap effectively results from the divergence of two nearby orbits whose initial phase-space separation is, for very cold thin streams, largely given by the impulse induced by the subhalo. We find that in a spherical potential the size of a gap increases linearly with time, while its density decreases as 1/t^2 for sufficiently long timescales. We have derived an analytic expression that shows how the growth rate depends on the mass of the perturbing subhalo, its scale and its relative velocity with respect to the stream. We have verified these scalings using N-body simulations and find excellent agreement. For example, a subhalo of mass 10^8 Msun directly impacting a very cold thin stream on an inclined orbit can induce a gap that may reach a size of several tens of kpc after a...

  11. Measuring the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinshu She MD, MPH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P .05. Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P < .05. Rural children are more than 4 times likely to have serious injuries (OR = 4.64, P < .01 and to be bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01. In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration.

  12. Measuring the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Xinshu; Zhao, Deqing; Scholnick, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P suicidal ideation in the past year (OR = 0.68, P > .05). Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01). In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration. PMID:27335999

  13. Optical Constants of Cadmium Telluride Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithyakalyani, P.; Pandiaraman, M.; Pannir, P.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Soundararajan, N.

    2008-04-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is II-VI direct band gap semiconductor compound with potential application in Solar Energy conversion process. CdTe thin film of thickness 220 mn was prepared by thermal evaporation technique at a high vacuum better than 10-5 m.bar on well cleaned glass substrates of dimensions (l cm×3 cm). The transmittance spectrum and the reflectance spectrum of the prepared CdTc thin film was recorded using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 900 nm. These spectral data were analyzed and the optical band and optical constants of CdTe Thin film have been determined by adopting suitable relations. The optical band gap of CdTe thin film is found to be 1.56 eV and this value is also agreeing with the published works of CdTe thin film prepared by various techniques. The absorption coefficient (α) has been higher than 106 cm-1. The Refractive index (n) and the Extinction Coefficient (k) are found to be varying from 3.0 to 4.0 and 0.1 Cm-1 to 0.5 Cm-1 respectively by varying the energy from l.0 eV to 4.0 eV. These results are also compared with the literature.

  14. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  15. Atlas C++ Coding Standard Specification

    CERN Document Server

    Albrand, S; Barberis, D; Bosman, M; Jones, B; Stavrianakou, M; Arnault, C; Candlin, D; Candlin, R; Franck, E; Hansl-Kozanecka, Traudl; Malon, D; Qian, S; Quarrie, D; Schaffer, R D

    2001-01-01

    This document defines the ATLAS C++ coding standard, that should be adhered to when writing C++ code. It has been adapted from the original "PST Coding Standard" document (http://pst.cern.ch/HandBookWorkBook/Handbook/Programming/programming.html) CERN-UCO/1999/207. The "ATLAS standard" comprises modifications, further justification and examples for some of the rules in the original PST document. All changes were discussed in the ATLAS Offline Software Quality Control Group and feedback from the collaboration was taken into account in the "current" version.

  16. Electrons and Photons at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Heim, Sarah; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The performance of the reconstruction, calibration and identification of electrons and photons with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is a key component to realize the ATLAS full physics potential, both in the searches for new physics and in precision measurements. The algorithms used for the reconstruction and identification of electrons and photons with the ATLAS detector during LHC run 2 are presented. Measurements of the identification efficiencies are derived from data. The results from the 2015 pp collision data set at sqrt(s)=13 TeV are reported. The electron and photon energy calibration procedure and its performance are also discussed.

  17. Automated Loads Analysis System (ATLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Stephen; Frere, Scot; O’Reilly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is a generalized solution that can be used for launch vehicles. ATLAS is used to produce modal transient analysis and quasi-static analysis results (i.e., accelerations, displacements, and forces) for the payload math models on a specific Shuttle Transport System (STS) flight using the shuttle math model and associated forcing functions. This innovation solves the problem of coupling of payload math models into a shuttle math model. It performs a transient loads analysis simulating liftoff, landing, and all flight events between liftoff and landing. ATLAS utilizes efficient and numerically stable algorithms available in MSC/NASTRAN.

  18. The new European wind atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans;

    2014-01-01

    database. Although the project participants will come from the 27 member states it is envisioned that the project will be opened for global participation through test benches for model development and sharing of data – climatologically as well as experimental. Experiences from national wind atlases...... will be utilized, such as the Indian, the South African, the Finnish, the German, the Canadian atlases and others....... European Wind Atlas” aiming at reducing overall uncertainties in determining wind conditions; standing on three legs: A data bank from a series of intensive measuring campaigns; a thorough examination and redesign of the model chain from global, mesoscale to microscale models and creation of the wind atlas...

  19. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius; Sun, Zhi;

    2016-01-01

    underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...... the veterinary proteomics domain, and this article demonstrates how the expression of isoform-unique peptides can be observed across distinct tissues and body fluids. The Pig PeptideAtlas is a unique resource for use in animal proteome research, particularly biomarker discovery and for preliminary design of SRM...

  20. Sensory nerve function and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various gap lengths with nerve guides and autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory nerve recovery and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various lengths of nerve gaps in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using different techniques. Group 4, in which the longest nerve gap (15 mm) was reconstructed with a thin-walled p(DL-lactide-y-capr

  1. Progressive multi-atlas label fusion by dictionary evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yantao; Wu, Guorong; Bahrami, Khosro; Sun, Quansen; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate segmentation of anatomical structures in medical images is important in recent imaging based studies. In the past years, multi-atlas patch-based label fusion methods have achieved a great success in medical image segmentation. In these methods, the appearance of each input image patch is first represented by an atlas patch dictionary (in the image domain), and then the latent label of the input image patch is predicted by applying the estimated representation coefficients to the corresponding anatomical labels of the atlas patches in the atlas label dictionary (in the label domain). However, due to the generally large gap between the patch appearance in the image domain and the patch structure in the label domain, the estimated (patch) representation coefficients from the image domain may not be optimal for the final label fusion, thus reducing the labeling accuracy. To address this issue, we propose a novel label fusion framework to seek for the suitable label fusion weights by progressively constructing a dynamic dictionary in a layer-by-layer manner, where the intermediate dictionaries act as a sequence of guidance to steer the transition of (patch) representation coefficients from the image domain to the label domain. Our proposed multi-layer label fusion framework is flexible enough to be applied to the existing labeling methods for improving their label fusion performance, i.e., by extending their single-layer static dictionary to the multi-layer dynamic dictionary. The experimental results show that our proposed progressive label fusion method achieves more accurate hippocampal segmentation results for the ADNI dataset, compared to the counterpart methods using only the single-layer static dictionary.

  2. PhoneGap for enterprise

    CERN Document Server

    Shotts, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who wish to use PhoneGap to develop useful, rich, secure mobile applications for their enterprise environment. The book assumes you have working knowledge of PhoneGap, HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript, and a reasonable understanding of networking and n-tier architectures.

  3. GAP Analysis. Bulletin Number 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    in 2002 ( ESSB • Creation of a stewardship map is central to GAP’s analysis 6400) that authorizes a comprehensive review to identify the state’s method...governments and their consultants. "Washington State Law ESSB 6400 can be accessed at www.leg.wa.gov/pubfbillinfo/2001-02/Senate, January 10, 2003. Gap

  4. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Pittsburgh, PA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Tampa, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Memphis, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  7. Forward Physics at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Poster summarize forward physics at the ATLAS experiment. It aims to AFP project which is the project to install forward detectors at 220m (AFP220) and 420m (AFP420) around ATLAS for measurements at high luminosity.

  8. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (http:/www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  9. ATLAS : civil engineering at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video.

  10. Women of ATLAS - International Women's Day 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Women play key roles in the ATLAS Experiment: from young physicists at the start of their careers to analysis group leaders and spokespersons of the collaboration. Celebrate International Women's Day by meeting a few of these inspiring ATLAS researchers.

  11. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Phoenix, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Milwaukee, WI EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  13. The ATLAS Trigger Muon "Vertical Slice"

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; Biglietti, M; Carlino, G; Cataldi, G; Conventi, F; Del Prete, T; Di Mattia, A; Falciano, S; Gorini, S; Kanaya, N; Kohno, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Lagouri, T; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Marzano, F; Nagano, K; Nisati, A; Panikashvili, N; Pasqualucci, E; Primavera, M; Scannicchio, D A; Spagnolo, S; Tarem, S; Tarem, Z; Tokushuku, K; Usai, G; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Yamazaki, Y; 10th Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors : Frontier Detectors For Frontier Physics

    2007-01-01

    The muon trigger system is a fundamental component of the ATLAS detector at the LHC collider. In this paper we describe the ATLAS multi-level trigger selecting events with muons: the Muon Trigger Slice.

  14. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Woodbine, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Portland, ME

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Fresno, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Paterson, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Fresno, CA EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  19. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The ATLAS facility is a leading facility for nuclear structure research in the...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Durham, NC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas ). The layers in these web...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Demo (Parent)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Portland, OR EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas community. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Milwaukee, WI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (http://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Paterson, NJ EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Memphis, TN EnviroAtlas community. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Phoenix, AZ EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  8. Components of the Belief Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Gaziano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge gap research focuses on education as an indicator of socioeconomic status (SES. Belief gap research centers on ideology as potentially more powerful than education in comparing sociopolitical groups with scientifically established knowledge and groups with opposing beliefs accepted on faith. This study examined the relationship between education and ideology to understand belief gaps better. The study used 2008 American National Election Study (ANES data to compare conservatives, moderates, and liberals by education on religiosity, child rearing values, opinionation, need for cognition, orientation toward politics, and mass media access and use. Although liberals tended to be more educated than conservatives overall, better-educated conservatives had the highest household incomes and were a much larger group. No known knowledge gap studies have reported results on one group characterized by high education and an opposing group distinguished by a different indicator of SES. Reformulations of the belief gap hypothesis are offered.

  9. Common atlas format and 3D brain atlas reconstructor: infrastructure for constructing 3D brain atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, Piotr; Kublik, Ewa; Furga, Grzegorz; Wójcik, Daniel Krzysztof

    2012-04-01

    One of the challenges of modern neuroscience is integrating voluminous data of diferent modalities derived from a variety of specimens. This task requires a common spatial framework that can be provided by brain atlases. The first atlases were limited to two-dimentional presentation of structural data. Recently, attempts at creating 3D atlases have been made to offer navigation within non-standard anatomical planes and improve capability of localization of different types of data within the brain volume. The 3D atlases available so far have been created using frameworks which make it difficult for other researchers to replicate the results. To facilitate reproducible research and data sharing in the field we propose an SVG-based Common Atlas Format (CAF) to store 2D atlas delineations or other compatible data and 3D Brain Atlas Reconstructor (3dBAR), software dedicated to automated reconstruction of three-dimensional brain structures from 2D atlas data. The basic functionality is provided by (1) a set of parsers which translate various atlases from a number of formats into the CAF, and (2) a module generating 3D models from CAF datasets. The whole reconstruction process is reproducible and can easily be configured, tracked and reviewed, which facilitates fixing errors. Manual corrections can be made when automatic reconstruction is not sufficient. The software was designed to simplify interoperability with other neuroinformatics tools by using open file formats. The content can easily be exchanged at any stage of data processing. The framework allows for the addition of new public or proprietary content.

  10. Construction and QA/QC of the MicroMegas Pavia Readout Panels for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to cope with the required precision tracking and trigger capabilities during Run III in ATLAS experiment, the innermost layer of the Muon Spectrometer endcap (Small Wheels) will be upgraded. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will be equipped with eight layers of MicroMegas (MM) detectors and eight layers of small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both arranged in two quadruplets. MM detectors of large size (up to 2 $m^{2}$) will be employed for the first time in HEP experiments. Four different types of MM quadruplets modules (SM1, SM2, LM1, LM2), built by different Institutes, will compose the NSW. Italian INFN is responsible for the construction of the SM1 modules. The construction is shared among different INFN sites. In particular, readout panels are built in Pavia. Due to the challenging mechanical specifications (with precisions of tens microns over meters), the construction procedure has been optimized to obtain the required strip alignment precision in the panel. A number of data quality checks on both ...

  11. Development of High-Speed, Low-fixed Latency Serial Links for the Router of ATLAS NSW sTGC Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Xueye; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) needs to be upgraded in order to cope with the increased luminosity and particle rates expected for the High Luminosity LHC (HL­LHC) running. Part of the phase­1 upgrade, to be done in the 2018/19 shutdown, is the replacement of the present muon forward detector (wheel) by a new detector, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW). The NSW detector consists of two detector technologies and the work here is on the small­strip Thin­Gap Chambers (sTGC). For sTGC, it requires very high­speed electronic triggering of signal events. The data must be quickly digitized, serialized, and transmitted off­detector for computer processing. The serialized data is sent to the trigger processor through a routing system that serves as a switchyard for all active signals. Design requirements on the router are low latency and stable/predictable data transfer timing with high­speed serial links (4.8 Gbps). We describe a 4.8 Gbps (maximum 6.6 Gbps) serial link structure base...

  12. Construction and QA/QC of the Micromegas Pavia Readout Panels for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to cope with the required precision tracking and trigger capabilities from Run III onwards in the ATLAS experiment, the innermost layer of the Muon Spectrometer endcap (Small Wheels) will be upgraded. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will be equipped with eight layers of MicroMegas (MM) detectors and eight layers of small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both arranged in two quadruplets. MM detectors of large size (up to 3 m$^2$) will be employed for the first time in HEP experiments. Four different types of MM quadruplets modules (SM1, SM2, LM1, LM2), built by different Institutes, will compose the NSW. The Italian INFN is responsible for the construction of the SM1 modules. The construction is shared among different INFN sites, Pavia being responsible for the readout panel construction. Due to the challenging mechanical specifications (with precisions of tens microns over meters), the construction procedure has been optimized to obtain the required strip alignment precision in the panel. A number of data q...

  13. ATLAS experiment : mapping the secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2010-01-01

    This 4 page color brochure describes ATLAS and the LHC, the ATLAS inner detector, calorimeters, muon spectrometer, magnet system, a short definition of the terms "particles," "dark matter," "mass," "antimatter." It also explains the ATLAS collaboration and provides the ATLAS website address with some images of the detector and the ATLAS collaboration at work.

  14. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 1 - ATLAS: ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN is one of the largest and most complex scientific endeavours ever assembled. The detector, located at collision point 1 of the LHC, is designed to explore the fundamental components of nature and to study the forces that shape our universe. The past year’s discovery of a Higgs boson is one of the most important scientific achievements of our time, yet this is only one of many key goals of ATLAS. During a brief break in their journey, some of the 3000-member ATLAS collaboration will be taking time to share the excitement of this exploration with you. On surface no restricted access  The exhibit at Point 1 will give visitors a chance to meet these modern-day explorers and to learn from them how answers to the most fundamental questions of mankind are being sought. Activities will include a visit to the ATLAS detector, located 80m below ground; watching the prize-winning ATLAS movie in the ATLAS cinema; seeing real particle tracks in a cloud chamber and discussi...

  15. Neonatal atlas construction using sparse representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-09-01

    Atlas construction generally includes first an image registration step to normalize all images into a common space and then an atlas building step to fuse the information from all the aligned images. Although numerous atlas construction studies have been performed to improve the accuracy of the image registration step, unweighted or simply weighted average is often used in the atlas building step. In this article, we propose a novel patch-based sparse representation method for atlas construction after all images have been registered into the common space. By taking advantage of local sparse representation, more anatomical details can be recovered in the built atlas. To make the anatomical structures spatially smooth in the atlas, the anatomical feature constraints on group structure of representations and also the overlapping of neighboring patches are imposed to ensure the anatomical consistency between neighboring patches. The proposed method has been applied to 73 neonatal MR images with poor spatial resolution and low tissue contrast, for constructing a neonatal brain atlas with sharp anatomical details. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly enhance the quality of the constructed atlas by discovering more anatomical details especially in the highly convoluted cortical regions. The resulting atlas demonstrates superior performance of our atlas when applied to spatially normalizing three different neonatal datasets, compared with other start-of-the-art neonatal brain atlases.

  16. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atlas Peak. 9.140 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.140 Atlas Peak. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Atlas Peak.”...

  17. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  18. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, P

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance was attributed on 2nd September 2002 during a ceremony in Hall 180 to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months before at their headquarters in Japan. The ATLAS experiment will become a reality thanks to a large international collaboration partnership. The industrial suppliers for the components all over the world play a major role in the construction of this gigantic jigsaw for the LHC. And sometimes they perform so well, that their work deserves specially to be recognised. This is the case for Kawasaki Heavy Industries and Toshiba Corporation, producers of the Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat and of the Superconducting Central Solenoid, respectively. With these awards, the ATLAS Collaboration wants to congratulate Kawasaki and Toshiba for fulfilling the hi...

  19. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  20. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1: zone of the ATLAS experiment 14-02-2001Realising anchorage, isolations and scaffoldings at UX 15 18-04-2001Concreting the arch and posing the metal reinforcements at UX 15

  1. Wheels lining up for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 30 October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year.

  2. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  3. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  4. Two new wheels for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Juergen Zimmer (Max Planck Institute), Roy Langstaff (TRIUMF/Victoria) and Sergej Kakurin (JINR), in front of one of the completed wheels of the ATLAS Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter. A decade of careful preparation and construction by groups in three continents is nearing completion with the assembly of two of the four 4 m diameter wheels required for the ATLAS Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter. The first two wheels have successfully passed all their mechanical and electrical tests, and have been rotated on schedule into the vertical position required in the experiment. 'This is an important milestone in the completion of the ATLAS End Cap Calorimetry' explains Chris Oram, who heads the Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter group. Like most experiments at particle colliders, ATLAS consists of several layers of detectors in the form of a 'barrel' and two 'end caps'. The Hadronic Calorimeter layer, which measures the energies of particles such as protons and pions, uses two techniques. The barrel part (Tile Calorimeter) cons...

  5. ATLAS online data quality monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Hadavand, H; Ilchenko, Y; Kolos, S; Slagle, K; Taffard, A

    2010-01-01

    Every minute the ATLAS detector is taking data, the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in providing quick feedback to the subsystems about the functioning and performance of the different parts of ATLAS by providing a configurable easy and fast visualization of all this information. The Data Quality Monitoring Display (DQMD) is a visualization tool for the automatic data quality assessment of the ATLAS experiment. It is the interface through which the shift crew and experts can validate the quality of the data being recorded or processed, be warned of problems related to data quality, an...

  6. Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For more than 20 years, the Dartmouth Atlas Project has documented glaring variations in how medical resources are distributed and used in the United States. The...

  7. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  8. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias;

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Scandinavia and other countries. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed...... by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the LHC Computing Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous...... environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF....

  9. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  10. Effect of Sn on the optical band gap determined using absorption spectrum fitting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heera, Pawan, E-mail: sramanb70@mailcity.com [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, INDIA, 171005 (India); Govt. College Amb, Himachal Pradesh, INDIA,177203 (India); Kumar, Anup, E-mail: kumar.anup.sml@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, INDIA, 171005 (India); Physics Department, Govt. College, Kullu, H. P., INDIA, 175101 (India); Sharma, Raman, E-mail: pawanheera@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, INDIA, 171005 (India)

    2015-05-15

    We report the preparation and the optical studies on tellurium rich glasses thin films. The thin films of Se{sub 30}Te{sub 70-x} Sn{sub x} system for x= 0, 1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 glassy alloys prepared by melt quenching technique are deposited on the glass substrate using vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The analysis of absorption spectra in the spectral range 400nm–4000 nm at room temperature obtained from UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer [Perkin Elmer Lamda-750] helps us in the optical characterization of the thin films under study. The absorption spectrum fitting method is applied by using the Tauc’s model for estimating the optical band gap and the width of the band tail of the thin films. The optical band gap is calculated and is found to decrease with the Sn content.

  11. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  12. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  13. Other Exotic States in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Yanjun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model (BSM) predict new phenomena accessible by the LHC. Searches for new physics models are performed using the ATLAS experiment at the LHC focusing on exotic signatures that can cover serval BSM theories. The results reported here use the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  14. Composition of the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Pater, Joleen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration consists of about 5,000 members from 178 institutes in 38 countries. About half of the members of the collaboration are scientific authors of the papers, and there are about 1,200 students in the collaboration. This note presents data showing aspects of the composition of the collaboration; in particular the relative fraction of women is described at several levels within the hierarchy of the ATLAS experiment.

  15. ATLAS Overview Week 2009 Barcelona

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    From October 5th to October 9th about 400 physicists from the ATLAS Collaboration met in Barcelona (Catalonia) to discuss the status of the experiment. The event was organized by the Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), a member of the ATLAS Collaboration. Besides the Scientific program, few social events were organized, such as Reception at the Palau de Pedralbes, a visit to the Fundacio Joan Miro and a social dinner at Maremagnunm hall.

  16. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The film is about the excavation work in the cavern and tunnels of ATLAS experiment in the point 1. You can see people working for iron mounting at the side of the pit where the parts of the detector will be lowered in the future. Partly the film concentrates the USA 15 and the work done there.

  17. Higgs boson measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Hays, Chris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive set of Higgs boson measurements has been performed in pp collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and the results combined between the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Recent results from ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are consistent with expectations. With more data available, additional Higgs boson processes are on the cusp of observation, while measured processes promise improved precision.

  18. ATLAS discoveries of optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Smartt, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    We report the following transients found by the ATLAS survey (see Tonry et al. ATel #8680). ATLAS is a twin 0.5m telescope system on Haleakala and Mauna Loa. The first unit is operational on Haleakala is robotically surveying the sky. Two filters are used, cyan and orange (denoted c and o, all mags in AB system), more information is on http://www.fallingstar.com.

  19. ATLAS discoveries of optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Smartt, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    We report the following transients found by the ATLAS survey (see Tonry et al. ATel #8680). ATLAS is a twin 0.5m telescope system on Haleakala and Mauna Loa. The first unit is operational on Haleakala is robotically surveying the sky. Two filters are used, cyan and orange (denoted c and o, all mags in AB system), more information is on http://www.fallingstar.com.

  20. More on gapped Goldstones at finite density: More gapped Goldstones

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto; Piazza, Federico; Rosen, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    It was recently argued that certain relativistic theories at finite density can exhibit an unconventional spectrum of Goldstone excitations, with gapped Goldstones whose gap is exactly calculable in terms of the symmetry algebra. We confirm this result as well as previous ones concerning gapless Goldstones for non-relativistic systems via a coset construction of the low-energy effective field theory. Moreover, our analysis unveils additional gapped Goldstones, naturally as light as the others, but this time with a model-dependent gap. Their exact number cannot be inferred solely from the symmetry breaking pattern either, but rather depends on the details of the symmetry breaking mechanism--a statement that we explicitly verify with a number of examples. Along the way we provide what we believe to be a particularly transparent interpretation of the so-called inverse-Higgs constraints for spontaneously broken spacetime symmetries.

  1. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CPPM Laboratory Marseille Starting with the Workshop- adding modules to the strip 00:09:19 Exterior-entering the lab site by car, Sascha Rosanov and a PR lady walking, Lab sign on building -Physique des Particules de Marseille 00:20:00 Interviews of the ATLAS pixel work for bio-mediacal research 00:34:00 Interview of Roy Aleksov, Head of CPPM Laboratory, Working in international team, working with CERN and GRID The rest of the film inclusdes lab testingand some exterior shots.

  2. ATLAS Style Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhandler, E F

    2008-01-01

    This is a compendium of rules, recommendations, information and advice for writing papers and notes within the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It covers what to include in the paper, and some general guidelines and specific points about writing a scientific paper. There are sections on the use of English (though it is not a guide to grammar), punctuation, and typography. Advice about the use of LATEX is given in the main text, and there is an appendix on software tools containing general comments about LATEX and information on using Microsoft Word. Currently on version 2.6, 3 March 2017, 47pp.

  3. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Meloni, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures. Sensitivity projections for the data that will be collected in 2015 are also presented.

  4. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Meloni, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This document summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric particles using LHC proton-proton collision data. Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. We consider both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios. The searches involve final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures. Sensitivity projections for the data that will be collected in 2015 are also presented.

  5. Dark Matter in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Resconi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Results of Dark Matter searches in mono-X analysis with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider are reported. The data were collected in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. A description of the main characteristics of each analysis and how the main backgrounds are estimated is shown. The observed data are in agreement with the expected Standard Model backgrounds for all analysis described. Exclusion limits are presented for Dark Matter models including pair production of dark matter candidates.

  6. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Reception for Markus Nordberg and Andrew Millington by about 20 physicists from the Budker Nuclear Physics Institute Host: Yuri Tikhonov Various short talks and exchanges, with coffee Sequence 2 Visit to BINP Facilities Tikhonov and Nordberg walking and talking Visit to electron accelerator, old solar detector Sequence 3 Visit to BNIP workshops Work on big wheel segments shots over-exposed Work on Atlas coils LHC Magnets Men playing chess, exterior shots of Tikhonov, Nordberg arriving Sequence 4 Shots from car of journey from workshop to main BNIP building.

  7. VH WW in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kinghorn-taenzer, Joseph Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson, in the H -> WW decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton– proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb-1 and 20.3 fb-1, respectively. The WH production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two-lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the ZH production mode.

  8. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The heavy-ion programme in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider aims to probe and characterise hot and dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. Moreover, smaller collision systems involving nuclei and hadrons are of interest to disentangle initial- from final-state effects. This report presents new results based on lead-lead and proton-proton data collected at √sNN = 5.02 TeV in 2015, including measurements of bulk collectivity, charged-particle production, electroweak bosons, photon-jet correlations, and quarkonium suppression. First attempts to measure electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions are also discussed.

  9. The ATLAS Simulation Software

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Z

    2008-01-01

    We present the status of the ATLAS Simulation Pro ject. Recent detector description improvements have focussed on commissioning layouts, implementation of inert material, and comparisons to the as-built detector. Core Simulation is reviewed with a focus on parameter optimizations, physics list choices, visualization, large-scale production, and validation. A fast simulation is also briefly described, and its performance is evaluated with respect to the full Simulation. Digitization, the last step of the Monte Carlo chain, is described, including developments in pile up and data overlay.

  10. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousson Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC that delivered more than 2 fb−1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  11. Surveying the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The cathedral-like cavern into which the ATLAS experiment will be lowered and installed forms a vital part of the engineering work at CERN in preparation for the new LHC accelerator. This cavern, being measured by surveyors in these images, will have one of the largest spans of any man-made underground structure. The massive 46X25X25 cubic metre detector will be the largest of its type in the world when it is completed for the LHC start-up in 2008.

  12. ATLAS top quark results

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, Sven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronises, analyses of events containing top quarks allow to probe the properties of bare quarks and to test perturbative QCD. This talk will focus on recent precision top-quark measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration: Single top-quark and top-quark pair production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented, as well as measurements of top-quark pair production in association with a W or Z boson and measurements of top quark properties such as the spin correlation and W boson helicity in top quark pair events.

  13. ATLAS Cloud R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitkin, Sergey; Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Caballero Bejar, Jose; Benjamin, Doug; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Gable, Ian; Hendrix, Val; Hover, John; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramon; Love, Peter; Ohman, Henrik; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Taylor, Ryan; Walker, Rodney; Zaytsev, Alexander; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained a significant insight into the cloud computing landscape and has identified points that still need to be addressed in order to fully utilize this technology. This contribution will explain the cloud integration models that are being evaluated and will discuss ATLAS' learning during the collaboration with leading commercial and academic cloud providers.

  14. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  15. The Income Gap GROWS Large

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The income gap between regions, urban and rural areas, industries and various social groups is widening in China. The gap, as indicated by the Gini Coefficient, extended beyond an alarming level. A World Bank report said the Gini Coefficient for China surged to 0.47 in 2009, exceeding the "red line" of 0.4. The problems caused by the rising income disparity have been the focus of public attention. Some experts believe that it is high time for China to shrink this income gap. A Xinhua News Agency research team recently analyzed this trend, and published an article in the Economic Information Daily. Edited excerpts follow:

  16. The Income Gap Grows Large

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ The income gap between regions,urban and rural areas,industries and various social groups is widening in China.The gap,as indicated by the Gini Coefficient,extended beyond an alarming level.A World Bank report said the Gini Coefficient for China surged to 0A7 in 2009,exceeding the "red line"of 0.4.The problems caused by the rising income disparity have been the focus of public attention.Some experts believe that it is high time for China to shrink this income gap.

  17. Vortex motion on a sphere: barrier with two gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Rhodri B.; McDonald, N. Robb

    2010-03-01

    Techniques based on the conformal mapping and the numerical method of contour dynamics are presented for computing the motion of a finite area patch of constant vorticity on a sphere in the presence of a thin barrier with two gaps. Finite area patch motion is compared with exact point vortex trajectories and good agreement is found between the point vortex trajectories and the centroid motion of finite area patches when the patch remains close to circular. Patch centroids are, in general, closely constrained to follow point vortex trajectories. However, Kelvin’s theorem constrains the circulation about the barrier to be a constant of the motion, thus, forcing a time-dependent volume flux through the gaps. More exotic motion is observed when the through-gap flow forces the vortex patch close to an edge of a barrier, resulting in the vortex splitting with only part of the patch passing through the gap. As the gap width is decreased this effect becomes more dramatic.

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    Data.gov (United States)

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    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). This EnviroAtlas dataset...

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