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Sample records for atlas resistive plate

  1. Performance and operation of the ATLAS Resistive Plate Chamber system in LHC Run-1

    CERN Document Server

    Boscherini, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The barrel region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer is instrumented with a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) system covering the pseudo-rapidity range |η|<1.05 with a detector surface of almost 4000 m2. The RPCs, providing the first level trigger signal and the track coordinate in the non-bending plane for the candidate muons, have played a fundamental role in the physics studies carried out by ATLAS, culminated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. During the LHC Run-1 the RPC have shown excellent performances up to the maximum instantaneous luminosity of 0.7 × 1034 cm−2 s−1, corresponding approximately to 70% of the design value. The detector operation in the challenging background and pileup conditions of the LHC environment will be presented together with the problems encountered and their corresponding solutions. The plans for the maintenance and consolidation of the ATLAS RPC system during the current LHC shutdown, in view of the increased luminosity expected in Run-2, will be also presented.

  2. Monitoring the Resistive Plate Chambers in the Muon Spectrometer of ATLAS.

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Qahtani, Shaikha

    2017-01-01

    A software was developed to monitor the resistive plate chambers. The purpose of the program is to detect any weak or dead chambers and locate them for repair. The first use of the program was able to spot several chambers with problems to be investigated.

  3. Maximization of the acceptance and momentum resolution of the ATLAS muon spectrometer with novel drift-tube and resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer provides high momentum resolution up to transverse muon momenta in the TeV range in almost the full pseudo-rapidity interval of −2.7 < η < 2.7. The acceptance of the muon spectrometer is currently limited by uninstrumented regions in the vicinity of η = 0 to provide space for cables and services of the inner detector and the calorimeters and in the feet region due to space limitations. A large fraction of these acceptance gaps will successively be closed by installing novel small monitored drift tube (sMDT) chambers with tubes of half the diameter of the present MDT chambers and novel resistive plate chambers (RPC) with smaller gas gaps and higher spatial resolution. The reduced size of the chambers without loss of measurement points does not only make it possible to equip the originally uninstrumented regions with tracking and trigger chambers, but also to operate the new chambers under the highly increased background radiation levels expected for the operation of the mu...

  4. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  5. Detector Physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian; Riegler, W

    2003-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are gaseous parallel plate avalanche detectors that implement electrodes made from a material with a high volume resistivity between 10^7 and 10^12 Ohm cm. Large area RPCs with 2mm single gaps operated in avalanche mode provide above 98% efficiency and a time resolution of around 1ns up to a flux of several kHz/cm2. These Trigger RPCs will, as an example, equip the muon detector system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN on an area of 3650m2 and with 355.000 independent read out channels. Timing RPCs with a gas gap of 0.2 to 0.3mm are widely used in multi gap configurations and provide 99% efficiency and time resolution down to 50ps. While their performance is comparable to existing scintillator-based Time-Of-Flight (TOF) technology, Timing RPCs feature a significantly, up to an order of magnitude, lower price per channel. They will for example equip the 176m2 TOF barrel of the ALICE experiment at CERN with 160.000 independent read out cells. RPCs were originally operated in stream...

  6. Microchannel plate resistance at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, P

    2000-01-01

    The resistance R of a 'low-resistance' microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier was measured over the extended temperature range 4-293 K. The ratio R(T)/R(293 K) reached values of 10 sup 2 , 10 sup 3 and 10 sup 6 at temperatures T=59, 40 and 19 K, respectively. These results are interpreted in terms of variable range hopping conduction mechanisms in the reduced lead silicate MCP glass. The results may be important for cryogenic charged particle detection using MCPs, as, for example, in a recent proposal for a quantum computer.

  7. The physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 3 years we investigated theoretical aspects of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in order to clarify some of the outstanding questions on space charge effects, high efficiency of small gap RPCs, charge spectra, signal shape and time resolution. In a series of reports we analyzed RPC performance including all detector aspects covering primary ionization, avalanche multiplication, space charge effects, signal induction in presence of resistive materials, crosstalk along detectors with long strips and front-end electronics. Using detector gas parameters entirely based on theoretical predictions and physical models for avalanche development and space charge effects we are able to reproduce measurements for 2 and 0.3 mm RPCs to very high accuracy without any additional assumptions. This fact gives a profound insight into the workings of RPCs and also underlines the striking difference in operation regime when compared to wire chambers. A summary of this work as well as recent results on three-dimensiona...

  8. The study on corrosion resistance of decorative satin nickel plating

    OpenAIRE

    LU Wenya; Cheng, Xianhua

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the corrosion resistance of satin nickel plating on conductive plastic.The electrochemical tests were to analyze the corrosion behavior of satin nickel plating with different processes in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results show that,because the satin nickel plating has an organic film on its surface due to process characteristics,the film results in different corrosion resistance.By increasing satin additive dosage,the nickel plating chroma decreases,the microsurface of the p...

  9. Improved Corrosion Resistance of Pulse Plated Nickel through Crystallisation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Watanabe, Tohru; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1995-01-01

    When electrodeposition of nickel is used for corrosion protection of steel two aspects are important. The porosity of the coating and the resistance against corrosion provided by the coating itself. Using simple pulsed current (PC) plating, the size of the deposited crystals can be significantly...... smaller, thereby reducing porosity correspondingly. This usually also leads to improved hardness of the coating. Introducing pulse reversal (PR) plating, the most active crystals are continuously dissolved during the anodic pulse, providing a coating with improved subsequent corrosion resistance in almost...... any corrosive environment. This correlation between film texture and corrosion resistance will be discussed....

  10. Breakup of Pangaea and plate kinematics of the central Atlantic and Atlas regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Antonio; Turco, Eugenio

    2009-08-01

    A new central Pangaea fit (type A) is proposed for the late Ladinian (230 Ma), together with a plate motions model for the subsequent phases of rifting, continental breakup and initial spreading in the central Atlantic. This model is based on: (1) a reinterpretation of the process of formation of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly along the eastern margin of North America and the corresponding magnetic anomalies at the conjugate margins of northwest Africa and the Moroccan Meseta; (2) an analysis of major rifting events in the central Atlantic, Atlas and central Mediterranean and (3) a crustal balancing of the stretched margins of North America, Moroccan Meseta and northwest Africa. The process of fragmentation of central Pangaea can be described by three major phases spanning the time interval from the late Ladinian (230 Ma) to the Tithonian (147.7 Ma). During the first phase, from the late Ladinian (230 Ma) to the latest Rhaetian (200 Ma), rifting proceeded along the eastern margin of North America, the northwest African margin and the High, Saharan and Tunisian Atlas, determining the formation of a separate Moroccan microplate at the interface between Gondwana and Laurasia. During the second phase, from the latest Rhaetian (200 Ma) to the late Pliensbachian (185 Ma), oceanic crust started forming between the East Coast and Blake Spur magnetic anomalies, whereas the Morrocan Meseta simply continued to rift away from North America. During this time interval, the Atlas rift reached its maximum extent. Finally, the third phase, encompassing the time interval from the late Pliensbachian (185 Ma) to chron M21 (147.7 Ma), was triggered by the northward jump of the main plate boundary connecting the central Atlantic with the Tethys area. Therefore, as soon as rifting in the Atlas zone ceased, plate motion started along complex fault systems between Morocco and Iberia, whereas a rift/drift transition occurred in the northern segment of the central Atlantic, between Morocco

  11. Simulation of space charge effects in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Multigap resistive plate chambers with 0.3-mm gas gaps operated in avalanche mode at atmospheric pressure have reached timing accuracies below 50 ps (standard deviation) with efficiencies above 99% . The avalanches in high homogeneous electric fields of 100 kV/cm are strongly influenced by space charge effects which are the main topic of this paper. We extend a previously discussed Monte Carlo simulation model of avalanches in resistive plate chambers by the dynamic calculation of the electric field in the avalanches. We complete the previously presented results on time resolution and efficiency data with simulated charge spectra. The simulated data shows good agreement with measurements. The detailed simulation of the avalanche saturation due to the space charge fields explains the small observed charges, the shape of the spectra, and the linear increase of average charges with high voltage. (22 refs).

  12. Temperature and humidity dependence of bulk resistivity of bakelite for resistive plate chambers in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Bahk, S Y; Gapienko, V A; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Jung, S Y; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lee, Y L; Lim, I T; Nam, S K; Pac, M Y; Park, S K; Ra, Y S; Rhee, J T; Seo, S W; Sim, K S

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents data obtained in a systematic study on the bulk resistivity of Korean bakelike as a function of temperature in the range 20-30 degrees C and relative humidity in the range 35-65%. Strong dependence of resistivity on both temperature and humidity was observed. Measurements were carried out in the framework of R&D work on resistive plate chambers which will be used in the CMS detector. (4 refs).

  13. Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Continental deformation in the diffuse western Mediterranean plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Francisco Gustavo

    -Eurasian plate convergence since the Early Miocene. The diffuse plate boundary comprises large, relatively rigid crustal blocks (Moroccan Meseta, High Plateau, and Saharan Platform) bounded by narrow deformable zones (the Atlas). In this context, the Middle Atlas can be interpreted as an accommodation zone resulting from differential movements between two large crustal blocks impinging on stable Africa. The Atlas Mountains exemplify the possible structural influence of inherited crustal weaknesses in a diffuse plate boundary such as the western Mediterranean region.

  14. Simulation of resistive plate chamber sensitivity to neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Altieri, S; Bruno, G; Merlo, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vitulo, P; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F

    2001-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) sensitivity to neutrons has been simulated using GEANT code with MICAP and FLUKA interfaces. The calculations have been performed as a function of the neutrons energy in the range 0.02 eV-1 GeV. To evaluate the response of the detector in the IHC background environment, the neutron energy spectrum expected in the CMS muon barrel has been taken into account; a hit rate due to neutrons of about 0.6 Hz cm/sup -2/ has been estimated for a 250*250 cm/sup 2/ RPC in the RB1 station. (2 refs).

  15. Resistive Plate Chambers for Imaging Calorimetry - the DHCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Repond, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The DHCAL, the Digital Hadron Calorimeter, is a prototype calorimeter based on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). The design emphasizes the imaging capabilities of the detector in an effort to optimize the calorimeter for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the reconstruction of hadronic jet energies in a colliding beam environment. The readout of the chambers is segmented into 1 x 1 cm2 pads, each read out with a 1-bit (single threshold) resolution. The prototype with approximately 500,000 readout channels underwent extensive testing in both the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This talk presents preliminary findings from the analysis of data collected at the test beams.

  16. Resistive Plate Chambers for imaging calorimetry — The DHCAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repond, J.

    2014-09-01

    The DHCAL — the Digital Hadron Calorimeter — is a prototype calorimeter based on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). The design emphasizes the imaging capabilities of the detector in an effort to optimize the calorimeter for the application of Particle Flow Algorithms (PFAs) to the reconstruction of hadronic jet energies in a colliding beam environment. The readout of the chambers is segmented into 1 × 1 cm2 pads, each read out with a 1-bit (single threshold) resolution. The prototype with approximately 500,000 readout channels underwent extensive testing in both the Fermilab and CERN test beams. This talk presents preliminary findings from the analysis of data collected at the test beams.

  17. Cosmic ray tests of large area Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    An, S; Kim, J; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, A; Zuyeuski, R

    2007-01-01

    We have built Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) with six gas gaps and an active area of . The signals are generated on 2.5 cm wide copper pickup strips; these are read out at each end thus allowing the position of the hit along the strip to be obtained from the time difference. Using three of these chambers we have set up a cosmic tracking system in a similar manner as planned for the Extreme Energy Events (EEE) project. The details of the set-up are presented in this paper. In addition we discuss the time and position resolution of these MRPCs measured using cosmic rays.

  18. The HARP resistive plate chambers: Characteristics and physics performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ammosov, V; Chelkov, G; Dedovitch, D; Dydak, F; Elagin, A; Gapienko, V; Gostkin, M; Guskov, A; Koreshev, V; Kroumchtein, Z; Nefedov, Yu; Nikolaev, K; Semak, A; Sviridov, Yu; Usenko, E; Wotschack, J; Zaets, V; Zhemchugov, A

    2009-01-01

    The HARP resistive plate chamber (RPC) system was designed for time-of-flight measurement in the large-angle acceptance region of the HARP spectrometer. It comprised 46 four-gap glass RPCs covering an area of . The design of the RPCs, their operation, intrinsic properties, and system performance are described. The intrinsic time resolution of the RPCs is 127 ps leading to a system time-of-flight resolution of 175 ps. It is argued that gross differences between pion and proton timing in multi-gap timing RPCs, reported recently in the literature, do not exist.

  19. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J David [Bolingbrook, IL; Mawdsley, Jennifer R [Woodridge, IL; Niyogi, Suhas [Woodridge, IL; Wang, Xiaoping [Naperville, IL; Cruse, Terry [Lisle, IL; Santos, Lilia [Lombard, IL

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  20. Resistive Plate Chambers commissioning and performance results for 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector system at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the LHC confers robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon RPC system has been upgraded with 144 double-gap chambers on the forth forward stations. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region up to 1.6. The main detector parameters are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC (13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing). Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) performance results for 2015 with pp collisions at 13 TeV are presented. These results include the occupancy, efficiency of newly installed detectors after applying new working point, history plots for the RPC relevant variables such as: Cluster Size, Efficiency, percentage of inactive detector during operation and Rates and overall system noise. RPC variables are studied as funct...

  1. Resistive Plate Chamber Digitization in a Hadronic Shower Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Z.

    2016-06-28

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadron Calorimeter (SDHCAL) technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadron calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. In this paper we present our prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are ...

  2. Gas mixture studies for streamer operated Resistive Plate Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, A.; Longhin, A.; Mengucci, A.; Pupilli, F.; Ventura, M.

    2016-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode are interesting detectors in neutrino and astro-particle physics applications (like OPERA and ARGO experiments). Such experiments are typically characterized by large area apparatuses with no stringent requirements on detector aging and rate capabilities. In this paper, results of cosmic ray tests performed on a RPC prototype using different gas mixtures are presented, the principal aim being the optimization of the TetraFluoroPropene concentration in Argon-based mixtures. The introduction of TetraFluoroPropene, besides its low Global Warming Power, is helpful because it simplifies safety requirements allowing to remove also isobutane from the mixture. Results obtained with mixtures containing SF6, CF4, CO2, N2 and He are also shown, presented both in terms of detectors properties (efficiency, multiple-streamer probability and time resolution) and in terms of streamer characteristics.

  3. Recombination An important effect in multigap resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Doroud, K; Hatzifotiadou, D; Rahighi, J; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, A

    2009-01-01

    We have simulated the gas avalanche in a multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC). The results were then compared with our data from the MRPC [1]. Up to now, the total amount of charge produced in a gas gap is considered to be given by the total number of positive ions generated by the gas avalanches. However, the total charge generated by the simulation program is much too large and is in conflict with our data. Our data indicate that nearly 100% of the negative ions recombine with the positive ions. The recombination effect dramatically reduces the amount of charge in the gas gap: a very important feature for MRPC technology especially for the rate capability.

  4. PHENIX Resistive Plate Chambers High Voltage Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Marshall; Phenix Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory studies polarized proton-proton collisions to better understand the spin structure of the proton. While RHIC is operating there are millions of collisions each second, but the PHENIX data acquisition system can only record a few thousand each second. To help select the rare events of interest, a new forward trigger has been commissioned that includes four stations of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). During the most recent RHIC run, significant polarized proton-proton data were recorded with the new trigger for the first time. The RPC high voltage was recorded and studied for each module and each run. Every physics run was classified into one of four categories depending on its high voltage conditions, including the number of trips and the number and magnitude of mismatches between the HV set point and readback voltage. Each condition that was required to consider a run to have good HV was investigated systematically to determine the appropriate set points. The methods and results of this systematic study will be presented. This research was supported in part by the DOE under grant number DE-FG03-94ER40860.

  5. Corrosion resistance characteristics of stamped and hydroformed proton exchange membrane fuel cell metallic bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundar, F. [NSF I/UCRC Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology (Turkey); Dur, Ender; Koc, M. [NSF I/UCRC Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Mahabunphachai, S. [NSF I/UCRC Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand)

    2010-06-01

    Metallic bipolar plates have several advantages over bipolar plates made from graphite and composites due to their high conductivity, low material and production costs. Moreover, thin bipolar plates are possible with metallic alloys, and hence low fuel cell stack volume and mass are. Among existing fabrication methods for metallic bipolar plates, stamping and hydroforming are seen as prominent approaches for mass production scales. In this study, the effects of important process parameters of these manufacturing processes on the corrosion resistance of metallic bipolar plates made of SS304 were investigated. Specifically, the effects of punch speed, pressure rate, stamping force and hydroforming pressure were studied as they were considered to inevitably affect the bipolar plate micro-channel dimensions, surface topography, and hence the corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance under real fuel cell conditions was examined using both potentiodynamic and potentiostatic experiments. The majority of the results exhibited a reduction in the corrosion resistance for both stamped and hydroformed plates when compared with non-deformed blank plates of SS304. In addition, it was observed that there exist an optimal process window for punch speed in stamping and the pressure rate in hydroforming to achieve improved corrosion resistance at a faster production rate. (author)

  6. Effect of heat treatment on wear resistance of a grinding plate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of heat treatment on the hardness and by extension the wear resistance of locally produced grinding plate of known composition were investigated. Specimens were prepared from the grinding plate and were heat treated at 840°C, 860°C and 880°C and quenched at different rate. Some of the specimens were ...

  7. Experimental characterization of resistive joints for use inside ATLAS toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Volpini, G; Pojer, M

    2001-01-01

    The authors have investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, the thermo-electrical behavior of the ATLAS magnets resistive joints. These magnets exploit an Al-clad NbTi Rutherford superconducting cable, and the splices between different sections are performed by TIG-welding the Al matrices of the two cables to be connected. This technique is simple from a construction point of view, and we have shown that its performance is adequate for a safe operation of the magnets. The two main concerns during the design of these joints are the temperature rise due to Joule dissipation and the eddy currents induced under nonstationary conditions. We have devised a reliable model of these joints, that allows estimating their resistances and the induced eddy currents; later we have built and measured several sample joints to give experimental confirmation. The model requires, along with the joint geometry, the knowledge of the Rutherford-matrix interface resistance as well as the RRR of the aluminum matrix. In this...

  8. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature......’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through...

  9. Development of a Resistive Plate Chamber with heat strengthened glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, G.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondal, S.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.

    2016-09-01

    The INO-ICAL is a proposed neutrino physics experiment, in which RPCs will be used as active detectors. The Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector will be made of 50 kTon of low carbon magnetized steel layers, tiled with 4 m × 2 m × 56 mm thick plates, alternating with layers of RPCs. The total number of 2 × 2 m2 RPCs required will be about 29000. However, during the assembly of RPCs, handling the 2 × 2 m2 normal float glass of thickness 3 mm is both difficult and risky. This prompted us to make RPCs with toughened glass and to characterize them. Toughened and tempered glass have higher mechanical strength compared to normal float glass and their processing involves controlled thermal or chemical treatment during the industrial production. This paper presents a comparison of the characteristics, such as noise rate, dark current, particle detection efficiency and time resolution, of normal and hardened glass RPCs.

  10. The acrylic's design or the addition of internal orthodontic wire changes the resistance of orthodontic plates?

    OpenAIRE

    PITHON, Matheus Melo; Sousa,Érica Luiza Santana Moreira; Fogaça,Davi Novaes Ladeia; Silva,William Soares da; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito; Coqueiro, Raildo Silva

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate resistance of Hawley retainers in three different acrylic configurations in order to evaluate if its format or the addition of internal wire interferes in its resistance. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 45 Hawley retainers were fabricated, divided into three groups (n = 15): Group 1 - acrylic covering the entire hard palate, Group 2 - plate with relief at the deepest region of the palate, leaving it with a "U" conformation and Group 3 - similar to Group 2, with the addition of 0.7mm ...

  11. Highly efficient resistive plate chambers for high rate environment

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    1999-01-01

    The full scale prototype of an inverted double gap RPC module for ME-1/1 station of the CMS detector was tested in the gamma irradiation facility at the CERN SPS muon beam. The chamber made of medium resistivity bakelite and filled with "green gas" mixture of C /sub 2/H/sub 2/F/sub 4//iso-butane/SF/sub 6/ has wide efficiency plateau and good timing properties when operated in avalanche mode under continuous irradiation with strong /sup 137/Cs source for rates up to about 5 kHz/cm/sup 2//gap. (10 refs).

  12. Resistive Micromegas for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dudder, Andreas Christian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    It is reported on the construction and test of large scale resistive Micromegas detectors for the ATLAS New Small Wheel upgrade. The production procedure of the 2 to 3 m2 active area is described. The validation of the construction procedure is proven with results obtained with prototype detectors showing 100 µm spatial resolution in the precision coordinate and above 98% efficiency

  13. Experimental Investigation of Laminated Rubberized Aramid Armor Plates Resisting .30 Caliber Fragment Simulating Projectile ImpactPlates Resisting .30 Caliber FSP Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel ALANKAYA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the survivability for armed forces and police teams, attentive solutions are needed owing to the damage mechanism of fragments that have more kinetic energy than traditional bullets. Nevertheless, determining the damage capability of composite laminates against fragment impact at ballistic velocities is a challenging issue because of the difficulty in determining elastic stiffness of the armor due to the complex damage modes, which can occur in composites through impact phenomenon. Fire tests are generally considered to be the best validation method for procurement transactions of customers. This study presents the effects of impact velocities for rubberized aramid plates on the basis of computerized tomography scans taking into consideration composite failure modes. Additionally, the impact damage of plates at different ballistic velocities is presented, supported by real test reports focusing on the penetrating prevention capability and a predictive equation of ballistic limit velocity for rubberized aramid plates resisting. 30 caliber FSP is developed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.7682

  14. Enhanced microwave absorbing properties and heat resistance of carbonyl iron by electroless plating Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu, E-mail: wanghongyu07010310@163.com; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhou, Wancheng; Luo, Fa

    2015-11-01

    Co coated carbonyl iron particles (Co (CI)) are fabricated through electroless plating method, and the electromagnetic microwave absorbing properties are investigated in the frequencies during 8.2–12.4 GHz. The complex permittivity of CI particles after electroless plating Co is higher than that of raw CI particles due to improvment of the polarization process. Furthermore, according to the XRD and TG results, the Co layer can enhance the heat resistance of CI particles. The bandwidth below −10 dB can reach 3.9 GHz for the Co(CI) absorbent. The results indicate that the electroless plating Co not only enhances the absorbing properties but also improves the heat resistance of CI. - Highlights: • The Co-coated carbonyl iron Co(CI) particles were prepared by electroless plating. • The electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of Co(CI) particles were studied. • The heat treatment on the absorbing property of Co(CI) particles was studied. • The Co(CI) particles have good absorbing property when compared with CI.

  15. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  16. Performance Study of the CMS Barrel Resistive Plate Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; 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Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    In October and November 2008, the CMS collaboration conducted a programme of cosmic ray data taking, which has recorded about 270 million events. The Resistive Plate Chamber system, which is part of the CMS muon detection system, was successfully operated in the full barrel. More than 98% of the channels were operational during the exercise with typical detection efficiency of 90%. In this paper, the performance of the detector during these dedicated runs is reported.

  17. Recent experimental results and developments on the resistive plate chambers for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Altieri, S; Bruno, G; Guida, R; Merlo, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vitulo, P; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F

    2001-01-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) have been chosen as dedicated trigger detectors for the CMS experiment at the LHC. The expected severe operating conditions have required an intense research and development activity on these detectors over the past years. Experimental results on overall performance of large chambers, rate capability, ageing and photon sensitivity are reviewed. In all of these tests the detector has proven to achieve good enough performance for successful use at the LHC. (6 refs).

  18. Deep-rooted “thick skinned” model for the High Atlas Mountains (Morocco. Implications for the seismic Eurasia-Africa plate boundary region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraud, M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous crustal models of the High Atlas suppose the existence of a mid-crustal detachment where all the surface thrusts merged and below which the lower crust was continuous. However, both seismic refraction data and gravity modeling detected a jump in crustal thickness between the High Atlas and the northern plains. Here we show that this rapid and vertical jump in the depth of Moho discontinuity suggests that a thrust fault may penetrate the lower crust and offset the Moho (deep-rooted “thick skinned” model. The distribution of Neogene and Quaternary volcanisms along and at the northern part of the High Atlas lineament can be related to the beginning of a partial continental subduction of the West African plate to the north underneath Moroccan microplate. Allowing from the complex problem of the plate boundary in the western zone of the Mediterranean, we propose to interpret the South-Atlasic fault zone as the actual northwestern boundary of the stable part of the African plate rather than the Azores-Gibraltar fault currently used.Los modelos geodinámicos existentes sobre la estructura profunda del alto Atlas suponen la existencia de un despegue medio-cortical donde convergen los cabalgamientos superficiales y bajo el cual la corteza inferior es continua. Los datos de sísmica de refracción y gravimetría, sin embargo, indican la existencia de una discontinuidad en el grosor de la corteza (profundidad del Moho bajo el Alto Atlas. En este artículo ponemos de manifiesto que este salto rápido en la profundidad del Moho puede ser causado por un cabalgamiento que penetra la corteza inferior, desplazando la base de la misma ("deeprooted thick skinned model". La distribución del volcanismo Neógeno y Cuaternario a lo largo de y al norte de la alineación del Alto Atlas pueden estar relacionados con el comienzo de una subducción continental parcial de la placa Africana occidental hacia el norte, bajo la microplaca marroquí. La expresi

  19. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikestikova, M., E-mail: mikestik@fzu.cz [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Allport, P.P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department and Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Hommels, L.B.A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ullan, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus UAB-Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Tackmann, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-21

    A radiation hard n{sup +}-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the “ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration” and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in “punch-through protection” (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} and by gamma rays from {sup 60}Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07. - Highlights:

  20. Final results from an extensive ageing test of bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, G; De Capua, S; Dominici, Daniele; Messi, R; Passaleva, G; Santovetti, E; Veltri, M

    2004-01-01

    We present the final results of an extensive aging test, performed at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility on two bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors. With a method based on a model describing the behaviour of an RPC under high particle flux conditions, we have periodically measured the electrode resistivity rho of the two RPC prototypes over 3 years. We observed a large spontaneous increase of rho with time, from the initial value of about 10**1**0 Omega cm to more than 200 multiplied by 10**1**0 Omega cm. A corresponding degradation of the RPC rate capabilities, from more than 3 kHz/cm**2 to less than 200 Hz/cm**2, was observed; the reversibility of the process, using a humid gas mixture, has also been studied. We also present a study of the effects of humidity on the bakelite resistivity using two 10 multiplied by 10 cm**2 bakelite samples.

  1. Preparation of actinide targets by molecular plating for coulomb excitation studies at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, J P; Ahmad, I

    1999-01-01

    Molecular plating is now routinely used to prepare sources and targets of actinide elements. Although the technique is simple and fairly reproducible, because of the radioactive nature of the targets, it is very useful to record various parameters in the preparation process. At Argonne, approx 200 mu g/cm sup 2 thick targets of Pu and Cm were required for Coulomb Excitation (COULEX) studies with the Argonne-Notre Dame boron germanate (BGO) gamma-ray facility and later with the GAMMASPHERE. These targets were plated on 50 mg/cm sup 2 Au backings and were covered with 150 mu g/cm sup 2 Au foil. Targets of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 2 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 4 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm were prepared by dissolving the material in isopropyl alcohol and electroplating the actinide ions by applying 600 V. The amount of these materials on the target was determined by alpha particle counting and gamma-ray counting. Details of the molecular plating and counting will be discussed.

  2. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  3. Test and characterization of multigap resistive plate chambers for the EEE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossini, E.; EEE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Energy Events project is based on the deployment of cosmic-ray telescopes in Italian high schools with the active contribution of students and teachers. Each telescope is made by three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers readout by strips. With around 50 telescopes already built and others under construction, specific systems to test and characterize the chambers are needed. In this article I will present a flexible and software-configurable solution to perform chamber efficiency studies with a set of scintillators and hardware to automatically scan detector strips to identify electrical issues. Both systems can provide accurate information but at the same time they can be easily operated by students.

  4. The EEE Project: Cosmic rays, multigap resistive plate chambers and high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M.; Antolini, R; Avanzini, C; Baldini Ferroli, R; Bencivenni, G; Bossini, E; Bressan, E; Chiavassa, A; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Coccia, E; De Gruttula, D; De Pasquale, S; Di Giovanni, A; D'Incecco, M; Doroud, K; Dreucci, M; Fabbri, FL; Frolov, V; Garbini, M; Gemme, G; Gnesi, I; Gustavino, C; Hatzifotiadu, D; La Rocca, P; Li, S; Moro, R; Miozzi, S; Massai, M; Maggiora, A; Librizzi, F; Piragino, G; Pilo, F; Perasso, L; Paoletti, R; Righini, GC; Scapparone, E; Sartorelli, G; Romano, F; Serci, S; Selvi, M; Scribano, A; Riggi, F; Regano, A; Squarcia, S; Spandre, G; Toselli, F; Taiuti, M; Zichichi, A; Zouyevski, R; Williams, MCS; Votano, L; Siddi, E; Panareo, M

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Gain Monitoring (GGM) system of the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon detector in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment provides fast and accurate determination of the stability in the working point conditions due to gas mixture changes in the closed loop recirculation system. In 2011 the GGM began to operate using a feedback algorithm to control the applied voltage, in order to keep the GGM response insensitive to environmental temperature and atmospheric pressure variations. Recent results are presented on the feedback method used and on alternative algorithms.

  5. Time resolution of resistive plate chambers investigated with 10 MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradela, C., E-mail: carlos.paradela@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Casarejos, E. [Universidad de Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Duran, I. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    The time resolution of double-gap timing resistive plate chambers (tRPC) has been measured with 10 MeV electron bunches of variable intensity. The use of electrons delivered in bunches of a few picoseconds was an attempt to mimic the energy deposition of heavy ions in the tRPC gas gap. The measurements show a clear dependence of the time resolution with the number of electrons per bunch, reaching 21 ps (standard deviation) for the highest beam intensity. The signal charge distribution and the time resolution are compared to data obtained with the same detectors for cosmic rays and {sup 238}U ions at 1 AGeV.

  6. Test and characterization of multigap resistive plate chambers for the EEE project

    CERN Document Server

    Bossini, E

    2016-01-01

    The Extreme Energy Events project is based on the deployment of cosmic-ray telescopes in Italian high schools with the active contribution of students and teachers. Each telescope is made by three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers readout by strips. With around 50 telescopes already built and others under construction, specific systems to test and characterize the chambers are needed. In this article I will present a flexible and software-configurable solution to perform chamber efficiency studies with a set of scintillators and hardware to automatically scan detector strips to identify electrical issues. Both systems can provide accurate information but at the same time they can be easily operated by students.

  7. Long-term performance of double gap resistive plate chambers under gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; Guarrasi, L; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Altieri, S; Belli, G; Bruno, G; Gianini, G; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Viola, L; Vitulo, P

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a dedicated test to study possible long- term aging effects on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). A double gap detector was operated under gamma irradiation for a period approximately equal to 10 years of LHC in the CMS-barrel region: an integrated dose of about 1.6 Gy and a total charge of about 0.05 C/cm /sup 2/ gap were accumulated on the chamber. The results show no relevant aging effect. Also the RPC sensitivity to /sup 60/Co gamma energies is measured. (9 refs).

  8. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region lt 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  9. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00207984

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region < 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  10. Study of the effect of water vapor on a resistive plate chamber with glass electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Sakai, H H; Teramoto, Y; Nakano, E E; Takahashi, T T

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of water vapor on the efficiencies of resistive plate chambers with glass electrodes, operated in the streamer mode. With moisture in the chamber gas that has freon as a component (water vapor approx 1000 ppm), a decrease in the efficiency (approx 20%) has been observed after operating for a period of several weeks to a few months. From our study, the cause of the efficiency decrease was identified as a change on the cathode surface. In addition, a recovery method was found: flushing for 1 day with argon bubbled through water containing >=3% ammonia, followed by a few weeks of training with dry gas.

  11. Finite element normal mode analysis of resistance welding jointed of dissimilar plate hat structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazri, N. A.; Sani, M. S. M.

    2017-10-01

    Structural joints offer connection between structural element (beam, plate, solid etc.) in order to build a whole assembled structure. The complex behaviour of connecting elements plays a valuable role in characteristics of dynamic such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. In automotive structures, the trustworthiness arrangement of the structure extremely depends on joints. In this paper, top hat structure is modelled and designed with spot welding joint using dissimilar materials which is mild steel 1010 and stainless steel 304, using finite element software. Different types of connector elements such as rigid body element (RBE2), welding joint element (CWELD), and bar element (CBAR) are applied to represent real connection between two dissimilar plates. Normal mode analysis is simulated with different types of joining element in order to determine modal properties. Natural frequencies using RBE2, CBAR and CWELD are compared to equivalent rigid body method. Connection that gives the lowest percentage error among these three will be selected as the most reliable joining for resistance spot weld. From the analysis, it is shown that CWELD is better compared to others in term of weld joining among dissimilar plate materials. It is expected that joint modelling of finite element plays significant role in structural dynamics.

  12. Performance and simulation of a double-gap resistive plate chamber in the avalanche mode

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn Sung Hwan; Hong Byung Sik; Hong Seong Jong; Ito, M; Kang, T I; Kim, B I; Kim, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee Hyup Woo; Lee, K B; Lee Kyong Sei; Lee Seok Jae; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee June Tak; Ryu, M S; Sim Kwang Souk

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the time and the charge signals of a prototype double-gap resistive plate chamber for the endcap region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The chamber was built with relatively low-resistivity bakelite. The time and the charge results demonstrate that the high- voltage plateau, which satisfies various CMS requirements for the efficiency, the noise cluster rate, the fraction of the large signal, and the streamer probability, can be extended at least up to 400 V with the present design. In addition, a simple avalanche multiplication model is studied in detail. The model can reproduce the experimental charge spectra reasonably well. The charge information enables us to estimate the effective Townsend coefficient in avalanche-mode operation.

  13. The Resistive-Plate WELL with Argon mixtures - a robust gaseous radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moleri, Luca; Arazi, Lior; Rocha Azevedo, Carlos Davide; Oliveri, Eraldo; Pitt, Michael; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Shaked-Renous, Dan; Marques Ferreira dos Santos, Joaquim; Veloso, Joao Filipe Calapez de Albuquerque; Breskin, Amos; Bressler, Shikma

    2016-01-01

    A thin single-element THGEM-based, Resistive-Plate WELL (RPWELL) detector was operated with 150 GeV/c muon and pion beams in Ne/(5%CH$_4$), Ar/(5%CH$_4$) and Ar/(7%CO$_2$); signals were recorded with 1 cm$^2$ square pads and SRS/APV25 electronics. Detection efficiency values greater than 98% were reached in all the gas mixtures, at average pad multiplicity of 1.2. The use of the 10$^9${\\Omega}cm resistive plate resulted in a completely discharge-free operation also in intense pion beams. The efficiency remained essentially constant at 98-99% up to fluxes of $\\sim$10$^4$Hz/cm$^2$, dropping by a few % when approaching 10$^5$ Hz/cm$^2$. These results pave the way towards cost-effective, robust, efficient, large-scale detectors for a variety of applications in future particle, astro-particle and applied fields. A potential target application is digital hadron calorimetry.

  14. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Akhnazarov, V; Canepa, A; Bremer, J; Burckhart, H; Cattai, A; Voss, R; Hervas, L; Kaplon, J; Nessi, M; Werner, P; Ten kate, H; Tyrvainen, H; Vandelli, W; Krasznahorkay, A; Gray, H; Alvarez gonzalez, B; Eifert, T F; Rolando, G; Oide, H; Barak, L; Glatzer, J; Backhaus, M; Schaefer, D M; Maciejewski, J P; Milic, A; Jin, S; Von torne, E; Limbach, C; Medinnis, M J; Gregor, I; Levonian, S; Schmitt, S; Waananen, A; Monnier, E; Muanza, S G; Pralavorio, P; Talby, M; Tiouchichine, E; Tocut, V M; Rybkin, G; Wang, S; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Ocariz, J H; Bertoli, W; Malaescu, B; Sbarra, C; Yamamoto, A; Sasaki, O; Koriki, T; Hara, K; Da silva gomes, A; Carvalho maneira, J; Marcalo da palma, A; Chekulaev, S; Tikhomirov, V; Snesarev, A; Buzykaev, A; Maslennikov, A; Peleganchuk, S; Sukharev, A; Kaplan, B E; Swiatlowski, M J; Nef, P D; Schnoor, U; Oakham, G F; Ueno, R; Orr, R S; Abouzeid, O; Haug, S; Peng, H; Kus, V; Vitek, M; Temming, K K; Dang, N P; Meier, K; Schultz-coulon, H; Geisler, M P; Sander, H; Schaefer, U; Ellinghaus, F; Rieke, S; Nussbaumer, A; Liu, Y; Richter, R; Kortner, S; Fernandez-bosman, M; Ullan comes, M; Espinal curull, J; Chiriotti alvarez, S; Caubet serrabou, M; Valladolid gallego, E; Kaci, M; Carrasco vela, N; Lancon, E C; Besson, N E; Gautard, V; Bracinik, J; Bartsch, V C; Potter, C J; Lester, C G; Moeller, V A; Rosten, J; Crooks, D; Mathieson, K; Houston, S C; Wright, M; Jones, T W; Harris, O B; Byatt, T J; Dobson, E; Hodgson, P; Hodgkinson, M C; Dris, M; Karakostas, K; Ntekas, K; Oren, D; Duchovni, E; Etzion, E; Oren, Y; Ferrer, L M; Testa, M; Doria, A; Merola, L; Sekhniaidze, G; Giordano, R; Ricciardi, S; Milazzo, A; Falciano, S; De pedis, D; Dionisi, C; Veneziano, S; Cardarelli, R; Verzegnassi, C; Soualah, R; Ochi, A; Ohshima, T; Kishiki, S; Linde, F L; Vreeswijk, M; Werneke, P; Muijs, A; Vankov, P H; Jansweijer, P P M; Dale, O; Lund, E; Bruckman de renstrom, P; Dabrowski, W; Adamek, J D; Wolters, H; Micu, L; Pantea, D; Tudorache, V; Mjoernmark, J; Klimek, P J; Ferrari, A; Abdinov, O; Akhoundov, A; Hashimov, R; Shelkov, G; Khubua, J; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Glagolev, V; Dedovich, D; Lykasov, G; Zhemchugov, A; Zolnikov, Y; Ryabenko, M; Sivoklokov, S; Vasilyev, I; Shalimov, A; Lobanov, M; Paramoshkina, E; Mosidze, M; Bingul, A; Nodulman, L J; Guarino, V J; Yoshida, R; Drake, G R; Calafiura, P; Haber, C; Quarrie, D R; Alonso, J R; Anderson, C; Evans, H; Lammers, S W; Baubock, M; Anderson, K; Petti, R; Suhr, C A; Linnemann, J T; Richards, R A; Tollefson, K A; Holzbauer, J L; Stoker, D P; Pier, S; Nelson, A J; Isakov, V; Martin, A J; Adelman, J A; Paganini, M; Gutierrez, P; Snow, J M; Pearson, B L; Cleland, W E; Savinov, V; Wong, W; Goodson, J J; Li, H; Lacey, R A; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H; Lanni, F; Nevski, P; Rescia, S; Kierstead, J A; Liu, Z; Yu, W W H; Bensinger, J; Hashemi, K S; Bogavac, D; Cindro, V; Hoeferkamp, M R; Coelli, S; Iodice, M; Piegaia, R N; Alonso, F; Wahlberg, H P; Barberio, E L; Limosani, A; Rodd, N L; Jennens, D T; Hill, E C; Pospisil, S; Smolek, K; Schaile, D A; Rauscher, F G; Adomeit, S; Mattig, P M; Wahlen, H; Volkmer, F; Calvente lopez, S; Sanchis peris, E J; Pallin, D; Podlyski, F; Says, L; Boumediene, D E; Scott, W; Phillips, P W; Greenall, A; Turner, P; Gwilliam, C B; Kluge, T; Wrona, B; Sellers, G J; Millward, G; Adragna, P; Hartin, A; Alpigiani, C; Piccaro, E; Bret cano, M; Hughes jones, R E; Mercer, D; Oh, A; Chavda, V S; Carminati, L; Cavasinni, V; Fedin, O; Patrichev, S; Ryabov, Y; Nesterov, S; Grebenyuk, O; Sasso, J; Mahmood, H; Polsdofer, E; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Liu, H; Hegazy, K H; Benjamin, D P; Zobernig, G; Ban, J; Brooijmans, G H; Keener, P; Williams, H H; Le geyt, B C; Hines, E J; Fadeyev, V; Schumm, B A; Law, A T; Kuhl, A D; Neubauer, M S; Shang, R; Gagliardi, G; Calabro, D; Conta, C; Zinna, M; Jones, G; Li, J; Stradling, A R; Hadavand, H K; Mcguigan, P; Chiu, P; Baldelomar, E; Stroynowski, R A; Kehoe, R L; De groot, N; Timmermans, C; Lach-heb, F; Addy, T N; Nakano, I; Moreno lopez, D; Grosse-knetter, J; Tyson, B; Rude, G D; Tafirout, R; Benoit, P; Danielsson, H O; Elsing, M; Fassnacht, P; Froidevaux, D; Ganis, G; Gorini, B; Lasseur, C; Lehmann miotto, G; Kollar, D; Aleksa, M; Sfyrla, A; Duehrssen-debling, K; Fressard-batraneanu, S; Van der ster, D C; Bortolin, C; Schumacher, J; Mentink, M; Geich-gimbel, C; Yau wong, K H; Lafaye, R; Crepe-renaudin, S; Albrand, S; Hoffmann, D; Pangaud, P; Meessen, C; Hrivnac, J; Vernay, E; Perus, A; Henrot versille, S L; Le dortz, O; Derue, F; Piccinini, M; Polini, A; Terada, S; Arai, Y; Ikeno, M; Fujii, H; Nagano, K; Ukegawa, F; Aguilar saavedra, J A; Conde muino, P; Castro, N F; Eremin, V; Kopytine, M; Sulin, V; Tsukerman, I; Korol, A; Nemethy, P; Bartoldus, R; Glatte, A; Chelsky, S; Van nieuwkoop, J; Bellerive, A; Sinervo, J K; Battaglia, A; Barbier, G J; Pohl, M; Rosselet, L; Alexandre, G B; Prokoshin, F; Pezoa rivera, R A; Batkova, L; Kladiva, E; Stastny, J; Kubes, T; Vidlakova, Z; Esch, H; Homann, M; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Pfeifer, B; Stenzel, H; Andrei, G V; Wessels, M; Buescher, V; Kleinknecht, K; Fiedler, F M; Schroeder, C D; Fernandez, E; Mir martinez, L; Vorwerk, V; Bernabeu verdu, J; Salt, J; Civera navarrete, J V; Bernard, R; Berriaud, C P; Chevalier, L P; Hubbard, R; Schune, P; Nikolopoulos, K; Batley, J R; Brochu, F M; Phillips, A W; Teixeira-dias, P J; Rose, M B D; Buttar, C; Buckley, A G; Nurse, E L; Larner, A B; Boddy, C; Henderson, J; Costanzo, D; Tarem, S; Maccarrone, G; Laurelli, P F; Alviggi, M; Chiaramonte, R; Izzo, V; Palumbo, V; Fraternali, M; Crosetti, G; Marchese, F; Yamaguchi, Y; Hessey, N P; Mechnich, J M; Liebig, W; Kastanas, K A; Sjursen, T B; Zalieckas, J; Cameron, D G; Banka, P; Kowalewska, A B; Dwuznik, M; Mindur, B; Boldea, V; Hedberg, V; Smirnova, O; Sellden, B; Allahverdiyev, T; Gornushkin, Y; Koultchitski, I; Tokmenin, V; Chizhov, M; Gongadze, A; Khramov, E; Sadykov, R; Krasnoslobodtsev, I; Smirnova, L; Kramarenko, V; Minaenko, A; Zenin, O; Beddall, A J; Ozcan, E V; Hou, S; Wang, S; Moyse, E; Willocq, S; Chekanov, S; Le compte, T J; Love, J R; Ciocio, A; Hinchliffe, I; Tsulaia, V; Gomez, A; Luehring, F; Zieminska, D; Huth, J E; Gonski, J L; Oreglia, M; Tang, F; Shochet, M J; Costin, T; Mcleod, A; Uzunyan, S; Martin, S P; Pope, B G; Schwienhorst, R H; Brau, J E; Ptacek, E S; Milburn, R H; Sabancilar, E; Lauer, R; Saleem, M; Mohamed meera lebbai, M R; Lou, X; Reeves, K B; Rijssenbeek, M; Novakova, P N; Rahm, D; Steinberg, P A; Wenaus, T J; Paige, F; Ye, S; Kotcher, J R; Assamagan, K A; Oliveira damazio, D; Maeno, T; Henry, A; Dushkin, A; Costa, G; Meroni, C; Resconi, S; Lari, T; Biglietti, M; Lohse, T; Gonzalez silva, M L; Monticelli, F G; Saavedra, A F; Patel, N D; Ciodaro xavier, T; Asevedo nepomuceno, A; Lefebvre, M; Albert, J E; Kubik, P; Faltova, J; Turecek, D; Solc, J; Schaile, O; Ebke, J; Losel, P J; Zeitnitz, C; Sturm, P D; Barreiro alonso, F; Modesto alapont, P; Soret medel, J; Garzon alama, E J; Gee, C N; Mccubbin, N A; Sankey, D; Emeliyanov, D; Dewhurst, A L; Houlden, M A; Klein, M; Burdin, S; Lehan, A K; Eisenhandler, E; Lloyd, S; Traynor, D P; Ibbotson, M; Marshall, R; Pater, J; Freestone, J; Masik, J; Haughton, I; Manousakis katsikakis, A; Sampsonidis, D; Krepouri, A; Roda, C; Sarri, F; Fukunaga, C; Nadtochiy, A; Kara, S O; Timm, S; Alam, S M; Rashid, T; Goldfarb, S; Espahbodi, S; Marley, D E; Rau, A W; Dos anjos, A R; Haque, S; Grau, N C; Havener, L B; Thomson, E J; Newcomer, F M; Hansl-kozanecki, G; Deberg, H A; Takeshita, T; Goggi, V; Ennis, J S; Olness, F I; Kama, S; Ordonez sanz, G; Koetsveld, F; Elamri, M; Mansoor-ul-islam, S; Lemmer, B; Kawamura, G; Bindi, M; Schulte, S; Kugel, A; Kretz, M P; Kurchaninov, L; Blanchot, G; Chromek-burckhart, D; Di girolamo, B; Francis, D; Gianotti, F; Nordberg, M Y; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Boyd, J; Wilkens, H G; Pauly, T; Fabre, C; Tricoli, A; Bertet, D; Ruiz martinez, M A; Arnaez, O L; Lenzi, B; Boveia, A J; Gillberg, D I; Davies, J M; Zimmermann, R; Uhlenbrock, M; Kraus, J K; Narayan, R T; John, A; Dam, M; Padilla aranda, C; 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Carlsen, A; Kanwal, B; Cochran jr, J H; Aronnax, M V; Lockner, M J; Zhou, B; Levin, D S; Weaverdyck, C J; Grom, G F; Rudge, A; Ebenstein, W L; Jia, B; Yamaoka, J; Jared, R C; Wu, S L; Banerjee, S; Lu, Q; Hughes, E W; Alkire, S P; Degenhardt, J D; Lipeles, E D; Spencer, E N; Savine, A; Cheu, E C; Lampl, W; Veatch, J R; Roberts, K; Atkinson, M J; Odino, G A; Polesello, G; Martin, T; White, A P; Stephens, R; Grinbaum sarkisyan, E; Vartapetian, A; Yu, J; Sosebee, M; Thilagar, P A; Spurlock, B; Bonde, R; Filthaut, F; Klok, P; Hoummada, A; Ouchrif, M; Pellegrini, G; Rafi tatjer, J M; Navarro, G A; Blumenschein, U; Weingarten, J C; Mueller, D; Graber, L; Gao, Y; Bode, A; Capeans garrido, M D M; Carli, T; Wells, P; Beltramello, O; Vuillermet, R; Dudarev, A; Salzburger, A; Torchiani, C I; Serfon, C L G; Sloper, J E; Duperrier, G; Lilova, P T; Knecht, M O; Lassnig, M; Anders, G; Deviveiros, P; Young, C; Sforza, F; Shaochen, C; Lu, F; Wermes, N; Wienemann, P; Schwindt, T; Hansen, P H; Hansen, J B; Pingel, A M; Massol, N; Elles, S L; Hallewell, G D; Rozanov, A; Vacavant, L; Fournier, D A; Poggioli, L; Puzo, P M; Tanaka, R; Escalier, M A; Makovec, N; Rezynkina, K; De cecco, S; Cavalleri, P G; Massa, I; Zoccoli, A; Tanaka, S; Odaka, S; Mitsui, S; Tomasio pina, J A; Santos, H F; Satsounkevitch, I; Harkusha, S; Baranov, S; Nechaeva, P; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V; Asai, M; Mount, R P; Nelson, T K; Smith, D; Kenney, C J; Malone, C M; Kobel, M; Friedrich, F; Grohs, J P; Jais, W J; O'neil, D C; Warburton, A T; Vincter, M; Mccarthy, T G; Groer, L S; Pham, Q T; Taylor, W J; La marra, D; Perrin, E; Wu, X; Bell, W H; Delitzsch, C M; Feng, C; Zhu, C; Tokar, S; Bruncko, D; Kupco, A; Marcisovsky, M; Jakoubek, T; Bruneliere, R; Aktas, A; Narrias villar, D I; Tapprogge, S; Mattmann, J; Kroha, H; Crespo, J; Korolkov, I; Cavallaro, E; Cabrera urban, S; Mitsou, V; Kozanecki, W; Mansoulie, B; Pabot, Y; Etienvre, A; Bauer, F; Chevallier, F; Bouty, A R; Watkins, P; Watson, A; Faulkner, P J W; Curtis, C J; Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; Sadrozinski, H; Lockman, W S; Martinez-mc kinney, G; Goussiou, A; Jones, A; Lie, K; Hasegawa, Y; Olcese, M; Gilewsky, V; Harrison, P F; Janus, M; Spangenberg, M; De, K; Ozturk, N; Pal, A K; Darmora, S; Bullock, D J; Oviawe, O; Derkaoui, J E; Rahal, G; Sircar, A; Frey, A S; Stolte, P; Rosien, N; Zoch, K; Li, L; Schouten, D W; Catinaccio, A; Ciapetti, M; Delruelle, N; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Hoecker, A; Klioutchnikova, T; Macina, D; Malyukov, S; Spiwoks, R D; Unal, G P; Vandoni, G; Petersen, B A; Pommes, K; Nairz, A M; Wengler, T; Mladenov, D; Solans sanchez, C A; Lantzsch, K; Schmieden, K; Jakobsen, S; Ritsch, E; Sciuccati, A; Alves dos santos, A M; Ouyang, Q; Zhou, M; Brock, I C; Janssen, J; Katzy, J; Anders, C F; Nilsson, B S; Bazan, A; Di ciaccio, L; Yildizkaya, T; Collot, J; Malek, F; Trocme, B S; Breugnon, P; Godiot, S; Adam bourdarios, C; Coulon, J; Duflot, L; Petroff, P G; Zerwas, D; Lieuvin, M; Calderini, G; Laporte, D; Ocariz, J; Gabrielli, A; Ohska, T K; Kurochkin, Y; Kantserov, V; Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  15. First in-beam studies of a Resistive-Plate WELL gaseous multiplier

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, S.; Pitt, M.; Kudella, S.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Amaro, F.D.; Jorge, M.R.; dos Santos, J.M.F.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Natal da Luz, H.; Arazi, L.; Olivieri, E.; Breskin, A.

    2016-01-12

    We present the results of the first in-beam studies of a medium size (10$\\times$10 cm$^2$) Resistive-Plate WELL (RPWELL): a single-sided THGEM coupled to a pad anode through a resistive layer of high bulk resistivity ($\\sim$10$^9 \\Omega$cm). The 6.2~mm thick (excluding readout electronics) single-stage detector was studied with 150~GeV muons and pions. Signals were recorded from 1$\\times$1 cm$^2$ square copper pads with APV25-SRS readout electronics. The single-element detector was operated in Ne\\(5% $\\mathrm{CH_{4}}$) at a gas gain of a few times 10$^4$, reaching 99$\\%$ detection efficiency at average pad multiplicity of $\\sim$1.2. Operation at particle fluxes up to $\\sim$10$^4$ Hz/cm$^2$ resulted in $\\sim$23$\\%$ gain drop leading to $\\sim$5$\\%$ efficiency loss. The striking feature was the discharge-free operation, also in intense pion beams. These results pave the way towards robust, efficient large-scale detectors for applications requiring economic solutions at moderate spatial and energy resolutions.

  16. Safety Analysis of the Patch Load Resistance of Plate Girders: Influence of Model Error and Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Shahabian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to undertake a statistical study to evaluate the accuracy of nine models that have been previously proposed for estimating the ultimate resistance of plate girders subjected to patch loading. For each model, mean errors and standard errors, as well as the probability of underestimating or overestimating patch load resistance, are estimated and the resultant values are compared one to another. Prior to that, the models are initially calibrated in order to improve interaction formulae using an experimental data set collected from the literature. The models are then analyzed by computing design factors associated with a target risk level (probability of exceedance. These models are compared one to another considering uncertainties existed in material and geometrical properties. The Monte Carlo simulation method is used to generate random variables. The statistical parameters of the calibrated models are calculated for various coefficients of variations regardless of their correlation with the random resistance variables. These probabilistic results are very useful for evaluating the stochastic sensitivity of the calibrated models.

  17. Degradation in the efficiency of glass Resistive Plate Chambers operated without external gas supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesso, P.; Cussans, D.; Thomay, C.; Velthuis, J.; Burns, J.; Quillin, S.; Stapleton, M.; Steer, C.

    2015-06-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) are particle detectors commonly used by the high energy physics community. Their normal operation requires a constant flow of gas mixture to prevent self-poisoning which reduces the chamber's capability to detect particles. We studied how quickly the efficiency of two RPCs drops when operated in sealed mode, i.e. without refreshing the gas mixture. The test aim is to determine how RPCs could be used as particle detectors in non-laboratory applications, such as those exploiting muon tomography for geological imaging or homeland security. The two sealed RPCs were operated in proportional mode for a period of more than three months, and their efficiencies were recorded continuously and analysed in 8-hours intervals. The results show that the efficiency drops on average by 0.79 ± 0.01 % every 24 hours of operation and returns close to the initial value after purging the old gas mixture and flushing the chambers with fresh gas.

  18. An encoding readout method used for Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs) for muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Zeng, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, X.; Zeng, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Cheng, J.

    2014-09-01

    A muon tomography facility has been built in Tsinghua University. Because of the low flux of cosmic muon, an encoding readout method, based on the fine-fine configuration, was implemented for the 2880 channels induced signals from the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) detectors. With the encoding method, the number of the readout electronics was dramatically reduced and thus the complexity and the cost of the facility was reduced, too. In this paper, the details of the encoding method, and the overall readout system setup in the muon tomography facility are described. With the commissioning of the facility, the readout method works well. The spatial resolution of all MRPC detectors are measured with cosmic muon and the preliminary imaging result are also given.

  19. Using pulse shape analysis to improve the position resolution of a resistive anode microchannel plate detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwal, Davinder; Wiggins, B. B.; deSouza, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Digital signal processing techniques were employed to investigate the joint use of charge division and risetime analyses for the resistive anode (RA) coupled to a microchannel plate detector (MCP). In contrast to the typical approach of using the relative charge at each corner of the RA, this joint approach results in a significantly improved position resolution. A conventional charge division analysis utilizing analog signal processing provides a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM). By using the correlation between risetime and position we were able to obtain a measured resolution of 92 μm (FWHM), corresponding to an intrinsic resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) for a single Z-stack MCP detector.

  20. Performance of Resistive Plate Chambers installed during the first long shutdown of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Shopova, M.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Sultanov, G.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Assran, Y.; Sayed, A.; Radi, A.; Aly, S.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharma, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Rios, A.A.O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Gul, M.; Fagot, A.; Bhatnagar, V.; Singh, J.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Ahmad, A.; Awan, I.M.; Shahzad, H.; Hoorani, H.; Asghar, M.I.; Muhammad, S.; Ahmed, W.; Shah, M.A.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lim, J.H.; Park, S.K.; Kim, M.S.; Laktineh, I.B.; Lagarde, F.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Pedraza, I.; Bernardino, S. Carpinteyro; Estrada, C. Uribe; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Pant, L.M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Fabozzi, F.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Lanza, G.; Esposito, M.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Montagna, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S.J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Petkov, P.; Pavlov, B.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J.C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment, located at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, has a redundant muon system composed by three different detector technologies: Cathode Strip Chambers (in the forward regions), Drift Tubes (in the central region) and Resistive Plate Chambers (both its central and forward regions). All three are used for muon reconstruction and triggering. During the first long shutdown (LS1) of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon system has been upgraded with 144 newly installed RPCs on the forth forward stations. The new chambers ensure and enhance the muon trigger efficiency in the high luminosity conditions of the LHC Run2. The chambers have been successfully installed and commissioned. The system has been run successfully and experimental data has been collected and analyzed. The performance results of the newly installed RPCs will be presented.

  1. The Time Response of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers to Heavily Ionizing Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; Bogomilov, M; Booth, C; Borghi, S; Catanesi, M G; Chimenti, P; Gastaldi, Ugo; Giani, S; Graulich, J S; Grégoire, G; Grossheim, A; Guglielmi, A; Ivantchenko, V; Kolev, D; Meurer, C; Mezzetto, M; Panman, J; Popov, B; Radicioni, E; Schroeter, R; Temnikov, P; Chernyaev, E; Tsenov, R; Tsukerman, I; Wiebusch, C

    2007-01-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.

  2. Multigap resistive plate chambers for EAS study in the EEE Project

    CERN Document Server

    An, S; Badalà, A; Zichichi, A

    2007-01-01

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project, conceived by its leader Antonino Zichichi, is an experiment to study very high-energetic air showers (EAS) through the detection of the shower's muon component using a network of tracking detectors, installed in Italian high schools. The single tracking telescope is composed of three large area () Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs). The data collected by the telescopes will be used for studies of air showers and also for the search of time correlations between sites which are far apart. The first telescope, recently installed in the Liceo B. Touschek in Grottaferrata (Rome), is successfully running, and other telescopes are going to be installed in a short time in other towns, opening up the way for the first search of long-distance coincidences over a total area of .

  3. Water resistant rhodium plated reflectors for use in the DIRC BaBar Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Benkebil, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G

    2000-01-01

    Early simulation studies showed that reflectors mounted on the photomultipliers would be useful for the DIRC BaBar Cherenkov detector, showing a gain between 20% and 30% in the number of Cherenkov photons. The proof of principle for these reflectors has been obtained during the beam test of a large-scale prototype of the DIRC detector. An extensive R and D has been conducted in order to test different metallization procedures. Indeed, the challenge was to find a metallization technique which can resist the pure de-ionized water (>15 M OMEGA) up to 10 yr. The chosen technology was rhodium plated reflectors. During the first BaBar cosmic run, the measured performance confirmed the results of the simulation, the prototype-II and the R and D.

  4. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. S.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Qian, S.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D.; Goh, J.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kang, J. W.; Kang, M.; Kwon, J. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. K.; Park, S. K.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Chudasama, R.; Singh, J. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Mehta, A.; Kumar, R.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Costantini, S.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Ocampo, A.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Doninck, W. V.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro, L.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Avila, C.; Ahmad, A.; Muhammad, S.; Shoaib, M.; Hoorani, H.; Awan, I.; Ali, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Shahzad, H.; Sayed, A.; Ibrahim, A.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Elkafrawy, T.; Sharma, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Paolucci, P.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Merola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, O. M.; Braghieri, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Vai, I.; Magnani, A.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Hadjiiska, R.; Ibargüen, H. S.; Morales, M. I. P.; Bernardino, S. C.; Bagaturia, I.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Crotty, I.

    2014-10-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  5. Web-based monitoring tools for Resistive Plate Chambers in the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Min Suk

    2014-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) are used in the CMS experiment at the trigger level and also in the standard offline muon reconstruction. In order to guarantee the quality of the data collected and to monitor online the detector performance, a set of tools has been developed in CMS which is heavily used in the RPC system. The Web-based monitoring (WBM) is a set of java servlets that allows users to check the performance of the hardware during data taking, providing distributions and history plots of all the parameters. The functionalities of the RPC WBM monitoring tools are presented along with studies of the detector performance as a function of growing luminosity and environmental conditions that are tracked over time.

  6. Performance of 2nd Generation BaBar Resistive Plate Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anulli, F.; Baldini, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; /Frascati; Cheng, C.H.; Lange, D.J.; Wright, D.M.; /LLNL,; Messner, R.; Wisniewski, William J.; /SLAC; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; /Ferrara; Capra, R.; /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Oregon U. /UC, Riverside

    2005-07-12

    The BaBar detector has operated nearly 200 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), constructed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detector, for the past two years. The RPCs experience widely different background and luminosity-driven singles rates (0.01-10 Hz/cm{sup 2}) depending on position within the endcap. Some regions have integrated over 0.3 C/cm{sup 2}. RPC efficiency measured with cosmic rays is high and stable. The average efficiency measured with beam is also high. However, a few of the highest rate RPCs have suffered efficiency losses of 5-15%. Although constructed with improved techniques and minimal use of linseed oil, many of the RPCs, which are operated in streamer mode, have shown increased dark currents and noise rates that are correlated with the direction of the gas flow and the integrated current. Studies of the above aging effects are presented and correlated with detector operating conditions.

  7. A new type of detector time of flight - multi-gap resistive plate chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H; Eppley, G; Geurts, F J M; Huang, S; Li, C; Liu, H; Llope, W J; Ruan, L; Shao, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z; Wu, J; Xu, Z; Zhang, Z

    2004-01-01

    Multi-gap resistive plate chamber is a new detector technology. It was first developed by the LHC-ALICE group at CERN in the late 1990s. The MRPC is a ideal detector for time-of-flight measurement due to its small gaps and works in the proportional (avalanche) mode. The beam test of single module result shows that MRPC tuning resolution is better than 70ps and the detection efficiency is higher than 95%. It is also radiation hard. A time-of-flight tray with 28 on MRPC modules. was tested at AGS. The average timing resolution is about 75ps (including the 4cm of beam spread) and detection efficiency is better than 95%. This tray has been installed on STAR detector system in October 2002 and used on the 200GeV d+Au experiment.

  8. Resistive Plate Chambers commissioning and performance results for 2011-2013.

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) performance results for the period between 2011-2013 are presented. These results include history plots for the RPC relevant variables such as: Cluster Size, Efficiency, percentage of inactive detector during operation, Rates, and Currents. RPC variables are studied as function of relevant parameters such as the averaged instantaneous luminosity of the LHC, time, and CMS cavern pressure. Results obtained with the monitoring tools used by CMS such as the Web Based Monitoring tool (WBM) are also shown. RPC Background rates measured during 2010, 2011, and 2012 are presented and compared. Preparations for the 2015 Run include the installation of a new couple of disks of RPCs in the endcap regions, results obtained during quality control campaigns for the new RPCs are also presented, these results include High voltage scans that probe the quality and standards of the RPC construction procedures, as well as tests on chamber gas leaks and current behavior for the new chambers. Basic p...

  9. Segmentation of plate coupling, fate of subduction fluids, and modes of arc magmatism in Cascadia, inferred from magnetotelluric resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamaker, Philip E.; Evans, Rob L.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Maris, Virginie; McGary, R. Shane

    2014-01-01

    Five magnetotelluric (MT) profiles have been acquired across the Cascadia subduction system and transformed using 2-D and 3-D nonlinear inversion to yield electrical resistivity cross sections to depths of ∼200 km. Distinct changes in plate coupling, subduction fluid evolution, and modes of arc magmatism along the length of Cascadia are clearly expressed in the resistivity structure. Relatively high resistivities under the coasts of northern and southern Cascadia correlate with elevated degrees of inferred plate locking, and suggest fluid- and sediment-deficient conditions. In contrast, the north-central Oregon coastal structure is quite conductive from the plate interface to shallow depths offshore, correlating with poor plate locking and the possible presence of subducted sediments. Low-resistivity fluidized zones develop at slab depths of 35–40 km starting ∼100 km west of the arc on all profiles, and are interpreted to represent prograde metamorphic fluid release from the subducting slab. The fluids rise to forearc Moho levels, and sometimes shallower, as the arc is approached. The zones begin close to clusters of low-frequency earthquakes, suggesting fluid controls on the transition to steady sliding. Under the northern and southern Cascadia arc segments, low upper mantle resistivities are consistent with flux melting above the slab plus possible deep convective backarc upwelling toward the arc. In central Cascadia, extensional deformation is interpreted to segregate upper mantle melts leading to underplating and low resistivities at Moho to lower crustal levels below the arc and nearby backarc. The low- to high-temperature mantle wedge transition lies slightly trenchward of the arc.

  10. Controlling the hydrophilicity and contact resistance of fuel cell bipolar plate surfaces using layered nanoparticle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng

    Hybrid nanostructured coatings exhibiting the combined properties of electrical conductivity and surface hydrophilicity were obtained by using Layer-by-Layer (LBL) assembly of cationic polymer, silica nanospheres, and carbon nanoplatelets. This work demonstrates that by controlling the nanoparticle zeta (zeta) potential through the suspension parameters (pH, organic solvent type and amount, and ionic content) as well as the assembly sequence, the nanostructure and composition of the coatings may be adjusted to optimize the desired properties. Two types of silica nanospheres were evaluated as the hydrophilic component: X-TecRTM 3408 from Nano-X Corporation, with a diameter of about 20 nm, and polishing silica from Electron Microscopy Supply, with diameter of about 65 nm. Graphite nanoplatelets with a thickness of 5~10nm (Aquadag RTM E from Acheson Industries) were used as electrically conductive filler. A cationic copolymer of acrylamide and a quaternary ammonium salt (SuperflocRTM C442 from Cytec Corporation) was used as the binder for the negatively charged nanoparticles. Coatings were applied to gold-coated stainless steel substrates presently used a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Coating thickness was found to vary nearly linearly with the number of polymer-nanoparticle layers deposited while a monotonic increase in coating contact resistance was observed for all heterogeneous and pure silica coatings. Thickness increased if the difference in the oppositely charged zeta potentials of the adsorbing components was enhanced through alcohol addition. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed if the zeta potential difference was increased through pH variation. This previously undocumented difference in adsorption behavior is herein related to changes to the surface chemical heterogeneity of the nanoparticles. Coating contact resistance and surface wettability were found to have a more subtle dependence on the assembly

  11. Electrical resistivity and dielectric properties of helical microorganism cells coated with silver by electroless plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jun, E-mail: jun_cai@buaa.edu.cn [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lan, Mingming; Zhang, Deyuan; Zhang, Wenqiang [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the microorganism cells as forming templates to fabricate the bio-based conductive particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microorganism cells selected as forming templates are Spirulina platens, which are of natural helical shape and high aspect ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sliver-coated Spirulina cells are a kind of lightweight conductive particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composites containing sliver-coated Spirulina cells exhibit a lower percolation value. - Abstract: In this paper, microorganism cells (Spirulina platens) were used as forming templates for the fabrication of the helical functional particles by electroless silver plating process. The morphologies and ingredients of the coated Spirulina cells were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer. The crystal structures were characterized by employing the X-ray diffraction. The electrical resistivity and dielectric properties of samples containing different volume faction of sliver-coated Spirulina cells were measured and investigated by four-probe meter and vector network analyzer. The results showed that the Spirulina cells were successfully coated with a uniform silver coating and their initial helical shapes were perfectly kept. The electrical resistivity and dielectric properties of the samples had a strong dependence on the volume content of sliver-coated Spirulina cells and the samples could achieve a low percolation value owing to high aspect ratio and preferable helical shape of Spirulina cells. Furthermore, the conductive mechanism was analyzed with the classic percolation theory, and the values of {phi}{sub c} and t were obtained.

  12. Accurate assessment of antibiotic susceptibility and screening resistant strains of a bacterial population by linear gradient plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuqing; Li, Jingran; Du, Jiafa; Hu, Ming; Bai, Hua; Qi, Jing; Gao, Chao; Wei, Tiantian; Su, Hong; Jin, Jianling; Gao, Peiji

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of a bacterial population exposed to the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antibiotic is an important issue in pharmacological research. Therefore, a novel antibiotic susceptibility test is urgently needed that can both precisely determine the MIC and accurately select antibiotic-resistant strains from clinical bacterial populations. For this purpose, we developed a method based on Fick's laws of diffusion using agar plates containing a linear gradient of antibiotic. The gradient plate contained two layers. The bottom layer consisted of 15 mL agar containing the appropriate concentration of enrofloxacin and allowed to harden in the form of a wedge with the plate slanted such that the entire bottom was just covered. The upper layer consisted of 15 mL plain nutrient agar added with the plate held in the horizontal position. After allowing vertical diffusion of the drug from the bottom agar layer for 12 h, the enrofloxacin concentration was diluted in proportion to the ratio of the agar layer thicknesses. The uniform linear concentration gradient was verified by measuring the enrofloxacin concentration on the agar surface. When heavy bacterial suspensions were spread on the agar surface and incubated for more than 12 h, only resistant cells were able to form colonies beyond the boundary of confluent growth of susceptible cells. In this way, the true MIC of enrofloxacin was determined. The MICs obtained using this linear gradient plate were consistent with those obtained using conventional antibiotic susceptibility tests. Discrete colonies were then spread onto a gradient plate with higher antibiotic concentrations; the boundary line increased significantly, and gene mutations conferring resistance were identified. This new method enables the rapid identification of resistant strains in the bacterial population. Use of the linear gradient plate can easily identify the precise MIC and reveal the dynamic differentiation of bacteria near the MIC

  13. High-resolution imaging detector using five microchannel plates and a resistive anode encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution imaging detector with five microchannel plates (MCPs) in a set of V and Z stacks and a resistive anode encoder (RAE) for future space applications. In a position-sensitive system with a RAE, the spatial resolution depends on the signal-to-noise ratios at the anode terminals. Therefore, a high and stable electron gain of MCPs allows the position determination of each photoelectron event with a high spatial resolution. We investigated the effect of the potentials applied to the detector on the pulse height distribution (PHD) and the spatial resolution by means of calculations and experiments. The calculations showed that the negative interstack potential reduced the size of the electron cloud at the Z-stack input by approximately 80%. The result suggests that, under such a condition, the Z-stack MCP is operated in the completely saturated mode and exhibits a narrow PHD. On the other hand, in the measurements, applying the negative interstack potential reduced the width of the PHD by approximately 60%. As a result, the spatial resolution of 45 microm, corresponding to 480x480 pixels, was achieved. The results enable us to optimize and apply the technique to future missions.

  14. Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for EAS study in the EEE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrescia, M.; An, S.; Antolini, R.; Badala, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Blanco, F.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Chiri, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Coccia, E.; de Pasquale, S.; di Giovanni, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Imponente, G.; Kim, J.; La Rocca, P.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Menghetti, H.; Miozzi, S.; Moro, R.; Panareo, M.; Pappalardo, G.S.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Romano, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Sbarra, C.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Williams, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyenski, R.

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Event) Project is an extensive air shower experiment devoted to the study of very high energy events through the detection at ground of the muon component of the shower. The detectors are installed inside many Italian High Schools, involving students in the experiment. The detector used is a tracking telescope made of 3 planes of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPCs), a simplified, large and cheap version of the detector designed for the time of flight measurements (TOF) of the ALICE experiment at LHC. Exploiting the concept of the multiple small gas gaps combined with the use of high gain and fast gas mixture (Freon and SF6 based), the MRPCs show an overall time resolution of 100 ps. The particle tracking is performed equipping MRPCs with 24 copper strips read at both ends by front end electronics based on NINO ASIC and using commercial multi-hit TDCs. The MRPCs for the EEE experiment are built at CERN by Italian High School students and teachers under the supervision of INFN and Centro “E. Fermi” experts. After construction they are shipped to Italy and after preliminary tests they are installed inside the schools. Here we present the status and first results of the already operating stations.

  15. Analysis and interpretation of the performance degradation of glass Resistive Plate Chambers operated in streamer mode

    CERN Document Server

    Calcaterra, A; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Della Mea, G; Restello, S; Ferri, F; Musella, P; Redaelli, N; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tinti, G; Mannocchi, G; Trinchero, G

    2007-01-01

    The long-term stability of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with glass electrodes was studied for one year with a dedicated test station hosting about 10 m2 of detectors. RPCs were operated in streamer mode with a ternary gas mixture containing argon (27%), isobutane (9%) and tetrafluoroethane (64%). Environmental conditions were kept under control and, in particular, the water pollution in the gas, deemed responsible for the degradation of glass RPC performance, was monitored never to exceed 30 ppm in the exhaust line. Evidence for a substantial aging of the detectors was observed, resulting in a loss of efficiency correlated to an increased rate of spurious streamers. This can be ascribed to the chemical attack of the glass surface by hydrofluoric acid formed in the streamer process, as confirmed by detailed morphological and chemical analyses of the electrode surface. Our results strengthen the indication that the instability of glass RPCs in the long term is related to the use of fluorocarbons as quenching...

  16. A new model for thermal contact resistance between fuel cell gas diffusion layers and bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2014-11-01

    A new analytical model is developed to predict the thermal contact resistance (TCR) between fibrous porous media such as gas diffusion layers (GDLs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and flat surfaces (bipolar plates). This robust model accounts for the salient geometrical parameters of GDLs, mechanical deformation, and thermophysical properties of the contacting bodies. The model is successfully validated against experimental data, and is used to perform in a comprehensive parametric study to investigate the effects of fiber parameters such as waviness and GDL properties on the TCR. Fiber waviness, diameter and surface curvature, as well as GDL porosity, are found to have a strong influence on TCR whereas fiber length does not affect the TCR when the porosity is kept constant. Such findings provide useful guidance for design and manufacturing of more effective GDLs for PEMFC heat management. The analytic model can be readily implemented in simulation and modeling of PEMFCs, and can be extended with minor modifications to other fibrous porous media such as fibrous catalysts, insulating media and sintered metals.

  17. Studies on fast triggering and high precision tracking with Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of fast triggering and high-precision tracking using Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs). Two beam tests were carried out with the 180 GeV muon beam at CERN using RPCs with gas gaps of 1.00 or 1.15 mm and equipped with readout strips with 1.27 mm pitch. This is the first beam test of RPCs with fine-pitch readout strips that explores simultaneously precision tracking and triggering capabilities. RPC signals were acquired with precision timing and charge integrating readout electronics at both ends of the strips. The time resolution was measured to be better than 600 ps and the average spatial resolution was found to be 220 um using charge information and 287 um using timing information. The dual-ended readout allows the determination of the average and the difference of the signal arrival times. The average time was found to be independent of the incident particle position along the strip and is useful for triggering purposes. The time difference yielded a determination of the hit position wit...

  18. CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance at $\\sqrt{s}=$13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrera Mora, Andres Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    During 2015, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has reached the record-breaking center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV for proton-proton collisions. The LHC restarted operations successfully after a two-year technical stop, known as Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), needed for servicing and consolidating the CERN accelerator complex. The Compact Muon Solenoid detector, a general-purpose detector at LHC, benefited from LS1 by performing crucial tasks necessary to operate the detector at higher energies. In particular, the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) system, one of the three muon detector technologies in CMS, was serviced, re-commissioned, and upgraded with 144 new chambers to enhance muon trigger efficiency. The CMS RPC system confers robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region $ \\lvert\\eta\\rvert \\leq$1.6. The CMS RPC collaboration has exploited early data samples at 13 TeV for detector performance studies. These data allowed for a first characte...

  19. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas (Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors have proven along the years to be a reliable high rate capable detector techno- logy characterised by an excellent spatial resolution. The ATLAS colla- boration at LHC has chosen the resistive Micromegas technology (mainly for tracking), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC, mainly for triggering), for the high luminosity upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. The NSW requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers with spatial resolution better than 100μm independent of the track inci- dence angle and the magnetic field (B < 0.3 T), with a rate capability up to ∼ 10kHz/cm2. Along with the precise tracking the Micromegas chambers should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small (10×10cm2) and medium size (1×0.5m2) resistive Micromegas chambers (b...

  20. Streamer free operation of a 2 mm gap resistive plate chamber with $C_{2}F_{5}H$

    CERN Document Server

    Cerron-Zeballos, E; Hatzifotiadou, D; Lamas-Valverde, J; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, A

    1999-01-01

    It is necessary to operate the resistive plate chamber (RPC) in avalanche mode to obtain high efficiency at elevated particle fluxes. We examine this mode of operation with a 2 mm gap RPC using gas mixtures containing C/sub 2/F/sub 4/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/F/sub 5/H. In order to explain the data we propose that the avalanche growth is strongly limited by space charge effects. (10 refs).

  1. Correction on the influence of thermal contact resistance in thermal conductivity measurements using the guarded hot plate method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanić Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the influence of finite thermal contact resistances which exist in thermal conductivity measurements of homogeneous and poor thermal conductive materials using the guarded hot plate method. As an example of correction method proposed in this work, different experimental results obtained from a standard reference material sample (with the conductivity of about 1 W/mK have been presented.

  2. Electrical Resistivity Tomography of the Karstic Aquifer of Bittit spring (Middle Atlas, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qarqori, Kh.; Rouai, M.; Moreau, F.; Saracco, G.; Hermitte, D.; Boualoul, M.; Dauteuil, O.; Biessy, G.; Sahbi, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Tabular Middle Atlas reservoir is one of the most important aquifers in northern Morocco. It is mainly a water table fractured reservoir consisting of Lias limestone and dolomite. The matrix permeability is very low and water flows essentially along open fractures and karsts. The Bittit Spring belongs to this karstic system and constitutes an important aquifer lying at the junction between the tabular reservoir and the Sais basin. Bittit spring, with an average annual discharge of about 1600 l/s, contributes largely to water supply of the big city of Meknes. Groundwater circulation is complex due to tectonics and to presence of karstic Quaternary travertine overlying Lias carbonate. In Bittit area, travertine is mostly covered by Quaternary basalt. Up to now water flow paths and the underground karst organization remain misknown, and turbidity affects the water quality after rain events. To highlight these issues, an integrated geophysical survey was performed in this area in the framework of a French-Moroccan scientific project. The geophysical imaging was carried out mainly by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Resistivity data were acquired by an ABEM Terrameter SAS1000 and a multi-electrode Lund system imaging using a Wenner array configuration of 64 electrodes and 5m spacing, reaching a depth of about 50m. Topographic corrections and 2D inversion models were performed using Res2Dinv software package. Seven 2D resistivity high resolution images have been obtained allowing to detect, delineate important fractures and also to hydrogeological characterization of the underground karst. A borehole of 100m depth was drilled in order to correlate and calibrate geophysical data and proposed models. Two sub-vertical fracture families have been identified with NE-SW and NW-SE directions respectively. These results correlate well with fracture data analysis gathered from remote sensing Spot images at large scale, and from local field fracture scanline surveys. A

  3. Improving wettability of photo-resistive film surface with plasma surface modification for coplanar copper pillar plating of IC substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Jing; Wang, Chong; Chen, Yuanming; Wang, Shouxu; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Huaiwu [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Gong, Lijun [Research and Development Department, Guangzhou Fastprint Circuit Tech Co., Ltd., Guangzhou 510663 (China); He, Wei, E-mail: heweiz@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Research and Development Department, Guangdong Guanghua Sci-Tech Co., Ltd., Shantou 515000 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Air atmosphere plasmacould generatehydrophilic groups of photo-resistive film. • Better wettability of photo-resistive filmled tohigher plating uniformity of copper pillars. • New flow isreduced cost, simplified process and elevated productivity. - Abstract: The wettability of the photo-resistive film (PF) surfaces undergoing different pretreatments including the O{sub 2}−CF{sub 4} low-pressure plasma (OCLP) and air plasma (AP), is investigated by water contact angle measurement instrument (WCAMI) before the bottom-up copper pillar plating. Chemical groups analysis performed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) shows that after the OCLP and wash treatment, the wettability of PF surface is attenuated, because embedded fluorine and decreased oxygen content both enhance hydrophobicity. Compared with OCLP treatment, the PF surface treatment by non-toxic air plasma displays features of C−O, O−C=O, C=O and −NO{sub 2} by AIR-FTIR and XPS, and a promoted wettability by WCAM. Under the identical electroplating condition, the surface with a better wettability allows electrolyte to spontaneously soak all the places of vias, resulting in improved copper pillar uniformity. Statistical analysis of metallographic data shows that more coplanar and flat copper pillars are achieved with the PF treatment of air plasma. Such modified copper-pillar-plating technology meets the requirement of accurate impedance, the high density interconnection for IC substrates.

  4. A study on the effect of flat plate friction resistance on speed performance prediction of full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Woo Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat plate friction lines have been used in the process to estimate speed performance of full-scale ships in model tests. The results of the previous studies showed considerable differences in determining form factors depending on changes in plate friction lines and Reynolds numbers. These differences had a great influence on estimation of speed performance of full-scale ships. This study was conducted in two parts. In the first part, the scale effect of the form factor depending on change in the Reynolds number was studied based on CFD, in connection with three kinds of friction resistance curves: the ITTC-1957, the curve proposed by Grigson (1993; 1996, and the curve developed by Katsui et al. (2005. In the second part, change in the form factor by three kinds of friction resistance curves was investtigated based on model tests, and then the brake power and the revolution that were finally determined by expansion processes of full-scale ships. When three kinds of friction resistance curves were applied to each kind of ships, these were investigated: differences between resistance and self-propulsion components induced in the expansion processes of full-scale ships, correlation of effects between these components, and tendency of each kind of ships. Finally, what friction resistance curve was well consistent with results of test operation was examined per each kind of ships.

  5. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas (Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors have proven along the years to be a reliable high rate capable detector technology characterised by an excellent spatial resolution. The ATLAS collaboration at LHC has chosen the resistive Micromegas technology (mainly for tracking), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC, mainly for triggering), for the high luminosity upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. The NSW requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers with spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$ independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field ($B<0.3\\,\\mathrm{T}$), with a rate capability up to $\\sim10\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$. Moreover, together with the precise tracking capability the Micromegas chambers should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small ($10\\times10\\,\\...

  6. Design, construction, quality checks and test results of first resistive-Micromegas read-out boards for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iengo, Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The development work carried out at CERN to push the Micromegas technology to a new frontier is now coming to an end. The construction of the first read-out boards for the upgrade of the ATLAS muon system will demonstrate in full-scale the feasibility of this ambitious project. The read-out boards, representing the heart of the detector, are manufactured in industries, making the Micromegas for ATLAS the first MPGD for a large experiment with a relevant part industrially produced. The boards are 50 cm wide and up to 220 cm long, carrying copper strips 315 μm wide with 415 μm pitch. Interconnected resistive strips, having the same pattern as the copper strips, provide spark protection. The boards are completed by the creation of cylindrical pillars 128 μm high, 280 μm in diameter and arranged in a triangular array 7 mm aside. The total number of boards to be produced for ATLAS is 2048 of 32 different types. We will review the main design parameters of the read-out boards for the ATLAS Micromegas, following...

  7. The flat-plate plant-microbial fuel cell: the effect of a new design on internal resistances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Marjolein

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to a growing world population and increasing welfare, energy demand worldwide is increasing. To meet the increasing energy demand in a sustainable way, new technologies are needed. The Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell (P-MFC is a technology that could produce sustainable bio-electricity and help meeting the increasing energy demand. Power output of the P-MFC, however, needs to be increased to make it attractive as a renewable and sustainable energy source. To increase power output of the P-MFC internal resistances need to be reduced. With a flat-plate P-MFC design we tried to minimize internal resistances compared to the previously used tubular P-MFC design. With the flat-plate design current and power density per geometric planting area were increased (from 0.15 A/m2 to 1.6 A/m2 and from 0.22 W/m2 to and 0.44 W/m2as were current and power output per volume (from 7.5 A/m3 to 122 A/m3 and from 1.3 W/m3 to 5.8 W/m3. Internal resistances times volume were decreased, even though internal resistances times membrane surface area were not. Since the membrane in the flat-plate design is placed vertically, membrane surface area per geometric planting area is increased, which allows for lower internal resistances times volume while not decreasing internal resistances times membrane surface area. Anode was split into three different sections on different depths of the system, allowing to calculate internal resistances on different depths. Most electricity was produced where internal resistances were lowest and where most roots were present; in the top section of the system. By measuring electricity production on different depths in the system, electricity production could be linked to root growth. This link offers opportunities for material-reduction in new designs. Concurrent reduction in material use and increase in power output brings the P-MFC a step closer to usable energy density and economic feasibility.

  8. A study on the effect of flat plate friction resistance on speed performance prediction of full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat plate friction lines hare been used in the process to estimate speed performance of full-scale ships in model tests. The results of the previous studies showed considerable differences in determining form factors depending on changes in plate friction lines and Reynolds numbers. These differences had a great influence on estimation of speed performance of full-scale ships. This study- was conducted in two parts. In the first part, the scale effect of the form factor depending on change in the Reynolds number was studied based on CFD, in connection with three kinds of friction resistance curves: the ITTC-1957, the curve proposed by Grigson (1993; 1996, and the curve developed by Katsui et al (2005. In the second part, change in the form factor by three kinds of

  9. High-voltage safety fuses for the transition-radiation tracking detector in the ATLAS experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voronov, SA; Voronov, YA; Onishchenko, EM; Simakov, AB; Sosnovtsev, VV; Suchkov, SI; Sugrobova, TA

    2004-01-01

    A safety fuse has been designed for the electrical protection of gas-filled detectors in the ATLAS experiment at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). The fuse is a polished lithium niobate plate with a titanium strip of 91-kOmega resistance deposited by the photolithographic technique. The forced blow-out

  10. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas chambers for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration at LHC has endorsed the resistive Micromegas technology (MM), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), for the high luminosity upgrade of the first muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) project. The NSW requires fully efficient MM chambers, up to a particle rate of $\\sim15\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$, with spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$ independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field ($B \\leq 0.3\\,\\mathrm{T}$). Along with the precise tracking the MM should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small ($10\\times10\\,\\mathrm{cm^2}$) MM chambers using medium ($10\\,\\mathrm{GeV/c}$, PS) and high ($150\\,\\mathrm{GeV/c}$, SPS) momentum hadron beams at CERN. Results on the efficiency and position resolution measured during these tests are presented demonstrating the excellent characteristics of the MM that fulf...

  11. Resistive Micromegas for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00215987; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Large size resistive micromegas detectors (MM) will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The current innermost stations of the muon endcap system, the Small Wheel, will be upgraded in 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) the ``New Small Wheel'' will be equipped with eight layers of MM detectors arranged in multilayers of two quadruplets, for a total of about 1200 m$^2$ detection planes. All quadruplets have trapezoidal shapes with surface areas between 2 and 3 m$^2$. The MM system will provide both trigger and tracking capabilities. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, a challenging mechanical precision is required in the construction for each plane of the assembled modules, with an alignment of the reado...

  12. Resistive Micromegas for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iodice, Mauro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Large size resistive Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The current innermost stations of the muon endcap system, the Small Wheel, will be upgraded in 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) the “New Small Wheel” will be equipped with eight layers of Micromegas (MM) detectors arranged in multilayers of two quadruplets, for a total of about 1200 m$^2$ detection planes. All quadruplets have trapezoidal shapes with surface areas between 2 and 3 m$^2$. The Micromegas system will provide both trigger and tracking capabilities. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, a challenging mechanical precision is required in the construction for each plane of the assembled modules, with an alig...

  13. Threshold dependence of strip clusters for the forward region resistive plate chamber of the CMS/LHC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Choi, E J; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Jung, S R; Kim, T J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K S; Lee, Y L; Lee, S B; Lee, S J; Nam, S K; Oh, J K; Park, M K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S; Woo, J K

    2003-01-01

    Strip clusters of muons and background hits induced by gamma rays and spurious pulses are analyzed for the Forward Region Resistive Plate Chamber of the CMS/LHC. In order to perform the analysis, a real size RE2/1 prototype RPC manufactured with the final baseline design of the Forward Region RPCs was tested at the Gamma Irradiation Facility of CERN. Strip cluster sizes for muons and strip cluster rates for gamma rays are sensitive to the threshold setting while the efficiency to muons is relatively insensitive.

  14. Electroless plating Cu-Co-P polyalloy on UV/ozonolysis irradiated polyethylene terephthalate film and its corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Lei; Bi, Siyi; Zhao, Hang; Xu, Yumeng; Mu, Yuhang; Lu, Yinxiang, E-mail: yxlu@fudan.edu.cn

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Electroless plating Cu-Co-P polyalloy was firstly fabricated onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. • An etchant-free and amine-free UV/ozonolysis irradiation method UV/ozonolysis was effective for the transition from hydrophilic to hydrophobic of PET sheet. • A time-saving and cost-effective orthogonal experiment (L{sub 9}(3){sup 4}) was utilized to optimize the plating conditions. • The optimized copper polyalloy possessed high corrosion resistance in three aggressive mediums including NaCl, NaOH and HCl, respectively. • The Cu-Co-P coated PET composite showed excellent electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE > 99.999% at frequency ranging from 30 MHz to 1000 MHz). - Abstract: High corrosion resistant Cu-Co-P coatings were firstly prepared on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by electroless plating in combination with UV/ozonolysis irradiation under optimized cobalt sulfate heptahydrate concentration, pH value, plating temperature and time. The copper polyalloy/PET composite can be obtained in three steps, namely: (i) the generation of oxygen-containing functionalities (carboxylic groups) onto PET surface through UV irradiation combined with ozone, (ii) Cu seeding catalysts were obtained after being immersed into cupric citrate and NaBH{sub 4} solutions subsequently, and (iii) Cu-Co-P polyalloy metallization using electroless plating bath. Attenuated total reflection fourier transformation infrared spectrometer (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurement and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were utilized to track the surface changes during the whole process. The electroless plating conditions were optimized by an orthogonal experiment (L{sub 9}(3){sup 4}) for Cu-Co-P coating as follows: CoSO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O addition of 0.08 M, pH value, plating temperature and time were set on 10.0, 35 °C and 25 min, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, copper

  15. Multi-dimensional Crustal and Lithospheric Structure of the Atlas Mountains of Morocco by Magnetotelluric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Ledo, J.; Siniscalchi, A.; Romano, G.

    2014-12-01

    The PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) project and the concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROSCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) project were designed to collect high resolution, multi-disciplinary lithospheric scale data in order to understand the tectonic evolution and lithospheric structure of the western Mediterranean. The over-arching objectives of the magnetotelluric (MT) component of the projects are (i) to provide new electrical conductivity constraints on the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Atlas Mountains, and (ii) to test the hypotheses for explaining the purported lithospheric cavity beneath the Middle and High Atlas inferred from potential-field lithospheric modeling. We present the results of an MT experiment we carried out in Morocco along two profiles: an approximately N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas, the High Atlas and the eastern Anti-Atlas to the east (called the MEK profile, for Meknes) and NE-SW oriented profile through western High Atlas to the west (called the MAR profile, for Marrakech). Our results are derived from three-dimensional (3-D) MT inversion of the MT data set employing the parallel version of Modular system for Electromagnetic inversion (ModEM) code. The distinct conductivity differences between the Middle-High Atlas (conductive) and the Anti-Atlas (resistive) correlates with the South Atlas Front fault, the depth extent of which appears to be limited to the uppermost mantle (approx. 60 km). In all inverse solutions, the crust and the upper mantle show resistive signatures (approx. 1,000 Ωm) beneath the Anti-Atlas, which is the part of stable West African Craton. Partial melt and/or exotic fluids enriched in volatiles produced by the melt can account for the high middle to lower crustal and uppermost mantle conductivity in the Folded Middle Atlas, the High Moulouya Plain and the

  16. Assessment of the Resistance of a Polymethylmethacrylate (Pmma Dynamic Compression Plate (DCP Prototype Tested on Osteotomized Canine Femurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Cardona R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Femur fractures are the most frequent long bone fractures in small animals. Due to the femur’s anatomical position, it is difficult to immobilize, and therefore internal fixations are very useful. Dynamic compression plates (DCP provide high stability, are durable, minimize fragment movement and promote primary healing of the bone. Advantages of this treatment include anatomical reconstruction, early mobility and carrying capacity of the affected limb. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA is an acrylic resin that has proved very useful in bone tumor treatment, cranial deformation prosthesis, percutaneous vertebroplasty and testicular prosthesis in animals. The purpose of this study was to manufacture DCP-PMMA and test its resistance to the different forces present in a fracture. Forty-eight (48 3.5MM x 4-hole DCP were made from an alginate mold. Six (6 femurs were obtained from canine cadavers zeighing from 10 to 20 kg, which underwent osteotomy simulating an oblique fracture. The plates were subsequently positioned in the osteotomized bones to submit them to the various forces involved in a fracture. The DCP-PMMA resisted a torque force of 2.83 newton/metres and a compression and flexion force of 0.21 kilonewton. The obtained resistance of the DCP-PMMA was an average of 20 kg per force. The results of this study show that it is possible to make a DCP-PMMA 3.5 mm x 4-hole, the resistance of which is of 20 kg against the three applied forces, and that it can be used to stabilize long bone fractures subjected to a pressure of less than 20 kg.

  17. Study on the poisoning resistance of Pd-coated ZrCo alloy prepared by electroless plating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiumei, E-mail: xiumei418@163.com; Wang, Shumao; Li, Zhinian; Yuan, Baolong; Ye, Jianhua; Qiu, Haochen; Wu, Yuanfang; Liu, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Lijun

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The Pd membrane was prepared by electroless plating method. • The Pd membrane was compact and uniform. • The effectiveness of Pd membranes was affected by impurity contents and temperatures. - Abstract: To improve the poisoning resistance of ZrCo alloy, Pd membranes have been prepared over the surface of the alloy substrates by using electroless plating method. The characteristics of Pd membranes have been examined by XRD, SEM, EDS and EPMA technologies. From SEM images, the uniform and compact thin Pd film was revealed. The effect of this Pd film was evaluated by comparing the hydrogen absorption properties of bare and Pd-coated ZrCo specimens in contaminated hydrogen gas. The degradation of hydrogen absorption of Pd-coated ZrCo induced by poisoning was less than that of bare ZrCo sample obviously, meaning that the Pd membranes over the surface of substrates appeared to be effective in improving the poisoning resistance of ZrCo alloy. Furthermore, the effect became more significant with the increasing of impurity contents in the experimental gas and the operation temperatures.

  18. Hydrodynamic resistance of the friction plates with longitudinal mikroborizdkamy and thin elastic coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.І. Коробов

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available  Weight measurements in a water tunnel have shown that there exist a range of parameters of longitudinally fine-ribbed surface such that turbulent friction in flow over the surface is less then that over a smooth flat plate of the same projected area. Damping coating made from the thin layer of an elastic material and have interior longitudinal ribs of rigidity (overturn riblets is more effective than usual riblets.

  19. ATLAS RPC Quality Assurance results at INFN Lecce

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00211509; Borjanovic, I.; Cataldi, G.; Cazzato, A.; Chiodini, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Perrino, R.; Primavera, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Tassielli, G.; Ventura, A.

    2006-01-01

    The main results of the quality assurance tests performed on the Resistive Plate Chamber used by the ATLAS experiment at LHC as muon trigger chambers are reported and discussed. Since July 2004, about 270 RPC units has been certified at INFN Lecce site and delivered to CERN, for being integrated in the final muon station of the ATLAS barrel region. We show the key RPC characteristics which qualify the performance of this detector technology as muon trigger chamber in the harsh LHC enviroments. These are dark current, chamber efficiency, noise rate, gas volume tomography, and gas leakage.

  20. Effects of SF$_{6}$ on the avalanche mode operation of a real-sized double-gap resistive plate chamber for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn Sung Hwan; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Ito, M; Kim, B I; Kim, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S; Kang, T I

    2005-01-01

    We present the design and the test, results for a real-sized prototype resistive plate chamber by using cosmic-ray muons for the forward region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In particular, we investigate the effects of adding SF/sub 6/ to the gas mixture for the avalanche mode operation of a resistive plate chamber. A small fraction of SF/sub 6/ is very effective in suppressing streamer signals in a resistive plate chamber. The shapes of the muon detection efficiency and the muon cluster size remain similar, but are shifted to higher operating voltage by SF/sub 6/. The noise cluster rate and size are not influenced by SF/sub 6/.

  1. Corrosion Resistance of 7475-T7351 Aluminum Alloy Plate for Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ming

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The intergranular corrosion and exfoliation corrosion properties of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy plate for aviation were investigated, and the corrosion behaviors of the alloy were analyzed by metallographic analysis(MA and transmission electron microscope(TEM. The results show that no obvious intergranular corrosion is observed, but exfoliation corrosion grade of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy increases from EA on surface to EC in the core. The exfoliation corrosion of 7475 alloy plate is mainly because of the typical lamellar structure, and the pathway formed by galvanic corrosion on grain boundary. The expansion of grain boundary corrosion product volume produces the wedging force,makes intergranular corrosion grow along the direction in parallel with the surface,and then gradually evolves into exfoliation corrosion. The degree of recrystallization decreases gradually from the surface to center, and the grain length-to-width radio increases, which inclines to exfoliation corrosion and leads to the exfoliation corrosion grade increasing from surface to center.

  2. Vibration analysis of resistance spot welding joint for dissimilar plate structure (mild steel 1010 and stainless steel 304)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, M. S. M.; Nazri, N. A.; Alawi, D. A. J.

    2017-09-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is a proficient joining method commonly used for sheet metal joining and become one of the oldest spot welding processes use in industry especially in the automotive. RSW involves the application of heat and pressure without neglecting time taken when joining two or more metal sheets at a localized area which is claimed as the most efficient welding process in metal fabrication. The purpose of this project is to perform model updating of RSW plate structure between mild steel 1010 and stainless steel 304. In order to do the updating, normal mode finite element analysis (FEA) and experimental modal analysis (EMA) have been carried out. Result shows that the discrepancies of natural frequency between FEA and EMA are below than 10 %. Sensitivity model updating is evaluated in order to make sure which parameters are influences in this structural dynamic modification. Young’s modulus and density both materials are indicate significant parameters to do model updating. As a conclusion, after perform model updating, total average error of dissimilar RSW plate is improved significantly.

  3. Improving wettability of photo-resistive film surface with plasma surface modification for coplanar copper pillar plating of IC substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jing; Wang, Chong; Chen, Yuanming; Wang, Shouxu; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Gong, Lijun; He, Wei

    2017-07-01

    The wettability of the photo-resistive film (PF) surfaces undergoing different pretreatments including the O2sbnd CF4 low-pressure plasma (OCLP) and air plasma (AP), is investigated by water contact angle measurement instrument (WCAMI) before the bottom-up copper pillar plating. Chemical groups analysis performed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) shows that after the OCLP and wash treatment, the wettability of PF surface is attenuated, because embedded fluorine and decreased oxygen content both enhance hydrophobicity. Compared with OCLP treatment, the PF surface treatment by non-toxic air plasma displays features of Csbnd O, Osbnd Cdbnd O, Cdbnd O and sbnd NO2 by AIR-FTIR and XPS, and a promoted wettability by WCAM. Under the identical electroplating condition, the surface with a better wettability allows electrolyte to spontaneously soak all the places of vias, resulting in improved copper pillar uniformity. Statistical analysis of metallographic data shows that more coplanar and flat copper pillars are achieved with the PF treatment of air plasma. Such modified copper-pillar-plating technology meets the requirement of accurate impedance, the high density interconnection for IC substrates.

  4. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, Marcello; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Cauwenbergh, Simon Marc D; Ferrini, Mauro; Muhammad, Saleh; Passamontic, L; Pierluigi, Daniele; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Russo, Alessandro; Savianoc, G; Tytgat, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require F-based gases for optimal performance. Recent regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard cms electronic setup are under test. In this talk preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze and with CO2 based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  5. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M.

    2016-01-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  6. Operation and performance of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers during LHC run II

    CERN Document Server

    Eysermans, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The Resitive Plate Chambers (RPC) at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) provide redundancy to the Drift Tubes in the barrel and Cathode Strip Chambers in the endcap regions. Consisting of 1056 double gap RPC chambers, the main detector parameters and environmental conditions are carefully monitored during the data taking period. At a center of mass energy of 13 TeV, the luminosity reached record levels which was challenging from the operational and performance point of view. In this work, the main operational parameters are discussed and the overall performance of the RPC system is reported for the LHC run II data taking period. With a low amount of inactive chambers, a good and stable detector performance was achieved with high efficiency.

  7. Microtiter Plate-Based Assay for Inhibitors of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a from Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Sudheer; Ponnaluri, V. K. Chaithanya; Mukherji, Mridul; Gutheil, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), the molecular determinant for high-level β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is intrinsically resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics. The development and characterization of new inhibitors targeting PBP2a would benefit from an effective and convenient assay for inhibitor binding. This study was directed toward the development of a fluorescently detected β-lactam binding assay for PBP2a from MRSA. Biotinylated ampicillin and biotinylated cephalexin were tested as tagging reagents for fluorescence detection by using a streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Both bound surprisingly well to PBP2a, with binding constants of 1.6 ± 0.4 μM and 13.6 ± 0.8 μM, respectively. Two forms of the assay were developed, a one-step direct competition form of the assay and a two-step indirect competition form of the assay, and both forms of the assay gave comparable results. This assay was then used to characterize PBP2a binding to ceftobiprole, which gave results consistent with previous studies of ceftobiprole-PBP2a binding. This assay was also demonstrated for screening for PBP2a inhibitors by screening a set of 13 randomly selected β-lactams for PBP2a inhibition at 750 μM. Meropenem was observed to give substantial inhibition in this screen, and a follow-up titration experiment determined its apparent Ki to be 480 ± 70 μM. The availability of convenient and sensitive microtiter-plate based assays for the screening and characterization of PBP2a inhibitors is expected to facilitate the discovery and development of new PBP2a inhibitors for use in combating the serious public health problem posed by MRSA. PMID:21402836

  8. Microtiter plate-based assay for inhibitors of penicillin-binding protein 2a from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Sudheer; Ponnaluri, V K Chaithanya; Mukherji, Mridul; Gutheil, William G

    2011-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), the molecular determinant for high-level β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is intrinsically resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics. The development and characterization of new inhibitors targeting PBP2a would benefit from an effective and convenient assay for inhibitor binding. This study was directed toward the development of a fluorescently detected β-lactam binding assay for PBP2a from MRSA. Biotinylated ampicillin and biotinylated cephalexin were tested as tagging reagents for fluorescence detection by using a streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Both bound surprisingly well to PBP2a, with binding constants of 1.6 ± 0.4 μM and 13.6 ± 0.8 μM, respectively. Two forms of the assay were developed, a one-step direct competition form of the assay and a two-step indirect competition form of the assay, and both forms of the assay gave comparable results. This assay was then used to characterize PBP2a binding to ceftobiprole, which gave results consistent with previous studies of ceftobiprole-PBP2a binding. This assay was also demonstrated for screening for PBP2a inhibitors by screening a set of 13 randomly selected β-lactams for PBP2a inhibition at 750 μM. Meropenem was observed to give substantial inhibition in this screen, and a follow-up titration experiment determined its apparent K(i) to be 480 ± 70 μM. The availability of convenient and sensitive microtiter-plate based assays for the screening and characterization of PBP2a inhibitors is expected to facilitate the discovery and development of new PBP2a inhibitors for use in combating the serious public health problem posed by MRSA.

  9. Performance of a large forward resistive plate chamber for the CMS /LHC under high radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kim, K H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Nam, S K; Park, S; Rhee, J T; Seo, S W; Sim, K S

    2001-01-01

    We present the first beam test results of a real size prototype RPC for the endcap region of the CMS, one of large detectors at CERN LHC. The chamber was built with relatively low resistivity bakelite made in Korea and was operated successfully at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN under the highest photon flux available, which corresponds to an effective cluster rate up to about 800 Hz/cm/sup 2 /. The cross-talk effects between strips and sectors have been studied extensively. The high voltage plateau, which satisfies the CMS requirements for efficiency and the number of strips fired per cluster, extends to at least 300 V. The time resolution has been measured to be better than 1.3 ns in this HV plateau region. These results demonstrate that the current design of the device can be used as a muon trigger detector for the CMS forward region. (13 refs).

  10. Crustal and lithospheric imaging of the Atlas Mountains of Morocco inferred from magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Hogg, C.; Ledo, J.; Sinischalchi, A.; Campanya, J.; Picasso Phase II Team

    2010-12-01

    The Atlas System of Morocco is an intra-continental mountain belt extending for more than 2,000 km along the NW African plate with a predominant NE-SW trend. The System comprises three main branches: the High Atlas, the Middle Atlas, and the Anti Atlas. We present the results of a very recent multi-institutional magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the Atlas Mountains region that started in September, 2009 and ended in February, 2010, comprising acquisition of broadband and long-period MT data. The experiment consisted of two profiles: (1) a N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas through the Central High Atlas to the east and (2) a NE-SW profile crossing the western High Atlas towards the Anti Atlas to the west. The MT measurements are part of the PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) and the concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) projects, to develop a better understanding of the internal structure and evolution of the crust and lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains. The MT data have been processed with robust remote reference methods and submitted to comprehensive strike and dimensionality analysis. Two clearly depth-differentiated strike directions are apparent for crustal (5-35 km) and lithospheric (50-150 km) depth ranges. These two orientations are roughly consistent with the NW-SE Africa-Eurasia convergence acting since the late Cretaceous, and the NNE-SSW Middle Atlas, where Miocene to recent Alkaline volcanism is present. Two-dimensional (2-D) smooth electrical resistivity models were computed independently for both 50 degrees and 20 degrees E of N strike directions. At the crustal scale, our preliminary results reveal a middle to lower-crustal conductive layer stretching from the Middle Atlas southward towards the High Moulouya basin. The most resistive (and therefore potentially thickest

  11. A Finite Element Analysis of Bearing Resistance of Timber Loaded through a Steel Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leijten A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Decrease projected length of bolts due to bending deformation in timber joints compresses the steel washers onto timber member and increases lateral resistance of the joints. As this lateral strength increase primarily depend on bearing characteristics of timber beneath the steel washers, a finite element analysis was performed to predict their bearing-embedment behavior. A 3-D finite element model consisting of 8-node solid and contact pair elements was developed using ANSYS assuming an anisotropic plasticity model for timber and an elastic-perfectly plastic model for the washers. Material constants for both steel washer and timber member were obtained from previous test data. The results of the analysis were in good agreement with the experimental load-embedment curves as well as the analytical curves obtained in a previous study based on a rigid-body-spring-model. The same approach was also used to evaluate the effective bearing length (under uniform compression of a 50 mm depth timber block partially compressed.

  12. Performance of a resistive plate chamber equipped with a new prototype of amplified front-end electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Marchisone, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. At forward rapidity a muon spectrometer detects muons from low mass mesons, quarkonia, open heavy-flavor hadrons as well as weak bosons. A muon selection based on transverse momentum is made by a trigger system composed of 72 resistive plate chambers (RPCs). For the LHC Run 1 and the ongoing Run 2 the RPCs have been equipped with a non-amplified FEE called ADULT. However, in view of an increase in luminosity expected for Run 3 (2021-2023) the possibility to use an amplified FEE has been explored in order to improve the counting rate limitation and to prevent the aging of the detector, by reducing the charge per hit. A prototype of this new electronics (FEERIC) has been developed and tested first with cosmic rays before equipping one RPC in the ALICE cavern with it. In this talk the most important performance indicators - efficiency, dark current, dark rate, cluster size and total charge - of an RPC equipped with this new FEE will be r...

  13. Performance of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers in CRAFT and early 2015 collisions at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) performance results with cosmics data at 3.8 T and p-p collision data at 13 TeV for 2015 are presented. These results include plots of relevant RPC variables such as occupancy, cluster size, efficiency and residuals. RPC cluster size, measured with cosmic rays at 3.8 T during 2015, is presented and compared with 2012 results. During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon system has been upgraded with 144 double-gap chambers on the forth forward stations. During the commissioning period, the system has been successfully run and experimental data has been collected and analyzed in details. Occupancy and efficiency results of newly installed chambers using 13 TeV p-p data are reported. The results of the 2015 HV Scan, performed at 0 T magnetic field, are presented and compared with the 2012 HV scan results at 3.8 T. These results are comparable since RPC efficiency is independent of the magnetic field surrounding the chambers.

  14. Recent results and performance of the multi-gap resistive plate chambers network for the EEE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrescia, M.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini, L.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Batignani, G.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; Corvaglia, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D`Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Fattibene, E.; Ferraro, A.; Frolov, V.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Grazzi, S.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; La Rocca, P.; Licciulli, F.; Maggiora, A.; Maragoto Rodriguez, O.; Maron, G.; Martelli, B.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Miozzi, S.; Nania, R.; Noferini, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Panareo, M.; Panetta, M. P.; Paoletti, R.; Park, W.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Schioppa, M.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stori, L.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Visnyei, O. B.; Vistoli, M. C.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zani, S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeusky, R.

    2016-11-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) Project is devoted to the study of Extensive Atmospheric Showers through a network of muon telescopes, installed in High Schools, with the further aim of introducing young students to particle and astroparticle physics. Each telescope is a tracking detector composed of three Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) with an active area of 1.60 × 0.80 m2. Their characteristics are similar to the ones built for the Time Of Flight array of the ALICE Experimentat LHC . The EEE Project started with a few pilot towns, where the telescopes have been taking data since 2008, and it has been constantly extended, reaching at present more than 50 MRPCs telescopes. They are spread across Italy with two additional stations at CERN, covering an area of around 3 × 105 km2, with a total surface area for all the MRPCs of 190 m2. A comprehensive description of the MRPCs network is reported here: efficiency, time and spatial resolution measured using cosmic rays hitting the telescopes. The most recent results on the detector and physics performance from a series of coordinated data acquisition periods are also presented.

  15. Study on surface topography of 446M stainless steel as a bipolar plate on interfacial contact resistance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Min; Kim, Seok Nyeon; Kim, Jong Hee; Lee, Yun Yong; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2012-12-01

    The effect of the surface topography of 446M ferritic stainless steel as a bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is evaluated by interfacial contact resistance (ICR) measurement and finite element method (FEM) simulation. When the surface of stainless steel is in contact with the carbon paper under load, the surface roughness of stainless steel can affect the degree of deformation of the carbon fiber. Moreover, the higher deformation of carbon fiber under load in the rougher stainless steel could lead to larger real contact area between stainless steel and carbon fiber, and consequently the rough one has a lower ICR value than the fine one. The results suggest that the topography of stainless steel as a bipolar plate significantly affects the ICR. Furthermore, it was found that topography of bipolar plate is one of the key factors to decrease ICR.

  16. Budker INP in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Novosibirsk group has proposed a new design for the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter with a constant thickness of absorber plates. This design has signifi- cant advantages compared to one in the Technical Proposal and it has been accepted by the ATLAS Collaboration. The Novosibirsk group is responsible for the fabrication of the precision aluminium structure for the e.m.end-cap calorimeter.

  17. Current density and catalyst-coated membrane resistance distribution of hydro-formed metallic bipolar plate fuel cell short stack with 250 cm2 active area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S.; Moser, M.; Hirschfeld, J. A.; Jozwiak, K.

    2016-01-01

    An automotive fuel cell with an active area of 250 cm2 is investigated in a 4-cell short stack with a current and temperature distribution device next to the bipolar plate with 560 current and 140 temperature segments. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this current scan shunt module. The applied fuel cell consists of bipolar plates constructed of 75-μm-thick, welded stainless-steel foils and a graphitic coating. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this module with a 6% deviation in in-plane conductivity. The current density distribution is evaluated up to 2.4 A cm-2. The entire cell's investigated volumetric power density is 4.7 kW l-1, and its gravimetric power density is 4.3 kW kg-1 at an average cell voltage of 0.5 V. The current density distribution is determined without influencing the operating cell. In addition, the current density distribution in the catalyst-coated membrane and its effective resistivity distribution with a finite volume discretisation of Ohm's law are evaluated. The deviation between the current density distributions in the catalyst-coated membrane and the bipolar plate is determined.

  18. Crustal and uppermost mantle structures of Atlas Mountains of Morocco inferred from electromagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Ledo, J.; Siniscalchi, A.; Romano, G.

    2012-12-01

    The second phase of the PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) project and the concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE Collaborative Research Project) is designed to determine the internal structure of the crust and lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. A multi-institutional magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the Atlas Mountains region comprises the acquisition of broadband and long period MT data along two profiles: a N-S oriented profile through Middle Atlas to the east and a NE-SW profile through Marrakech to the west. The preliminary results of interpretation of the MT data collected over the first profile were presented in the paper by Ledo et al. (2011). In this study, we present the results from 3D MT inversion using the codes WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005) and Modular system for Electromagnetic Inversion (ModEM; Egbert and Kelbert, 2012). There is a general good agreement between the main features obtained from the 2D models and the new results of the 3D modelling. Models inverting for only off-diagonal tensor components showed a distinct conductivity contrast between Middle-High Atlas and Anti Atlas correlates with the South Atlas Front fault, the depth extent of which appears to be limited to uppermost mantle (approximately 55 km). The resistivity of the lithosphere is gradually increasing towards Anti Atlas. Beside this, a prominent conducting anomaly at the lower crust/uppermost mantle is imaged west of the profile in the junction between the High and Middle Atlas (Moulouya plain). The conductive body, which extends from the southern boundary of Middle Atlas to the northern boundary of High Atlas, is interpreted as due to the presence of partial melt and/or migrated fluids.

  19. Performance Studies of Resistive Micromegas Detectors for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00387450

    2016-01-01

    With the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC the ATLAS Muon spectrometer will face increased particle rates, requiring an upgrade of the innermost end-cap detectors with a high-rate capable technology. Micromegas have been chosen as main tracking technology for this New Small Wheel upgrade. In an intense R$\\&$D and prototype phase the technology has proven to meet the stringent performance requirements of highly efficient particle detection with better than 100$\\rm{\\mu m}$ spatial resolution, independent of the track incidence angle up to 32$^\\circ$, in a magnetic field B $\\leq$ 0.3 T and at background hit rate of up to 15kHz/cm$^2$.

  20. Construction and Quality Assurance of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Losel, Philipp Jonathan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the increased background induced hit rate of up to ~15 kHz/cm$^2$ in the innermost stations of the muon endcap system of the ATLAS experiment after the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the currently used precision detectors will be replaced by resistive strip Micromegas in 2019. In the "New Small Wheel" the Micromegas will be arranged in two times four detection layers built of trapezoidally shaped quadruplets of four different sizes.The Micromegas quadruplets will consist of 5 panels, 3 drift panels and 2 readout panels, made of aluminum honeycomb core sandwiched by printed circuit boards (PCBs). To achieve 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons and thus a spatial resolution in a single plane of about 100 $\\mu$m, each active plane has to have an accuracy of 80 $\\mu$m perpendicular to the plane and the alignment of the readout strips on the individual PCBs and particularly the alignment within a quadruplet must fulfill a challenging precision of 30 $\\mu$m. The required mechanical p...

  1. Test Beam results and integration of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, M; Cataldi, G; Chiodini, G; Fiore, G; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Miccoli, A; Perrino, R; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Tassielli, G F; Ventura, A; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Canale, V; Caprio, M A; Carlino, G; Conventi, F; De Asmundis, R; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Iengo, P; Izzo, V; Migliaccio, A; Patricelli, S; Sekhniaidze, G; Bocci, V; Chiodi, G; Gennari, E; Nisati, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Petrolo, E; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; Aielli, G; Camarri, P; Cardarelli, R; Delle Fratte, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Di Stante, L; Liberti, B; Salamon, A; Santonico, R; Solfaroli, E; Aprodu, V; Petcu, M; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Muon Trigger will be crucial for the online selection of events with high transverse momentum muons and for its correct association to the bunch-crossing corresponding to the detected events. This system uses dedicated coarse granularity and fast detectors capable of providing measurements in two orthogonal projections. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are used in the barrel region. The associated trigger electronics is based on a custom chip, the Coincidence Matrix, that performs space coincidences within programmable roads and time gates. The system is highly redundant and communicates with the ATLAS Level-1 trigger Processor with the MUCTPI Interface. The trigger electronics provides also the Readout of the RPCs. Preliminary results achieved with a full trigger tower with production detectors in the H8 test beam at CERN will be shown. In particular preliminary results on the integration of the barrel muon trigger electronics with the MUCTPI interface and with the ATLAS DAQ system will ...

  2. Performance of the ATLAS Level-1 muon barrel trigger during the Run 2 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range |η| < 1.05 for a total surface of more than 4000 m 2 and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates according to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 μs. The measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking are here presented.

  3. Corrosion resistance of siloxane–poly(methyl methacrylate) hybrid films modified with acetic acid on tin plate substrates: Influence of tetraethoxysilane addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunst, S.R.; Cardoso, H.R.P. [LAPEC, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul – UFRGS, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Oliveira, C.T. [ICET, University Feevale, RS-239, 2755 Novo Hamburgo, RS (Brazil); Santana, J.A.; Sarmento, V.H.V. [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, Av. Vereador Olímpio Grande s/n, Centro, Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Muller, I.L. [LAPEC, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul – UFRGS, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Malfatti, C.F., E-mail: celia.malfatti@ufrgs.br [LAPEC, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul – UFRGS, Avenida Bento Gonçalves, 9500 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Siloxane–PMMA film was produced by dip-coating on tin plate substrate. • It was evaluated the influence of (TEOS) addition on siloxane–PMMA hybrid films. • Siloxane–PMMA films without TEOS presented a regular coverage and lowest roughness. • The TEOS addition decrease the corrosion resistance of siloxane–PMMA films. • Siloxane–PMMA without TEOS presented is higher durability in the film wear test. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of hybrid films. Tin plate was coated with a siloxane–poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid film prepared by sol–gel route with covalent bonds between the organic (PMMA) and inorganic (siloxane) phases obtained by hydrolysis and polycondensation of 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl) methacrylate (TMSM) and polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a thermic initiator. Hydrolysis reactions were catalyzed by acetic acid solution avoiding the use of chlorine or stronger acids in the film preparation. The effect of the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on the protective properties of the film was evaluated. The hydrophobicity of the film was determined by contact angle measurements, and the morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry. The local nanostructure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrochemical behavior of the films was assessed by open circuit potential monitoring, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in a 0.05 M NaCl solution. The mechanical behavior was evaluated by tribology. The results highlighted that the siloxane–PMMA hybrid films modified with acetic acid are promising anti-corrosive coatings that acts as an efficient diffusion barrier, protecting tin plates against corrosion. However, the coating properties were affected by the TEOS addition, which contributed for the thickness increase

  4. Gene escape model: transfer of heavy metal resistance genes from Escherichia coli to Alcaligenes eutrophus on agar plates and in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, E; Mergeay, M; Springael, D; Verstraete, W

    1990-08-01

    Conjugal transfer from Escherichia coli to Alcaligenes eutrophus of the A. eutrophus genes coding for plasmid-borne resistance to cadmium, cobalt, and zinc (czc genes) was investigated on agar plates and in soil samples. This czc fragment is not expressed in the donor strain, E. coli, but it is expressed in the recipient strain, A. eutrophus. Hence, expression of heavy metal resistance by cells plated on a medium containing heavy metals represents escape of the czc genes. The two plasmids into which this DNA fragment has been cloned previously and which were used in these experiments are the nonconjugative, mobilizable plasmid pDN705 and the nonconjugative, nonmobilizable plasmid pMOL149. In plate matings at 28 to 30 degrees C, the direct mobilization of pDN705 occurred at a frequency of 2.4 x 10(-2) per recipient, and the mobilization of the same plasmid by means of the IncP1 conjugative plasmids RP4 or pULB113 (present either in a third cell [triparental cross] or in the recipient strain itself [retromobilization]) occurred at average frequencies of 8 x 10(-4) and 2 x 10(-5) per recipient, respectively. The czc genes cloned into the Tra- Mob- plasmid pMOL149 were transferred at a frequency of 10(-7) to 10(-8) and only by means of plasmid pULB113. The direct mobilization of pDN705 was further investigated in sandy, sandy-loam, and clay soils. In sterile soils, transfer frequencies at 20 degrees C were highest in the sandy-loam soil (10(-5) per recipient) and were enhanced in all soils by the addition of easily metabolizable nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The ATLAS Barrel Level-1 Muon Trigger Processor Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, V; Ciapetti, G; De Pedis, D; Di Girolamo, A; Di Mattia, A; Gennari, E; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pastore, F; Petrolo, E; Spila, F; Vari,, R; Veneziano, S; Zanelli, L; Aielli, G; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Di Stante, L; Salamon, A; Santonico, R; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Canale, V; Carlino, G; Conventi, F; De Asmundis, R; Della Pietra, M; Delle Volpe, D; Iengo, P; Izzo, V; Migliaccio, A; Patricelli, S; Sekhniaidze, G; Brambilla, Elena; Cataldi, G; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Perrino, R; Primavera, M; Spagnolo, S; Aprodo, V; Bartos, D; Buda, S; Constantin, S; Dogaru, M; Magureanu, C; Pectu, M; Prodan, L; Rusu, A; Uroseviteanu, C

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS level-1 muon trigger will select events with high transverse momentum and tag them to the correct machine bunch-crossing number with high efficiency. Three stations of dedicated fast detectors provide a coarse pT measurement, with tracking capability on bending and non-bending pro jections. In the Barrel region, hits from doublets of Resistive Plate Chambers are processed by custom ASIC, the Coincidence Matrices, which performs almost all the functionalities required by the trigger algorithm and the readout. In this paper we present the performance of the level-1 trigger system studied on a cosmic test stand at CERN, concerning studies on expected trigger rates and efficiencies.

  6. The LECCE cosmic ray testing facility for the ATLAS RPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, M.; Cataldi, G.; Chiodini, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Perrino, R.; Primavera, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Tassielli, G.

    2006-09-01

    A detailed description of a dedicated facility built in the Lecce INFN and Physics Department High Energy Laboratory to test part of the Resistive Plate Counters (RPCs) of the ATLAS barrel muon spectrometer is presented. In this cosmic ray test stand the chambers are operated for the first time, after being assembled and equipped with all required services for gas and electrical connections. A complete set of measurements is performed on each chamber in order to certificate its quality and performances before the installation in the experiment.

  7. High-throughput and automated diagnosis of antimicrobial resistance using a cost-effective cellphone-based micro-plate reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Tseng, Derek; di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-12-01

    Routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) can prevent deaths due to bacteria and reduce the spread of multi-drug-resistance, but cannot be regularly performed in resource-limited-settings due to technological challenges, high-costs, and lack of trained professionals. We demonstrate an automated and cost-effective cellphone-based 96-well microtiter-plate (MTP) reader, capable of performing AST without the need for trained diagnosticians. Our system includes a 3D-printed smartphone attachment that holds and illuminates the MTP using a light-emitting-diode array. An inexpensive optical fiber-array enables the capture of the transmitted light of each well through the smartphone camera. A custom-designed application sends the captured image to a server to automatically determine well-turbidity, with results returned to the smartphone in ~1 minute. We tested this mobile-reader using MTPs prepared with 17 antibiotics targeting Gram-negative bacteria on clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae, containing highly-resistant antimicrobial profiles. Using 78 patient isolate test-plates, we demonstrated that our mobile-reader meets the FDA-defined AST criteria, with a well-turbidity detection accuracy of 98.21%, minimum-inhibitory-concentration accuracy of 95.12%, and a drug-susceptibility interpretation accuracy of 99.23%, with no very major errors. This mobile-reader could eliminate the need for trained diagnosticians to perform AST, reduce the cost-barrier for routine testing, and assist in spatio-temporal tracking of bacterial resistance.

  8. High-voltage safety fuses for the transition-radiation tracking detector in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Voronov, S A; Onishchenko, E M; Simakov, A B; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Sugrobova, T A

    2004-01-01

    A safety fuse has been designed for the electrical protection of gas- filled detectors in the ATLAS experiment at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). The fuse is a polished lithium niobate plate with a titanium strip of 91-kOmega resistance deposited by the photolithographic technique. The forced blowout time of the fuse is 10-50 ms; whereupon the leakage current through it is less than 1 nA at a 2-kV voltage. The resistance of the fuse case is greater than or equivalent equal' greater than 10**1**2 Omega. Its overall dimensions are 5.8 multiplied by 3.8 multiplied by 2 mm.

  9. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  10. Aging studies of resistive bulk Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Katie Louise

    2017-01-01

    A long-term operation study is presented as a probe of the aging properties of two bulk-resistive Micromegas chambers installed at the GIF$^{++}$ Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. Trends in the instantaneous chamber current, recorded over $\\approx$ 500 days of sustained exposure to the GIF$^{++}$ high intensity photon source, are analysed as a function of time in order to identify any signs of detector aging. As part of the study, additional variations in the current due to the changing external conditions of the chambers must be corrected for in order to isolate any aging effects. These include the changing chamber positions with respect to the photon source and the temperature and pressure fluctuations of the detector gas medium. Due to a number of subsets of the total irradiation period in which the exact detector positions are unknown, the aging study at the present time remains inconclusive. As a result, an alternative long-term aging study utilising the instantaneous chamber dark currents is suggested...

  11. Enhanced stress corrosion cracking resistance and electrical conductivity of a T761 treated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy thin plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Zhai, Sudan; Gao, Di; Liu, Ye; Xu, Jing; Liu, Yang

    2018-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior, electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy pre-stretched thin plate for wing skin were researched in this paper. The microstructures and SCC fracture surfaces of the alloy treated at different conditions were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated that with the increasing of aging temperature, the electrical conductivity and the elongation increased greatly, while the strength decreased gradually which were closely associated with the type and morphology of the precipitates. Compared with the T6 treated alloy, the SCC resistance of the T761 treated Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was improved greatly. The SCC behavior of the T6 treated alloy was dominated by anodic dissolution theory, whereas the hydrogen induced cracking controlled the fracture behavior of the T761 treated alloy which was influenced by the morphology of grain boundary precipitates in this investigated alloy.

  12. Simulation and prototyping of 2 m long resistive plate chambers for detection of fast neutrons and multi-neutron event identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elekes, Z., E-mail: z.elekes@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Bemmerer, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Caesar, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Cowan, T.C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Hehner, J.; Heil, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kempe, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Rossi, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Röder, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Simon, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Sobiella, M.; Stach, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Wagner, A.; Yakorev, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Zilges, A. [Universität zu Köln, Köln (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-02-11

    Resistive plate chamber (RPC) prototypes of 2 m length were simulated and built. The experimental tests using a 31 MeV electron beam, discussed in details, showed an efficiency higher than 90% and an excellent time resolution of around σ=100ps. Furthermore, comprehensive simulations were performed by GEANT4 toolkit in order to study the possible use of these RPCs for fast neutron (200 MeV–1 GeV) detection and multi-neutron event identification. The validation of simulation parameters was carried out via a comparison to experimental data. A possible setup for invariant mass spectroscopy of multi-neutron emission is presented and the characteristics are discussed. The results show that the setup has a high detection efficiency. Its capability of determining the momentum of the outgoing neutrons and reconstructing the relative energy between the fragments from nuclear reactions is demonstrated for different scenarios.

  13. Cyclotriphosphazene and TiO2 reinforced nanocomposite coated on mild steel plates for antibacterial and corrosion resistance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnadevi, Krishnamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-03-01

    The mild steel surface has been modified to impart anticorrosion and antibacterial properties through a dip coating method followed by thermal curing of a mixture containing amine terminated cyclotriphosphazene and functionalized titanium dioxide nanoparticles reinforced benzoxazine based cyanate ester composite (ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE). The corrosion resistance behavior of coating material has been investigated by electrochemical and antibacterial studies by disc diffusion method. The nanocomposites coated mild steels have displayed a good chemical stability over long immersion in a corrosive environment. The protection efficiency has found to be high for ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE composites, which can be used in microelectronics and marine applications.

  14. Construction and Quality Assurance of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at LHC/CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00389527; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. To cope with increasing background rates, associated with the steadily increasing luminosity of LHC to 10 times design luminosity, the present detector technology in the current innermost stations of the muon endcap system of the ATLAS experiment (the Small Wheel), will be replaced in 2019 by resistive strip Micromegas and small strip TGC detectors. Both technologies will provide tracking and trigger information. In the ``New Small Wheel'' the Micromegas will be arranged in eight detection layers built of trapezoidally shaped quadruplets of four different sizes covering in total about 1200\\,m$^2$ of detection plane. In order to achieve 15\\,\\% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, a challenging mechanical precision is required in the construction of each active plane, with an alignment of the readout strips at the level of 30\\,\\textmu m along the precision coordinate and 80\\,\\textmu m perpendicular...

  15. Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance profile and comparison of selective plating media for the isolation of Salmonella in backyard chickens from Entre Rios, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F I; Pascal, D C; Pulido, D; Osinalde, J M; Caffer, M I; Bueno, D J

    2017-10-27

    This study was conducted to estimate the apparent prevalence of Salmonella spp. in birds kept under backyard system in Entre Ríos, Argentina, and determine the performance of two selective plating media used for Salmonella isolation, and the antimicrobial resistance of the isolated. Also, the association of farms characteristics with Salmonella presence was evaluated. A total of 657 backyard chickens and 15 gooses were sampled one time by cloacal swab, belonging to 51 and one family farms, respectively, and four counties in Entre Rios state from April 2014 to May 2015. Only four samples from backyard chickens belonged to three family farms from Uruguay County were positive to Salmonella spp., so the apparent prevalence was 0.6% for this kind of chicken. Four serovars were isolated (Salmonella ser. Lille, S. ser. Newport, S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Rissen), which were susceptible to all antibiotics tested with the exception of erythromycin. For Hektoen enteric agar and brilliant green agar, relative specificity and positive predictive value were 1, and the relative sensitivity and negative predictive value did not show any difference between them. The agreement was very good between these two plating media. None of the variables studied could be selected to calculate the risk factors associated with Salmonella isolation because p > .15. Although the prevalence of Salmonella spp. is low in backyard birds in Entre Rios, the presence of S. ser. Enteritidis should not be discounted, because it is found in the county that concentrates a large population of intensive poultry production in the state. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Characterization of hierarchical α-MoO3 plates toward resistive heating synthesis: electrochemical activity of α-MoO3/Pt modified electrode toward methanol oxidation at neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippo, Emanuela; Baldassarre, Francesca; Tepore, Marco; Guascito, Maria Rachele; Chirizzi, Daniela; Tepore, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    The growth of MoO3 hierarchical plates was obtained by direct resistive heating of molybdenum foils at ambient pressure in the absence of any catalysts and templates. Plates synthesized after 60 min resistive heating typically grow in an single-crystalline orthorhombic structure that develop preferentially in the [001] direction, and are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction pattern and Raman-scattering measurements. They are about 100-200 nm in thickness and a few tens of micrometers in length. As heating time proceeds to 80 min, plates of α-MoO3 form a branched structure. A more attentive look shows that primary plates formed at until 60 min could serve as substrates for the subsequent growth of secondary belts. Moreover, a full electrochemical characterization of α-MoO3 plates on platinum electrodes was done by cyclic voltammetric experiments, at pH 7 in phosphate buffer, to probe the activity of the proposed composite material as anode to methanol electro-oxidation. Reported results indicate that Pt MoO3 modified electrodes are appropriate to develop new an amperometric non-enzymatic sensor for methanol as well as to make anodes suitable to be used in direct methanol fuel cells working at neutral pH.

  17. Identifying fecal pollution sources using 3M(™) Petrifilm (™) count plates and antibiotic resistance analysis in the Horse Creek Watershed in Aiken County, SC (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, S Michele; West, Ryan T; Yates, James R

    2014-12-01

    Sources of fecal coliform pollution in a small South Carolina (USA) watershed were identified using inexpensive methods and commonly available equipment. Samples from the upper reaches of the watershed were analyzed with 3M(™) Petrifilm(™) count plates. We were able to narrow down the study's focus to one particular tributary, Sand River, that was the major contributor of the coliform pollution (both fecal and total) to a downstream reservoir that is heavily used for recreation purposes. Concentrations of total coliforms ranged from 2,400 to 120,333 cfu/100 mL, with sharp increases in coliform counts observed in samples taken after rain events. Positive correlations between turbidity and fecal coliform counts suggested a relationship between fecal pollution and stormwater runoff. Antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA) compared antibiotic resistance profiles of fecal coliform isolates from the stream to those of a watershed-specific fecal source library (equine, waterfowl, canines, and untreated sewage). Known fecal source isolates and unknown isolates from the stream were exposed to six antibiotics at three concentrations each. Discriminant analysis grouped known isolates with an overall average rate of correct classification (ARCC) of 84.3 %. A total of 401 isolates from the first stream location were classified as equine (45.9 %), sewage (39.4 %), waterfowl (6.2 %), and feline (8.5 %). A similar pattern was observed at the second sampling location, with 42.6 % equine, 45.2 % sewage, 2.8 % waterfowl, 0.6 % canine, and 8.8 % feline. While there were slight weather-dependent differences, the vast majority of the coliform pollution in this stream appeared to be from two sources, equine and sewage. This information will contribute to better land use decisions and further justify implementation of low-impact development practices within this urban watershed.

  18. ATLAS Muon DCS Upgrades and Optimizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bakalis, Christos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Muon subsystem is comprised of four detector types: Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) for trigger purposes, and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) and Muon Drift Tubes (MDT) for muon track reconstruction. The MDTs cover a large area at the outer part of the detector. In total, there are over a 1’000 MDT chambers, which are made of about 350’000 tubes. The luminosity upgrade of the HL-LHC is expected to pose a serious challenge to the MDTs. The expected increase of particle flux will set new, higher standards regarding the operation and control of the chambers. A step towards optimizing the ATLAS Muon Detector Control System (DCS) was to develop several DCS tools, namely a High Luminosity vs Trip Limit panel with its accompanying scripts and managers. The ultimate goal of this tool is to protect the MDT chambers from the rising particle flux and its associated increase in chamber current. In addition to optimizing the ATLAS Muon DCS, several tasks to accommodate the newly installed B...

  19. Off-line time calibration of the ATLAS RPC system

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodini, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC's), operated in saturated avalanche regime, are used in the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment to produce the first level of the muon trigger in the central region, $|eta| <$ 1.05. The logic, based on a coincidence of hits in three layers of detector doublets, takes advantage of the very good time resolution of these detectors which allows to easily identify the LHC bunch crossing. The RPC readout electronics, based on a 320 MHz clock, allows to store a very granular time information, making potentially the RPC system the detector providing the most accurate time measurement in ATLAS. To fully exploit the intrinsic time resolution of detector and readout electronics a careful calibration of the system is needed, involving about 330,000 channels. The ATLAS data recorded during 2011 in LHC p-p collisions at $sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV have been used to show that, after applying an offline calibration procedure, a time resolution uniform over the entire detector and stable in time c...

  20. Plate tectonics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 209 Plate Tectonics A. K. Chaubey National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004. chaubey@nio.org Introduction The theory of continental drift, which paved the way for discovery... of plate tectonics, was put forward by Alfred Lother Wegener - a meteorologist from Germany - in 1912. The theory states that continents are not fixed, but have been slowly wandering during the course of Earth’s geological history. Although Wegener...

  1. Performance of ATLAS RPC Level-1 Muon trigger during the 2015 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Corradi, Massimo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Its input stage consists of an array of processors receiving the full granularity of data from Resistive Plate Chambers in the central area of the ATLAS detector ("Barrel"). The trigger efficiency and the level of synchronisation of its elements with the rest of ATLAS and the LHC clock are crucial figures of this system: many parameters of the constituent RPC detector and the trigger electronics have to be constantly and carefully checked to assure a correct functioning of the Level-1 selection. Notwithstanding the complexity of such a large array of integrated RPC detectors, the ATLAS Level-1 system has resumed operations successfully after the past 2 year shutdown, with levels similar to those of Run 1. We present the inclusive monitoring of the RPC+L1 system that we have developed to characterise the behaviour of the system, using reconstructed muons in events selected by...

  2. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out-of-flatness and cyclic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza; Djilali, Ned; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on measurements of thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) as a function of temperature and its thermal contact resistance (TCR) with treated and untreated gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The thermal conductivity of the BPP decreases with temperature and its thermal contact resistance with GDLs, which has been overlooked in the literature, is found to be dominant over a relatively wide range of compression. The effects of PTFE loading, micro porous layer (MPL), compression, and BPP out-of-flatness are also investigated experimentally. It is found that high PTFE loadings, MPL and even small BPP out-of-flatness increase the BPP-GDL thermal contact resistance dramatically. The paper also presents the effect of cyclic load on the total resistance of a GDL-BPP assembly, which sheds light on the behavior of these materials under operating conditions in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  3. Compiling a national resistivity atlas of Denmark based on airborne and ground-based transient electromagnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Adrian; Møller, Ingelise; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2016-01-01

    We present a large-scale study of the petrophysical relationship of resistivities obtained from densely sampled ground-based and airborne transient electromagnetic surveys and lithological information from boreholes. The overriding aim of this study is to develop a framework for examining...... the resistivity-lithology relationship in a statistical manner and apply this framework to gain a better description of the large-scale resistivity structures of the subsurface. In Denmark very large and extensive datasets are available through the national geophysical and borehole databases, GERDA and JUPITER...... respectively. In a 10 by 10 km grid, these data are compiled into histograms of resistivity versus lithology. To do this, the geophysical data are interpolated to the position of the boreholes, which allows for a lithological categorization of the interpolated resistivity values, yielding different histograms...

  4. Preparation of a photo-degradation- resistant quantum dot-polymer composite plate for use in the fabrication of a high-stability white-light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Pyo; Song, Woo-Seuk; Lee, Ki-Heon; Yang, Heesun

    2013-02-01

    We report on the synthesis of highly fluorescent double-ZnS-shell-capped, yellow-emitting Cu-In-S quantum dots (QDs) with a surprisingly high quantum yield of 92%, the preparation of a free-standing QD-polymethylmethacrylate composite plate, and the application of the QD plate in the fabrication of QD-based white-light-emitting diodes (WLEDs). A free-standing QD plate with QDs embedded uniformly inside a polymeric matrix is used to fabricate a remote-type, resin-free WLED. The QD plate-based WLED displays a high luminous efficiency; however, it suffers from a significantly unstable device performance due to QD degradation upon prolonged photo-excitation. An exceptional operational stability of the QD plate-based WLED is realized by generating hybrid double layers of an organic adhesion layer and a gas barrier layer of sol-gel-derived silica, rendering the QD plate impermeable to oxygen. Our success in achieving a color converter robust against photo-degradation and applying it in the fabrication of a reliable QD-based LED is greatly encouraging as regards the development of next-generation QD-based LED lighting sources.

  5. A readout digitization system for the ATLAS muon spectrometer phase-I tRPC trigger upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X. T.; Levin, D. S.; Chapman, J. W.; Li, D. C.; Yao, Z. E.; Zhou, B.

    2017-10-01

    The front-end digitization electronics for thin-Resistive Plate Chambers to be installed as part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Phase-I upgrade project is described. The design is based on the CERN HPTDC and GOL chips. In this paper, the design of the digitization system is presented, including power, connection interfaces to front-end amplifier-shaper-discriminator board and to the low level trigger processor board. System performance tests were conducted and validated with a prototype which includes one HPTDC/GOL pair.

  6. Certification and commissioning of barrel stations for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, S

    2006-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment, which is scheduled to commence data taking at the Large Hadron Collider, LHC at CERN in 2007, comprises more than a thousand muon stations, which have the double purpose of triggering on high-p/sub t/ muon tracks as well as providing precise trajectory reconstruction. While monitored drift tube chambers are used for track reconstruction in all of the muon spectrometer except for a region close to the beam pipe in forward direction, two different technologies are used for triggering, resistive plate chambers in the barrel region and thin gap chambers in the end-caps. Both have in common that the ATLAS geometry allows only limited accessibility after chambers are installed in the detector. A thorough testing and certification prior to installation is therefore crucial. This paper reviews the test procedure at CERN for barrel chambers of type BO and BM, i.e. of stations for which a drift chamber is coupled with one or two resistive plate chambers. The final certific...

  7. Stuart R. Stidolph diatom atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidolph, S.R.; Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Smith, K.E.L.; Kraberg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Stuart R. Stidolph Diatom Atlas" is a comprehensive volume of diatom taxa identified and micrographed by Stuart R. Stidoph during the 1980s and 1990s. The samples were collected from marine coasts of various geographic regions within tropical and subtropical climates. The plates included within this report have never been published and are being published by the USGS as an online reference so that others may have access to this incredible collection.

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective ... and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add ...

  9. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  10. Multicentre validation of 4-well azole agar plates as a screening method for detection of clinically relevant azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Verweij, Paul E; Mouton, Johan W

    2017-01-01

    following E.Def 9.3. In-house and commercial 4-well plates containing agars supplemented with 4 mg/L itraconazole, 1 mg/L voriconazole, 0.5 mg/L posaconazole and no antifungal, respectively, were evaluated. Growth was scored (0-3) by two independent observers in three laboratories. Inter-plate, inter......%-100%) for the WT-TR34/L98H combination, but 100% for the WT/G54W combination. The performance remained unchanged using only itraconazole- and voriconazole-containing agars, but was lower for the other combinations. Conclusions: Implementation of the 4-well screening plate in routine laboratories will allow easy...

  11. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  12. Modeling the hydrodynamics of Phloem sieve plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Mullendore, Daniel Leroy; Holbrook, Noel Michele

    2012-01-01

    understood. We propose a theoretical model for quantifying the effect of sieve plates on the phloem in the plant, thus unifying and improving previous work in the field. Numerical simulations of the flow in real and idealized phloem channels verify our model, and anatomical data from 19 plant species...... are investigated. We find that the sieve plate resistance is correlated to the cell lumen resistance, and that the sieve plate and the lumen contribute almost equally to the total hydraulic resistance of the phloem translocation pathway....

  13. An MRI Von Economo - Koskinas atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Lianne H; de Reus, Marcel A; de Lange, Siemon C; Schmidt, Ruben; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2016-12-28

    The cerebral cortex displays substantial variation in cellular architecture, a regional patterning that has been of great interest to anatomists for centuries. In 1925, Constantin von Economo and George Koskinas published a detailed atlas of the human cerebral cortex, describing a cytoarchitectonic division of the cortical mantle into over 40 distinct areas. Von Economo and Koskinas accompanied their seminal work with large photomicrographic plates of their histological slides, together with tables containing for each described region detailed morphological layer-specific information on neuronal count, neuron size and thickness of the cortical mantle. Here, we aimed to make this legacy data accessible and relatable to in vivo neuroimaging data by constructing a digital Von Economo - Koskinas atlas compatible with the widely used FreeSurfer software suite. In this technical note we describe the procedures used for manual segmentation of the Von Economo - Koskinas atlas onto individual T1 scans and the subsequent construction of the digital atlas. We provide the files needed to run the atlas on new FreeSurfer data, together with some simple code of how to apply the atlas to T1 scans within the FreeSurfer software suite. The digital Von Economo - Koskinas atlas is easily applicable to modern day anatomical MRI data and is made publicly available online. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Indonesian Landforms and Plate Tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Th. Verstappen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.103The horizontal configuration and vertical dimension of the landforms occurring in the tectonically unstable parts of Indonesia were resulted in the first place from plate tectonics. Most of them date from the Quaternary and endogenous forces are ongoing. Three major plates – the northward moving Indo-Australian Plate, the south-eastward moving SE-Asian Plate and the westward moving Pacific Plate - meet at a plate triple-junction situated in the south of New Guinea’s Bird’s Head. The narrow North-Moluccan plate is interposed between the Asia and Pacific. It tapers out northward in the Philippine Mobile Belt and is gradually disappearing. The greatest relief amplitudes occur near the plate boundaries: deep ocean trenches are associated with subduction zones and mountain ranges with collision belts. The landforms of the more stable areas of the plates date back to a more remote past and, where emerged, have a more subdued relief that is in the first place related to the resistance of the rocks to humid tropical weathering Rising mountain ranges and emerging island arcs are subjected to rapid humid-tropical river erosions and mass movements. The erosion products accumulate in adjacent sedimentary basins where their increasing weight causes subsidence by gravity and isostatic compensations. Living and raised coral reefs, volcanoes, and fault scarps are important geomorphic indicators of active plate tectonics. Compartmental faults may strongly affect island arcs stretching perpendicular to the plate movement. This is the case on Java. Transcurrent faults and related pull-apart basins are a leading factor where plates meet at an angle, such as on Sumatra. The most complicated situation exists near the triple-junction and in the Moluccas. Modern research methods, such as GPS measurements of plate movements and absolute dating of volcanic outbursts and raised coral reefs are important tools. The mega-landforms resulting

  15. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  16. Fabrication of high-aspect-ratio hard x-ray zone plates with HSQ plating molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Mancini, Derrick C.

    2008-08-01

    Fresnel zone plates are important x-ray diffractive optics which offer a focusing resolution approaching the theoretical limit. In hard x-ray region, the refractive indices of all the materials are close to unity, which requests thick zone plate to achieve a reasonable efficiency. It makes high-resolution zone plate extremely difficult to fabricate due to its high aspect ratio. We report a LIGA-like fabrication process employing e-beam resist HSQ as the plating mold material, which is relative simply compared with traditional processes. 1-μm-thick gold zone plates with 80-nm-wide outermost zone have been fabricated with this process.

  17. Performances of the ATLAS RPC Level-1 Muon trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Its input stage consists of an array of processors receiving the full granularity of data from Resistive Plate Chambers in the central area of the ATLAS detector ("Barrel"). The RPCs, placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS detector, are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range |η|<1.05 for a total surface of more than 4000 m2 and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 μs. We illustrate the selections, strategy and validation for an unbiased determination of the efficiency and timing of the RPC and the L1 from data; and show the results w...

  18. Performances of the ATLAS Level-1 Muon barrel trigger during the Run-II data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Sessa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Muon Barrel Trigger is one of the main elements of the event selection of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It exploits the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors to generate the trigger signal. The RPCs are placed in the barrel region of the ATLAS experiment: they are arranged in three concentric double layers and operate in a strong magnetic toroidal field. RPC detectors cover the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta|<1.05$ for a total surface of more than $4000\\ m^2$ and about 3600 gas volumes. The Level-1 Muon Trigger in the barrel region allows to select muon candidates with respect to their transverse momentum and associates them with the correct bunch-crossing number. The trigger system is able to take a decision within a latency of about 2 $\\mu s$. The detailed measurement of the RPC detector efficiencies and of the trigger performance during the ATLAS Run-II data taking is here presented.

  19. Construction and quality assurance of large area resistive strip Micromegas for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at LHC/CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösel, P.

    2017-06-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. To cope with increasing background rates, associated with the steadily increasing luminosity of LHC to 10 times design luminosity, the present detector technology in the current innermost stations of the muon endcap system of the ATLAS experiment (the Small Wheel), will be replaced in 2019/2020 by resistive strip Micromegas and small strip TGC detectors. Both technologies will provide tracking and trigger information. In the "New Small Wheel" the Micromegas will be arranged in eight detection layers built of trapezoidally shaped quadruplets of four different sizes covering in total about 1200 m2 of detection plane. In order to achieve 15 % transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, a challenging mechanical precision is required in the construction of each active plane, with an alignment of the readout strips at the level of 30 μm RMS along the precision coordinate and 80 μm RMS perpendicular to the plane. Each individual Micromegas plane must achieve a spatial resolution better than 100 μm at background rates up to 15 kHz/cm2 while being operated in an inhomogeneous magnetic field (B <= 0.3 T). The required mechanical precision for the production of the components and their assembly, on such large area detectors, is a key point and must be controlled during construction and integration. Particularly the alignment of the readout strips within a quadruplet appears to be demanding. The readout strips are etched on PCB boards using photolithographic processes. Depending on the type of the module, 3 or 5 PCB boards need to be joined and precisely aligned to form a full readout plane. The precision in the alignment is reached either by use of precision mechanical holes or by optical masks, both referenced to the strip patterns. Assembly procedures have been developed to build the single panels with the required mechanical precision and to assemble them in a

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs EXPO ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ...

  1. Growth Plate Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Growth Plate Fractures Page ( 1 ) The bones of children and adults share many of the same risks for ... also subject to a unique injury called a growth plate fracture. Growth plates are areas of cartilage ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ... your protein. See this list of protein foods . Add a serving of fruit , a serving of dairy ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and ... Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating ...

  4. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your ... down the middle of the plate. Then on one side, cut it again so you will have ...

  5. Atlas of the potential vegetation of Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Demissew, Sebsebe; van Breugel, Paulo

    Based on many years of field work by the two senior authors (Ib Friis and Sebsebe Demissew) and with the application of GIS analyses (by P. van Breugel) 15 major vegetation types in Ethiopia are described and mapped. The book descibes the structure and floristic composition of the vegetation types...... recognised, and the descriptions are illustrated with selected photographs from many parts of Ethiopia. Parts of the book is an atlas with 29 map plates and a legend to signatures. This atlas shows the potential distribution of the 15 natural vegetation types. The book also describes the relation between...

  6. RPCs as trigger detector for the ATLAS experiment performances, simulation and application to the level-1 di-muon trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, A; Di Ciaccio, A

    2005-01-01

    In the muon spectrometer different detectors are used to provide trigger functionality and precision momentum measurements. In the pseudorapidity range |eta|<1 the first level muon trigger is based on Resistive Plate Chambers, gas ionization detectors which are characterized by a fast response and an excellent time resolution (<1.5ns). The working principles of the Resistive Plate Chambers will be illustrated in chapter 3. Given the long time of operation expected for the ATLAS experiment (~10 years), ageing phenomena have been carefully studied, in order to ensure stable long-term operation of all the subdetectors. Concerning Resistive Plate Chambers, a very extensive ageing test has been performed at CERN's Gamma Irradiation Facility on three production chambers. The results of this test are presented in chapter 4. One of the most commonly used gases in RPCs operation is C2H2F4, which during the gas discharge can produce fluorine ions. Being F one of the most aggressive elements in nature, the presenc...

  7. Current plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-05-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  8. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the data-taking period at LHC (Run-II), several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed. The results from searches by the ATLAS collaborations are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  9. ATLAS Story

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108663

    2012-01-01

    This film produced in July 2012 explains how fundamental research connects to Society and what benefits collaborative way of working can and may generate in the future, using ATLAS Collaboration as a case study. The film is intellectually inspired by the book "Collisions and Collaboration" (OUP) by Max Boisot (ed.), see: collisionsandcollaboration.com. The film is directed by Andrew Millington (OMNI Communications)

  10. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the LHC Run-II data-taking period, several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed by the ATLAS collaboration. The results from these searches are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  11. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  12. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  13. ATLAS Data Preservation Policy

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The principal intent of this document is to describe the ATLAS policy ensuring that its data are maintained reliably in a form accessible to ATLAS members. A separate document describes the ATLAS policy for making its data available, and potentially useful, to scientists who are not members of ATLAS.

  14. Nickel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Sheet, Strip, and Plate 72Ni - 15.5Cr - 0.95 (Cb (Nb) + Ta) - 2.5Ti - 0.70Al - 7.0Fe Consumable Electrode, Remelted or Vacuum Induction Melted, Solution Heat Treated, Precipitation-Hardenable

    CERN Document Server

    SAE Aerospace Standards. London

    2012-01-01

    Nickel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Sheet, Strip, and Plate 72Ni - 15.5Cr - 0.95 (Cb (Nb) + Ta) - 2.5Ti - 0.70Al - 7.0Fe Consumable Electrode, Remelted or Vacuum Induction Melted, Solution Heat Treated, Precipitation-Hardenable

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Zero Degree Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a set of two sampling calorimeters modules symmetrically located at 140m from the ATLAS interaction point. The ZDC covers a pseudorapidity range of |eta| > 8.3 and it is both longitudinally and transversely segmented, thus providing energy and position information of the incident particles. The ZDC is installed between the two LHC beam pipes, in a configuration such that only the neutral particles produced at the interaction region can reach this calorimeter. The ZDC uses Tungsten plates as absorber material and rods made of quartz interspersed in the absorber as active media. The energetic charged particles crossing the quartz rods produces Cherenkov light which is then detected by photomultipliers and sent to the front end electronics for processing, in a total of 120 individual electronic channels. The Tungsten plates and quartz rods are arranged in a way to segment the calorimeters in 4 longitudinal sections. The first section (...

  16. Recherches sedimentologiques et structurales à l’articulation entre Haut et Moyen Atlas et la Haute Moulouya, Maroc

    OpenAIRE

    Löwner, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The northeast border of the central Atlas Mountains lies at the hinge between three structural units: the High Atlas, the Middle Atlas and the inter-mountainous plateau of the High Moulouya. Situated along the northwest border of the African continental plate, the region’s sedimentological and geodynamic evolution was strongly influenced by both the Mediterranean (or Tethysian) mobile zone to the east and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The other major factor influencing the area's evolution ...

  17. Growth Plate Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plate injuries includes: Falling down. Competitive sports (like football). Recreational activities. Sometimes growth plate injuries happen when ... knee. For More Info U.S. Food and Drug Administration Toll free: 888-INFO-FDA (888-463-6332) ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  19. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent Advances Type 1 ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this interactive tool. The healthy meal combinations are endless! Ready to try it at home? Just follow ... non-starchy vegetables and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  4. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to Give Become a Member Vehicle Donation Planned Giving ... Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for ...

  5. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy veggies ...

  7. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  8. Atlantoaxial dislocation associated with stenosis of canal at atlas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Three rare cases of stenosis of spinal canal at the level of atlas associated with atlantoaxial dislocation are presented. An atlantoaxial lateral mass fixation with plate and screws after posterior midline bony decompression was successfully performed in these cases.

  9. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Beetz, C P; Steinbeck, J; Lemieux, B; Winn, D R

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of approx 0.5 to approx 25 mu m, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposite...

  10. Geologically current plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-04-01

    We describe best-fitting angular velocities and MORVEL, a new closure-enforced set of angular velocities for the geologically current motions of 25 tectonic plates that collectively occupy 97 per cent of Earth's surface. Seafloor spreading rates and fault azimuths are used to determine the motions of 19 plates bordered by mid-ocean ridges, including all the major plates. Six smaller plates with little or no connection to the mid-ocean ridges are linked to MORVEL with GPS station velocities and azimuthal data. By design, almost no kinematic information is exchanged between the geologically determined and geodetically constrained subsets of the global circuit-MORVEL thus averages motion over geological intervals for all the major plates. Plate geometry changes relative to NUVEL-1A include the incorporation of Nubia, Lwandle and Somalia plates for the former Africa plate, Capricorn, Australia and Macquarie plates for the former Australia plate, and Sur and South America plates for the former South America plate. MORVEL also includes Amur, Philippine Sea, Sundaland and Yangtze plates, making it more useful than NUVEL-1A for studies of deformation in Asia and the western Pacific. Seafloor spreading rates are estimated over the past 0.78 Myr for intermediate and fast spreading centres and since 3.16 Ma for slow and ultraslow spreading centres. Rates are adjusted downward by 0.6-2.6mmyr-1 to compensate for the several kilometre width of magnetic reversal zones. Nearly all the NUVEL-1A angular velocities differ significantly from the MORVEL angular velocities. The many new data, revised plate geometries, and correction for outward displacement thus significantly modify our knowledge of geologically current plate motions. MORVEL indicates significantly slower 0.78-Myr-average motion across the Nazca-Antarctic and Nazca-Pacific boundaries than does NUVEL-1A, consistent with a progressive slowdown in the eastward component of Nazca plate motion since 3.16 Ma. It also

  11. Space geodetic constraints on plate rigidity and global plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, Giovanni Federico

    differences reflect gradual slowing associated with convergent plate boundaries, and may reflect increased resistance to subduction or convergence associated with decreased slab pull and/or crustal thickening.

  12. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger with Beam Collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken its first data with colliding beams. The LHC aims to deliver an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 in the run period 2010/2011 at luminosities of up to 1032 cm-2 s-1, which requires active rejection of events in the trigger system. The muon system is the largest sub-detector of the ATLAS experiment and has the capability to reconstruct muons in standalone mode, as well as in combination with the Inner Detector tracking. It deploys different detector technologies, resistive plate chambers and thin gap chambers to provide fast trigger signals, and monitored drift tubes and cathode strip chambers for precision measurements. The L1 muon trigger gets its input from the fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The Muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level 2 trigger followed by an event...

  13. System Test of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in the H8 Beam at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Etzion, Erez; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference; Etzion, Erez

    2004-01-01

    An extensive system test of the ATLAS muon spectrometer has been performed in the H8 beam line at the CERN SPS during the last four years. This spectrometer will use pressurized Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) for precision tracking, Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) for triggering in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for triggering in the end-cap region. The test set-up emulates one projective tower of the barrel (six MDT chambers and six RPCs) and one end-cap octant (six MDT chambers, A CSC and three TGCs). The barrel and end-cap stands have also been equipped with optical alignment systems, aiming at a relative positioning of the precision chambers in each tower to 30-40 micrometers. In addition to the performance of the detectors and the alignment scheme, many other systems aspects of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been tested and validated with this setup, such as the mechanical detector integration and installation, the detector control system, the data acquisi...

  14. EnviroAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web...

  15. ATLAS experimentet

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    Filmen innehåller mycket information om fysik och varför LHC behövs tilsammans med stora detektorer och specielt om behovet av ATLAS Experimentet. Mycket bra film för att förklara det okända- som man undersöker i CERN för att ge svar på frågor som människor har försökt förklara under flere tusen år.

  16. Minimum wall pressure coefficient of orifice plate energy dissipater

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-zheng AI; Wang, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Orifice plate energy dissipaters have been successfully used in large-scale hydropower projects due to their simple structure, convenient construction procedure, and high energy dissipation ratio. The minimum wall pressure coefficient of an orifice plate can indirectly reflect its cavitation characteristics: the lower the minimum wall pressure coefficient is, the better the ability of the orifice plate to resist cavitation damage is. Thus, it is important to study the minimum wall pressure co...

  17. The Hatfield SCT lunar atlas photographic atlas for Meade, Celestron, and other SCT telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In a major publishing event for lunar observers, the justly famous Hatfield atlas is updated in even more usable form. This version of Hatfield’s classic atlas solves the problem of mirror images, making identification of left-right reversed imaged lunar features both quick and easy. SCT and Maksutov telescopes – which of course include the best-selling models from Meade and Celestron – reverse the visual image left to right. Thus it is extremely difficult to identify lunar features at the eyepiece of one of the instruments using a conventional Moon atlas, as the human brain does not cope well when trying to compare the real thing with a map that is a mirror image of it. Now this issue has at last been solved.   In this atlas the Moon’s surface is shown at various sun angles, and inset keys show the effects of optical librations. Smaller non-mirrored reference images are also included to make it simple to compare the mirrored SCT plates and maps with those that appear in other atlases. This edition s...

  18. Brazed bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutzler, Jay Kevin

    1998-01-01

    A liquid-cooled, bipolar plate separating adjacent cells of a PEM fuel cell comprising corrosion-resistant metal sheets brazed together so as to provide a passage between the sheets through which a dielectric coolant flows. The brazement comprises a metal which is substantially insoluble in the coolant.

  19. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  20. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  1. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Green Bay, WI Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  3. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Paterson, NJ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  4. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, ME Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the ... Help Enroll in the Living WIth Type 2 Diabetes Program Food & Fitness Food Recipes Planning Meals What Can I Eat Weight Loss Fitness In My Community Calendar of Events ...

  6. mill grinding plates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. Maize was milled either 'wet' or ''dry'' using locally-manufactured milling plates. Samples of milled maize were taken and analyzed for elemental iron (Fe). Results show that iron particles from milling plates contaminates the milled maize and that the level of contamination increases with the quantity of milled ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community ... Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday ... Foods donate en -- Limited Time MATCH Offer - limited- ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  10. Resistivity Index Measurement without the Porous Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springer, N.; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Aage, Helle Karina

    2003-01-01

    A Desaturation Technique Based on Evaporation Produces Uniform Water Saturation Profiles and More Reliable Results for Tight North Sea Chalk......A Desaturation Technique Based on Evaporation Produces Uniform Water Saturation Profiles and More Reliable Results for Tight North Sea Chalk...

  11. Frontier use in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; The ATLAS collaboration; DeStefano, J; Dewhurst, A; Donno, F; Dykstra, D; Front, D; Gallas, E; Hawkings, R; Luehring, F; Walker, R

    2010-01-01

    Frontier is a distributed database access system, including data caching, that was developed originally for the CMS experiment. This system has been in production for CMS for some time, providing world-wide access to the experiment's conditions data for all user jobs. The ATLAS experiment, which has had similar problems with global data distribution, investigated the use of the system for ATLAS jobs. After months of trials and verification, ATLAS put the Frontier system into production late in 2009. Frontier now supplies database access for ATLAS jobs at over 50 computing sites. This successful deployment of Frontier in ATLAS will be described, along with the scope of the system and necessary resources.

  12. ATLAS25: Facebook Live Events

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    2017-01-01

    This video is a montage of the 5 Facebook Live events that were broadcast on 2nd October 2017, to celebrate ATLAS25. For more details visit: http://atlas.cern/updates/atlas-news/celebrating-25-years-discovery

  13. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  14. Design and Construction of Precision Tooling for the Construction of Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors for the ATLAS Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00389964; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical precision is a key-aspect of the $2~m^2$ high-rate capable Micromegas detectors for the upgrade of the Small Wheels of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. 32 SM2 quadruplets will be built by four German sites with cathodes and strip-anodes made of stable honeycomb sandwiches.\\\\ To achieve the required single plane resolution below $100\\mu m$ the deviation from planarity of a single detector plane must not exceed $80\\mu m$ in direction perpendicular to the precision coordinate. The global position of the readout strips has to be within $30\\mu m$ for a single readout-plane of three PCBs, as well as between all four planes of a quadruplet.\\\\ Precision tooling is used for the correct positioning of readout PCBs and readout sandwich planes. For quality control of the planarity of the sandwich planes a laser distance sensor combined with a coordinate measurement system has been developed. Deviation from planarity below 10 $\\mu$m can be easily resolved.\\\\ We will present key features of the challenging construct...

  15. ATLAS presents award to a Russian manufacturer within an ISTC project

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 28 January the Russian machine building plant Molniya was awarded a prize for best ATLAS suppliers, for excellence in the construction of 29 modules for the Hadronic End-Cap Calorimeter of ATLAS. An ATLAS supplier award ceremony was held on Wednesday 28th January. The award for the most exceptional contribution to construction of the future detector was presented to the Russian company Molniya, a former weapons manufacturer based near Moscow. The Molniya machine building plant constructed a total of 29 modules for the LAr Hadronic End-Cap Calorimeter (HEC) of ATLAS. Thirteen are series modules which have already been integrated into the four wheels of the detector. The remaining 16 are calibration modules, designed for the ATLAS beam tests. To manufacture the unique copper plates and module structures required, the company set up a dedicated production process and developed stringent quality control criteria. The task was completed on time, within budget and the completed modules surpassed required qua...

  16. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes, located in the outer part of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two photomultiplier in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator based readout system. Combined information from all systems allows to monitor and equalise the calorimeter r...

  17. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40 MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  18. ATLAS Tile calorimeter calibration and monitoring systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chomont, Arthur Rene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), located on the outside of the calorimeter. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain during the data taking, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser and charge injection elements and it allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scin...

  19. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  20. Pixelated neutron image plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  1. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  2. Plating in Top Agar

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    1. Warm plates to room temperature before use. Cold plates causes the top agar to solidify irregularly. DO not warm plates to 37° as the top agar will take forever to solidify. - Prepare top agar as the appropriate liquid medium with 0.7% agar. Keeping 100 mL bottles is convenient. For phages, use λ top agar, which is less rich and yields bigger plaques. - Melt top agar in the microwave completely. Allow the agar to boil after liquification; incompletely melted agar looks liquid, but is...

  3. Probabilistic liver atlas construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Esther; Domingo, Juan; Ayala, Guillermo; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Goceri, E

    2017-01-13

    Anatomical atlases are 3D volumes or shapes representing an organ or structure of the human body. They contain either the prototypical shape of the object of interest together with other shapes representing its statistical variations (statistical atlas) or a probability map of belonging to the object (probabilistic atlas). Probabilistic atlases are mostly built with simple estimations only involving the data at each spatial location. A new method for probabilistic atlas construction that uses a generalized linear model is proposed. This method aims to improve the estimation of the probability to be covered by the liver. Furthermore, all methods to build an atlas involve previous coregistration of the sample of shapes available. The influence of the geometrical transformation adopted for registration in the quality of the final atlas has not been sufficiently investigated. The ability of an atlas to adapt to a new case is one of the most important quality criteria that should be taken into account. The presented experiments show that some methods for atlas construction are severely affected by the previous coregistration step. We show the good performance of the new approach. Furthermore, results suggest that extremely flexible registration methods are not always beneficial, since they can reduce the variability of the atlas and hence its ability to give sensible values of probability when used as an aid in segmentation of new cases.

  4. Geodetic constraints on active tectonics of the Western Mediterranean: Implications for the kinematics and dynamics of the Nubia-Eurasia plate boundary zone

    OpenAIRE

    Vernant, Philippe; Fadil, Abdelali; Mourabit, Taoufik; Ouazar, Driss; Koulali, Achraf; Davila, Jose Martin; Garate, Jorge; Mcclusky, Simon; Reilinger, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We present GPS observations in Morocco and adjacent areas of Spain from 15 continuous (CGPS) and 31 survey-mode (SGPS) sites extending from the stable part of the Nubian plate to central Spain. We determine a robust velocity field for the W Mediterranean that we use to constrain models for the Iberia-Nubia plate boundary. South of the High Atlas mountain system, GPS motions are consistent with Nubia plate motions from prior geodetic studies. We constrain shortening in the ...

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy 8 Tips for ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Resources for School Projects How to Reference Our Site Diabetes Basics Myths Common Terms Research Resources ... to manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best-selling, sectioned to-go plate with easy- ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get closer to curing diabetes and ... on one side, cut it again so you will have three sections on your plate. Fill the ...

  10. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one side, cut it again so you will have three sections on your plate. Fill the largest ... home, the office, or somewhere in between, you have an easy portion control solution that works. Last ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion ... dairy or both as your meal plan allows. Choose healthy fats in small amounts. For cooking, use ...

  14. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent Advances Type 1 ... Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With ...

  15. Humvee Armor Plate Drilling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    When drilling holes in hard steel plate used in up-armor kits for Humvee light trucks, the Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama, requested the assistance of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM...

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safely Get And Stay Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In ... way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best-selling, sectioned to-go plate with easy-sealing ... Research Leaders We Support Your Doctor Student Resources Patient Access to Research Research Resources Practice Resources Ways ...

  18. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  19. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  20. Vibration and Buckling of Web Plate of the Plate Girder

    OpenAIRE

    高橋, 和雄; 呉, 明強; 中澤, 聡志; 筑紫, 宏之

    1998-01-01

    The vibration and buckling of the web of the plate girder are studied in this paper. The small deflection theory of the thin plate is used. The finite strip method is employed to solve vibration and buckling of the plate girder. Natural frequenies of buckling properties are shown for various plate girder bridges.

  1. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R. [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  2. Future ATLAS Higgs Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, Ben; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will prove a challenging environment to work in, with for example $=200$ expected. It will however also provide great opportunities for advancing studies of the Higgs boson. The ATLAS detector will be upgraded, and Higgs prospects analyses have been performed to assess the reach of ATLAS Higgs studies in the HL-LHC era. These analyses are presented, as are Run-2 ATLAS di-Higgs analyses for comparison.

  3. Failure Atlas for Rolling Bearings in Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallian, T. E.

    2006-01-01

    This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T.E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2nd edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The content of the atlas comprises plate pages from the book that contain bearing failure images, application data, and descriptions of failure mode, image, and suspected failure causes. Rolling bearings are a critical component of the mainshaft system, gearbox and generator in the rapidly developing technology of power generating wind turbines. The demands for long service life are stringent; the design load, speed and temperature regimes are demanding and the environmental conditions including weather, contamination, impediments to monitoring and maintenance are often unfavorable. As a result, experience has shown that the rolling bearings are prone to a variety of failure modes that may prevent achievement of design lives. Morphological failure diagnosis is extensively used in the failure analysis and improvement of bearing operation. Accumulated experience shows that the failure appearance and mode of failure causation in wind turbine bearings has many distinguishing features. The present Atlas is a first effort to collect an interpreted database of specifically wind turbine related rolling bearing failures and make it widely available. This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T. E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2d edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The main body of that book is a comprehensive collection of self-contained pages called Plates, containing failure images, bearing and application data, and three descriptions: failure mode, image and suspected failure causes. The Plates are sorted by main failure mode into chapters. Each chapter is preceded by a general technical discussion of the failure mode, its appearance and causes. The Plates part is supplemented by an introductory part, describing the appearance classification and failure classification

  4. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  5. The Mechanical Strength of Acrylic Palatal Plates Reinforced with Net or Bundle Glass Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Hedzelek, W.; Gajdus, P.; Joniak, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the resistant forces of acrylic palatal plates reinforced with glass net and unidirectional glass fibers. The form and models of the edentulous jaw (Frasaco) were used in the study. Palatal plates were made from hot polymerised acrylic SR Triplex Hot (Ivoclar). In the total reinforced method the studied palatal plates used were reinforced with one or three layers of fiber glass net (Stick Net). In the partial reinforced method acrylic palatal plates wer...

  6. Bending and stretching of plates

    CERN Document Server

    Mansfield, E H; Hemp, W S

    1964-01-01

    The Bending and Stretching of Plates deals with elastic plate theory, particularly on small- and large-deflexion theory. Small-deflexion theory concerns derivation of basic equations, rectangular plates, plates of various shapes, plates whose boundaries are amenable to conformal transformation, plates with variable rigidity, and approximate methods. Large-deflexion theory includes general equations and some exact solutions, approximate methods in large-deflexion theory, asymptotic large-deflexion theories for very thin plates. Asymptotic theories covers membrane theory, tension field theory, a

  7. A graphite-coated carbon fiber epoxy composite bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ha Na; Lim, Jun Woo; Suh, Jung Do; Lee, Dai Gil

    A PEMFC (polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell or proton exchange membrane fuel cell) stack is composed of GDLs (gas diffusion layers), MEAs (membrane electrode assemblies), and bipolar plates. One of the important functions of bipolar plates is to collect and conduct the current from cell to cell, which requires low electrical bulk and interfacial resistances. For a carbon fiber epoxy composite bipolar plate, the interfacial resistance is usually much larger than the bulk resistance due to the resin-rich layer on the composite surface. In this study, a thin graphite layer is coated on the carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate to decrease the interfacial contact resistance between the bipolar plate and the GDL. The total electrical resistance in the through-thickness direction of the bipolar plate is measured with respect to the thickness of the graphite coating layer, and the ratio of the bulk resistance to the interfacial contact resistance is estimated using the measured data. From the experiment, it is found that the graphite coating on the carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate has 10% and 4% of the total electrical and interfacial contact resistances of the conventional carbon/epoxy composite bipolar plate, respectively, when the graphite coating thickness is 50 μm.

  8. Instrumented module of the ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    The ATLAS tile calorimeter consists of steel absorber plates interspersed with plastic scintillator tiles. Interactions of high-energy hadrons in the plates transform the incident energy into a 'hadronic shower'. When shower particles traverse the scintillating tiles, the latter emit an amount of light proportional to the incident energy. This light is transmitted along readout fibres to a photomultiplier, where a detectable electrical signal is produced. These pictures show one of 64 modules or 'wedges' of the barrel part of the tile calorimeter, which are arranged to form a cylinder around the beam axis. The wedge has been instrumented with scintillators and readout fibres. Photos 03, 06: Checking the routing of the readout fibres into the girder that houses the photomultipliers. Photo 04: A view of the fibre bundles inside the girder.

  9. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  10. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    La Givrine near St Cergue Cross Country Skiing and Fondue at Basse Ruche with M Nordberg, P Jenni, M Nessi, F Gianotti and Co. ATLAS Management Fondu dinner, reviewing state of play of the experiment Many fun scenes from cross country skiing and after 41 minutes of the film starts the fondue dinner in a nice chalet with many persons working for ATLAS experiment

  11. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  12. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  13. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  14. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  15. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  16. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  17. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  18. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  19. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  20. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  1. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  2. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Shots of aircraft factory where machining for ATLAS is done Shots of aircraft Work on components for ATLAS big wheel Discussions between Tikhonov and Nordberg in workshop Sequence 2 Shots of downtown Novosibirsk, including little church which is mid-point of Russian Federation Sequence 3 Interview of Yuri Tikhonov by Andrew Millington

  3. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  4. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  5. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  6. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  7. Comprehensive cellular‐resolution atlas of the adult human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royall, Joshua J.; Sunkin, Susan M.; Ng, Lydia; Facer, Benjamin A.C.; Lesnar, Phil; Guillozet‐Bongaarts, Angie; McMurray, Bergen; Szafer, Aaron; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Stevens, Allison; Tirrell, Lee; Benner, Thomas; Caldejon, Shiella; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Lau, Christopher; Nyhus, Julie; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zackery L.; Sandman, David; Shen, Elaine; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Write, Michelle; Zollei, Lilla; Dang, Chinh; Knowles, James A.; Koch, Christof; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Zielke, H. Ronald; Hohmann, John G.; Jones, Allan R.; Bernard, Amy; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Fischl, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Detailed anatomical understanding of the human brain is essential for unraveling its functional architecture, yet current reference atlases have major limitations such as lack of whole‐brain coverage, relatively low image resolution, and sparse structural annotation. We present the first digital human brain atlas to incorporate neuroimaging, high‐resolution histology, and chemoarchitecture across a complete adult female brain, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI), and 1,356 large‐format cellular resolution (1 µm/pixel) Nissl and immunohistochemistry anatomical plates. The atlas is comprehensively annotated for 862 structures, including 117 white matter tracts and several novel cyto‐ and chemoarchitecturally defined structures, and these annotations were transferred onto the matching MRI dataset. Neocortical delineations were done for sulci, gyri, and modified Brodmann areas to link macroscopic anatomical and microscopic cytoarchitectural parcellations. Correlated neuroimaging and histological structural delineation allowed fine feature identification in MRI data and subsequent structural identification in MRI data from other brains. This interactive online digital atlas is integrated with existing Allen Institute for Brain Science gene expression atlases and is publicly accessible as a resource for the neuroscience community. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3127–3481, 2016. © 2016 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27418273

  8. Highly adhesive metal plating on Zylon fiber via iodine pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatema, Ummul Khair [Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1 Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Gotoh, Yasuo, E-mail: ygotohy@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1 Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan)

    2011-11-01

    Highly adhesive metal plating was performed on poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) fiber named Zylon via iodine pretreatment followed by electroless plating. First, iodine components were selectively doped into the inner part of the fiber near the surface through iodine vapor exposure. The doped iodine was converted to palladium iodide particles by treating with palladium chloride solution. After the reduction of the iodide to metal palladium particles, electroless copper plating was conducted on the fiber. A uniform copper layer was deposited on the fiber surface and exhibited high durability in durability tests such as ultrasonic exposure, tape peeling-off, and corrosion in NaCl solution. This durability was attributed to the palladium particles formed at the fiber surface that served as an anchor for the plated layer as well as an electroless plating catalyst. The plated fibers also possessed electrical conductivity. Although the tensile strength of the Zylon fiber decreased from 5.8 to 4.9 GPa after undergoing the pretreatment and plating processes, the light shielding effect improved the light resistance of the plated fibers in terms of tensile properties. After 18 days of xenon lamp exposure, the plated fibers retained 74% of its initial strength, whereas that of untreated fibers decreased to 43%.

  9. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Codina, Estel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For the forthcoming Phase-I upgrade to the LHC (2018/19), the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap system, Small Wheel, needs to be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have to operate in a high background radiation region while reconstructing muon tracks with high precision and providing information for the Level-1 trigger. In particular, the precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm, and the Level-1 trigger track segments have to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of approximately 1 mrad. The NSWs consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both providing trigger and tracking capabilities. The single sTGC planes of a quadruplet consists of an anode layer of 50μm gold plated tungsten wire sandwiched between two resistive cathode layers. Behind one of the resistive cathode layers, a PCB with precise machined strips (thus the name sTGC) spaced every 3.2mm allows to achieve a position resolution that ranges from 70...

  10. Micromegas Detectors for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The upcoming luminosity upgrades of the LHC accelerator up to an ultimate value of $5 \\times 10^{34}\\, \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$ require a replacement of the innermost forward muon tracking stations (Small Wheels) of the ATLAS detector in 2018 and 2019. These New Small Wheels (NSW) will contain resistive strip micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chamber detectors. The resistive strip micromegas detector concept is presented, together with the $\\muup$TPC track reconstruction technique for a single plane track angle measurement. The mechanical layout of the NSW micromegas chambers is discussed as well, as the features of the specially designed frontend electronics. A pre-series micromegas chamber will be installed within ATLAS already in 2014. It will be integrated into the ATLAS data acquisition system with help of a custom micromegas Read Out Driver (ROD), based on the Scalable Readout System (SRS).

  11. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  12. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  13. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  14. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  15. The Plate Tectonics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  16. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meal-planning, In this section Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods ... your year-end donation today and help fight diabetes. Donate Today We Can Help - we-can-help. ...

  17. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are ... Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor Recipes Association Cookbook Recipes Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten ...

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to Give Become a ... glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy veggies and smaller portions of starchy foods ...

  19. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ... Donations Travel bookings completed through Hotels.com give 5% back to the Association. » « Connect With Us Register ...

  20. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To ... Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy ... Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ...

  1. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know ... Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food ...

  2. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables Fats Alcohol What Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food ...

  3. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely Get And ... manage portion control wherever you are. Now, our best-selling, sectioned to-go plate with easy-sealing ...

  4. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... portion control wherever you are. Now, our best-selling, sectioned to-go plate with easy-sealing lid ... We Can Help - we-can-help.html Chat Online Chat Closed engagement en -- Free Type 2 Education ...

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the ... way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy ...

  6. Correlation between Wear Resistance and Lifetime of Electrical Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical contacts are usually plated in order to prevent corrosion. Platings of detachable electrical contacts experience wear because of the motion between contacts. Once the protecting platings have been worn out, electrical contacts will fail rapidly due to corrosion or fretting corrosion. Therefore the wear resistance of the platings is a very important parameter for the long lifetime of electrical contacts. Many measures which improve the wear resistance can diminish the conductivity of the platings. Due to the fact that platings of electrical contacts must have both a high wear resistance and a high electrical conductivity, the manufacturing of high performance platings of electrical contacts poses a great challenge. Our study shows firstly the correlation between the wear resistance of platings and lifetime of electrical contacts and then the measures, which improve the wear resistance without impairing the electrical performance of the contacts.

  7. Important ATLAS Forward Calorimeter Milestone Reached

    CERN Document Server

    Loch, P.

    The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter working group has reached an important milestone in the production of their detectors. The mechanical assembly of the first electromagnetic module (FCal1C) has been completed at the University of Arizona on February 25, 2002, only ten days after the originally scheduled date. The photo shows the University of Arizona FCal group in the clean room, together with the assembled FCal1C module. The module consists of a stack of 18 round copper plates, each about one inch thick. Each plate is about 90 cm in diameter, and has 12260 precision-drilled holes in it, to accommodate the tube/rod electrode assembly. The machining of the plates, which was done at the Science Technology Center (STC) at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, required high precision to allow for easy insertion of the electrode copper tube. The plates have been carefully cleaned at the University of Arizona, to remove any machining residue and metal flakes. This process alone took about eleven weeks. Exactly 122...

  8. An overview of the mechanical design of the Atlas pulsed power machine

    CERN Document Server

    Bowman, D W; Barr, G W; Bennett, G A; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Davis, T O; Dorr, G; Gribble, R F; Griego, J R; Hood, M; Kimerly, H J; Martínez, A; McCuistian, B T; Miller, R B; Ney, S A; Nielsen, K; Pankuch, P; Parsons, W M; Potter, C; Ricketts, R L; Salazar, H R; Scudder, D W; Shapiro, C; Thompson, M C; Trainor, R J; Valdez, G A; Yonemoto, W; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    Atlas is a pulsed-power facility being designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform high-energy density experiments in support of Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship and basic research programs. Atlas will consist of 24 individual maintenance units, each consisting of 4 240-kV Marx units. Maintenance units are contained in large oil tanks arrayed in a circle about a central target chamber. Total stored energy of the capacitor bank will be 23 MJ. Maintenance units will discharge through an output shorting switch into a vertical tri-plate transmission line, and from there into a transition area/collector inside a large vacuum chamber. An overview of mechanical design aspects of the Atlas machine is presented. These include maintenance unit design and design of the tri-plate transmission line and transition region. Findings from fabrication and testing of prototype systems are discussed. (2 refs).

  9. Experimental Method for Determining Forces at Bending of Perforated Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Adrian; Oleksik, Mihaela; Avrigean, Eugen

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the method of calculating the forces which appear at the bending of perforated plates with holes of different shapes and placed in different patterns, by means of a dynamometric table which uses resistive tensometric transducers (strain gauges). It also describes an instrument for the recording of data from the dynamometric table, a tool created with the aid of the "TestPoint" software which, beneath the data recording, ensures the filtering and statistic processing of data. The obtained results are displayed in comparative graphs for six types of perforated plates, as well as for an unperforated plate.

  10. Dealing with difficult deformations: Construction of a knowledge-based deformation atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann; Darvann, T.A.; Hermann, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    from before to after lip closure in infants with UCLP. The purpose of the present work was to show that use of prior information about typical deformations due to lip closure, through the construction of a knowledge-based atlas of deformations, could overcome the problem. Initially, mean volumes...... (atlases) for the pre- and post-surgical populations, respectively, were automatically constructed by non-rigid registration. An expert placed corresponding landmarks in the cleft area in the two atlases; this provided prior information used to build a knowledge-based deformation atlas. We model the change...... from pre- to post-surgery using thin-plate spline warping. The registration results are convincing and represent a first move towards an automatic registration method for dealing with difficult deformations due to this type of surgery. New or breakthrough work to be presented: The method provides...

  11. Lecture Notes on a Machine Independent Compiler for ATLAS (MICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    RESISTANCE 26 DISPLAY, RESULT, ’MEASUREMENT’ 30 DISPLAY, MESSAGE, KILOHMS 000255 REMVE, ALL 000265 FINISH 000270 TERMINATE , ATLAS PROGRAM ’TEST’$ Figure 5...CORAL PROCESO 66:z::z~Z::Z:::::::::::::::z::::.:. . .* . . . ..... .... CORAL 66OGRAM ... Figure.16 23 ..... SAMPLE CORAL 66 PROGRAM PRODUCED BY THE

  12. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  13. Status of HVCMOS Developments for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Peric, Ivan; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Ehrler, Felix; Guezzi Messaoud, Fadoua; Kramer, Christian; Leys, Richard; Prathapan, Mridula; Schimassek, Rudolf; Schoning, Andre; Vilella Figueras, Eva; Weber, Alena; Zhang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the developments made by ATLAS HVCMOS and HVMAPS collaborations. We have proposed two HVCMOS sensor concepts for ATLAS pixels—the capacitive coupled pixel detector (CCPD) and the monolithic detector. The sensors have been implemented in three semiconductor processes AMS H18, AMS H35 and LFoundry LFA15. Efficiency of 99.7% after neutron irradiation to 1015 neq/cm2W has been measured with the small area CCPD prototype in AMS H18 technology. About 84% of the particles are detected with a time resolution better than 25 ns. The sensor was implemented on a low resistivity substrate. The large area demonstrator sensor in AMS H35 process has been designed, produced and successfully tested. The sensor has been produced on different high resistivity substrates ranging from 80 Ωcm to more than 1 kΩ. Monolithic- and hybrid readout are both possible. In August 2016, six different monolithic pixel matrices for ATLAS with a total area of 1 cm2 have been submitted in LFoundry LFA15 proc...

  14. Baking process of thin plate carbonaceous compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Shimada, Toyokazu

    1987-06-27

    As a production process of a thin plate carbonaceous compact for separator of phosphoric acid fuel cell, there is a process to knead carbonaceous powder and thermosetting resin solution, to form and harden the kneaded material and then to bake, carbonize and graphitize it. However in this baking and carbonization treatment, many thin plate compacts are set in a compiled manner within a heating furnace and receive a heat treatment from their circumference. Since the above compacts to be heated tend generally to be heated from their peripheries, their baked conditions are not homogeneous easily causing the formation of cracks, etc.. As a process to heat and bake homogeneously by removing the above problematical points, this invention offers a process to set in a heating furnace a laminate consisting of the lamination of thin plate carbonaceous compacts and the heat resistant soaking plates which hold the upper and lower ends of the above lamination, to fill the upper and under peripheries of the laminate above with high heat conductive packing material and its side periphery with low heat conductive packing material respectively and to heat and sinter it. In addition, the invention specifies the high and low heat conductive packing materials respectively. (1 fig, 2 tabs)

  15. Inelastic buckling of plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, G.

    This paper concerns the inelastic stability of a thin plate under in-plane loading. In Love-Kirchhoffs approximation, using Hencky's relations and the Von Mises criterion, yield the particular stress distribution across the plate thickness for elastic and elastic-plastic prestress fields. The principle of virtual work is used to study the equilibrium of the bifurcated solution. This leads to the energy relations where explicit dependence between the stability equation coefficients and the solution is carried out. In the equilibrium equation, two nonquadratic additional terms are obtained which are neglected in the classical equation. Some applications are made using Ramberg-Osgood's formula to show the importance of the additional terms.

  16. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - EnviroAtlas Community Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  17. ATLAS Data Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Roger; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to parallel open access and analysis preservation initiatives, ATLAS is taking steps to ensure that the data taken by the experiment during run-1 remain accessible and available for future analysis by the collaboration. An evaluation of what is required to achieve this is underway, examining the ATLAS data production chain to establish the effort required and potential problems. Several alternatives are explored, but the favoured solution is to bring the run 1 data and software in line with the equivalent to that which will be used for run 2. This will result in a coherent ATLAS dataset for the data already taken and that to come in the future.

  18. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  19. Development and mechanical properties of a locking T-plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane R. Mesquita

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to develop a locking T-plate and to evaluate its mechanical properties in synthetic models. A titanium 2.7mm T-plate was designed with a shaft containing three locked screw holes and one dynamic compression hole, and a head with two locked screw holes. Forty T-shaped polyurethane blocks, and 20 T-plates were used for mechanical testing. Six bone-plate constructs were tested to failure, three in axial compression and three in cantilever bending. Fourteen bone-plate constructs were tested for failure in fatigue, seven in axial compression and seven in cantilever bending. In static testing higher values of axial compression test than cantilever bending test were observed for all variables. In axial compression fatigue testing all bone-plate constructs withstood 1,000,000 cycles. Four bone-plate constructs failure occurred before 1,000,000 cycles in cantilever bending fatigue testing. In conclusion, the locking T-plate tested has mechanical properties that offer greatest resistance to fracture under axial loading than bending forces.

  20. ATLAS Event - First Splash of Particles in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2008-01-01

    A simulated event. September 10, 2008 - The ATLAS detector lit up as a flood of particles traversed the detector when the beam was occasionally directed at a target near ATLAS. This allowed ATLAS physicists to study how well the various components of the detector were functioning in preparation for the forthcoming collisions. The first ATLAS data recorded on September 10, 2008 is seen here. Running time 24 seconds

  1. The fabrication of microelectrode array biochip on PET using plate-to-plate NIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Khi Khim; Samsuri, Fahmi; Lee, Lai Seng; Ooi, Su Guan; Ong, Wei Jie; Mohamed, Khairudin

    2017-07-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films are useful for various applications due to the characterization of PET were flexibility, thermal resistance and chemical resistant. PET Films are widely used in both commercial and industrial today since they are highly demand in the market. In this study, microelectrode array biochip was fabricated on flexible PET film using (plate-to-plate) nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The PET films acted as substrate while PDMS as the mould. The Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mould was attached on top of the PET film and additionally clamped between two pieces of glass. A mild force was applied to it for REM (replica moulding). A study was carried out upon the surface profiling of the PDMS mould and PET to monitor the possibility of deformation after applying force upon the samples. The experiment shall present the finding of required force to REM the microelectrode array biochip pattern on the PET film.

  2. THE NEW STRUCTURE OF A PLATE-PILE FOUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMORODOV О. V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. In the construction of high-rise buildings with significant loads on foundations and bedding at the base of not rocky soils tend to use the most common pile foundation to reduce the deformation and correspond to regulations [1] on the maximum permissible deformation. Monitoring of the stress-strain state (SSS pile foundations constructed buildings shows the existing reserves of bearing capacity on the one hand - soil bases of the second group of limit states, on the other - the foundation of the first group of limit states by regulating the SSS foundation during construction and exploitation. Therefore, are increasingly using more progressive structure of foundations consisting of piles and of plate, as well as methods for their construction [2 - 10], however, in their design there are a number of disadvantages associated with the ambiguity of the application of methods for the calculation of such structures, which allows to do only partial conclusions and recommendations. Purpose. Is proposing the new structure of a plate-pile foundation, which overcomes the drawbacks of the existing design solutions and methods of consruction their, as well as is proposing an engineering method of a determination of basic parameters. Conclusion. Is proposes the new structure of a plate-pile foundation and the method of a determination of basic parameters his in the design of a soil base to the maximum permissible deformation Su buildings. Efficiency of application this type plate-pile foundation obtained by rational distribution resistance between a plate and piles, when under load from the building to the first work fully incorporated plate that allows maximum deformed for plate, and then the piles - due to of the hinge connection with the plate. Thus, depending on the maximum permissible deformation for buildings resistance of plate part of a full load of more than 50%, that significantly reduces the consumption of concrete.

  3. Fuel cell end plate structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1991-04-23

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  4. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  5. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN, Building 40 Interview with theorist Mr. Philip Hinchliffe (Berkeley) as well an interview with his wife Mrs. Hinchliffe who is also Physics Department head at Berkeley. They are both working in ATLAS Experiment.

  6. Lunar Sample Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sample Atlas provides pictures of the Apollo samples taken in the Lunar Sample Laboratory, full-color views of the samples in microscopic thin-sections,...

  7. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    ATLAS Physics Workshop at the University of Roma Tre held from Monday 06 June 2005 to Saturday 11 June 2005. Experts establishing workshop, poster, people milling Shots of Peter Jenni introduction Many audience shots Sequences from various talks

  8. The Latest from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Since November 2008, ATLAS has undertaken detailed maintenance, consolidation and repair work on the detector (see Bulletin of 20 July 2009). Today, the fraction of the detector that is operational has increased compared to last year: less than 1% of dead channels for most of the sub-systems. "We are going to start taking data this year with a detector which is even more efficient than it was last year," agrees ATLAS Spokesperson, Fabiola Gianotti. By mid-September the detector was fully closed again, and the cavern sealed. The magnet system has been operated at nominal current for extensive periods over recent months. Once the cavern was sealed, ATLAS began two weeks of combined running. Right now, subsystems are joining the run incrementally until the point where the whole detector is integrated and running as one. In the words of ATLAS Technical Coordinator, Marzio Nessi: "Now we really start physics." In parallel, the analysis ...

  9. Consolidated Lunar Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Consolidated Lunar Atlas is a collection of the best photographic images of the moon, including low-oblique photography, full-moon photography, and tabular and...

  10. ATLAS Cavern baseplate

    CERN Multimedia

    It-UDS-Audiovisual Services

    2002-01-01

    This video shows the incredible amounth of iron used for ATLAS cavern. Please look at the related links and also videos that are concerning the civil engineering where you can see even more detailed cavern excavation work.

  11. VT Planning Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Planning Atlas provides easy access to commonly requested land use planning data – the status of local planning and regulation, state designation boundaries and...

  12. Apollo Image Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Apollo Image Atlas is a comprehensive collection of Apollo-Saturn mission photography. Included are almost 25,000 lunar images, both from orbit and from the...

  13. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  14. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  15. ATLAS soft QCD results

    CERN Document Server

    Sykora, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Recent results of soft QCD measurements performed by the ATLAS collaboration are reported. The measurements include total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, inclusive spectra, underlying event and particle correlations in p-p and p-Pb collisions.

  16. A Comparison of the Sensititre MycoTB Plate, the Bactec MGIT 960, and a Microarray-Based Molecular Assay for the Detection of Drug Resistance in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Moscow, Russia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Y Nosova

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to compare the consistency of three assays for the determination of the drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB strains with various resistance profiles isolated from the Moscow region.A total of 144 MTB clinical isolates with a strong bias toward drug resistance were examined using Bactec MGIT 960, Sensititre MycoTB, and a microarray-based molecular assay TB-TEST to detect substitutions in the rpoB, katG, inhA, ahpC, gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, and embB genes that are associated with resistance to rifampin, isoniazid, fluoroquinolones, second-line injectable drugs and ethambutol.The average correlation for the identification of resistant and susceptible isolates using the three methods was approximately 94%. An association of mutations detected with variable resistance levels was shown. We propose a change in the breakpoint minimal inhibitory concentration for kanamycin to less than 5 μg/ml in the Sensititre MycoTB system. A pairwise comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of two different drugs revealed an increased correlation in the first-line drug group and a partial correlation in the second-line drug group, reflecting the history of the preferential simultaneous use of drugs from these groups. An increased correlation with the MICs was also observed for drugs sharing common resistance mechanisms.The quantitative measures of phenotypic drug resistance produced by the Sensititre MycoTB and the timely detection of mutations using the TB-TEST assay provide guidance for clinicians for the choice of the appropriate drug regimen.

  17. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: June ATLAS Plenary Meeting Tutorial on Physics EDM and Tools (June) Freiburg Overview Week Ketevi Assamagan's Tutorial on Analysis Tools Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  18. ATLAS Transitional Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the transitional radiation tracker within the ATLAS detector. Subjects covered include what the tracker is used to measure, its structure, what happens when particles pass through the tracker, how it distinguishes between different types of particles within it.

  19. ATLAS Status and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lankford, AJ; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study a broad range of particle physics at the highest available laboratory energies, from measurements of the standard model to searches for new physics beyond the standard model. The status of ATLAS commissioning and the ATLAS physics program will be reported, and physics prospects for the 2010 LHC run will be discussed.

  20. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1999-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. The film has original working sound.

  1. Plate Full of Color

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Plate Full of Color teaches the value of eating a variety of colorful and healthy foods.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  2. Plate tectonics and sedimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yasuji

    1988-05-20

    The theory of continental drift which German meteorologist, Wegener had proposed was denied by the experts at that time and disappeared from the academy. However, scholars of UK measured palaeomagnetism at several parts of the world in 1950's and from this standpoint, the continental drift theory revived. Furthermore, the conditions of the ocean beds started to be discovered due to the development of oceanographic observations in 1950's and in the end of 1960's, the principle of plate tectonics was firmly established changing totally and dramatically then conventional solid earth science based upon the substantially immovable continents and ocean floors. Consequently, the geology up to that time was obliged to be reexamined in its entire fields. This article provides the general information on the above history up to the present time, states about where the sedimentary basins which formed strata do occupy its positions on the earth, and explains the concrete relationship between the geological facts which have been revealed and plate tectonics. (16 figs, 49 refs)

  3. Atlas Fractures and Atlas Osteosynthesis: A Comprehensive Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandziora, Frank; Chapman, Jens R; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Schroeder, Gregory D; Scholz, Matti

    2017-09-01

    Most atlas fractures are the result of compression forces. They are often combined with fractures of the axis and especially with the odontoid process. Multiple classification systems for atlas fractures have been described. For an adequate diagnosis, a computed tomography is mandatory. To distinguish between stable and unstable atlas injury, it is necessary to evaluate the integrity of the transverse atlantal ligament (TAL) by magnetic resonance imaging and to classify the TAL lesion. Studies comparing conservative and operative management of unstable atlas fractures are unfortunately not available in the literature; neither are studies comparing different operative treatment strategies. Hence all treatment recommendations are based on low level evidence. Most of atlas fractures are stable and will be successfully managed by immobilization in a soft/hard collar. Unstable atlas fractures may be treated conservatively by halo-fixation, but nowadays more and more surgeons prefer surgery because of the potential discomfort and complications of halo-traction. Atlas fractures with a midsubstance ligamentous disruption of TAL or severe bony ligamentous avulsion can be treated by a C1/2 fusion. Unstable atlas fractures with moderate bony ligamentous avulsion may be treated by atlas osteosynthesis. Although the evidence for the different treatment strategies of atlas fractures is low, atlas osteosynthesis has the potential to change treatment philosophies. The reasons for this are described in this review.

  4. Status and new layout of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Netchaeva, P

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is based on a set of radiation-hard electronics chips able to resist a dose of 500 kGy. The implementation of these chips in the DMILL technology did not give the expected results. Re-design of the radiation-hard chips in Deep SubMicron technology is ongoing, but has implied a one and a half year delay in an already tight schedule. Major layout changes have therefore been necessary to allow installation of the ATLAS pixel detector at LHC start-up. This paper illustrates the status of the ATLAS pixel project, die motivations for the new layout, the way this should be implemented and the prototype fabrication and testing. (4 refs).

  5. Characterization of the commercially-available fluorescent chloroquine-BODIPY conjugate, LynxTag-CQGREEN, as a marker for chloroquine resistance and uptake in a 96-well plate assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl C Y Loh

    Full Text Available Chloroquine was a cheap, extremely effective drug against Plasmodium falciparum until resistance arose. One approach to reversing resistance is the inhibition of chloroquine efflux from its site of action, the parasite digestive vacuole. Chloroquine accumulation studies have traditionally relied on radiolabelled chloroquine, which poses several challenges. There is a need for development of a safe and biologically relevant substitute. We report here a commercially-available green fluorescent chloroquine-BODIPY conjugate, LynxTag-CQGREEN, as a proxy for chloroquine accumulation. This compound localized to the digestive vacuole of the parasite as observed under confocal microscopy, and inhibited growth of chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 more extensively than in the resistant strains 7G8 and K1. Microplate reader measurements indicated suppression of LynxTag-CQGREEN efflux after pretreatment of parasites with known reversal agents. Microsomes carrying either sensitive- or resistant-type PfCRT were assayed for uptake; resistant-type PfCRT exhibited increased accumulation of LynxTag-CQGREEN, which was suppressed by pretreatment with known chemosensitizers. Eight laboratory strains and twelve clinical isolates were sequenced for PfCRT and Pgh1 haplotypes previously reported to contribute to drug resistance, and pfmdr1 copy number and chloroquine IC50s were determined. These data were compared with LynxTag-CQGREEN uptake/fluorescence by multiple linear regression to identify genetic correlates of uptake. Uptake of the compound correlated with the logIC50 of chloroquine and, more weakly, a mutation in Pgh1, F1226Y.

  6. ATLAS Supplier Award for the ECT Vacuum Vessels

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    On 12 February the Netherlands firm Schelde Exotech was awarded the ATLAS Supplier Award for the construction of the two vacuum vessels for the ATLAS End- Cap Toroid (ECT) magnets. ATLAS Supplier Award ceremonies have now become something of a tradition. For the third consecutive year, ATLAS has given best supplier awards for the most exceptional contributors to the construction of the detector. The Netherlands firm Schelde Exotech has just received the award for the construction of the two vacuum vessels for the ECTs. With a diameter of 11 metres and a volume of 550 cubic metres, the ECT vacuum vessels are obviously impressive in scale. They consist of large aluminium plates and a stainless steel central bore tube. In order to obtain the required undulations, the firm had to develop a special assembly and welding technique. Despite the chambers' imposing size, a very high degree of precision has been achieved in their geometry. Moreover, the chambers, which were delivered in July 2002 to CERN, were built i...

  7. Hard X-ray Zone Plates Using Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, M. J.; Joshi, V.; Sumant, A. V.; Divan, R.; Ocola, L. E.; Lu, M.; Mancini, D. C.

    2011-09-01

    While hard x-ray zone plates have made great advances recently towards improved resolution, their focusing efficiency requires further development. This problem becomes more important as higher-energy x-rays are used for x-ray microscopy. The current method for fabricating zone plates involves a dielectric mold, which is then electroplated into, but the materials used for this mold are not mechanically stiff enough for the zone plates desired. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) is a form of diamond that can be grown as a thin film by chemical vapor deposition and offers many of the physical properties of bulk diamond. Its mechanical stiffness, resistance to radiation damage, dielectric properties, and ability to be etched suggests UNCD as a capable mold material. Reported is progress in the fabrication of hard x-ray zone plates with gold electroformed into a UNCD mold.

  8. Minimum wall pressure coefficient of orifice plate energy dissipater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-zheng Ai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orifice plate energy dissipaters have been successfully used in large-scale hydropower projects due to their simple structure, convenient construction procedure, and high energy dissipation ratio. The minimum wall pressure coefficient of an orifice plate can indirectly reflect its cavitation characteristics: the lower the minimum wall pressure coefficient is, the better the ability of the orifice plate to resist cavitation damage is. Thus, it is important to study the minimum wall pressure coefficient of the orifice plate. In this study, this coefficient and related parameters, such as the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate diameter to the flood-discharging tunnel diameter; the relative thickness, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate thickness to the tunnel diameter; and the Reynolds number of the flow through the orifice plate, were theoretically analyzed, and their relationships were obtained through physical model experiments. It can be concluded that the minimum wall pressure coefficient is mainly dominated by the contraction ratio and relative thickness. The lower the contraction ratio and relative thickness are, the larger the minimum wall pressure coefficient is. The effects of the Reynolds number on the minimum wall pressure coefficient can be neglected when it is larger than 105. An empirical expression was presented to calculate the minimum wall pressure coefficient in this study.

  9. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  10. Une plate-forme en distension, témoin de phases pré-accrétion téthysienne en Afrique du Nord pendant le Toarcien Aalénien (synclinal Iguer Awragh Afennourir, Moyen Atlas occidental, Maroc)A pre-accretional extensional platform of the North African Tethys during the Toarcian Aalenian (Iguer Awragh Afennourir syncline, western Middle Atlas, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hammichi, Fatima; Elmi, Serge; Faure-Muret, Anne; Benshilil, Khadija

    2002-10-01

    A stratigraphic study and mapping allow defining the particular features of this area of the southwestern Middle Atlas (Morocco) during the Toarcian and the Aalenian. Numerous spectacular variations in thickness and facies are documented by the discovery of coralline build-ups dated to the Late Toarcian. They occur along the palaeostructures. Development of the structures occurred in several stages: (1) initial differentiation during the Early and Middle Toarcian; (2) homogenisation during the Late Toarcian, after the construction of the reefs. The Aalenian history is similar: differentiation (Early Aalenian)-homogenisation (Middle to Late Aalenian). Two palaeostructural trends are evident: SW-NE and transverse SSW-NNE to south-north. These caused separation of several subbasins, which alternatively deepened and shallowed, probably due to the tilting of several blocks to the southwest. To cite this article: F. El Hammichi et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 1003-1010.

  11. EnviroAtlas Community Boundaries Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundaries of all EnviroAtlas Communities. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in each EnviroAtlas...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Austin, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Cleveland, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  14. Aluminum Manganese Molten Salt Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    cyanide waste products are generated during all stages of the cadmium plating lifecycle . The cadmium plating process generates spent plating bath and...X Check caustic line and PVC circulation piping for leaks X Verify pH at laboratory X Measure conductivity X Replace rinse...tank, which is then routed to the rinse tank. At the rinse tank, the chemical will be injected via appropriate fittings into to a PVC pipe loop which

  15. Flexible plate and foundation modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Hosking, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the most common mathematical model for a moving load on a continuously- supported flexible plate, the plate is assumed thin and elastic. An exception is the inclusion of viscoelasticity in the theory for the response of a floating ice plate, where the deflexion at the critical load speed corresponding to the minimum phase speed of hybrid flexural-gravity waves consequently approaches a steady state. This is in contrast to the elastic theory, where the response is predi...

  16. The boost transistor: a field plate controlled LDMOST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrara, A.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Boksteen, B.K.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart; Steeneken, P.G.; Heringa, A.; Claes, J.; van der Wel, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a new device: the boost transistor. The boost transistor is an LDMOS transistor that is controlled by a separate field plate boost electrode that reduces the specific on-resistance RonA. By applying a positive voltage Vboost, this electrode creates an accumulation layer in

  17. Improvements of Nickel Deposit Characteristics by Pulse Plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Leisner, Peter; Møller, Per

    1993-01-01

    Investigation of the properties of electroplated nickel, using both pulse plating and conventional di-rect current (DC), has lead to several interesting improvements of deposit characteristics. Investigated properties include; internal stress, tensile strength, yield stress, elongation, hardness......, throwing power, current efficiency and corrosion resistance (porosity). Experiments have been made with Watts nickel baths, sulphamate baths and a modified Watts bath called W3....

  18. Slice Test Results of the ATLAS Barrel Muon Level-1 Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Alviggi, M G; Bocci, V; Brambilla, Elena; Canale, V; Caprio, M A; Cardarelli, R; Cataldi, G; De Asmundis, R; Della Volpe, D; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Simone, A; Distante, L; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Iengo, P; Nisati, A; Pastore, F; Patricelli, S; Perrino, R; Petrolo, E; Primavera, M; Salamon, A; Santonico, R; Sekhniaidze, G; Severi, M; Spagnolo, S; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano; 9th Workshop On Electronics For LHC Experiments - LECC 2003

    2003-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment makes use of the Resistive Plate Chambers detectors for particle tracking in the barrel region. The level-1 muon trigger system has to measure and discriminate muon transverse momentum, perform a fast and coarse tracking of the muon candidates, associate them to the bunch crossing corresponding to the event of interest, measure the second coordinate in the non-bending projection. The on-detector electronics first collects front-end signals coming from the two inner RPC stations on the low-pT PAD boards, each one covering a region of DetaxDphi=0.2x0.2, and hosting four Coincidence Matrix ASICs. Each CMA performs the low-pT trigger algorithm and data readout on a region of DetaxDphi=0.2x0.1. Data coming from the four CMAs are assembled by the low-pT PAD logic. Each low-pT PAD board sends data to the corresponding high-pT PAD boards, located on the outer RPC station. Four CMA on each board make use of the low-pT trigger result and of the front-end signals coming from...

  19. Technical Design Report for the Phase-II Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Collaboration, ATLAS

    2017-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector will be significantly upgraded during the Phase-II upgrade in LS3 in order to cope with the operational conditions at the HL-LHC in Run 4 and beyond. A large fraction of the frontend and on- and off-detector readout and trigger electronics for the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC), Thin Gap Chambers (TGC), and Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will be replaced to make them compatible with the higher trigger rates and longer latencies necessary for the new level-0 trigger. The MDT chambers will be integrated into the level-0 trigger in order to sharpen the momentum threshold. Additional RPC chambers will be installed in the inner barrel layer to increase the acceptance and robustness of the trigger, and some chambers in high-rate regions will be refurbished. Some of the MDT chambers in the inner barrel layer will be replaced with new small-diameter MDTs. New TGC triplet chambers in the barrel-endcap transition region will replace the current TGC doublets to suppress t...

  20. The coincidence matrix ASIC of the level-1 muon barrel trigger of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, V; Salamon, A; Vari, R; Veneziano, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel level-1 muon trigger processes hit information from the resistive plate chamber detector, identifying candidate muon tracks and assigning them to a programmable p/sub T/ range and to a unique bunch crossing number. The trigger system uses up to seven detector layers and seeks hit patterns compatible with muon tracks in the bending and nonbending projection. The basic principle of the algorithm is to demand a coincidence of hits in the different chamber layers within a path. The width of the road is related to the p/sub T / threshold to be applied. The system is split into an on-detector and an off-detector part. The on-detector electronics reduces the information from about 350 k channels to about 400 32-bit data words sent via optical fiber to the so-called sector logic (SL). The off- detector SL electronics collects muon candidates and associates them to detector regions-of-interest of Delta eta * Delta Phi of 0.1*0.1. The core of the on-detector electronics is the coincidence matrix ASIC (...

  1. Laterally Loaded Nail-Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob; Rathkjen, Arne

    Load-displacement curves from about 200 short-term and laterally loaded nail-plate joints are analysed. The nail-plates are from Gang-Nail Systems, type GNA 20 S. The test specimens and the measuring systems are described. The tests are divided into 32 different series. The influence of the number...... of nail row, edge distance, fixed nail-plate, bending direction, unloading, and grain direction, plate and load direction on the load-displacement curves are analysed. Mean load-displacement curves from all the tests are given....

  2. Intermittent plate tectonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Paul G; Behn, Mark D

    2008-01-04

    Although it is commonly assumed that subduction has operated continuously on Earth without interruption, subduction zones are routinely terminated by ocean closure and supercontinent assembly. Under certain circumstances, this could lead to a dramatic loss of subduction, globally. Closure of a Pacific-type basin, for example, would eliminate most subduction, unless this loss were compensated for by comparable subduction initiation elsewhere. Given the evidence for Pacific-type closure in Earth's past, the absence of a direct mechanism for termination/initiation compensation, and recent data supporting a minimum in subduction flux in the Mesoproterozoic, we hypothesize that dramatic reductions or temporary cessations of subduction have occurred in Earth's history. Such deviations in the continuity of plate tectonics have important consequences for Earth's thermal and continental evolution.

  3. VISAS AND GREEN PLATES

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    From 3 April 2000, all questions relating to visa requests for Switzerland, France, or Russia for a member of the personnel must be addressed to Ms. Agnita Querrou (telephone 72838, office 5-2-019, e-mail Agnita.Querrou@cern.ch).The Users' Office continues to deal with requests for letters of invitation and questions concerning visas for users in EP Division.Questions relating to removals, requests for green plates, to privileges of members of the personnel and to the importation of vehicles are still dealt with by Ms Zuzana Miller (telephone 79257, office 33-1-017, e-mail Zuzana.Muller@cern.ch) and Ms Joëlle Belleman (telephone 73962, office 33-1-019, e-mail Joelle.Belleman@cern.ch).

  4. Effect of plate working length on plate stiffness and cyclic fatigue life in a cadaveric femoral fracture gap model stabilized with a 12-hole 2.4 mm locking compression plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Peini; Conrad, Bryan P; Lewis, Daniel D; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Pozzi, Antonio

    2013-06-24

    There are several factors that can affect the fatigue life of a bone plate, including the mechanical properties of the plate and the complexity of the fracture. The position of the screws can influence construct stiffness, plate strain and cyclic fatigue of the implants. Studies have not investigated these variables in implants utilized for long bone fracture fixation in dogs and cats. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of plate working length on construct stiffness, gap motion and resistance to cyclic fatigue of dog femora with a simulated fracture gap stabilized using a 12-hole 2.4 mm locking compression plates (LCP). Femora were plated with 12-hole 2.4 mm LCP using 2 screws per fracture segment (long working length group) or with 12-hole 2.4 mm LCP using 5 screws per fracture segment (a short working length group). Construct stiffness did not differ significantly between stabilization techniques. Implant failure did not occur in any of the plated femora during cycling. Mean ± SD yield load at failure in the short plate working length group was significantly higher than in the long plate working length group. In a femoral fracture gap model stabilized with a 2.4 mm LCP applied in contact with the bone, plate working length had no effect on stiffness, gap motion and resistance to fatigue. The short plate working length constructs failed at higher loads; however, yield loads for both the short and long plate working length constructs were within physiologic range.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Polyurea-Coated Steel Plates at Underwater Explosive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-hui Dai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the survivability of ship structures at underwater explosion, thin steel plates coated with polyurea were used to investigate the blast protection effect. During the experimental tests of bare steel plates at different standoff, an appropriate distance was selected as the reference standoff to perform the tests of coated plates. Experimental tests of different coating locations (front versus back and coating thickness were carried out to study the influencing factors of blast resistance for metal substrate plates. Compared with the bare steel plates, the polyurea coating was found to reduce the deformation of the test plates at blast tests in both cases of the front and back surface locations of the polyurea layer. An increase in the coating thickness also mitigates substantially the deformation of plates. In addition, the properties of the material and the substrate-coating bond strength may also affect the protective effect of the polyurea coating.

  6. Active faulting and transpression tectonics along the plate boundary in North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Meghraoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a synthesis of the active tectonics of the northern Atlas Mountains, and suggest a kinematic model of transpression and block rotation that illustrates the mechanics of this section of the Africa–Eurasia plate boundary. Neotectonic structures and significant shallow seismicity (with Mw >5.0 indicate that coeval E-W-trending, right-lateral faulting and NE-SW, thrust-related folding result from oblique convergence at the plate boundary, which forms a transpressional system. The strain distribution obtained from fault–fold structures and P axes of focal mechanism solutions, and the geodetic (NUVEL-1 and GPS convergence show that the shortening and convergence directions are not coaxial. The transpressional strain is partitioned along the strike and the quantitative description of the displacement field yields a compression-to-transcurrence ratio varying from 33% near Gibraltar, to 50% along the Tunisian Atlas. Shortening directions oriented NNE and NNW for the Pliocene and Quaternary, respectively, and the S shape of the Quaternary anticline axes, are in agreement with the 2.24˚/Myr to 3.9˚/Myr modeled clockwise rotation of the small tectonic blocks and with the paleomagnetic data. The convergence between Africa and Eurasia is absorbed along the Atlas Mountains at the upper crustal level, by means of thrusting above decollement systems, which are controlled by subdued transcurrent faults. The Tell Atlas of northwest Algeria, which has experienced numerous large earthquakes with respect to the other regions, is interpreted as a restraining bend that localizes the strain distribution along the plate boundary.

  7. Plate osteosynthesis of simple forearm fractures : LCP versus DC plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Charles Tjerk; Ten Duis, Henk Jan

    The aim of this study was to compare the time to radiological bony union of simple A-type fractures of the forearm, treated with either a locking compression plate (LCP) or a dynamic compression plate (DCP). For each fracture, the relation between the use of compression and radiological healing time

  8. ATLAS Review Office

    CERN Multimedia

    Szeless, B

    The ATLAS internal reviews, be it the mandatory Production Readiness Reviews, the now newly installed Production Advancement Reviews, or the more and more requested different Design Reviews, have become a part of our ATLAS culture over the past years. The Activity Systems Status Overviews are, for the time being, a one in time event and should be held for each system as soon as possible to have some meaning. There seems to a consensus that the reviews have become a useful project tool for the ATLAS management but even more so for the sub-systems themselves making achievements as well as possible shortcomings visible. One other recognized byproduct is the increasing cross talk between the systems, a very important ingredient to make profit all the systems from the large collective knowledge we dispose of in ATLAS. In the last two months, the first two PARs were organized for the MDT End Caps and the TRT Barrel Modules, both part of the US contribution to the ATLAS Project. Furthermore several different design...

  9. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  10. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  11. Calibration and monitoring of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central section of the hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and provides important information for reconstruction of hadrons, jets, hadronic decays of tau leptons and missing transverse energy. This sampling calorimeter uses steel plates as absorber and scintillating tiles as active medium. The light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are then digitized at 40~MHz and stored on detector and are only transferred off detector once the first level trigger acceptance has been confirmed. The readout is segmented into about 5000 cells (longitudinally and transversally), each of them being read out by two PMTs in parallel. To calibrate and monitor the stability and performance of each part of the readout chain, a set of calibration systems is used. The TileCal calibration system comprises Cesium radioactive sources, laser, charge injection elements and an integrator b...

  12. Aging studies for the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT)

    CERN Document Server

    Åkesson, T; Bondarenko, V; Capéans-Garrido, M; Catinaccio, A; Cwetanski, Peter; Danielsson, H; Dittus, F; Dolgoshein, B A; Dressnandt, N; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Farthouat, Philippe; Fedin, O; Froidevaux, D; Gavrilenko, I; Grichkevitch, Y; Gagnon, P; Hajduk, Z; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Konovalov, S; Kowalski, T; Kramarenko, V A; Laritchev, A; Lichard, P; Lundberg, B; Luehring, F C; Markina, I; Manara, A; McFarlane, K; Mitsou, V; Muraviev, S; Newcomer, F M; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Olszowska, J; Peshekhonov, V D; Rembser, C; Romaniouk, A; Rhone, O; Rust, D R; Shchegelskii, V; Shmeleva, A; Smirnov, S; Smirnova, L N; Sosnovtsev, V V; Sutchkov, S; Tartarelli, F; Tikhomirov, V; Van Berg, R; Vassilieva, L; Wang, C; Williams, H H

    2003-01-01

    A summary of the aging and material validation studies carried out for the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is presented. Particular emphasis is put on the different phenomena observed in straw tubes operating with the chosen Xe/CF//4/CO//2 mixture. The most serious effects observed are silicon deposition on the anode wire and damage of the anode wire gold plating. Etching phenomena and active radical effects are also discussed. With a careful choice of all materials and components, and with good control of the water contamination in the active gas, the ATLAS TRT will operate reliably for 10 years at the LHC design luminosity. To demonstrate this fully, more work is still needed on the gas system purification elements, in particular to understand their interplay with the active species containing fluorine created in the avalanche process under irradiation.

  13. Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    --Simulation and validation of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at LHC TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution describes the detailed simulation of this large scale calorimeter from the implementation of the geometrical elements down to the realistic description of the electronics readout pulses, the special noise treatment and the signal reconstruction. Detector non-uniformities and imperfections are also represented. Detailed validation has shown that the simulated detector response characteristics have been successfully integrated and...

  14. Modeling particulate removal in plate-plate and wire-plate electrostatic precipitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramechecandane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is concerned with the modeling of electrically charged particles in a model plate-plate and a single wire-plate electrostatic precipitator (ESP. The particle concentration distributions for both a plate-plate and a wire-plate ESP are calculated using a modified drift flux model. Numerical investigations are performed using the modified drift flux model for particle number concentration, in addition to the RNG k - ε model for the mean turbulent flow field and the Poisson equation for the electric field. The proposed model and the outlined methodology for coupling the flow field, electric field, charging kinetics and particle concentration is applied to two model precipitators that are truly representative of a wide class of commercialized ESPs. The present investigation is quite different from the earlier studies as it does not make assumptions like a homogeneous electric field or an infinite turbulent diffusivity. The electric field calculated is a strong function of position and controls the migration velocity of particles. Hence, the proposed model can be implemented in a flow solver to obtain a full-fledged solution for any kind of ESP with no limitations on the particle number concentration, as encountered in a Lagrangian approach. The effect of turbulent diffusivity on particle number concentration in a plate-plate ESP is investigated in detail and the results obtained are compared with available experimental data. Similarly, the effect of particle size/diameter and applied electric potential on the accumulative collection performance in the case of a wire-plate ESP is studied and the results obtained are compared with available numerical data. The numerical results obtained using the modified drift flux model for both the plate-plate and wire-plate ESP are in close agreement with available experimental and numerical data.

  15. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  16. Multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Fang, A; Nguyen, B T; Raphel, J K; Jagannathan, L; Raghavan, R; Bryan, R N; Miller, G A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of developing multiple, complementary, fully labeled electronic brain atlases and an atlas-based neuroimaging system for analysis, quantification, and real-time manipulation of cerebral structures in two and three dimensions, we have digitized, enhanced, segmented, and labeled the following print brain atlases: Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain by Talairach and Tournoux, Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren, Referentially Oriented Cerebral MRI Anatomy by Talairach and Tournoux, and Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci by Ono, Kubik, and Abernathey. Three-dimensional extensions of these atlases have been developed as well. All two- and three-dimensional atlases are mutually preregistered and may be interactively registered with an actual patient's data. An atlas-based neuroimaging system has been developed that provides support for reformatting, registration, visualization, navigation, image processing, and quantification of clinical data. The anatomical index contains about 1,000 structures and over 400 sulcal patterns. Several new applications of the brain atlas database also have been developed, supported by various technologies such as virtual reality, the Internet, and electronic publishing. Fusion of information from multiple atlases assists the user in comprehensively understanding brain structures and identifying and quantifying anatomical regions in clinical data. The multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system have substantial potential impact in stereotactic neurosurgery and radiotherapy by assisting in visualization and real-time manipulation in three dimensions of anatomical structures, in quantitative neuroradiology by allowing interactive analysis of clinical data, in three-dimensional neuroeducation, and in brain function studies.

  17. Performance Assessment of Two Different Aviation CARC Coating Systems on Steel When Cadmium Plating Is Eliminated

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Placzankis, Brian E; Miller, Chris E; Grendahl, Scott M; Kane, Michael J; Bhansali, Kirit J

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion-test specimens of AISI 4130 and 4340 steel with and without cadmium plating were prepared for evaluation using two different aviation versions of the chemical agent resistant coating system...

  18. Post-Variscan evolution of the Anti-Atlas belt of Morocco constrained from low-temperature geochronology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouiza, M; Charton, R.J.G.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P; Storms, J.E.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas belt of Morocco extends ENE–WSW, over more than 600 km, from the Atlantic margin in the west to the interior of the African plate in the east. It exhibits Precambrian rocks outcropping as basement inliers and surrounded by marine Ediacaran–Cambrian sequences around the axis of the

  19. Experimental investigation on the dynamic response of clamped corrugated sandwich plates subjected to underwater impulsive loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dacheng; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Corrugated sandwich plates are widely used in marine industry because such plates have high strength-to-weight ratios and blast resistance. The laboratory-scaled fluid-structure interaction experiments are performed to demonstrate the shock resistance of solid monolithic plates and corrugated sandwich plates by quantifying the permanent transverse deflection at mid-span of the plates as a function of impulsive loadings per areal mass. Sandwich structures with 6mm-thick and 10mm-thick 3003 aluminum corrugated core and 5A06 face sheets are compared with the 5A06 solid monolithic plates in this paper. The dynamic deformation of plates are captured with the the 3D digital speckle correlation method (DIC). The results affirm that sandwich structures show a 30% reduction in the maximum plate deflection compare with a monolithic plate of identical mass per unit area, and the peak value of deflection effectively reduced by increasing the thickness core. The failure modes of sandwich plates consists of core crushing, imprinting, stretch tearing of face sheets, bending and permanent deformation of entire structure with the increasing impulsive loads, and the failure mechanisms are analyzed with the postmortem panels and dynamic deflection history captured by cameras. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  20. Augmenting atlas-based liver segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning by incorporating image features proximal to the atlas contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Chen, Jinhu; Li, Hongsheng; Yin, Yong; Ibragimov, Bulat; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Atlas-based segmentation utilizes a library of previously delineated contours of similar cases to facilitate automatic segmentation. The problem, however, remains challenging because of limited information carried by the contours in the library. In this studying, we developed a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. This study presented a new concept of atlas based segmentation method. Instead of using the complete volume of the target organs, only information along the organ contours from the atlas images was used for guiding segmentation of the new image. In setting up an atlas-based library, we included not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. In this work, 139 CT images with normal appearing livers collected for radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were first registered to each other using affine registration. The nonlinear narrow shell was generated alongside the object contours of registered images. Matching voxels were selected inside common narrow shell image features of a library case and a new case using a speed-up robust features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the new image by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy optimization within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by physicians. A novel atlas-based segmentation technique with inclusion of neighborhood image features through the introduction of a narrow-shell surrounding the target objects was established. Application of the technique to

  1. Augmenting atlas-based liver segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning by incorporating image features proximal to the atlas contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Chen, Jinhu; Li, Hongsheng; Yin, Yong; Ibragimov, Bulat; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-07

    Atlas-based segmentation utilizes a library of previously delineated contours of similar cases to facilitate automatic segmentation. The problem, however, remains challenging because of limited information carried by the contours in the library. In this studying, we developed a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. This study presented a new concept of atlas based segmentation method. Instead of using the complete volume of the target organs, only information along the organ contours from the atlas images was used for guiding segmentation of the new image. In setting up an atlas-based library, we included not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. In this work, 139 CT images with normal appearing livers collected for radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were first registered to each other using affine registration. The nonlinear narrow shell was generated alongside the object contours of registered images. Matching voxels were selected inside common narrow shell image features of a library case and a new case using a speed-up robust features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the new image by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy optimization within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by physicians. A novel atlas-based segmentation technique with inclusion of neighborhood image features through the introduction of a narrow-shell surrounding the target objects was established. Application of the technique to

  2. ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Module Zero

    CERN Multimedia

    1993-01-01

    This module was built and tested with beam to validate the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter design. One original design feature is the folding. 10 000 lead plates and electrodes are folded into an accordion shape and immersed in liquid argon. As they cross the folds, particles are slowed down by the lead. As they collide with the lead atoms, electrons and photons are ejected. There is a knock-on effect and as they continue on into the argon, a whole shower is produced. The electrodes collect up all the electrons and this signal gives a measurement of the energy of the initial particle. The M0 was fabricated by French institutes (LAL, LAPP, Saclay, Jussieu) in the years 1993-1994. It was tested in the H6/H8 beam lines in 1994, leading to the Technical Design Report in 1996.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Heelan, Louise; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter (TileCal) provides highly-segmented energy measurements of incoming particles. It is a key detector for the measurement of hadrons, jets, tau leptons and missing transverse energy. It is also useful for identification and reconstruction of muons due to good signal to noise ratio. The calorimeter consists of thin steel plates and 460,000 scintillating tiles configured into 5000 cells, each viewed by two photomultipliers. The calorimeter response and its readout electronics is monitored to better than 1% using radioactive source, laser and charge injection systems. The calibration and performance of the calorimeter have been established through test beam measurements, cosmic ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired in 2011 and 2012. Results on the calorimeter performance are presented, including the absolute energy scale, timing, noise and associated stabilities. The results demonstrate that the Tile Calorimeter has performed well within the design ...

  4. Calibration Systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O

    2013-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. A brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems is given and the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors, linearity and stability are presented.

  5. Calibration systems of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This sampling calorimeter uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the over 10000 PMTs are measured and digitized before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. A multi-faceted calibration system allows to monitor and equalize the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal production, from scintillation light to digitization. This calibration system is based on signal generation from different sources: a Cs radioactive source, laser light, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. This talk presents a brief description of the different TileCal calibration systems and presents the latest results on their performance in terms of calibration factors...

  6. Flexural waves on narrow plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew N

    2003-05-01

    Flexural wave speeds on beams or plates depend upon the bending stiffnesses which differ by the well-known factor (1 - nu2). A quantitative analysis of a plate of finite lateral width displays the plate-to-beam transition, and permits asymptotic analysis that shows the leading order dependence on the width. Orthotropic plates are analyzed using both the Kirchhoff and Kirchhoff-Rayleigh theories, and isotropic plates are considered for Mindlin's theory with and without rotational inertia. A frequency-dependent Young's modulus for beams or strips of finite width is suggested, although the form of the correction to the modulus is not unique and depends on the theory used. The sign of the correction for the Kirchhoff theory is opposite to that for the Mindlin theory. These results indicate that the different plate and beam theories can produce quite distinct behavior. This divergence in predictions is further illustrated by comparison of the speeds for antisymmetric flexural, or torsional, modes on narrow plates. The four classical theories predict limiting wave speeds as the plate width vanishes, but the values are different in each case. The deviations can be understood in terms of torsional waves and how each theory succeeds, or fails, in approximating the effect of torsion. Dispersion equations are also derived, some for the first time, for the flexural edge wave in each of the four "engineering" theories.

  7. MyPlate Food Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español MyPlate Food Guide KidsHealth / For Teens / MyPlate Food Guide What's ... and other sugary drinks. Avoid large portions . Five Food Groups Different food groups have different nutrients and ...

  8. Micro-channel plate detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  9. ATLAS production system

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Klimentov, Alexei; Golubkov, Dmitry; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Wenaus, Torre; Padolski, Siarhei

    2016-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS production system called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager which used by thousands of physicists to analyze the data remotely, with the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, across a more than hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based on many criterias, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kind of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteering computers. Besides jobs definition Production System also includes flexible web user interface, which implements user-friendly environment for main ATLAS workflows, e.g. simple way of combining different data flows, and real-time monitoring, optimised for using with huge amount of information to present. We present an overview of the ATLAS Production System major components: job and task definition, workflow manager web user i...

  10. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Showing excellence in mechanics, electronics and cryogenics, three industries are honoured for their contributions to the ATLAS experiment. Representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony. For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Close interaction with CERN was a key factor in the selection of each rewarded company, in addition to the high-quality products they delivered to the experiment. Alu Menziken Industrie AG, of Switzerland, was honoured for the production of 380,000 aluminium tubes for the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). As Giora Mikenberg, the Muon System Project Leader stressed, the aluminium tubes were delivered on time with an extraordinary quality and precision. Between October 2000 and Jan...

  11. Event visualization in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R. M.; Boudreau, J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Moyse, E.; Thomas, J.; Waugh, B. M.; Yallup, D. P.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  12. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211497; The ATLAS collaboration; Boudreau, Joseph; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Martyniuk, Alex; Moyse, Edward; Thomas, Juergen; Waugh, Ben; Yallup, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  13. ATLAS B Physics Reach

    CERN Document Server

    Smizanska, M

    2004-01-01

    The current scope and status of ATLAS B-physics trigger and off-line performance studies are presented. With the initial low-luminosity LHC runnings the high-statistics analyses will allow to make sensitivity tests of possible New physics contributions by searching for additional CP violation effects and for increased probabilities of rare B-decay channels. In physics of Bs meson system there is sensitivity to mass and width differences and to a weak mixing phase beyond SM expectation. ATLAS will be able to access rare B decays using also high-luminosity running. In beauty production ATLAS will perform measurements sensitive to higher order QCD terms providing new data to investigate present inconsistency between theory and experiment.

  14. Analyse d’atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ouvrages de référence, de lecture, d’actualité, les atlas s’adressent à des publics très divers, de l’école à l’université.La Bibliothèque vient de recevoir des publications intéressantes à faire connaître aux lecteurs d’ EchoGéo. Les exemples choisis et analysés illustrent la variété formelle et thématique de ce type de document. L’atlas des atlas : le Monde vu d’ailleurs200 cartes proposées sous la direction de Philippe Thureau-Dangin, Christine Chameau et al. Paris : Arthaud, 2008. 191 p (...

  15. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  16. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  17. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration:

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Christopher Jon; The ATLAS collaboration; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Ballestrero, Sergio; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Voronkov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of ̃3000 servers, processing the data readout from ̃100 million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. During the data taking only critical security updates are applied and broken hardware is replaced to ensure a stable operational environment. The LS1 provided an excellent opportunity to look into new technologies and applications that would help to improve and streamline the daily tasks of not only the System Administrators, but also of the scientists who wil...

  18. Two ATLAS suppliers honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recognised the outstanding contribution of two firms to the pixel detector. Recipients of the supplier award with Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, and Maximilian Metzger, CERN Secretary-General.At a ceremony held at CERN on 28 November, the ATLAS collaboration presented awards to two of its suppliers that had produced sensor wafers for the pixel detector. The CiS Institut für Mikrosensorik of Erfurt in Germany has supplied 655 sensor wafers containing a total of 1652 sensor tiles and the firm ON Semiconductor has supplied 515 sensor wafers (1177 sensor tiles) from its foundry at Roznov in the Czech Republic. Both firms have successfully met the very demanding requirements. ATLAS’s huge pixel detector is very complicated, requiring expertise in highly specialised integrated microelectronics and precision mechanics. Pixel detector project leader Kevin Einsweiler admits that when the project was first propo...

  19. The ATLAS Computing Model

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Bee, C P; Hawkings, R; Jarp, S; Jones, R; Malon, D; Poggioli, L; Poulard, G; Quarrie, D; Wenaus, T

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Offline Computing Model is described. The main emphasis is on the steady state, when normal running is established. The data flow from the output of the ATLAS trigger system through processing and analysis stages is analysed, in order to estimate the computing resources, in terms of CPU power, disk and tape storage and network bandwidth, which will be necessary to guarantee speedy access to ATLAS data to all members of the Collaboration. Data Challenges and the commissioning runs are used to prototype the Computing Model and test the infrastructure before the start of LHC operation. The initial planning for the early stages of data-taking is also presented. In this phase, a greater degree of access to the unprocessed or partially processed raw data is envisaged.

  20. Aseptic laboratory techniques: plating methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Erin R

    2012-05-11

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. Isolate single bacterial colonies by the streak-plating

  1. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  2. Analysis Preservation in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Kyle; The ATLAS collaboration; Jones, Roger; South, David

    2015-01-01

    Long before data taking ATLAS established a policy that all analyses need to be preserved. In the initial data-taking period, this has been achieved by various tools and techniques. ATLAS is now reviewing the analysis preservation with the aim to bring coherence and robustness to the process and with a clearer view of the level of reproducibility that is reasonably achievable. The secondary aim is to reduce the load on the analysts. Once complete, this will serve for our internal preservation needs but also provide a basis for any subsequent sharing of analysis results with external parties.

  3. Atlas of Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam; Al-Bilbisi, Hussam; al-Muheisen, Zeydoun; al-Nahar, Maysoun; Alaime, Mathieu; Augé, Christian; Azizeh, Wael Abu; Bakhit, Adnan; De Bel-Air, Françoise; Bourke, Stephen; Courcier, Rémy; Crouzel, Isabelle; Daher, Rami; Daradkeh, Saleh Musa; Darmame, Khadija

    2014-01-01

    L’ambition de cet atlas est d’offrir au lecteur des clés d’analyse spatiale des dynamiques sociales, économiques et politiques qui animent la Jordanie, pays exemplaire de la complexité du Moyen-Orient. Produit de sept années de coopération scientifique entre l’Ifpo, le Centre Royal Jordanien de Géographie et l’Université de Jordanie, l’atlas réunit les contributions de 48 chercheurs européens, jordaniens et internationaux. La formation des territoires jordaniens sur le temps long est éclairée...

  4. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m......A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles...

  5. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; 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Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  6. ATLAS forward physics program

    CERN Document Server

    HELLER, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The variety of forward detectors installed in the vicinity of the ATLAS experiment allows to look over a wide range of forward physics topics. They ensure a good information about rapidity gaps, and the installation of very forward detectors (ALFA and AFP) will allow to tag the leading proton(s) remaining from the different processes studied. Most of the studies have to be done at low luminosity to avoid pile-up, but the AFP project offers a really exiting future for the ATLAS forward physics program. We also present how these forward detectors can be used to measure the relative and absolute luminosity.

  7. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    CAMERA ON TOROID The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The video is about the slow lowering of the toroid down to the cavern of ATLAS. It is very demanding task. The camera is placed on top of the toroid.

  8. The Herschel ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  9. Improving ATLAS reprocessing software

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    For my CERN Summer Student programme I have been working with ATLAS reprocessing group. Data taken at ATLAS experiment is not only processed after being taken, but is also reprocessed multiple times afterwards. This allows applying new alignments, calibration of detector and using improved or faster algorithms. Reprocessing is usually done in campaigns for different periods of data or for different interest groups. The idea of my project was to simplify the definition of tasks and monitoring of their progress. I created a LIST configuration files generator script in Python and a monitoring webpage for tracking current reprocessing tasks.

  10. ATLAS Fast Physics Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Koeneke, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is recording data from proton-proton collisions with 7 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2010. The integrated luminosity has grown nearly exponentially since then and continues to rise fast. The ATLAS collaboration has set up a framework to automatically run over the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2-3 days after data taking). Hints of potentially interesting physics signals obtained this way are followed up by physics groups.

  11. Microchannel plate detector and methods for their fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Mane, Anil U.; Peng, Qing

    2015-03-03

    A multi-component tunable resistive coating and methods of depositing the coating on the surfaces of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. The resistive coating composed of a plurality of alternating layers of a metal oxide resistive component layer and a conductive component layer composed of at least one of a metal, a metal nitride and a metal sulfide. The coating may further include an emissive layer configured to produce a secondary electron emission in response to a particle interacting with the MCP and a neutron-absorbing layer configured to respond to a neutron interacting with the MCP.

  12. Tectonics, Uplift and Surface Processes in the Moroccan Atlas Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixell, A.; Arboleya, M.; Babault, J.; Teson, E.; Ayarza, P.; Alvarez-Lobato, F.; Owen, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    The Atlas Mountains of Morocco constitute a natural laboratory for studying interactions between tectonics and surface processes in convergent zones. The tectonic forcing of the system is well understood, where a combination of crustal and mantle processes contributed to surface uplift. A growing database on magnetostratigraphic dating of synorogenic sediments, low-temperature thermochronology and surface exposure dating constrain the relationships between tectonics, erosion, climate and drainage patterns during the late Cenozoic. The Atlas chains derive from the Cenozoic inversion of Triassic-Jurassic rifts in the NW African plate. Topography is high: large areas lie over 2000 m of mean elevation, and summits exceed 4000 m. In spite of high elevation, crustal thickening is modest: tectonic shortening is mean rate of 0.2 mm/a. Moderate erosion in the Atlas prevents to detect Cenozoic apatite fission-track ages except from narrow areas, where ages of 17-25 Ma record exhumation induced by the crustal shortening mechanism. The southern, best preserved foreland basin system of the Atlas Mountains was internally drained until the late Miocene-early Pliocene. The system was then captured or overflowed across mountain massifs that bordered it to the S (Anti-Atlas). External drainage resulted in fluvial incision strongly modulated by climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales, as evidenced by cosmogenic dating of fans and terraces. Incision occurred at rates of 0.3-1 mm/a for the later part of the Quaternary, demonstrating a strong climatic control on sediment transfer and landscape denudation during this epoch.

  13. Injection moulded low cost bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, A.; Mahlendorf, F.; Niemzig, O.; Kreuz, C.

    The development of bipolar plates that can be produced by standard mass production techniques is a main issue for the commercialization of PEM fuel cells, as bipolar plates contribute significantly to the cost structure of PEM stacks. In recent years, the University of Duisburg-Essen together with the Zentrum für BrennstoffzellenTechnik GmbH (ZBT) has identified a number of carbon-polymer composites with densities of 1.6 g/cm 3, specific bulk conductivities between 5 and 150 S/cm and material prices between 2 and 10 €/kg. Standard composite mixtures consist of a thermoplast and a carbon compound mixture with additional additives to increase the conductivity of the compound material. The composites generally show high corrosion resistance in the PEM fuel cell environment. Composite material samples proved to be absolutely stable in immersion tests in sulphuric acid and deionized water under pure oxygen atmosphere for several thousand hours. ZBT has successfully demonstrated the production of bipolar plates by injection moulding with cycle times of 30-60 s. With the help of tailored moulds injection moulding of bipolar plates becomes price competitive even for comparatively small series in the range of several thousand plates. PEM stacks with injection moulded bipolar plates of 2.5-4 mm thickness and an electrical power of up to 200 W have been constructed and successfully operated.

  14. Application of Laser Ranging and VLBI Data to a Study of Plate Tectonic Driving Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The conditions under which changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes are measurable with laser ranging or very long base interferometry were investigated. Aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements were identified. Analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault, finite element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting, and quantitative constraints from modeling of global intraplate stress on the magnitude of deviatoric stress in the lithosphere are among the topics discussed.

  15. Nickel Coatings and Electroforming Using Pulse Reversal Plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Dylmer, Henrik; Møller, Per

    1995-01-01

    Introducing pulse plating brings new life and possibilities to one the oldest groups of electroplating processes. Nickel coatings and electroforming are used in a great variety of products, from oil valves to optical discs, and for many applications such as corrosion protection and micro......-mechanics. A series of new results using pulse reversal plating in Watts based electrolytes will be discussed. Elec-troforming completely without internal stress and with improved throwing power will be demonstrated, as well as a corrosion resistance of nickel coatings that could allow coating thicknesses, as well...

  16. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. When passing throw the walls the succeeding can be heard and seen. The film has original working sound.

  17. Plate shell structures of glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne

    to their curved shape. A plate shell structure maintains a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, while facilitating the use of plane structural elements. The study focuses on using laminated glass panes for the load bearing facets. Various methods of generating a plate shell geometry are suggested. Together with Ghent......, such as facet size, imperfections, and connection characteristics. The critical load is compared to that of a similar, but smoothly curved, shell structure. Based on the investigations throughout the study, a set of guidelines for the structural design of plate shells of glass is proposed....

  18. Imaging of growth plate injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanaguizawa, Matiko; Taberner, Gustavo Sobreira; Aihara, Andre Yui; Yamaguchi, Cleudia Kazue; Guimaraes, Maria Carolina; Rosenfeld, Andre [Diagnosticos da America, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: matikoyan@uol.com.br; Fernandes, Joao Luiz [Image Memorial, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa [ Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis

    2008-05-15

    The structures responsible for the growth of bones include the physis (also called growth plate) and the epiphysis. Affections involving patients with immature skeletons, i.e., with a still open growth plate, may affect the bone growth, resulting in complications such as growth arrest, limb shortening and angular deformities. Traumatic conditions, many times resulting in epiphyseal fractures, are the most frequent cause of growth plate injuries. A careful evaluation of these patients by means of currently available imaging methods, especially radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, allows an early diagnosis of the involvement of structures related to the bone growth, besides an appropriate management, reducing the probability of secondary complications. (author)

  19. Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco formed as a result of the collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates about 80 million years ago. This collision destroyed the Tethys Ocean; the limestone, sandstone, claystone, and gypsum layers that formed the ocean bed were folded and crumpled to create the Atlas and Anti-Atlas Mountains. In this ASTER image, short wavelength infrared bands are combined to dramatically highlight the different rock types, and illustrate the complex folding. The yellowish, orange and green areas are limestones, sandstones and gypsum; the dark blue and green areas are underlying granitic rocks. The ability to map geology using ASTER data is enhanced by the multiple short wavelength infrared bands, that are sensitive to differences in rock mineralogy. This image was acquired on June 13, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and

  20. Electric modelling and image analysis of channel flow in bipolar plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.; Gonzalez, L.; Garcia-Alegre, M.C.; Guinea, D. [Instituto de Automatica Industrial, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 28500 Arganda, Madrid (Spain); Guinea, D.M.; Moreno, B. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    Bipolar plates are an essential part of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) and are related to fluid conduction. The topology of a bipolar plate is critical to the homogeneous distribution of the feeding gases over the accessible zone of the electrode. An electric model that simulates flow in bipolar plates and permits the optimisation of gas feeding in PEMFCs is proposed. As a first approach, an analogy is made between the gas pressure P and an electric voltage U in a circuit and a gas flow F and an electric current I. The fluidic resistance in a bipolar plate channel is thus R=P/F and is equivalent to the electric resistance R=U/I in a branch of a circuit. Computer image processing techniques allow the validation of the present flow estimation approach based on electrical variables. Separate plates were developed to experimentally implement a complete parallel bipolar topology. (author)

  1. Prime wires for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In an award ceremony on 3 September, ATLAS honoured the French company Axon Cable for its special coaxial cables, which were purpose-built for the Liquid Argon calorimeter modules. Working for CERN since the 1970s, Axon' Cable received the ATLAS supplier award last week for its contribution to the liquid argon calorimeter cables of ATLAS (LAL/Orsay, France and University of Victoria, Canada), started in 1996. Its two sets of minicoaxial cables, called harnesses "A" and "B", are designed to function in the harsh conditions in the liquid argon (at 90 Kelvin or -183°C) and under extreme radiation (up to several Mrads). The cables are mainly used for the readout of the calorimeters, and are connected to the outside world by 114 signal feedthroughs with 1920 channels each. The signal from the detectors is transmitted directly without any amplification, which imposes tight restrictions on the impedance and on the signal propagation time of the cables. Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, gives the award for best s...

  2. Taus at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, Sarah M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-06

    The grant "Taus at ATLAS" supported the group of Sarah Demers at Yale University over a period of 8.5 months, bridging the time between her Early Career Award and her inclusion on Yale's grant cycle within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The work supported the functioning of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and the analysis of ATLAS data. The work included searching for the Higgs Boson in a particular mode of its production (with a W or Z boson) and decay (to a pair of tau leptons.) This was part of a broad program of characterizing the Higgs boson as we try to understand this recently discovered particle, and whether or not it matches our expectations within the current standard model of particle physics. In addition, group members worked with simulation to understand the physics reach of planned upgrades to the ATLAS experiment. Supported group members include postdoctoral researcher Lotte Thomsen and graduate student Mariel Pettee.

  3. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  4. The ATLAS event filter

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, H P; Boissat, C; Davis, R; Duval, P Y; Etienne, F; Fede, E; Francis, D; Green, P; Hemmer, F; Jones, R; MacKinnon, J; Mapelli, Livio P; Meessen, C; Mommsen, R K; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Nacasch, R; Negri, A; Pinfold, James L; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rafflin, C; Scannicchio, D A; Stanescu, C; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the studies for the ATLAS Event Filter is given. The architecture and the high level design of the DAQ-1 prototype is presented. The current status if the prototypes is briefly given. Finally, future plans and milestones are given. (11 refs).

  5. A thermosiphon for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2013-01-01

    A new thermosiphon cooling system, designed for the ATLAS silicon detectors by CERN’s EN-CV team in collaboration with the experiment, will replace the current system in the next LHC run in 2015. Using the basic properties of density difference and making gravity do the hard work, the thermosiphon promises to be a very reliable solution that will ensure the long-term stability of the whole system.   Former compressor-based cooling system of the ATLAS inner detectors. The system is currently being replaced by the innovative thermosiphon. (Photo courtesy of Olivier Crespo-Lopez). Reliability is the major issue for the present cooling system of the ATLAS silicon detectors. The system was designed 13 years ago using a compressor-based cooling cycle. “The current cooling system uses oil-free compressors to avoid fluid pollution in the delicate parts of the silicon detectors,” says Michele Battistin, EN-CV-PJ section leader and project leader of the ATLAS thermosiphon....

  6. ATLAS Experiment Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00085461

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  7. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking).

  8. ATLAS PDF Results

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, Mark; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties from parton distribution functions can limit our measurements of new cross sections and searches beyond the SM. Results are presented on recent ATLAS measurements which are sensitive to parton distribution functions. These cover a wide range of cross section measurements, including those from: jets, photons, $W$/$Z$ bosons and top quarks.

  9. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1 March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day.

  10. Prototype ATLAS straw tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This is an early prototype of the straw tracking device for the ATLAS detector at CERN. This detector will be part of the LHC project, scheduled to start operation in 2008. The straw tracker will consist of thousands of gas-filled straws, each containing a wire, allowing the tracks of particles to be followed.

  11. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  12. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  13. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  14. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - French

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  15. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Serbian

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  16. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Italian

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  17. Taking ATLAS to new heights

    CERN Document Server

    Abha Eli Phoboo, ATLAS experiment

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this month, 51 members of the ATLAS collaboration trekked up to the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains, Mt. Toubkal (4,167m), in North Africa.    The physicists were in Marrakech, Morocco, attending the ATLAS Overview Week (7 - 11 October), which was held for the first time on the African continent. Around 300 members of the collaboration met to discuss the status of the LS1 upgrades and plans for the next run of the LHC. Besides the trek, 42 ATLAS members explored the Saharan sand dunes of Morocco on camels.  Photos courtesy of Patrick Jussel.

  18. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  19. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  20. Application of laser ranging and VLBI data to a study of plate tectonic driving forces. [finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The measurability of changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes by laser rangefinding or VLBI is considered with emphasis on those aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements. Topics covered include: (1) analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault; (2) two dimensional finite-element solutions for the global state of stress at the Earth's surface for possible plate driving forces; and (3) finite-element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting.

  1. TEXTILE IMPACT PLATES FOR NANOPARTICLES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    VISILEANU Emilia; DUMITRESCU Iuliana; VARZARU Elena; MITRAN Cornelia; CHIRIAC Laura

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents textile materials with destination impact plates, having different surface architectures and active treatments for functionalization, with influence upon the aging process of nano-Ag and nano-CeO2...

  2. corn-mill grinding plates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    manufactured corn-mill grinding plates to investigate the possible causes of their early wear and failure. Three different samples selected from the same local manufacturer were tested for chemical composition and micro- structural, as well as wear ...

  3. Experimental investigation on different patterned bolted/welded structural connection in steel and GFRP plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchidurai, S.; Vivek, P.

    2017-07-01

    The experimental investigation is explained different structural connection like various patterned single shear lap bolted connections and slot complete penetration welded connection. Totally 12 numbers of 300 x 50 x 4 mm steel connections made by lap joint as per IS800: 2007 provisions. The patterns are linear, diamond and staggered for the bolted and slot complete penetration welded connections, 4.6 grade bolt and tungsten electrode rods are used for structural slot complete penetration welded connection conforming to IS 800: 2007. And 6 numbers of 300 x 50 x 6mm Glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) plate with bolted connection was casted, shear resistance capacity is considerably higher in the staggered pattern structural connections then the linear and diamond pattern connections. The connection which is made by GFRP, failure occurred in the plate itself and the shear resistance capacity is lowered 60% then the steel plate even though GFRP plate high resistivity against aggressive environment

  4. Effectiveness of nickel plating in inhibiting atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, T.; Sorensen, R.; Guilinger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A series of tests was run to determine the effect of Ni plating thickness on connector contact resistance. Copper coupons were plated with an electrolytic nickel strike followed by electroless nickel to produce Ni layers of 10, 20, 55 and 100 {micro}in. The coupons were then exposed to a simulated industrial environment. Pore corrosion was observed after the exposure, which correlated with Ni thickness. In a second series of tests, beryllium-copper four-tine contacts with 50 {micro}in of gold plate over electrolytic nickel strike/electroless-nickel plates of varying thickness were exposed the same corrosive environment. Contact resistance of mated pairs was monitored over a two-month period. The degradation in contact resistance correlated with the Ni thickness used in the connectors.

  5. The dynamics of plate tectonics and mantle flow: from local to global scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Georg; Gurnis, Michael; Burstedde, Carsten; Wilcox, Lucas C; Alisic, Laura; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-08-27

    Plate tectonics is regulated by driving and resisting forces concentrated at plate boundaries, but observationally constrained high-resolution models of global mantle flow remain a computational challenge. We capitalized on advances in adaptive mesh refinement algorithms on parallel computers to simulate global mantle flow by incorporating plate motions, with individual plate margins resolved down to a scale of 1 kilometer. Back-arc extension and slab rollback are emergent consequences of slab descent in the upper mantle. Cold thermal anomalies within the lower mantle couple into oceanic plates through narrow high-viscosity slabs, altering the velocity of oceanic plates. Viscous dissipation within the bending lithosphere at trenches amounts to approximately 5 to 20% of the total dissipation through the entire lithosphere and mantle.

  6. Rhodium platings – experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rudolf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern rhodium plating solutions are based on either sulphate or phosphate. Although in theory there are four possible combinations, in practice only three different rhodium electrolytes are used. These are based on dilutions of rhodium sulphate or phosphate concentrates with added sulphuric or phosphoric acid. These processes are be discussed in this paper with a demonstration of Rh platings in the Slovenian firm Zlatarna Celje d.d.

  7. Late Cretaceous to Present evolution of the NW Africa peri-cratonic in the Africa-Eurasia plate convergence context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbal, B.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Africa-Eurasia plate convergence is the main mechanism to explain topographic evolution and patterns of Tertiary vertical motions recorded around the entire Mediterranean and even further east. However, most of the studies are concentrated on the Eurasian side of the Mediterranean Realm. Along the NW Africa pericratonic zone (western Mediterranean side) extending longitudinally from the Anti-Atlas to the Rif Mountains, the highest topography is observed in the High Atlas intracontinental belt and in the Pan-African Anti-Atlas belt, and not in the youngest belt, the Rif. The combination of AFT and (U-Th)/He low-thermal dating, performed on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks along the Moroccan pericratonic transect (500km) yield ages ranging respectively between 90-9Ma and 65-7Ma, documenting vertical motions of subsidence and exhumation in between Late Cretaceous and Present. Time-Temperature models show that vertical movements are spatially zoned through Morocco, with the highest amplitude of vertical movements in the High Atlas (>4-5km) and more modest amounts in the Anti-Atlas and the Western Meseta (Meseta and the Anti-Atlas in addition to the Atlas and the Rif systems experienced Tertiary deformation. Two stages of folding are distinguished on the basis of low-thermal dating results along the pericratonic transect. The first is a lithospherical folding of ~500km in the Late Cretaceous (confirming that this process is a primary response to recently induced compressional stress fields) and the second is a crustal folding of ~100-150km wavelength in the Late Eocene that occurred independently to the mantle, requiring therefore the existence of a decoupling in between the base of the crust and the high mantle.

  8. Optimization of FIBMOS Through 2D Silvaco ATLAS and 2D Monte Carlo Particle-based Device Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, J.; He, X.; Vasileska, D.; Schroder, D. K.

    2001-01-01

    Focused Ion Beam MOSFETs (FIBMOS) demonstrate large enhancements in core device performance areas such as output resistance, hot electron reliability and voltage stability upon channel length or drain voltage variation. In this work, we describe an optimization technique for FIBMOS threshold voltage characterization using the 2D Silvaco ATLAS simulator. Both ATLAS and 2D Monte Carlo particle-based simulations were used to show that FIBMOS devices exhibit enhanced current drive ...

  9. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  10. Volar fixed-angle plating of distal radius extension fractures: influence of plate position on secondary loss of reduction--a biomechanic study in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobetz, Herwig; Bryant, Adam L; Pokorny, Tom; Spitaler, Ralf; Leixnering, Martin; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2006-04-01

    Treatment of extension fractures of the distal radius with volar fixed-angle plates has become increasingly popular in the past 2 years. It has been observed clinically that placement of the distal screws as close as possible to the subchondral zone is crucial to maintain radial length after surgery. The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate radial shortening after plating with regard to plate position and (2) to evaluate whether plate position has an influence on the strength and rigidity of the plate-screw construct. An extra-articular fracture (AO classification, A3) was created in 7 pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver radiuses. The radiuses then were plated with a volar distal radius locking compression plate. Seven plates were applied subchondrally; 7 plates were applied 4.5 mm to 7.5 mm proximal to the subchondral zone. The specimens were loaded with 800-N loads for 2,000 cycles to evaluate radial shortening in the 2 groups. Each specimen then was loaded to failure. Radial shortening was significantly greater when the distal screws were placed proximal to the subchondral zone. The amount of shortening after cyclic loading correlated significantly with the distance the distal screws were placed from the subchondral zone. Rigidity of the plate systems was significantly higher in radiuses in which the distal screws were placed close to the subchondral zone. To maintain radial length after volar fixed-angle plating, placement of the distal screws as subchondral as possible is essential. The subchondral plate-screw-bone constructs showed significantly greater rigidity, indicating higher resistance to postoperative loads and displacement forces.

  11. Characterization and commissioning of the ATLAS micromegas quadruplet prototype

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068921

    2016-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro Mesh Gaseous Structure) chambers have been chosen for the New Small Wheel (NSW) project, the upgrade of the forward muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment both to provide precision tracking and contribute to the trigger. A quadruplet (1m $\\times$ 0.5m) has been built at the CERN laboratories, it will serve as prototype for the future ATLAS chambers. This detector is realized using resistive-strip technology and decoupling the amplification mesh from the readout structure. The four readout planes host overall 4096 strips with a pitch of 415 $\\mu m$. A complete detector characterization carried out with cosmic rays, X-Ray source and dedicated test beam is discussed. Characterization is done using analog front-end chip (APV25). The efforts that lead to the chamber construction and the preparation for the installation in the ATLAS experimental cavern are presented. Finally, an overview of the readout system developed for this prototype, and integration into the ATLAS Data Acquisition System i...

  12. Characterization and commissioning of the ATLAS micromegas quadruplet prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Michele; The ATLAS collaboration; Iengo, Paolo; Lin, Tai-hua; Schott, Matthias; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Wotschack, Jorg; Zibell, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro Mesh Gaseous Detector) chambers have been chosen for the upgrade of the forward muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment to provide precision tracking and also to contribute to the trigger. A quadruplet (1m X 0.5m) has been built at the CERN laboratories, it will serve as prototype for the future ATLAS chambers. This detector is realized using resistive-strip technology and decoupling the amplification mesh from the readout structure. The four readout planes host overall 4096 strips with a pitch of 415$\\mu m$. A complete detector characterization carried out with cosmic rays, X-Ray source and dedicated test beam is discussed, characterization is obtained by use of analog front-end chip (APV25). The efforts that lead to the chamber construction and the preparation for the installation in the ATLAS experimental cavern are presented. Finally, an overview of the readout system developed for this prototype, and integration in to the ATLAS Data Acquisition System is provided.

  13. A new strips tracker for the upgraded ATLAS ITk detector

    CERN Document Server

    David, Claire; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The inner detector of the present ATLAS detector has been designed and developed to function in the environment of the present Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the next-generation tracking detector proposed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the so-called ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade, the particle densities and radiation levels will be higher by as much as a factor of ten. The new detectors must be faster, they need to be more highly segmented, and covering more area. They also need to be more resistant to radiation, and they require much greater power delivery to the front-end systems. At the same time, they cannot introduce excess material which could undermine performance. For those reasons, the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector must be redesigned and rebuilt completely. The design of the ATLAS Upgrade inner tracker (ITk) has already been defined. It consists of several layers of silicon particle detectors. The innermost layers will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, and the outer layers will consist of s...

  14. The Atlas High-Energy Density Physics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harold A.

    1998-11-01

    Atlas is a pulsed-power facility under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory to drive high-energy density experiments. It is optimized for materials properties and hydrodynamics experiments under extreme conditions. The system is designed to implode heavy liner loads ( ~ 50 g) with a peak current of 30 MA delivered in 4 μs. Atlas will be operational near the end of 2000 and is designed to provide 100 shots per year. The Atlas capacitor bank consists of an array of 240-kV Marx modules storing a total of 23 MJ. The bank is resistively damped to limit fault currents and capacitor voltage reversal and will have 16 nH total initial inductance. The current is propagated radially from the Marx generators to the one-meter radius by 24 vertical, triplate, oil-insulated transmission lines. A combination of flat and conical, radially converging transmission lines will deliver the current to the load from the one-meter radius. A prototype Marx generator has been successfully tested at full charge voltage. For many applications the Atlas liner will be a nominal 50-gram-aluminum cylinder with ~ 5-cm radius and 4-cm length. Implosion velocities exceeding 1.4 cm/μs are predicted. Using composite inner layers and a variety of interior target designs, a wide array of experiments in cm^3 volumes may be performed.---Sponsored by US DOE under contract W-7405-ENG-36

  15. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  16. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance has just been attributed to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months ago at their headquarters in Japan.

  17. ATLAS: civil engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. Nice view from the surface to the cavern from the pit side - all the big machines looked very small. The film has original working sound.

  18. Muriel is approached to run as new ATLAS spokesperson

    CERN Multimedia

    Muriel

    Dear Muriel, There will be elections in 2008 for a new Spokesperson. Peter Jenni will be a hard person to follow: we need someone who will be highly visible and tough. Having watched your exploits through the ATLAS eNews, it is clear that you are the most visible person in ATLAS and it seems to me that you are just the kind of person we need to be out next Spokesperson (Spokesanimal?). Have you given this possibility any thought? Yours, Animal Lover. Muriel's reply: Dear Animal Lover, thank you very much for your support. I thought it was about time someone asked!I am certainly interested in the position. Will I get a CD plate for my car? Muriel decided to check out the scene before accepting to run for the ATLAS spokesperson position and gave it a try in the spokesperson's office. Muriel also decided to have add a productive chat with Fabiola Gianotti while raising support for her candidature.

  19. IR Temperature Measurement in Pressure-Shear Plate Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Tong; Malhotra, Pinkesh; Clifton, Rodney; School of Engineering, Brown University Team

    2017-06-01

    Pressure-Shear Plate Impact (PSPI) experiments on samples sandwiched between two hard plates have been developed previously for measuring the shearing resistance of materials at high strain rates, large inelastic shear strains, and high pressures. To enhance the value of such experiments in developing constitutive models for the dynamic response of materials, concurrent temperature measurements are being pursued by monitoring the infrared radiation emitted from the sample/rear-plate interface. The emitted radiation is collected by fast HgCdTe detectors through a pair of 90o off-axis parabolic reflectors. ZnSe is used as the rear plate (window) because its transmission band (0.6 μm -16 μm) covers an exceptionally wide range of wavelengths - extending beyond the cutoff wavelength of the IR detector. Moreover, ZnSe remains nominally linear-elastic up to a pressure of 12 GPa - encompassing the pressure range for most PSPI experiments. Because temperatures generated in PSPI experiments are modest, the emissivity of the interface is increased by applying a thin layer of SiC at the sample/window interface. The high shearing resistance of SiC ensures that the allowable range of shear stresses is not limited by the presence of the high-emissivity layer. Pilot experiments will be assessed for their potential and limitations. This work is supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  20. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019/20. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55% of CO_2 and 45% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a Sr-90 source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height of...

  1. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00425540; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased by up to seven times its design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019-2020. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55\\% of CO$_{2}$ and 45\\% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a 10~mCi~$^{90}$Sr source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height o...

  2. A Highly Selective First-Level Muon Trigger With MDT Chamber Data for ATLAS at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00390105

    2016-01-01

    Highly selective triggers are essential for the physics programme of the ATLAS experiment at HL-LHC where the instantaneous luminosity will be about an order of magnitude larger than the LHC instantaneous luminosity in Run 1. The first level muon trigger rate is dominated by low momentum muons below the nominal trigger threshold due to the moderate momentum resolution of the Resistive Plate and Thin Gap trigger chambers. The resulting high trigger rates at HL-LHC can be su?ciently reduced by using the data of the precision Muon Drift Tube chambers for the trigger decision. This requires the implementation of a fast MDT read-out chain and of a fast MDT track reconstruction algorithm with a latency of at most 6 microseconds. A hardware demonstrator of the fast read-out chain has been successfully tested at the HL-LHC operating conditions at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The fast track reconstruction algorithm has been implemented on a fast trigger processor.

  3. Plate tectonics of the Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D P

    1970-04-18

    The seismicity and fault plane solutions in the Mediterranean area show that two small rapidly moving plates exist in the Eastern Mediterranean, and such plates may be a common feature of contracting ocean basins. The results show that the concepts of plate tectonics apply to instantaneous motions across continental plate boundaries.

  4. Data challenges in ATLAS computing

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A

    2003-01-01

    ATLAS computing is steadily progressing towards a highly functional software suite, plus a World Wide computing model which gives all ATLAS equal and equal quality of access to ATLAS data. A key component in the period before the LHC is a series of Data Challenges of increasing scope and complexity. The goals of the ATLAS Data Challenges are the validation of the computing model, of the complete software suite, of the data model, and to ensure the correctness of the technical choices to be made. We are committed to 'common solutions' and look forward to the LHC Computing Grid being the vehicle for providing these in an effective way. In close collaboration between the Grid and Data Challenge communities ATLAS is testing large-scale testbed prototypes around the world, deploying prototype components to integrate and test Grid software in a production environment, and running DC1 production at 39 'tier' centers in 18 countries on four continents.

  5. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  6. Delamination, upper plate extension, and plate margin complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kosuke; Gerya, Taras; Willett, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the syn- and post-subduction margin evolution with respect to extension, lithospheric removal, and magmatic and topographic consequences by employing 3D geodynamic models. In all experiments, regions of extended partial melting are overlain by up to 3 km high plateaus. There is complex geometric entanglement between upper mantle, partially molten rocks, and lithosphere, which is thermally eroded, over hundreds of kilometers across the plate contact. A complex lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary features elongated anomalies at scales of few tens to hundred kilometers. First-order, synthetic seismic anomaly patterns, based on thermodynamic velocities which are tabulated for model p,T conditions, are accordingly complex. Passive margin geometry variations in the lower plate effect consistent and inherited differences in dynamic evolution. Promontories along the margin tend to trigger three stages of evolution: 1) a magmatic arc; 2) a lower plate, eduction-like exhumation of buried continental crust in domal patterns of few tens of km wavelength; and subsequently, 3) the formation of extended zones on the upper plate which lack a lithospheric mantle, undergo partial extension, and feature lower crustal melting. Slab break-off is consistently favoured in locations where the lower plate margin is relatively recessed. Concerning the classical removal mechanisms, transitions and co-evolution between delamination, convective thinning, and upper-plate extension are gradual and these modes are not mutually exclusive. Almost complete mixed-mode removal and extension can be compared to the Aegean. Slab window formation by margin geometry variation produces characteristic uplift patterns that are comparable to the Apennines, where higher uplift rates could be a consequence of incipient necking of the slab below central Calabria.

  7. Beyond plate tectonics - Looking at plate deformation with space geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    The requirements that must be met by space-geodetic systems in order to constrain the horizontal secular motions associated with the geological deformation of the earth's surface are explored. It is suggested that in order to improve existing plate-motion models, the tangential components of relative velocities on interplate baselines must be resolved to an accuracy of less than 3 mm/yr. Results indicate that measuring the velocities between crustal blocks to + or - 5 mm/yr on 100-km to 1000-km scales can produce geologically significant constraints on the integrated deformation rates across continental plate-boundary zones such as the western United States.

  8. Jet physics in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet performance and physics measurements, together with results from new physics searches using the 2011 dataset. They include studies of the underlying event and fragmentation models, measurements of the inclusive jet, dijet and multijet cross sections, parton density functions, heavy flavours, jet shape, mass and substructure. Searches for new physics in monojet, dijet and photon-jet final states are also presented.

  9. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation periods allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  10. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  11. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  12. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  13. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  14. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  15. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  16. ATLAS latest results

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Reale, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the LHC start-up and the first runs at 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV and 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy in the years 2009 and 2010, the ATLAS detector started to record its first collision events. The integrated luminosity has now reached one inverse pico barn. These data have been used to perform detailed studies on the performance of the detector, including measuring charged and neutral particle mass resonances and the study of QCD cross-sections. The data have already made it possible to commission and calibrate the various ATLAS subdetectors, and understand their performance in detail. The first observation of Standard Model electroweak processes, in particular mass resonances, is also being used as a benchmark for validating the analysis and simulation tools. The status and performance of the detector will be briefly reviewed, the latest physics results will be summarized and limits on new physics will be given.

  17. Exotics searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Renjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new physics accessible by the LHC. The ATLAS experiment all have rigorous search programs ongoing with the aim to find indications for new physics involving state of the art analysis techniques. This talk reports on new results obtained using the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  18. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bellagamba, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This report presents an overview of some of the most recent results obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration using pp and heavy-ion collisions at LHC. The review is not intended to be comprehensive and includes recent updates on the Higgs boson properties, precision Standard Model measurements, as well as searches for new physics. Most of the results exploit the data collected in the last LHC run, providing pp collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV.

  19. The ATLAS Experiment Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  20. L'esperimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  1. El experimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  2. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Torro Pastor, Emma; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  3. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb̄, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  4. Higgs results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00145153; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM) Higgs results, such as $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma,ZZ,WW,\\tau\\tau,\\mu\\mu,b\\bar{b}$, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM) results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  5. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  6. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  7. Minimum Plate Thickness in High-Speed Craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Zhang, Shengming

    1998-01-01

    The minimum plate thickness requirements specified by the classification societies for high-speed craft are supposed to ensure adequate resistance to impact loads such as collision with floating objects and objects falling on the deck. The paper presents analytical methods of describing such impact...... phenomena and proposes performance requirements instead of thickness requirements for hull panels in high-speed craft made of different building materials....

  8. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to `transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  9. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to 'transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  10. ATLAS overview week highlights

    CERN Document Server

    D. Froidevaux

    2005-01-01

    A warm and early October afternoon saw the beginning of the 2005 ATLAS overview week, which took place Rue de La Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the heart of the Quartier Latin in Paris. All visitors had been warned many times by the ATLAS management and the organisers that the premises would be the subject of strict security clearance because of the "plan Vigipirate", which remains at some level of alert in all public buildings across France. The public building in question is now part of the Ministère de La Recherche, but used to host one of the so-called French "Grandes Ecoles", called l'Ecole Polytechnique (in France there is only one Ecole Polytechnique, whereas there are two in Switzerland) until the end of the seventies, a little while after it opened its doors also to women. In fact, the setting chosen for this ATLAS overview week by our hosts from LPNHE Paris has turned out to be ideal and the security was never an ordeal. For those seeing Paris for the first time, there we...

  11. Nova Scotia wind atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In order to stimulate growth of the wind energy sector in the province of Nova Scotia and to optimize the development of an important renewable energy source in the province, the Nova Scotia Department of Energy has launched the Nova Scotia wind atlas project. The atlas provides valuable information regarding the identification of the optimal locations to install wind farm turbines, both at the large utility scale level and at the private or small business levels. This article presented information on the wind atlas website and on wind resource maps. Background information on the project was presented. The wind resource maps were developed in partnership by the K.C, Irving Chair in Sustainable Development at Moncton University and the Applied Geomatics Research Group at the Nova Scotia Community College. The wind resource maps are available for viewing on the website where users can click on tile section to obtain enlarged versions of wind resource maps for different parts of the province of Nova Scotia. The maps were developed using computer modelling. 7 figs.

  12. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extens...

  13. ATLAS Upgrade Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000/fb by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new...

  14. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  15. Reverse blocking characteristics and mechanisms in Schottky-drain AlGaN/GaN HEMT with a drain field plate and floating field plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mao; Wei-Bo, She; Cui, Yang; Jin-Feng, Zhang; Xue-Feng, Zheng; Chong, Wang; Yue, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel AlGaN/GaN HEMT with a Schottky drain and a compound field plate (SD-CFP HEMT) is presented for the purpose of better reverse blocking capability. The compound field plate (CFP) consists of a drain field plate (DFP) and several floating field plates (FFPs). The physical mechanisms of the CFP to improve the reverse breakdown voltage and to modulate the distributions of channel electric field and potential are investigated by two-dimensional numerical simulations with Silvaco-ATLAS. Compared with the HEMT with a Schottky drain (SD HEMT) and the HEMT with a Schottky drain and a DFP (SD-FP HEMT), the superiorities of SD-CFP HEMT lie in the continuous improvement of the reverse breakdown voltage by increasing the number of FFPs and in the same fabrication procedure as the SD-FP HEMT. Two useful optimization laws for the SD-CFP HEMTs are found and extracted from simulation results. The relationship between the number of the FFPs and the reverse breakdown voltage as well as the FP efficiency in SD-CFP HEMTs are discussed. The results in this paper demonstrate a great potential of CFP for enhancing the reverse blocking ability in AlGaN/GaN HEMT and may be of great value and significance in the design and actual manufacture of SD-CFP HEMTs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61204085, 61334002, 61306017, 61474091, 61574112, and 61574110).

  16. A Time for Atlases and Atlases for Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Yoav; Mizrahi, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism's experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases. PMID:20204142

  17. A time for atlases and atlases for time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Livneh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism’s experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases.

  18. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  19. Constraints on Indian plate motion since 20 Ma from dense Russian magnetic data: Implications for Indian plate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkouriev, S.; Demets, C.

    2006-02-01

    Capricorn-Somalia seafloor spreading at ˜10-9 Ma corresponds well with the onset at 8 Ma of folding and faulting across an equatorial plate boundary separating the Indian and Capricorn plates, suggesting that the latter may have played a fundamental role in restoring equilibrium between the torques that were driving and resisting the northward motions of the Indian and Capricorn plates.

  20. Hydroelasticity of a Floating Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X.; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Cui, W.

    2003-01-01

    in the frequency domain. The second-order vertical displacements induced by the membrane forces are calculated by the von Karman plate theory. The results show that the membrane contribution both in terms of the axial stresses and the effect on the bending stresses can be important......The membrane forces are included in the hydroelastic analysis of a floating plate undergoing large vertical deflections in regular monochromatic multidirectional waves. The first-order vertical displacements induced by the linear wave exciting forces are calculated by the mode expansion method...

  1. Orifice plates and venturi tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Reader-Harris, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book gives the background to differential-pressure flow measurement and goes through the requirements explaining the reason for them. For those who want to use an orifice plate or a Venturi tube the standard ISO 5167 and its associated Technical Reports give the instructions required.  However, they rarely tell the users why they should follow certain instructions.  This book helps users of the ISO standards for orifice plates and Venturi tubes to understand the reasons why the standards are as they are, to apply them effectively, and to understand the consequences of deviations from the standards.

  2. Quality control and quality assurance of micromegas readout boards for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Nanda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The resistive anode boards of the Micromegas detectors for ATLAS NSW upgrade, will be produced in industries. The anode boards will be thoroughly evaluated at CERN following a detailed quality control and quality assurance (QA/QC) procedure. The report describes thoroughly the procedures and the design of a small QC tool for easier measurements of electrical properties of the readout boards.

  3. Upgrade Plans for ATLAS Forward Calorimetry for the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J.; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    Even though the LHC is still in an early phase of operation, plans are being developed to operate the machine and its detectors at up to 10 times the original design luminosity. This has a major impact on the Forward Calorimeter (FCal), which is exposed to some of the highest radiation rates in ATLAS. The FCal detector and its associated components were designed for operation at the maximum LHC luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1. However at the higher luminosities projected for the HL-LHC, operation of the FCal may be compromised. Beam heating in the FCal could lead to the formation of argon bubbles in the detector, the ionization rate will result in space charge effects that will reduce the signal and the current draw will result in a voltage drop across the HV current limiting resistors. Two possible solutions are being considered to maintain FCal operation at HL-LHC. One is a complete replacement of the FCal system. A replacement FCal would have a similar design to the current calorimeter except for the addition of cooling loops, lower value HV protection resistors and the use of smaller ionization gaps, as small as 100 microns in the first compartment. The second solution is the installation of a small warm calorimeter, referred to as the Mini-FCal, to be placed in front of the FCal. This addition would reduce the ionization load in the first FCal compartment, which would keep a larger region of the FCal active and reduce the heat load to an acceptable level. The current concept for the Mini-FCal is a standard parallel plate calorimeter with copper absorbers and diamond sensors, which were chosen for their inherent radiation resistance. It is anticipated that neutrons will be the major cause of damage to the diamond sensors and the integrated flux of neutrons in the Mini-FCal after 3000 fb-1 at the HL-LHC will be up to 2 x 1017 neutrons/cm2. Recent irradiation tests carried out by members of the ATLAS Liquid Argon group show that these sensors can still operate after

  4. Evaluación de placas de screening de cefoxitina y cefotaxima para la detección de resistencia a meticilina en Staphylococcus aureus Evaluation of cefoxitin and cefotaxime screening plates for the detection of methicillin-resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lorenz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available La detección de Staphylococcus aureus meticilina-resistente (SAMR representa un serio problema para el laboratorio de microbiología de baja y mediana complejidad. En el presente trabajo se evalúa la sensibilidad, especificidad, valores predictivos positivo y negativo de placas de screening (AS de cefoxitina (FOX y cefotaxima (CTX (8 y 16 µg/ml, con 4% de NaCl o sin agregado de sal, para la detección de SAMR. El AS oxacilina (OXA y el test de aglutinación MRSA-Screen Latex para detección de PLP2a se utilizaron como métodos de referencia. El 100% de las cepas PLP2a positivas (94 cepas fueron detectadas como SAMR por el AS FOX (8 µg/ml y por el AS CTX (8 µg/ml, con 4% de NaCl. La ventaja del AS FOX (8 µg/ml es que no requiere de NaCl y la del AS CTX (8 µg/ml, con 4% de NaCl, que CTX es un antimicrobiano fácilmente disponible en nuestro país.Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates represents a serious problem to low and media level microbiology labs. In this work cefoxitin (FOX and cefotaxime (CTX screen plates (AS (8-16 µg/ml with and without 4% of NaCl were evaluated to detect MRSA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were determined. The AS oxacillin and the agglutination test MRSA-Screen Latex for the detection of PLP2a were used as reference methods for the evaluation of the different studied screening plates. The 100% (94 strains PLP2a positive were detected as MRSA with FOX (8 µg/ml, and CTX (8 µg/ml with 4% NaCl AS. The advantage of FOX AS (8 µg/ml is that it does not need the addition of NaCl, and CTX AS (8 µg/ml with 4% NaCl is that cefotaxime is an antimicrobial easily accessible in our country.

  5. Electroless silver plating on PET fabric initiated by in situ reduction of polyaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Shipeng; Xie, Huayang [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Wei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Lab of Eco-Textile, Ministry of Education, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Yu, Dan, E-mail: yudan@dhu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Key Lab of Eco-Textile, Ministry of Education, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We propose a method to initiate electroless plating by reduction of PANI. • The shielding effective of the silver-plated fabric reaches 50–90 dB. • The silver-plated fabric has good antibacterial activity. - Abstract: Novel electroless silver plating poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric was prepared by a two-step procedure. In the first step, the in situ polymerized polyaniline (PANI) occurred on the fabric surface in the presence of ammonium persulfate (APS). Then, Ag(0) species reduced from silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) by in situ reduction of PANI were used as catalyst to initiate electroless silver plating. Hence, this composite material was prepared by conductive polymer combined with electroless plating. The silver layer on PET fabric surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the silver layer was plated uniformly and compactly with surface resistance about 0.1 Ω/sq on average. The shielding effectiveness (SE) of silver-plated PET fabric was around 50–90 dB, which was considered to have potential applications in electromagnetic shielding materials. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis was carried out to study thermal stability. The antibacterial tests demonstrated that the silver-plated fabric exhibited excellent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli both with 100%.

  6. Highly adhesive metal plating on Zylon ® fiber via iodine pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, Ummul Khair; Gotoh, Yasuo

    2011-11-01

    Highly adhesive metal plating was performed on poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) fiber named Zylon® via iodine pretreatment followed by electroless plating. First, iodine components were selectively doped into the inner part of the fiber near the surface through iodine vapor exposure. The doped iodine was converted to palladium iodide particles by treating with palladium chloride solution. After the reduction of the iodide to metal palladium particles, electroless copper plating was conducted on the fiber. A uniform copper layer was deposited on the fiber surface and exhibited high durability in durability tests such as ultrasonic exposure, tape peeling-off, and corrosion in NaCl solution. This durability was attributed to the palladium particles formed at the fiber surface that served as an anchor for the plated layer as well as an electroless plating catalyst. The plated fibers also possessed electrical conductivity. Although the tensile strength of the Zylon® fiber decreased from 5.8 to 4.9 GPa after undergoing the pretreatment and plating processes, the light shielding effect improved the light resistance of the plated fibers in terms of tensile properties. After 18 days of xenon lamp exposure, the plated fibers retained 74% of its initial strength, whereas that of untreated fibers decreased to 43%.

  7. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension. 1. Introduction. Plate boundaries are the zones where most earth dynamics are focussed. The complexity of tectonic boundaries draws attention to them as the largest earthquakes are felt in these areas and they elicit the natural hazard of ...

  8. Seismic link at plate boundary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  9. [Biodynamics of the epiphyseal plate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallek, M; Jungbluth, K H

    1984-02-01

    The architecture of the collagenous fibers in epiphyseal plates of infantile long bones is ordered in a manner that tensile load is able to be transformed in compressive stress and reverse. This system can be classify in the theory of the formation of the sustentacular tissue by mechanical forces of Roux, Benninghoff and Pauwels.

  10. Comment on "Intermittent plate tectonics?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2008-06-06

    Silver and Behn (Reports, 4 January 2008, p. 85) proposed that intermittent plate tectonics may resolve a long-standing paradox in Earth's thermal evolution. However, their analysis misses one important term, which subsequently brings their main conclusion into question. In addition, the Phanerozoic eustasy record indicates that the claimed effect of intermittency is probably weak.

  11. TUBULARIZED INCISED PLATE (TIP) URETHROPLASTY:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Recently, tubularized incised plate. (TIP) urethroplasty (Snodgrass repair) has gained popularity for the primary repair of distal and proximal hypospadias. This study was carried out to evaluate TIP urethro- plasty in the repair of failed and compli- cated hypospadias cases. Patients and Methods: This study was ...

  12. Shaker slip-plate adapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, O. S.

    1969-01-01

    Magnesium adapter ties in all of the attachment bosses on a horizontal slip table and makes a rigid coupling which terminates in a single row of attachment bosses at the edge of the horizontal plate. This eliminates ineffective dissipation of the driving force in vibration tests.

  13. TUBULARIZED INCISED PLATE (TIP) URETHROPLASTY:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Churchill BM, van Savage JG, Khoury AE, McLorie. GA. The dartos flap as an adjunct in preventing urethrocutaneous fistulas in repeat hypospadias surgery. J Urol1996, 15612047. Cooper CS, Noh PH, Snyder HM 3"'. Preservation of urethral plate spongiosurn1 technique to reduce hypospadias fistulas. Urology 2001 ...

  14. Properties of molded graphite bi-polar plates for PEM fuel cell stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbir, F.; Braun, J.; Neutzler, J. [Energy Partners, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The electrical resistance of the bi-polar collector plate plays a major role in fuel cell stack performance. Typically, the plates in laboratory fuel cells are made of graphite, which has acceptable electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, but is expensive. Less expensive graphite/polymer mixtures can be used but they have lower electrical conductivity. This paper discusses the properties of molded graphite/composite plates with enhanced electrical conductivity, as developed by Energy Partners of West Palm Beach, Florida. By optimizing collector plate materials, compounding and the molding processes, the resistance of the molded collector/backing layer sandwich was significantly reduced, with a corresponding improvement in performance of more than 50 mV per cell at 1 A/sq.cm. in a 10-cell stack with an active area of 300 sq. cm.

  15. Dynamics and stress field of the Eurasian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warners-Ruckstuhl, Karin; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2013-04-01

    We address the connection between forces on the Eurasian plate, the plate's motion and the intraplate stress field. Resistive forces along convergent plate boundaries have a major impact on surface deformation, most visibly at collisional plate boundaries. Although quantification of these forces is key to understanding the evolution and present state of mountain belts, they remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of plate boundary structures and rheologies. In this study we analyse the forces along the southern boundary of the Eurasian plate, presently the most prominent suture zone on Earth, resulting from the closure of the Neo-Tethys ocean. We address the dynamics of the Eurasian plate as a whole. This enables us to base our analysis on mechanical equilibrium of a tectonic plate and to evaluate the force distribution along the Tethyan boundary as part of an internally consistent set of forces driving and deforming Eurasia. We evaluate force distributions obeying this mechanical law on the basis of their ability to reproduce observed stress orientations. We incorporate tractions from convective mantle flow modelling in a lithospheric model in which edge and lithospheric body forces are modelled explicitly and compute resulting stresses in a homogeneous elastic thin shell. Our investigation is structured according to two research objectives, pursued in a corresponding step-wise approach: (1) a detailed understanding of the sensitivity of Eurasia's stress field to the distribution of all acting forces; and (2) a quantification of collision-related forces along the southern boundary of Eurasia, including their relation to observed plate boundary structure, in particular plateau height. Intraplate stress observations as compiled in the World Stress Map project are used to constrain the distribution of forces acting on Eurasia. Eurasia's stress field turns out to be sensitive to the distribution of collision forces on the plate's southern margin and, to a lesser

  16. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  17. The new European wind atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    European Wind Atlas” aiming at reducing overall uncertainties in determining wind conditions; standing on three legs: A data bank from a series of intensive measuring campaigns; a thorough examination and redesign of the model chain from global, mesoscale to microscale models and creation of the wind atlas...... database. Although the project participants will come from the 27 member states it is envisioned that the project will be opened for global participation through test benches for model development and sharing of data – climatologically as well as experimental. Experiences from national wind atlases...... will be utilized, such as the Indian, the South African, the Finnish, the German, the Canadian atlases and others....

  18. Automated Loads Analysis System (ATLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Stephen; Frere, Scot; O’Reilly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is a generalized solution that can be used for launch vehicles. ATLAS is used to produce modal transient analysis and quasi-static analysis results (i.e., accelerations, displacements, and forces) for the payload math models on a specific Shuttle Transport System (STS) flight using the shuttle math model and associated forcing functions. This innovation solves the problem of coupling of payload math models into a shuttle math model. It performs a transient loads analysis simulating liftoff, landing, and all flight events between liftoff and landing. ATLAS utilizes efficient and numerically stable algorithms available in MSC/NASTRAN.

  19. Development of a Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Komai, Hidetoshi; Edo, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC) is being developed a sacandidate for the muon system of the ATLAS detector for upgrading in LHC experiments. The μ-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector that doesn’t have floating structure such as wires, mesh, or foil. This detector can be made by printed-circuit-board (PCB) technology, which is commercially available and suited for mass production. Operation tests have been performed under high flux neutrons under similar conditions to the ATLAS cavern. Spark rates are measured using several gas mixtures under 7 MeV neutron irradiation, and good properties were observed using neon, ethane, and CF4 mixture of gases.Using resistive materials as electrodes, we are also developing a new μ-PIC, which is not expected to damage the electrodes in the case of discharge sparks.

  20. Rapid license plate detection using Modest AdaBoost and template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Kam Tong; Tian, Xiao Lin

    2010-02-01

    License plate detection and recognition are vital yet challenging tasks for law enforcement agencies. This paper presents a license plate detection prototype system for a Macao law enforcement department using Modest Adaboost combined with template matching technique. Firstly, a machine learning algorithm, based on Modest AdaBoost which mostly aims for better generalization capability and resistance to overfitting, was applied to find out candidate license plates over the input images. In the second stage, template matching technique was employed to verify the license plate appearances in order to reduce false positives. This paper shows that the AdaBoost algorithm, which was originally used for face detection, has successfully been applied to solve the problems of license plate detection. Experimental results demonstrate high accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.