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Sample records for atlas discovery potential

  1. ATLAS discovery potential of the Standard Model Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles is remarkably succesful in describing experimental data. The Higgs mechanism as the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking and mass generation, however, has not yet been confirmed experimentally. The search for the Higgs boson is thus one of the most important tasks of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This talk will present an overview of the potential of the ATLAS detector for the discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson. Different production processes and decay channels -to cover a wide mass range- will be discussed.

  2. ATLAS Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles is remarkably succesful in describing experimental data. The Higgs mechanism as the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking and mass generation, however, has not yet been confirmed experimentally. The search for the Higgs boson is thus one of the most important tasks of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This talk will present an overview of the potential of the ATLAS detector for the discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson. Different production processes and decay channels -to cover a wide mass range- will be discussed.

  3. Supersymmetry discovery potential in the 2 leptons channel with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, U

    2008-01-01

    The main argument of the PhD thesis is the evaluation of the ATLAS detector potential to discover Supersymmetry and to estimate the masses of the supersymmetric particles produced in events with two isolated leptons (electrons or muons) in the final state. The Supersymmetry (SUSY) is one of the most credited theories to extend the Standard Model (SM). This theory foresees a new class of particles that can be detected reconstructing their decay chains. Under some basic assumptions that define the mSUGRA model, all these chains finish with the Lightest SUSY Particle (LSP) that is stable, neutral and weakly interacting: a good candidate for the Cold Dark Matter. The LSP escapes the detection originating a large amount of missing energy in the detector. Within the mSUGRA model, this channel is then characterised by the presence of two isolated leptons, missing energy and energetic jets. A strategy to estimate the SM background in this channel using only real data has been developed allowing the discovery of SUSY ...

  4. ATLAS DISCOVERY POTENTIAL FOR A HEAVY CHARGED HIGGS BOSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assamagan, K.A.; Coadou, Y.; Deandrea, A.

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of the ATLAS detector to the discovery of a heavy charged Higgs boson is presented. Assuming a heavy SUSY spectrum, the most promising channels above the top quark mass are H ± → tb and h ± → τ ± ν τ which provide coverage in the low and high tan β regions up to ∼ 600 GeV. The achievable precisions on the charged Higgs mass and tan β determination are also discussed. The H ± → W ± h 0 channel, though restricted to a small MSSM parameter space, shows a viable signal in NMSSM where the parameter space is less constrained. The observation of the channel H - → τ L - ν τ + c.c. may constitute a distinctive evidence for models with singlet neutrinos in large extra dimensions

  5. Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2011-01-01

    Four hundred years ago in Middelburg, in the Netherlands, the telescope was invented. The invention unleashed a revolution in the exploration of the universe. Galileo Galilei discovered mountains on the Moon, spots on the Sun, and moons around Jupiter. Christiaan Huygens saw details on Mars and rings around Saturn. William Herschel discovered a new planet and mapped binary stars and nebulae. Other astronomers determined the distances to stars, unraveled the structure of the Milky Way, and discovered the expansion of the universe. And, as telescopes became bigger and more powerful, astronomers delved deeper into the mysteries of the cosmos. In his Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries, astronomy journalist Govert Schilling tells the story of 400 years of telescopic astronomy. He looks at the 100 most important discoveries since the invention of the telescope. In his direct and accessible style, the author takes his readers on an exciting journey encompassing the highlights of four centuries of astronomy. Spectacul...

  6. Commissioning of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter and Z' → e+e- discovery potential in the first LHC data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangeard, P.S.

    2009-07-01

    After about fifteen years of development, the ATLAS detector is ready to operate and it recorded, in 2008, several millions of cosmic events as well as first LHC data. This achievement is based on the long experience of beam tests and on the large effort towards the detector in situ commissioning undertaken by the ATLAS collaboration. This promises fast ability to perform searches for evidence of the Higgs boson and new physics. I heavily contributed to the in situ commissioning of the electromagnetic calorimeter. To verify its performance, I studied the first cosmic data taken in 2006 which allowed the first in situ analysis of dead channels, energy reconstruction and detector response uniformity. This participation to the commissioning has continued with the study of the single beam data recorded during the first week of LHC operation (Sept. 2008). Expanding on my expertise of the electromagnetic calorimeter, I focused my physics analysis, prepared with simulation, on the promising discovery potential of new physics at LHC via the di-electron/di-photon decay of new heavy gauge boson in the early LHC data (the first 100 pb -1 ). Possible limitations coming from early hardware problems or imperfect electron energy calibration in first data have been estimated. According to the new schedule of LHC operation, this analysis will be possible with 10 TeV pp collisions data in 2010. (author)

  7. Calibration of the ATLAS calorimeters and discovery potential for massive top quark resonances at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Jon-And, K; Hellman, S

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector which has recently started to take data at the LHC at CERN. This thesis describes the tests and calibrations of the central calorimeters of ATLAS and outlines a search for heavy top quark pair resonances.The calorimeter tests were performed before the ATLAS detector was assembled at the LHC, in such a way that particle beams of known energy were targeted at the calorimeter modules. In one of the studies presented here, modules of the hadronic barrel calorimeter, TileCal, were exposed to beams of pions of energies between 3 and 9 GeV. It is shown that muons from pion decays in the beam can be separated from the pions, and that the simulation of the detector correctly describes the muon behaviour. In the second calorimeter study, a scheme for local hadronic calibration is developed and applied to single pion test beam data in a wide range of energies, measured by the combination of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and the TileCal hadronic calorimeter. The calibration meth...

  8. Study of the Higgs boson discovery potential in the process $pp \\to H/A \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-/\\tau^+\\tau^-$ with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dedes, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN for the heavy neutral Higgs bosons H/A of the Min- imal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model of particle physics (MSSM) in the decay channels H/A → τ + τ − → e/μ + X and H/A → μ+ μ− has been studied. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the full spectrum of the physics phenomena occuring in the proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy and to provide answers to the question of the origin of particle masses and of elec- troweak symmetry breaking. For the studies, the ATLAS muon spectrometer plays an important role. The spectrometer allows for a precise muon momentum measure- ment independently of other ATLAS subdetectors. The performance of the muon spectrometer depends strongly on the performance of the muon tracking detectors, the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). Computer programs have been developed in order to test and verify the ATLAS muon spectrometer s...

  9. Study of the Higgs boson discovery potential in the process pp→Hqq, H→τ+τ- with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this work is the evaluation of the discovery potential of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider for the Standard Model Higgs boson in vector-boson fusion production and a subsequent decay into a τ-lepton pair. This is one of the most promising discovery channels of the Higgs boson in the low mass range, which is the mass range favored from precision measurements of the electroweak interaction. The decay modes where both τ leptons decay leptonically and where one τ lepton decays leptonically and the other one hadronically are studied in this thesis. The main objective was to investigate possible improvements upon earlier cut-based analyses by using additional discriminating variables as well as by applying multivariate analysis methods which take into account correlations between the variables. The variables are carefully selected in order to avoid correlations with the reconstructed invariant ττ mass. In an intermediate step, the sequential signal selection cuts have been optimized for maximum signal significance. With this strategy, one can expect to discover the Higgs boson with ≥5σ significance in the mass range 115 GeV≤ m H ≤135 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 30 fb -1 corresponding to the first three years of ATLAS operation. The maximum signal significance of 5.9σ is obtained for a Higgs mass of 120 GeV. Significant further improvement was found with multivariate selection methods. The best results are obtained with an Artificial Neural Network algorithm. The mass range for the ≥5σ Higgs discovery with 30 fb -1 is extended to 110 GeV with a maximum signal significance of 6.5 σ at m H =125 GeV. Systematic uncertainties are studied in detail for both methods and are included in the above predictions of the signal significance. The largest uncertainty is due to the jet energy scale. In the case of using only Monte Carlo simulations for estimating the background, the uncertainties on the detector performance lead to

  10. Study of the Higgs boson discovery potential in the process pp{yields}Hqq, H{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Manfred

    2009-04-27

    The subject of this work is the evaluation of the discovery potential of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider for the Standard Model Higgs boson in vector-boson fusion production and a subsequent decay into a {tau}-lepton pair. This is one of the most promising discovery channels of the Higgs boson in the low mass range, which is the mass range favored from precision measurements of the electroweak interaction. The decay modes where both {tau} leptons decay leptonically and where one {tau} lepton decays leptonically and the other one hadronically are studied in this thesis. The main objective was to investigate possible improvements upon earlier cut-based analyses by using additional discriminating variables as well as by applying multivariate analysis methods which take into account correlations between the variables. The variables are carefully selected in order to avoid correlations with the reconstructed invariant {tau}{tau} mass. In an intermediate step, the sequential signal selection cuts have been optimized for maximum signal significance. With this strategy, one can expect to discover the Higgs boson with {>=}5{sigma} significance in the mass range 115 GeV{<=} m{sub H}{<=}135 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 30 fb{sup -1} corresponding to the first three years of ATLAS operation. The maximum signal significance of 5.9{sigma} is obtained for a Higgs mass of 120 GeV. Significant further improvement was found with multivariate selection methods. The best results are obtained with an Artificial Neural Network algorithm. The mass range for the {>=}5{sigma} Higgs discovery with 30 fb{sup -1} is extended to 110 GeV with a maximum signal significance of 6.5 {sigma} at m{sub H}=125 GeV. Systematic uncertainties are studied in detail for both methods and are included in the above predictions of the signal significance. The largest uncertainty is due to the jet energy scale. In the case of using only Monte Carlo simulations for estimating the

  11. ATLAS level-1 jet trigger rates and study of the ATLAS discovery potential of the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in b-jet decay channels

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, Kambiz

    2001-01-01

    The response of the ATLAS calorimeters to electrons, photons and hadrons, in terms of the longitudinal and lateral shower development, is parameterized using the GEANT package and a detailed detector description (DICE). The parameterizations are implemented in the ATLAS Level-1 (LVL1) Calorimeter Trigger fast simulation package which, based on an average detector geometry, simulates the complete chain of the LVL1 calorimeter trigger system. In addition, pile-up effects due to multiple primary interactions are implemented taking into account the shape and time history of the trigger signals. An interface to the fast physics simulation package (ATLFAST) is also developed in order to perform ATLAS physics analysis, including the LVL1 trigger effects, in a consistent way. The simulation tools, the details of the parameterization and the interface are described. The LVL1 jet trigger thresholds corresponding to the current trigger menus are determined within the framework of the fast simulation, and the LVL1 jet tr...

  12. Study of the Higgs boson discovery potential in the process pp→H/A→μ+μ-/τ+τ- with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedes, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN for the heavy neutral Higgs bosons H/A of theMinimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model of particle physics (MSSM) in the decay channels H/A→τ + τ - →e/μ+X and H/A→μ + μ - has been studied. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the full spectrum of the physics phenomena occuring in the proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy and to provide answers to the question of the origin of particle masses and of electroweak symmetry breaking. For the studies, the ATLAS muon spectrometer plays an important role. The spectrometer allows for a precise muon momentum measurement independently of other ATLAS subdetectors. The performance of the muon spectrometer depends strongly on the performance of the muon tracking detectors, the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). Computer programs have been developed in order to test and verify the ATLAS muon spectrometer simulation, an essential ingredient for data analysis. In addition, dedicated programs for the monitoring of the quality of the data collected by the muon spectrometer have been developed and tested with data from cosmic ray muons. High-quality cosmic ray muon data have been used for the calibration of the MDT-chambers. A new calibration method, called analytical autocalibration, has been tested. The proposed method achieved the required accuracy of 20 μm in the determination of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the drift tubes of the MDT chambers with only 2000 muon tracks per chamber. Reliable muon detector simulation and calibration are essential for the study of the MSSM Higgs boson decays H/A→τ + τ - →e/μ+X and H/A→μ + μ - and of the corresponding background processes. The signal selection and background rejection requirements have been optimized for maximum signal significance. The following results have been obtained for different assumptions on the

  13. Atlas electromagnetic calorimeter and electron reconstruction commissioning with the first LHC collision data: study of the W' -> eν heavy gauge boson discovery potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuna, M.

    2010-09-01

    ATLAS is a general purpose particle detector based at the Large Hadron Collider which has been delivering collisions since the beginning of 2010, with an energy in the center of mass of √(s) = 7 TeV. The electron and the discovery potential it carries is the subject of my thesis. The electromagnetic calorimeter is a crucial sub-detector for the measurement of electrons kinematic properties. In order to verify its functioning, I contributed to the first in situ data analysis, cosmic muons in 2008 and LHC beam data in 2009. These analyses showed the electromagnetic calorimeter was operational and efficient over its whole coverage. The knowledge of the electrons energy losses before they reach the calorimeter is mandatory to achieve precise measurements. For that purpose, I contributed to a method evaluating the amount of material upstream using Monte-Carlo simulations of high transverse momentum electrons. The information from the electrons allows the mapping of the material from the inner tracker to the calorimeter entrance. In 2009 and 2010, the LHC collisions at √(s) = 900 GeV and √(s) = 7 TeV collisions provided ATLAS with its first electron candidates and enabled the verification of their reconstruction performance. In this prospect, I compared the electron identification variables of data and simulation. Finally, I prepared the search for a charged heavy gauge boson W' decaying in an electron and a neutrino, using a calorimetry only definition of missing transverse energy in order to improve the method's robustness in the perspective of an early data analysis. (author)

  14. submitter Investigation of the discovery potential for supersymmetry in Tau final states and measurement of the Tau identification efficiency for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lumb, Debra

    Despite its success, the Standard Model has a number of short-comings that lead particle physicists to believe the it is only a low-energy approximation of a more fundamental theory. One of the most promising candidates for an extension of the Standard Model is supersymmetry. From 2009 the search for Supersymmetry will be taken into a new energy regime with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN. A new inclusive search for SUSY in tau final states has been developed for the ATLAS experiment. The search focuses on the signature of taus, jets and missing transverse energy. Analyses with different jet multiplicities (4, 3 and 2-jets) have been studied. The requirement of the tau significantly reduces the abundant QCD multijet background making the mode potentially more robust than other modes already in use that focus only on jets and missing transverse energy as the signature. The discovery reach for R-parity conserving mSUGRA models has been studied for a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV and an int...

  15. Physics potential of ATLAS detector with high luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bing

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to exploit the full physics potential in the TeV energy region opened up by the Large Hadron Collider at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with very high luminosities. The physics performance of the ATLAS detector on Higgs, extra-dimension and strong symmetry breaking scenario is summarized in this note. ATLAS experiment has great discovery potential for these new phenomena with high luminosity. Triple gauge couplings are very sensitive for probing new physics at TeV scale. We show that ATLAS can measure these couplings very precisely with high luminosity. (orig.)

  16. Discovery of SM Higgs Boson in ATLAS Experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ics, Higgs boson, particle detec- tors, trigger, grid computing. Discovery of SM Higgs Boson in ATLAS Experiment. Prafulla Kumar Behera. Prafulla Kumar Behera is an experimental high energy physicist at the. IITM, Chennai. He has participated in many large-scale collider experiments namely. BELLE at Japan, BABAR.

  17. Discovery of SM Higgs Boson in ATLAS Experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 3. Discovery of SM Higgs Boson in ATLAS Experiment. Prafulla Kumar Behera. General Article Volume 18 Issue 3 March 2013 pp 248-263. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Study of the Higgs boson discovery potential in the process pp{yields}H/A{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}/{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedes, Georgios

    2008-04-22

    In this thesis, the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN for the heavy neutral Higgs bosons H/A of theMinimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model of particle physics (MSSM) in the decay channels H/A{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{yields}e/{mu}+X and H/A{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} has been studied. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the full spectrum of the physics phenomena occuring in the proton-proton collisions at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy and to provide answers to the question of the origin of particle masses and of electroweak symmetry breaking. For the studies, the ATLAS muon spectrometer plays an important role. The spectrometer allows for a precise muon momentum measurement independently of other ATLAS subdetectors. The performance of the muon spectrometer depends strongly on the performance of the muon tracking detectors, the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). Computer programs have been developed in order to test and verify the ATLAS muon spectrometer simulation, an essential ingredient for data analysis. In addition, dedicated programs for the monitoring of the quality of the data collected by the muon spectrometer have been developed and tested with data from cosmic ray muons. High-quality cosmic ray muon data have been used for the calibration of the MDT-chambers. A new calibration method, called analytical autocalibration, has been tested. The proposed method achieved the required accuracy of 20 {mu}m in the determination of the space-to-drift-time relationship of the drift tubes of the MDT chambers with only 2000 muon tracks per chamber. Reliable muon detector simulation and calibration are essential for the study of the MSSM Higgs boson decays H/A{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{yields}e/{mu}+X and H/A{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and of the corresponding background processes. The signal selection and background rejection requirements have been optimized for maximum signal

  19. ATLAS B-physics potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smizanska, M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies since 1993 have demonstrated the ability of ATLAS to pursue a wide B physics program. This document presents the latest performance studies with special stress on lepton identification. B-decays containing several leptons in ATLAS statistically dominate the high-precision measurements. We present new results on physics simulations of CP violation measurements in the B s 0 → J/Ψphi decay and on a novel ATLAS programme on beauty production in central proton-proton collisions of LHC

  20. Taus and the Trigger for Discovery at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demers, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This five year grant allowed Yale Professor Sarah Demers and her students and postdocs to contribute to the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. We worked on a particular mode of the Higgs Boson decay, contributing to the discovery of this particle as well as measuring the particle's properties. We also performed a 'first of its kind' measurement at a hadron collider in the measurement of tau polarization, which increased the sensitivity of ATLAS in a number of exciting ways, both for making measurements of known particles and for hunting for new ones. We also contributed to the tau trigger - the real-time selection that chooses data that includes the signature of the tau lepton. Four PhD students in the Yale Physics Department received their PhDs during the term of this grant, with at least partial support from the grant.

  1. ATLAS B-physics potential

    CERN Document Server

    Smizanska, M

    2001-01-01

    Studies since 1993 have demonstrated the ability of ATLAS to pursue a wide B physics program. This document presents the latest performance studies with special stress on lepton identification. B-decays containing several leptons in ATLAS statistically dominate the high- precision measurements. We present new results on physics simulations of CP violation measurements in the B/sub s//sup 0/ to J/ psi phi decay and on a novel ATLAS programme on beauty production in central proton-proton collisions at the LHC. (7 refs).

  2. Design and implementation of the object-oriented fast simulation program for the ATLAS experiment and its use to determine the discovery potential of the Higgs Boson via the channel h- > ZZ- > bbl+l-

    CERN Document Server

    Steward, Richard M

    2004-01-01

    The design and implementation of the object-oriented fast simulation program Atlfast is described for the ATLAS experiment at the CERN particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. Fast simulations use parametrised energy and momentum smearing in order to recreate the detection efficiency and particle identification of a real experimental detector, without the time-consuming computation required for full detector simulation. Additionally, an object-oriented program for performing user-defined physics analyses is described. This program is released for general use by the ATLAS collaboration and is designed for use with, but not restricted to, physics output from the Atlfast fast simulation program. These programs are demonstrated in a physics study of the feasibility of discovering the Higgs boson at the ATLAS experiment, using the discovery channel ho > Z Z * > bb l+l via weak vector boson fusion in the mass range 150 GeV - 200 GeV. It is found that this channel does not significantly increase the discovery pot...

  3. Three education modules using EnviroAtlas-Exploration and Discovery Through Maps: Teaching Science with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Session #1: Exploration and Discovery through Maps: Teaching Science with Technology (elementary school) - EnviroAtlas is a tool developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and its partners that empowers anyone with the internet to be a highly informed local decision-ma...

  4. The discovery of long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lømo, Terje

    2003-04-29

    This paper describes circumstances around the discovery of long-term potentiation (LTP). In 1966, I had just begun independent work for the degree of Dr medicinae (PhD) in Per Andersen's laboratory in Oslo after an eighteen-month apprenticeship with him. Studying the effects of activating the perforant path to dentate granule cells in the hippocampus of anaesthetized rabbits, I observed that brief trains of stimuli resulted in increased efficiency of transmission at the perforant path-granule cell synapses that could last for hours. In 1968, Tim Bliss came to Per Andersen's laboratory to learn about the hippocampus and field potential recording for studies of possible memory mechanisms. The two of us then followed up my preliminary results from 1966 and did the experiments that resulted in a paper that is now properly considered to be the basic reference for the discovery of LTP.

  5. EnviroAtlas - Potential Wetland Areas - Contiguous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Potential Wetland Areas (PWA) dataset shows potential wetland areas at 30-meter resolution. Beginning two centuries ago, many wetlands were turned...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Potentially Restorable Wetlands on Agricultural Land - Contiguous United States Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The EnviroAtlas Potentially...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Potential Wetland Areas - Contiguous United States Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The EnviroAtlas Potential...

  8. Electrical tests of silicon detector modules for the ATLAS experiment and a study of the discovery potential of the $t\\overline{t}H, H \\to W^{+}W^{-}$ process

    CERN Document Server

    Ludwig, Inga

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this thesis was a contribution to the construction of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracking detector (SCT). About 200 SCT endcap modules were assembled at the University of Freiburg. Before installation in the experiment, each module was subject to thorough testing in order to ensure their functionality within the ATLAS specifications. A large part of these tests concerned the electrical functionality of the readout electronics and the bias current behaviour of the sensors. The responsibility for the electrical characterization of the Freiburg modules was part of this thesis. To be suited for the analysis of physics processes, the signals measured in the detector need to be transferred into particle four-momenta, requiring the reconstruction and identification of different particle types. This thesis contributes to the physics object identification by a study of methods to separate isolated electrons from real electron background produced in the decays of heavy quarks. A standard set of four disc...

  9. ATLAS Potential for Beauty Physics Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smizanska, M.

    2001-01-01

    The main focus of ATLAS b physics has traditionally been on the standard model. In the last few years also the aspects of new physics in B-decays has been addressed. Another new field of studies started recently is a beauty production. We give an overview of the older as well as more recent results. After an introduction outlining selected trigger and detector performance characteristics, we explain methods and goals of CP violation measurements in decay channels of B d 0 meson, physics of B s 0 system and of rare decays. Finally, the ATLAS program for beauty production measurements is presented. (author)

  10. The ATLAS multi-user upgrade and potential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J. A.; Savard, G.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2017-12-01

    With the recent integration of the CARIBU-EBIS charge breeder into the ATLAS accelerator system to provide for more pure and efficient charge breeding of radioactive beams, a multi-user upgrade of the ATLAS facility is being proposed to serve multiple users simultaneously. ATLAS was the first superconducting ion linac in the world and is the US DOE low-energy Nuclear Physics National User Facility. The proposed upgrade will take advantage of the continuous-wave nature of ATLAS and the pulsed nature of the EBIS charge breeder in order to simultaneously accelerate two beams with very close mass-to-charge ratios; one stable from the existing ECR ion source and one radioactive from the newly commissioned EBIS charge breeder. In addition to enhancing the nuclear physics program, beam extraction at different points along the linac will open up the opportunity for other potential applications; for instance, material irradiation studies at ~ 1 MeV/u and isotope production at ~ 6 MeV/u or at the full ATLAS energy of ~ 15 MeV/u. The concept and proposed implementation of the ATLAS multi-user upgrade will be presented. Future plans to enhance the flexibility of this upgrade will also be presented.

  11. Discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, HaiChen

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson was predicted by theorists in the 1960s during the development of the electroweak theory. Prior to the startup of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), experimental searches found no evidence of the Higgs boson. In July 2012, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC reported the discovery of a new boson in their searches for the SM Higgs boson. Subsequent experimental studies have revealed the spin-0 nature of this new boson and found its couplings to SM particles consistent to those of a Higgs boson. These measurements confirmed the newly discovered boson is indeed a Higgs boson. More measurements will be performed to compare the properties of the Higgs boson with the SM predictions.

  12. ATLAS distributed computing operation shift teams experience during the discovery year and beginning of the long shutdown 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, Alexey; Girolamo, Alessandro Di; Negri, Guidone; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Smirnov, Iouri; Vartapetian, Armen; Yu, Jaehoon

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS Distributed Computing Operation Shifts evolve to meet new requirements. New monitoring tools as well as operational changes lead to modifications in organization of shifts. In this paper we describe the structure of shifts, the roles of different shifts in ATLAS computing grid operation, the influence of a Higgs-like particle discovery on shift operation, the achievements in monitoring and automation that allowed extra focus on the experiment priority tasks, and the influence of the Long Shutdown 1 and operational changes related to the no beam period.

  13. Computer-aided discovery of antimicrobial agents as potential enoyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer-aided discovery of antimicrobial agents as potential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase inhibitors. ... Conclusion: Overall, the newly discovered hits can act as a good starting point in the future for the development of safe and potent antibacterial agents. Keywords: Enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase, saFabI, ...

  14. Improving the discovery potential of charged Higgs bosons at the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Run 2 discovery potential of H¦bosons in a general Type-II 2HDM is ... gluon and quark–antiquark pairs (hence – by definition – the attainable Higgs ... This description fails to correctly account for the production phenomenology of charged.

  15. Discovery of Jurassic ammonite-bearing series in Jebel Bou Hedma (South-Central Tunisian Atlas): Implications for stratigraphic correlations and paleogeographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrouni, Néjib; Houla, Yassine; Soussi, Mohamed; Boughdiri, Mabrouk; Ali, Walid Ben; Nasri, Ahmed; Bouaziz, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Recent geological mapping undertaken in the Southern-Central Atlas of Tunisia led to the discovery of Jurassic ammonite-bearing series in the Jebel Bou Hedma E-W anticline structure. These series represent the Southernmost Jurassic rocks ever documented in the outcrops of the Tunisian Atlas. These series which outcrop in a transitional zone between the Southern Tunisian Atlas and the Chott basin offer a valuable benchmark for new stratigraphic correlation with the well-known Jurassic series of the North-South Axis of Central Tunisia and also with the Jurassic subsurface successions transected by petroleum wells in the study area. The preliminary investigations allowed the identification, within the most complete section outcropping in the center of the structure, of numerous useful biochronological and sedimentological markers helping in the establishment of an updated Jurassic stratigraphic framework chart of South-Western Tunisia. Additionally, the Late Jurassic succession documents syn-sedimentary features such as slumping, erosion and reworking of sediments and ammonite faunas that can be considered as strong witnesses of an important geodynamic event around the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. These stratigraphic and geodynamic new data make of the Jurassic of Jebel Bou Hedma a key succession for stratigraphic correlation attempt between Atlas Tunisian series and those currently buried in the Chott basin or outcropping in the Saharan platform. Furthermore, the several rich-ammonite identified horizons within the Middle and Upper Jurassic series constitute reliable time lines that can be useful for both paleogeographic and geodynamic reconstructions of this part of the North African Tethyan margin but also in the refinement of the potential migration routes for ammonite populations from the Maghrebian Southern Tethys to Arabia.

  16. Prospects for SUSY discovery based on inclusive searches with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The search for Supersymmetry (SUSY) among the possible scenarios of new physics is one of the most relevant goals of the ATLAS experiment running at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. In the present work the expected prospects for discovering SUSY with the ATLAS detector are reviewed, in particular for the first fb -1 of collected integrated luminosity. All studies and results reported here are based on inclusive search analyses realized with Monte Carlo signal and background data simulated through the ATLAS apparatus.

  17. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  19. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Pittsburgh, PA - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  2. EnviroAtlas - New Bedford, MA - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Residents with Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Des Moines, IA - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - Residents with Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Residents with Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - Residents with Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of waterbodies. A potential...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  12. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  14. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Potentially Restorable Wetlands on Agricultural Land - Contiguous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Potentially Restorable Wetlands on Agricultural Land (PRW-Ag) dataset shows potentially restorable wetlands at 30-meter resolution. Beginning two...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Potential Window Views of Water by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has potential views of water bodies. A potential...

  17. IMG-ABC: An Atlas of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters to Fuel the Discovery of Novel Secondary Metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Min; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B.K.; Cimermancic, Peter; Fischbach, Michael; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Pati, Amrita

    2014-10-28

    In the discovery of secondary metabolites (SMs), large-scale analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of relevant computational resources. We present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/) -- An Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system1. IMG-ABC is a rich repository of both validated and predicted biosynthetic clusters (BCs) in cultured isolates, single-cells and metagenomes linked with the SM chemicals they produce and enhanced with focused analysis tools within IMG. The underlying scalable framework enables traversal of phylogenetic dark matter and chemical structure space -- serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules.

  18. EnviroAtlas - Potentially Restorable Wetlands in the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows potentially restorable wetlands at 30 meter resolution. Beginning two centuries ago, many wetlands were turned into farm fields or...

  19. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Residents with Potential Window Views of Trees by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the total block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has little access to potential window views of...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Residents with Potential Window Views of Trees by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the total block group population and the percentage of the block group population that has little access to potential window views of...

  1. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - French

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  2. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Turkish

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  3. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Hebrew

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  4. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Italian

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  5. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - German

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  6. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Japanese

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  7. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Portuguese

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  8. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Czech

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  9. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Dutch

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  10. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Romanian

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  11. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Serbian

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  12. ATLAS Experiment Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00085461

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  13. Physics potential of ATLAS upgrades at HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Marianna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity-Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is expected to start in 2026 and to pro- vide an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb−1 in ten years, a factor 10 more than what will be collected by 2023. This high statistics will allow ATLAS to perform precise measurements in the Higgs sector and improve searches for new physics at the TeV scale. The luminosity needed is L ∼ 7.51034 cm−2 s−1, corresponding to ∼200 additional proton-proton pile- up interactions. To face such harsh environment some sub-detectors of the ATLAS experiment will be upgraded or completely substituted. The performances of the new or upgraded ATLAS sub-detectors are presented, focusing in particular on the new inner tracker and a proposed high granularity time device. The impact of those upgrades on crucial physics measurements for HL-LHC program is also shown.

  14. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Akhnazarov, V; Canepa, A; Bremer, J; Burckhart, H; Cattai, A; Voss, R; Hervas, L; Kaplon, J; Nessi, M; Werner, P; Ten kate, H; Tyrvainen, H; Vandelli, W; Krasznahorkay, A; Gray, H; Alvarez gonzalez, B; Eifert, T F; Rolando, G; Oide, H; Barak, L; Glatzer, J; Backhaus, M; Schaefer, D M; Maciejewski, J P; Milic, A; Jin, S; Von torne, E; Limbach, C; Medinnis, M J; Gregor, I; Levonian, S; Schmitt, S; Waananen, A; Monnier, E; Muanza, S G; Pralavorio, P; Talby, M; Tiouchichine, E; Tocut, V M; Rybkin, G; Wang, S; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Ocariz, J H; Bertoli, W; Malaescu, B; Sbarra, C; Yamamoto, A; Sasaki, O; Koriki, T; Hara, K; Da silva gomes, A; Carvalho maneira, J; Marcalo da palma, A; Chekulaev, S; Tikhomirov, V; Snesarev, A; Buzykaev, A; Maslennikov, A; Peleganchuk, S; Sukharev, A; Kaplan, B E; Swiatlowski, M J; Nef, P D; Schnoor, U; Oakham, G F; Ueno, R; Orr, R S; Abouzeid, O; Haug, S; Peng, H; Kus, V; Vitek, M; Temming, K K; Dang, N P; Meier, K; Schultz-coulon, H; Geisler, M P; Sander, H; Schaefer, U; Ellinghaus, F; Rieke, S; Nussbaumer, A; Liu, Y; Richter, R; Kortner, S; Fernandez-bosman, M; Ullan comes, M; Espinal curull, J; Chiriotti alvarez, S; Caubet serrabou, M; Valladolid gallego, E; Kaci, M; Carrasco vela, N; Lancon, E C; Besson, N E; Gautard, V; Bracinik, J; Bartsch, V C; Potter, C J; Lester, C G; Moeller, V A; Rosten, J; Crooks, D; Mathieson, K; Houston, S C; Wright, M; Jones, T W; Harris, O B; Byatt, T J; Dobson, E; Hodgson, P; Hodgkinson, M C; Dris, M; Karakostas, K; Ntekas, K; Oren, D; Duchovni, E; Etzion, E; Oren, Y; Ferrer, L M; Testa, M; Doria, A; Merola, L; Sekhniaidze, G; Giordano, R; Ricciardi, S; Milazzo, A; Falciano, S; De pedis, D; Dionisi, C; Veneziano, S; Cardarelli, R; Verzegnassi, C; Soualah, R; Ochi, A; Ohshima, T; Kishiki, S; Linde, F L; Vreeswijk, M; Werneke, P; Muijs, A; Vankov, P H; Jansweijer, P P M; Dale, O; Lund, E; Bruckman de renstrom, P; Dabrowski, W; Adamek, J D; Wolters, H; Micu, L; Pantea, D; Tudorache, V; Mjoernmark, J; Klimek, P J; Ferrari, A; Abdinov, O; Akhoundov, A; Hashimov, R; Shelkov, G; Khubua, J; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Glagolev, V; Dedovich, D; Lykasov, G; Zhemchugov, A; Zolnikov, Y; Ryabenko, M; Sivoklokov, S; Vasilyev, I; Shalimov, A; Lobanov, M; Paramoshkina, E; Mosidze, M; Bingul, A; Nodulman, L J; Guarino, V J; Yoshida, R; Drake, G R; Calafiura, P; Haber, C; Quarrie, D R; Alonso, J R; Anderson, C; Evans, H; Lammers, S W; Baubock, M; Anderson, K; Petti, R; Suhr, C A; Linnemann, J T; Richards, R A; Tollefson, K A; Holzbauer, J L; Stoker, D P; Pier, S; Nelson, A J; Isakov, V; Martin, A J; Adelman, J A; Paganini, M; Gutierrez, P; Snow, J M; Pearson, B L; Cleland, W E; Savinov, V; Wong, W; Goodson, J J; Li, H; Lacey, R A; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H; Lanni, F; Nevski, P; Rescia, S; Kierstead, J A; Liu, Z; Yu, W W H; Bensinger, J; Hashemi, K S; Bogavac, D; Cindro, V; Hoeferkamp, M R; Coelli, S; Iodice, M; Piegaia, R N; Alonso, F; Wahlberg, H P; Barberio, E L; Limosani, A; Rodd, N L; Jennens, D T; Hill, E C; Pospisil, S; Smolek, K; Schaile, D A; Rauscher, F G; Adomeit, S; Mattig, P M; Wahlen, H; Volkmer, F; Calvente lopez, S; Sanchis peris, E J; Pallin, D; Podlyski, F; Says, L; Boumediene, D E; Scott, W; Phillips, P W; Greenall, A; Turner, P; Gwilliam, C B; Kluge, T; Wrona, B; Sellers, G J; Millward, G; Adragna, P; Hartin, A; Alpigiani, C; Piccaro, E; Bret cano, M; Hughes jones, R E; Mercer, D; Oh, A; Chavda, V S; Carminati, L; Cavasinni, V; Fedin, O; Patrichev, S; Ryabov, Y; Nesterov, S; Grebenyuk, O; Sasso, J; Mahmood, H; Polsdofer, E; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Liu, H; Hegazy, K H; Benjamin, D P; Zobernig, G; Ban, J; Brooijmans, G H; Keener, P; Williams, H H; Le geyt, B C; Hines, E J; Fadeyev, V; Schumm, B A; Law, A T; Kuhl, A D; Neubauer, M S; Shang, R; Gagliardi, G; Calabro, D; Conta, C; Zinna, M; Jones, G; Li, J; Stradling, A R; Hadavand, H K; Mcguigan, P; Chiu, P; Baldelomar, E; Stroynowski, R A; Kehoe, R L; De groot, N; Timmermans, C; Lach-heb, F; Addy, T N; Nakano, I; Moreno lopez, D; Grosse-knetter, J; Tyson, B; Rude, G D; Tafirout, R; Benoit, P; Danielsson, H O; Elsing, M; Fassnacht, P; Froidevaux, D; Ganis, G; Gorini, B; Lasseur, C; Lehmann miotto, G; Kollar, D; Aleksa, M; Sfyrla, A; Duehrssen-debling, K; Fressard-batraneanu, S; Van der ster, D C; Bortolin, C; Schumacher, J; Mentink, M; Geich-gimbel, C; Yau wong, K H; Lafaye, R; Crepe-renaudin, S; Albrand, S; Hoffmann, D; Pangaud, P; Meessen, C; Hrivnac, J; Vernay, E; Perus, A; Henrot versille, S L; Le dortz, O; Derue, F; Piccinini, M; Polini, A; Terada, S; Arai, Y; Ikeno, M; Fujii, H; Nagano, K; Ukegawa, F; Aguilar saavedra, J A; Conde muino, P; Castro, N F; Eremin, V; Kopytine, M; Sulin, V; Tsukerman, I; Korol, A; Nemethy, P; Bartoldus, R; Glatte, A; Chelsky, S; Van nieuwkoop, J; Bellerive, A; Sinervo, J K; Battaglia, A; Barbier, G J; Pohl, M; Rosselet, L; Alexandre, G B; Prokoshin, F; Pezoa rivera, R A; Batkova, L; Kladiva, E; Stastny, J; Kubes, T; Vidlakova, Z; Esch, H; Homann, M; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Pfeifer, B; Stenzel, H; Andrei, G V; Wessels, M; Buescher, V; Kleinknecht, K; Fiedler, F M; Schroeder, C D; Fernandez, E; Mir martinez, L; Vorwerk, V; Bernabeu verdu, J; Salt, J; Civera navarrete, J V; Bernard, R; Berriaud, C P; Chevalier, L P; Hubbard, R; Schune, P; Nikolopoulos, K; Batley, J R; Brochu, F M; Phillips, A W; Teixeira-dias, P J; Rose, M B D; Buttar, C; Buckley, A G; Nurse, E L; Larner, A B; Boddy, C; Henderson, J; Costanzo, D; Tarem, S; Maccarrone, G; Laurelli, P F; Alviggi, M; Chiaramonte, R; Izzo, V; Palumbo, V; Fraternali, M; Crosetti, G; Marchese, F; Yamaguchi, Y; Hessey, N P; Mechnich, J M; Liebig, W; Kastanas, K A; Sjursen, T B; Zalieckas, J; Cameron, D G; Banka, P; Kowalewska, A B; Dwuznik, M; Mindur, B; Boldea, V; Hedberg, V; Smirnova, O; Sellden, B; Allahverdiyev, T; Gornushkin, Y; Koultchitski, I; Tokmenin, V; Chizhov, M; Gongadze, A; Khramov, E; Sadykov, R; Krasnoslobodtsev, I; Smirnova, L; Kramarenko, V; Minaenko, A; Zenin, O; Beddall, A J; Ozcan, E V; Hou, S; Wang, S; Moyse, E; Willocq, S; Chekanov, S; Le compte, T J; Love, J R; Ciocio, A; Hinchliffe, I; Tsulaia, V; Gomez, A; Luehring, F; Zieminska, D; Huth, J E; Gonski, J L; Oreglia, M; Tang, F; Shochet, M J; Costin, T; Mcleod, A; Uzunyan, S; Martin, S P; Pope, B G; Schwienhorst, R H; Brau, J E; Ptacek, E S; Milburn, R H; Sabancilar, E; Lauer, R; Saleem, M; Mohamed meera lebbai, M R; Lou, X; Reeves, K B; Rijssenbeek, M; Novakova, P N; Rahm, D; Steinberg, P A; Wenaus, T J; Paige, F; Ye, S; Kotcher, J R; Assamagan, K A; Oliveira damazio, D; Maeno, T; Henry, A; Dushkin, A; Costa, G; Meroni, C; Resconi, S; Lari, T; Biglietti, M; Lohse, T; Gonzalez silva, M L; Monticelli, F G; Saavedra, A F; Patel, N D; Ciodaro xavier, T; Asevedo nepomuceno, A; Lefebvre, M; Albert, J E; Kubik, P; Faltova, J; Turecek, D; Solc, J; Schaile, O; Ebke, J; Losel, P J; Zeitnitz, C; Sturm, P D; Barreiro alonso, F; Modesto alapont, P; Soret medel, J; Garzon alama, E J; Gee, C N; Mccubbin, N A; Sankey, D; Emeliyanov, D; Dewhurst, A L; Houlden, M A; Klein, M; Burdin, S; Lehan, A K; Eisenhandler, E; Lloyd, S; Traynor, D P; Ibbotson, M; Marshall, R; Pater, J; Freestone, J; Masik, J; Haughton, I; Manousakis katsikakis, A; Sampsonidis, D; Krepouri, A; Roda, C; Sarri, F; Fukunaga, C; Nadtochiy, A; Kara, S O; Timm, S; Alam, S M; Rashid, T; Goldfarb, S; Espahbodi, S; Marley, D E; Rau, A W; Dos anjos, A R; Haque, S; Grau, N C; Havener, L B; Thomson, E J; Newcomer, F M; Hansl-kozanecki, G; Deberg, H A; Takeshita, T; Goggi, V; Ennis, J S; Olness, F I; Kama, S; Ordonez sanz, G; Koetsveld, F; Elamri, M; Mansoor-ul-islam, S; Lemmer, B; Kawamura, G; Bindi, M; Schulte, S; Kugel, A; Kretz, M P; Kurchaninov, L; Blanchot, G; Chromek-burckhart, D; Di girolamo, B; Francis, D; Gianotti, F; Nordberg, M Y; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Boyd, J; Wilkens, H G; Pauly, T; Fabre, C; Tricoli, A; Bertet, D; Ruiz martinez, M A; Arnaez, O L; Lenzi, B; Boveia, A J; Gillberg, D I; Davies, J M; Zimmermann, R; Uhlenbrock, M; Kraus, J K; Narayan, R T; John, A; Dam, M; Padilla aranda, C; 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Mcgarvie, S A; Kilvington, G J; D'auria, S; O'shea, V; Mcglone, H M; Fox, H; Henderson, R; Kartvelishvili, V; Davies, B; Sherwood, P; Fraser, J T; Lancaster, M A; Tseng, J C; Hays, C P; Apolle, R; Dixon, S D; Parker, K A; Gazis, E; Papadopoulou, T; Panagiotopoulou, E; Karastathis, N; Hershenhorn, A D; Milov, A; Groth-jensen, J; Bilokon, H; Miscetti, S; Canale, V; Rebuzzi, D M; Capua, M; Bagnaia, P; De salvo, A; Gentile, S; Safai tehrani, F; Solfaroli camillocci, E; Sasao, N; Tsunada, K; Massaro, G; Magrath, C A; Van kesteren, Z; Beker, M G; Van den wollenberg, W; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Read, A L; Gjelsten, B K; Banas, E A; Turnau, J; Derendarz, D K; Kisielewska, D; Chesneanu, D; Rotaru, M; Maurer, J B; Wong, M L; Lund-jensen, B; Asman, B; Jon-and, K B; Silverstein, S B; Johansen, M; Alexandrov, I; Iatsounenko, I; Krumshteyn, Z; Peshekhonov, V; Rybaltchenko, K; Samoylov, V; Cheplakov, A; Kekelidze, G; Lyablin, M; Teterine, V; Bednyakov, V; Kruchonak, U; Shiyakova, M M; Demichev, M; Denisov, S P; 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Carlsen, A; Kanwal, B; Cochran jr, J H; Aronnax, M V; Lockner, M J; Zhou, B; Levin, D S; Weaverdyck, C J; Grom, G F; Rudge, A; Ebenstein, W L; Jia, B; Yamaoka, J; Jared, R C; Wu, S L; Banerjee, S; Lu, Q; Hughes, E W; Alkire, S P; Degenhardt, J D; Lipeles, E D; Spencer, E N; Savine, A; Cheu, E C; Lampl, W; Veatch, J R; Roberts, K; Atkinson, M J; Odino, G A; Polesello, G; Martin, T; White, A P; Stephens, R; Grinbaum sarkisyan, E; Vartapetian, A; Yu, J; Sosebee, M; Thilagar, P A; Spurlock, B; Bonde, R; Filthaut, F; Klok, P; Hoummada, A; Ouchrif, M; Pellegrini, G; Rafi tatjer, J M; Navarro, G A; Blumenschein, U; Weingarten, J C; Mueller, D; Graber, L; Gao, Y; Bode, A; Capeans garrido, M D M; Carli, T; Wells, P; Beltramello, O; Vuillermet, R; Dudarev, A; Salzburger, A; Torchiani, C I; Serfon, C L G; Sloper, J E; Duperrier, G; Lilova, P T; Knecht, M O; Lassnig, M; Anders, G; Deviveiros, P; Young, C; Sforza, F; Shaochen, C; Lu, F; Wermes, N; Wienemann, P; Schwindt, T; Hansen, P H; Hansen, J B; Pingel, A M; Massol, N; Elles, S L; Hallewell, G D; Rozanov, A; Vacavant, L; Fournier, D A; Poggioli, L; Puzo, P M; Tanaka, R; Escalier, M A; Makovec, N; Rezynkina, K; De cecco, S; Cavalleri, P G; Massa, I; Zoccoli, A; Tanaka, S; Odaka, S; Mitsui, S; Tomasio pina, J A; Santos, H F; Satsounkevitch, I; Harkusha, S; Baranov, S; Nechaeva, P; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V; Asai, M; Mount, R P; Nelson, T K; Smith, D; Kenney, C J; Malone, C M; Kobel, M; Friedrich, F; Grohs, J P; Jais, W J; O'neil, D C; Warburton, A T; Vincter, M; Mccarthy, T G; Groer, L S; Pham, Q T; Taylor, W J; La marra, D; Perrin, E; Wu, X; Bell, W H; Delitzsch, C M; Feng, C; Zhu, C; Tokar, S; Bruncko, D; Kupco, A; Marcisovsky, M; Jakoubek, T; Bruneliere, R; Aktas, A; Narrias villar, D I; Tapprogge, S; Mattmann, J; Kroha, H; Crespo, J; Korolkov, I; Cavallaro, E; Cabrera urban, S; Mitsou, V; Kozanecki, W; Mansoulie, B; Pabot, Y; Etienvre, A; Bauer, F; Chevallier, F; Bouty, A R; Watkins, P; Watson, A; Faulkner, P J W; Curtis, C J; Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; Sadrozinski, H; Lockman, W S; Martinez-mc kinney, G; Goussiou, A; Jones, A; Lie, K; Hasegawa, Y; Olcese, M; Gilewsky, V; Harrison, P F; Janus, M; Spangenberg, M; De, K; Ozturk, N; Pal, A K; Darmora, S; Bullock, D J; Oviawe, O; Derkaoui, J E; Rahal, G; Sircar, A; Frey, A S; Stolte, P; Rosien, N; Zoch, K; Li, L; Schouten, D W; Catinaccio, A; Ciapetti, M; Delruelle, N; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Hoecker, A; Klioutchnikova, T; Macina, D; Malyukov, S; Spiwoks, R D; Unal, G P; Vandoni, G; Petersen, B A; Pommes, K; Nairz, A M; Wengler, T; Mladenov, D; Solans sanchez, C A; Lantzsch, K; Schmieden, K; Jakobsen, S; Ritsch, E; Sciuccati, A; Alves dos santos, A M; Ouyang, Q; Zhou, M; Brock, I C; Janssen, J; Katzy, J; Anders, C F; Nilsson, B S; Bazan, A; Di ciaccio, L; Yildizkaya, T; Collot, J; Malek, F; Trocme, B S; Breugnon, P; Godiot, S; Adam bourdarios, C; Coulon, J; Duflot, L; Petroff, P G; Zerwas, D; Lieuvin, M; Calderini, G; Laporte, D; Ocariz, J; Gabrielli, A; Ohska, T K; Kurochkin, Y; Kantserov, V; Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  15. Discovery of the Lost Star Catalog of Hipparchus on the Farnese Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    Hipparchus was the greatest astronomer in Antiquity, with part of his reputation being based on his creation of the first star catalog around 129 BC. His star catalog has been since lost, although a few partial star positions are recorded in his only surviving work, the Commentary. Independently, a late Roman statue called the Farnese Atlas (now in Naples) has been known since the Middle Ages which records ancient Greek constellations. This marble statue shows the Titan Atlas kneeling on one knee while hold a large globe (65 cm in diameter) on one shoulder. This globe records 41 constellations accurately placed against a grid of reference circles, including the equator, tropics, colures, Arctic circle, and Antarctic circle. As the constellation positions shift over time (due to precession as discovered by Hipparchus), the position of the constellations on the Titan's globe will reveal the date of observations as ultimately used by the sculptor. Prior brief work on the globe has resulted in dates spread out over six centuries, with recent reviews only concluding that a thorough study is desperately needed. To fill this need, I have taken photographs appropriate for photogrammetry and have measured the positions of 70 points in the constellation figures and transformed these into RA and DEC in the globe's reference frame. A chi-square analysis then shows the date of the constellations to be 125 BC with a one-sigma uncertainty of 55 years. This date points directly at Hipparchus as being the observer and it strongly excludes all candidates that have been proposed over the past century (Aratus at c. 275 BC, Eudoxus at c. 366 BC, the original Assyrian observer at c. 1130 BC, and Ptolemy at AD 128). In addition, a very detailed comparison of the constellation figures and symbols on the Atlas' globe has been made with Hipparchus' Commentary, Aratus' (and Eudoxus') Phaenomena, Eratosthenes' Catasterismi, and Ptolemy's Almagest. I find essentially perfect agreement with

  16. Finding viable models in SUSY parameter spaces with signal specific discovery potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Thomas; Lindroos, Jan Øye; Lipniacka, Anna; Sandaker, Heidi

    2013-08-01

    Recent results from ATLAS giving a Higgs mass of 125.5 GeV, further constrain already highly constrained supersymmetric models such as pMSSM or CMSSM/mSUGRA. As a consequence, finding potentially discoverable and non-excluded regions of model parameter space is becoming increasingly difficult. Several groups have invested large effort in studying the consequences of Higgs mass bounds, upper limits on rare B-meson decays, and limits on relic dark matter density on constrained models, aiming at predicting superpartner masses, and establishing likelihood of SUSY models compared to that of the Standard Model vis-á-vis experimental data. In this paper a framework for efficient search for discoverable, non-excluded regions of different SUSY spaces giving specific experimental signature of interest is presented. The method employs an improved Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme exploiting an iteratively updated likelihood function to guide search for viable models. Existing experimental and theoretical bounds as well as the LHC discovery potential are taken into account. This includes recent bounds on relic dark matter density, the Higgs sector and rare B-mesons decays. A clustering algorithm is applied to classify selected models according to expected phenomenology enabling automated choice of experimental benchmarks and regions to be used for optimizing searches. The aim is to provide experimentalist with a viable tool helping to target experimental signatures to search for, once a class of models of interest is established. As an example a search for viable CMSSM models with τ-lepton signatures observable with the 2012 LHC data set is presented. In the search 105209 unique models were probed. From these, ten reference benchmark points covering different ranges of phenomenological observables at the LHC were selected.

  17. Electron and Photon Reconstruction with the ATLAS Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrevski, J

    2014-01-01

    An excellent performance of the reconstruction of electrons and photons with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is a key component to realize the full physics potential of ATLAS, both in searches for new physics and in precision measurements. For instance, all these played a critical role in the discovery of a Higgs boson, announced by the ATLAS Collaboration in 2012, and in the measurement of its properties. This paper highlights the reconstruction of electrons and photons.

  18. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Chinese (Traditional)

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081027

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  19. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Chinese (Simplified)

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  20. EnviroAtlas - Percent of Each 12-Digit HUC in the Contiguous U.S. with Potentially Restorable Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the percent of each 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) subwatershed in the contiguous U.S. with potentially restorable wetlands. Beginning...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Percent Land Cover with Potentially Restorable Wetlands on Agricultural Land per 12-Digit HUC - Contiguous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the percent land cover with potentially restorable wetlands on agricultural land for each 12-digit Hydrologic Unit (HUC) watershed in...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Annual average potential wind energy resource by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the annual average potential wind energy resource in kilowatt hours per square kilometer per day for each 12-digit Hydrologic Unit...

  3. Computer-aided discovery of antimicrobial agents as potential enoyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase inhibitors. Mohammad A ... shaped conformation of the fatty acyl substrate is guided by ... surface area (PSA) ≤ 140 and rotatable bonds ≤. 10. ... hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and hydrophobic.

  4. Upgrade of ATLAS and CMS for High Luminosity LHC: Detector performance and Physics potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, M.

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is expected to start providing proton-proton collisions by 2026. In the following 10 years it will deliver about 3000 fb −1 of integrated luminosity, more than a factor 10 of the data that will be collected by the end of Run3 at LHC in 2023. For such amount of data, an instantaneous luminosity of ∼ 7.5 × 10 34 cm −2 s −1 is needed. At this luminosity an unprecedented average number of pile-up collision per bunch crossing of 200 is expected. The ATLAS and CMS detectors will be upgraded to fully exploit the HL-LHC potential in this harsh environment. In this document the performances of the ATLAS and CMS upgraded detectors will be described. Their impact on crucial measurements of the Higgs boson sector, of the vector boson fusion process and on new physics searches, will be reported as well.

  5. Examining the Potential of LSST to Contribute to Exoplanet Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Michael B.; Pepper, Joshua; Jacklin, Savannah; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2018-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), currently under construction in Chile with scheduled first light in 2019, will be one of the major sources of data in the next decade and is one of the top priorities expressed in the last Decadal Survey. As LSST is intended to cover a range of science questions, and so the LSST community is still working on optimizing the observing strategy of the survey. With a survey area that will cover half the sky in 6 bands providing photometric data on billions of stars from 16th to 24th magnitude, LSST has the ability to be leveraged to help contribute to exoplanet science. In particular, LSST has the potential to detect exoplanets around stellar populations that are not normally usually included in transiting exoplanet searches. This includes searching for exoplanets around red and white dwarfs and stars in the galactic plane and bulge, stellar clusters, and potentially even the Magellanic Clouds. In probing these varied stellar populations, relative exoplanet frequency can be examined, and in turn, LSST may be able to provide fresh insight into how stellar environment can play a role in planetary formation rates.Our initial work on this project has been to demonstrate that even with the limitations of the LSST cadence, exoplanets would be recoverable and detectable in the LSST photometry, and to show that exoplanets indeed worth including in discussions of variable sources that LSST can contribute to. We have continued to expand this work to examine exoplanets around stars in belonging to various stellar populations, both to show the types of systems that LSST is capable of discovering, and to determine the potential exoplanet yields using standard algorithms that have already been implemented in transiting exoplanet searches, as well as how changes to LSST's observing schedule may impact both of these results.

  6. Discovery potential for directional dark matter detection with nuclear emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, A. M.; NEWSdm Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Direct Dark Matter searches are nowadays one of the most exciting research topics. Several Experimental efforts are concentrated on the development, construction, and operation of detectors looking for the scattering of target nuclei with Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs). In this field a new frontier can be opened by directional detectors able to reconstruct the direction of the WIMP-recoiled nucleus thus allowing to extend dark matter searches beyond the neutrino floor. Exploiting directionality would also give a proof of the galactic origin of dark matter making it possible to have a clear and unambiguous signal to background separation. The angular distribution of WIPM-scattered nuclei is indeed expected to be peaked in the direction of the motion of the Solar System in the Galaxy, i.e. toward the Cygnus constellation, while the background distribution is expected to be isotropic. Current directional experiments are based on the use of gas TPC whose sensitivity is limited by the small achievable detector mass. In this paper we show the potentiality in terms of exclusion limit of a directional experiment based on the use of a solid target made by newly developed nuclear emulsions and read-out systems reaching sub-micrometric resolution.

  7. Neutral Scalar Higgs searches using Vector Boson Fusion at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    De Jong, J K; Pinfold, J L

    2005-01-01

    The Higgs boson is the last undiscovered particle predicted by the Standard Model. Its discovery is key to our understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking process and the origin of mass. The primary purpose of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is the discovery of this particle. This thesis evaluates the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment for a Heavy Neutral Scalar Higgs boson, $\\text{M}_{H} \\ge 170 ~\\text{\\GEVCC}$, produced through vector boson fusion and decaying through the four physics channels : H$\\rightarrow$ZZ$\\rightarrow l^{+}l^{-}$+jj and H$\\rightarrow$WW$\\rightarrow l\

  8. Top quark properties at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Dilip, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS potential for the study of the top quark properties and physics beyond the Standard Model in the top quark sector, is described. The measurements of the top quark charge, the spin and spin correlations, the Standard Model decay (t-> bW), rare top quark decays associated to flavour changing neutral currents (t-> qX with X = gluon, Z, photon) and ttbar resonances are discussed. The sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment is estimated for an expected luminosity of 1fb-1 at the LHC. The full simulation of the ATLAS detector is used. For the Standard Model measurements the expected precision is presented. For the tests of physics beyond the Standard Model, the 5 sigma discovery potential (in the presence of a signal) and the 95% Confidence Level (CL) limit (in the absence of a signal) are given.

  9. Harnessing the potential of natural products in drug discovery from a cheminformatics vantage point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago

    2017-11-15

    Natural products (NPs) present a privileged source of inspiration for chemical probe and drug design. Despite the biological pre-validation of the underlying molecular architectures and their relevance in drug discovery, the poor accessibility to NPs, complexity of the synthetic routes and scarce knowledge of their macromolecular counterparts in phenotypic screens still hinder their broader exploration. Cheminformatics algorithms now provide a powerful means of circumventing the abovementioned challenges and unlocking the full potential of NPs in a drug discovery context. Herein, I discuss recent advances in the computer-assisted design of NP mimics and how artificial intelligence may accelerate future NP-inspired molecular medicine.

  10. An evaluation of the potential of GPUs to accelerate tracking algorithms for the ATLAS trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Baines, JTM; The ATLAS collaboration; Emeliyanov, D; Howard, JR; Kama, S; Washbrook, AJ; Wynne, BM

    2014-01-01

    The potential of GPUs has been evaluated as a possible way to accelerate trigger algorithms for the ATLAS experiment located at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During LHC Run-1 ATLAS employed a three-level trigger system to progressively reduce the LHC collision rate of 20 MHz to a storage rate of about 600 Hz for offline processing. Reconstruction of charged particles trajectories through the Inner Detector (ID) was performed at the second (L2) and third (EF) trigger levels. The ID contains pixel, silicon strip (SCT) and straw-tube technologies. Prior to tracking, data-preparation algorithms processed the ID raw data producing measurements of the track position at each detector layer. The data-preparation and tracking consumed almost three-quarters of the total L2 CPU resources during 2012 data-taking. Detailed performance studies of a CUDA™ implementation of the L2 pixel and SCT data-preparation and tracking algorithms running on a Nvidia® Tesla C2050 GPU have shown a speed-up by a factor of 12 for the ...

  11. Prospects for discovery of single production of vector-like top quarks with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2259461; García Navarro, José Enrique

    The project focuses on studying the expected sensitivity of discovery or exclusion of vector-like top quarks $T$ produced singly at the LHC in the decay channel $T \\rightarrow tZ$, with $Z \\rightarrow \

  12. The future of drug discovery: enabling technologies for enhancing lead characterization and profiling therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R

    2014-08-01

    Technology often serves as a handmaiden and catalyst of invention. The discovery of safe, effective medications depends critically upon experimental approaches capable of providing high-impact information on the biological effects of drug candidates early in the discovery pipeline. This information can enable reliable lead identification, pharmacological compound differentiation and successful translation of research output into clinically useful therapeutics. The shallow preclinical profiling of candidate compounds promulgates a minimalistic understanding of their biological effects and undermines the level of value creation necessary for finding quality leads worth moving forward within the development pipeline with efficiency and prognostic reliability sufficient to help remediate the current pharma-industry productivity drought. Three specific technologies discussed herein, in addition to experimental areas intimately associated with contemporary drug discovery, appear to hold particular promise for strengthening the preclinical valuation of drug candidates by deepening lead characterization. These are: i) hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for characterizing structural and ligand-interaction dynamics of disease-relevant proteins; ii) activity-based chemoproteomics for profiling the functional diversity of mammalian proteomes; and iii) nuclease-mediated precision gene editing for developing more translatable cellular and in vivo models of human diseases. When applied in an informed manner congruent with the clinical understanding of disease processes, technologies such as these that span levels of biological organization can serve as valuable enablers of drug discovery and potentially contribute to reducing the current, unacceptably high rates of compound clinical failure.

  13. Looking for the Charged Higgs Boson - Simulation Studies for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073607

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of a charged Higgs boson (H+) would be an unambiguous sign of physics beyond the Standard Model. This thesis describes preparations for the H+ search with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The H+ discovery potential is evaluated, and tools for H+ searches are developed and refined. The $H^{+} \\to \\tau \

  14. Sensitivity and Discovery Potential of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessandria, F; Ardito, R; Artusa, DR; III, FTA; Azzolini, O; Balata, M; Banks, TI; Bari, G; Beeman, J; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Bloxham, T; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Cai, XZ; Canonica, L; Cao, X; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Carrettoni, M; Casali, N; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, RJ; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; Datskov, V; Biasi, AD; Deninno, MM; Domizio, SD; Vacri, MLD; Ejzak, L; Faccini, R; Fang, DQ; Farach, HA; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Franceschi, MA; Freedman, SJ; Fujikawa, BK; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Goett, J; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Guardincerri, E; Gutierrez, TD; Haller, EE; Han, K; Heeger, KM; Huang, HZ; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kogler, L; Kolomensky, YG; Lenz, D; Li, YL; Ligi, C; Liu, X; Ma, YG; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Martinez, M; Maruyama, RH; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Napolitano, T; Newman, S; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, EB; Nucciotti, A; O' Donnell, T; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, JL; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Piperno, G; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Rampazzo, V; Rimondi, F; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sala, E; Sangiorgio, S; Scielzo, ND; Sisti, M; Smith, AR; Stivanello, F; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Tian, WD; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Ventura, G; Vignati, M; Wang, BS; Wang, HW; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhu, BX; Zucchelli, S

    2017-07-06

    We present a study of the sensitivity and discovery potential of CUORE, a bolometric double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. Two approaches to the computation of experimental sensitivity for various background scenarios are presented, and an extension of the sensitivity formulation to the discovery potential case is also discussed. Assuming a background rate of 10-2 cts/(keV kg y), we find that, after 5 years of live time, CUORE has a 1 sigma sensitivity to the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T$0v\\atop{1/2}$(1θ) = 1.6 \\times 1026 y and thus a potential to probe the effective Majorana neutrino mass down to 40-100 meV; the sensitivity at 1.64 sigma, which corresponds to 90% C.L., will be T$0v\\atop{1/2}$(1.64θ) = 9.5 \\times 1025 y. This range is compared with the claim of observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge and the preferred range of the neutrino mass parameter space from oscillation results.

  15. Atlas of the Colombian coal, Potential map and rank: Map 5-09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulido Gonzalez, Orlando

    1999-01-01

    With the presentation of the Atlas of Coal to scale 1:500.000, it is sought to show to big features the location of the different areas with coal in Colombia, associating with the geologic units, the potential and the range. In the Map 5-09, the formations that include the coal are defined as Umir, Guaduas, Limbo, (Los Cuervos), San Fernando, (Carbonera), defined as Kst, Ksgt and Pgt. For the potential an arbitrary scale settled down, in the following way: in the first place bigger to 1000 million tons; between 1000 and 100; between 100 and 10 and lastly smaller to 10 million tons. These figures are represented in the map by triangles with colors that they are equal before to the figures mentioned. Keeping in mind the scale, it was opted to report the potential in the category of the hypothetical resources; when the resources or reserves are established, they are also reported. As for the range, in the map it is indicated by means of symbols that should be taken as a domain or tendency of the coal in each area in general. The the coal rank understood as the transformation that has reached along the geologic evolution is what is mentioned as anthracitic coal, semi-anthracitic, bituminous low in volatile, bituminous middle in volatile, bituminous high in volatile A, B and C, sub-bituminous and lastly the lignite. For each map are mentioned that there are determined

  16. ATLAS. LHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In Greek mythology, Atlas was a Titan who had to hold up the heavens with his hands as a punishment for having taken part in a revolt against the Olympians. For LHC, the ATLAS detector will also have an onerous physics burden to bear, but this is seen as a golden opportunity rather than a punishment. The major physics goal of CERN's LHC proton-proton collider is the quest for the long-awaited£higgs' mechanism which drives the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the electroweak Standard Model picture. The large ATLAS collaboration proposes a large general-purpose detector to exploit the full discovery potential of LHC's proton collisions. LHC will provide proton-proton collision luminosities at the aweinspiring level of 1034 cm2 s~1, with initial running in at 1033. The ATLAS philosophy is to handle as many signatures as possible at all luminosity levels, with the initial running providing more complex possibilities. The ATLAS concept was first presented as a Letter of Intent to the LHC Committee in November 1992. Following initial presentations at the Evian meeting (Towards the LHC Experimental Programme') in March of that year, two ideas for generalpurpose detectors, the ASCOT and EAGLE schemes, merged, with Friedrich Dydak (MPI Munich) and Peter Jenni (CERN) as ATLAS cospokesmen. Since the initial Letter of Intent presentation, the ATLAS design has been optimized and developed, guided by physics performance studies and the LHC-oriented detector R&D programme (April/May, page 3). The overall detector concept is characterized by an inner superconducting solenoid (for inner tracking) and large superconducting air-core toroids outside the calorimetry. This solution avoids constraining the calorimetry while providing a high resolution, large acceptance and robust detector. The outer magnet will extend over a length of 26 metres, with an outer diameter of almost 20 metres. The total weight of the detector is 7,000 tonnes. Fitted with its end

  17. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Rotational Spectral Modulations in a Low-mass, L-type Brown Dwarf Companion to a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjavacas, Elena; Apai, Dániel; Zhou, Yifan; Karalidi, Theodora; Lew, Ben W. P.; Schneider, Glenn; Cowan, Nicolas; Metchev, Stan; Miles-Páez, Paulo A.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Radigan, Jacqueline; Bedin, Luigi R.; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Observations of rotational modulations of brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets allow the characterization of condensate cloud properties. As of now, rotational spectral modulations have only been seen in three L-type brown dwarfs. We report here the discovery of rotational spectral modulations in LP261-75B, an L6-type intermediate surface gravity companion to an M4.5 star. As a part of the Cloud Atlas Treasury program, we acquired time-resolved Wide Field Camera 3 grism spectroscopy (1.1–1.69 μm) of LP261-75B. We find gray spectral variations with the relative amplitude displaying only a weak wavelength dependence and no evidence for lower-amplitude modulations in the 1.4 μm water band than in the adjacent continuum. The likely rotational modulation period is 4.78 ± 0.95 hr, although the rotational phase is not well sampled. The minimum relative amplitude in the white light curve measured over the whole wavelength range is 2.41% ± 0.14%. We report an unusual light curve, which seems to have three peaks approximately evenly distributed in rotational phase. The spectral modulations suggests that the upper atmosphere cloud properties in LP261-75B are similar to two other mid-L dwarfs of typical infrared colors, but differ from that of the extremely red L-dwarf WISE0047.

  18. Study of the effect of the misalignment of the muon detectors at the ATLAS experiment on the discovery of the Higgs particle H->4mu

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanidis, E

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) detector is one of the four detectors which will be installed in the new accelerator, at LHC, CERN. One of the experiments' research aims is the discovery of the Higgs particle and thus, the confirmation or not of the Standard Model. The Muon Spectrometer of the detector has special importance, because the decay channels of the Higgs particle which have muons at the final state are clear signatures of the existence of the Higgs particle. This project focuses on the Higgs decay through the channel: H->ZZ->4mu. The alignment of the muon detectors has to be very accurate, so that its contribution on the measurement of the muons' momentum, to be low compared to the intrinsic resolution of the detectors themselves. Although the alignment of the muons detectors at the barrel and the end-caps regions is well controlled, the relative alignment of the end-caps with respect to barrel is not controlled with the same accuracy. In this project, we study the influence of such misalignme...

  19. Augmenting collider searches and enhancing discovery potentials through stochastic jet grooming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tuhin S.; Thalapillil, Arun M.

    2017-04-01

    The jet trimming procedure has been demonstrated to greatly improve event reconstruction in hadron collisions by mitigating contamination due initial state radiation, multiple interactions, and event pileup. Meanwhile, Qjets—a nondeterministic approach to tree-based jet substructure—has been shown to be a powerful technique in decreasing random statistical fluctuations, yielding significant effective luminosity improvements. This manifests through an improvement in the significance S /δ B , relative to conventional methods. Qjets also provides novel observables in many cases, like mass-volatility, that could be used to further discriminate between signal and background events. The statistical robustness and volatility observables, for tagging, are obtained simultaneously. We explore here a combination of the two techniques, and demonstrate that significant enhancements in discovery potentials may be obtained in nontrivial ways. We will illustrate this by considering a diboson resonance analysis as a case study, enabling us to interpolate between scenarios where the gains are purely due to statistical robustness and scenarios where the gains are also reinforced by volatility variable discriminants. The former, for instance, is applicable to digluon/diquark resonances, while the latter will be of relevance to di -W±/di -Z0 resonances, where the boosted vector bosons are decaying hadronically and have an intrinsic mass scale attached to them. We argue that one can enhance signal significance and discovery potentials markedly through stochastic grooming, and help augment studies at the Large Hadron Collider and future hadron colliders.

  20. Radiotracer properties determined by high performance liquid chromatography: a potential tool for brain radiotracer discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S.; Lewsey, James; Dewar, Deborah; Pimlott, Sally L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Previously, development of novel brain radiotracers has largely relied on simple screening tools. Improved selection methods at the early stages of radiotracer discovery and an increased understanding of the relationships between in vitro physicochemical and in vivo radiotracer properties are needed. We investigated if high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methodologies could provide criteria for lead candidate selection by comparing HPLC measurements with radiotracer properties in humans. Methods: Ten molecules, previously used as radiotracers in humans, were analysed to obtain the following measures: partition coefficient (Log P); permeability (P m ); percentage of plasma protein binding (%PPB); and membrane partition coefficient (K m ). Relationships between brain entry measurements (Log P, P m and %PPB) and in vivo brain percentage injected dose (%ID); and K m and specific binding in vivo (BP ND ) were investigated. Log P values obtained using in silico packages and flask methods were compared with Log P values obtained using HPLC. Results: The modelled associations with %ID were stronger for %PPB (r 2 =0.65) and P m (r 2 =0.77) than for Log P (r 2 =0.47) while 86% of BP ND variance was explained by K m . Log P values were variable dependant on the methodology used. Conclusions: Log P should not be relied upon as a predictor of blood-brain barrier penetration during brain radiotracer discovery. HPLC measurements of permeability, %PPB and membrane interactions may be potentially useful in predicting in vivo performance and hence allow evaluation and ranking of compound libraries for the selection of lead radiotracer candidates at early stages of radiotracer discovery.

  1. EnviroAtlas - Potential Evapotranspiration 1950 - 2099 for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Climate Scenarios were generated from NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) Downscaled Climate Projections (NEX-DCP30) ensemble averages (the average of over 30...

  2. The battle of Alzheimer's Disease - the beginning of the future Unleashing the potential of academic discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist, Johan; Halldin, Magnus M; Sandin, Johan; Nordvall, Gunnar; Forsell, Pontus; Svensson, Samuel; Jansson, Liselotte; Johansson, Gunilla; Winblad, Bengt; Ekstrand, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, affecting approximately 36 million people worldwide. To date there is no preventive or curative treatment available for AD, and in absence of major progress in therapeutic development, AD manifests a concrete socioeconomic threat. The awareness of the growing problem of AD is increasing, exemplified by the recent G8 Dementia Summit, a meeting held in order to set the stage and steer the compass for the future. Simultaneously, and paradoxically, we have seen key players in the pharmaceutical industry that have recently closed or significantly decreased their R&D spending on AD and other CNS disorders. Given the pressing need for new treatments in this area, other actors need to step-in and enter this drug discovery arena complementing the industrial efforts, in order to turn biological and technological progress into novel therapeutics. In this article, we present an example of a novel drug discovery initiative that in a non-profit setting, aims to integrate with both preclinical and clinical academic groups and pharmaceutical industry to explore the therapeutic potential of new concepts in patients, using novel biology, state of the art technologies and rapid concept testing.

  3. Progress and Potential of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Applied to Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Wisztorski, Maxence; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Mapping provides a direct means to assess the impact of protein biomarkers and puts into context their relevance in the type of cancer being examined. To this end, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was developed to provide the needed spatial information which is missing in traditional liquid-based mass spectrometric proteomics approaches. Aptly described as a "molecular histology" technique, MSI gives an additional dimension in characterizing tumor biopsies, allowing for mapping of hundreds of molecules in a single analysis. A decade of developments focused on improving and standardizing MSI so that the technique can be translated into the clinical setting. This review describes the progress made in addressing the technological development that allows to bridge local protein detection by MSI to its identification and to illustrate its potential in studying various aspects of cancer biomarker discovery.

  4. Fly pupae and puparia as potential contaminants of forensic entomology samples from sites of body discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, M S; Elgar, M A; Briggs, C A; Ranson, D L

    2006-11-01

    Fly pupae and puparia may contaminate forensic entomology samples at death scenes if they have originated not from human remains but from animal carcasses or other decomposing organic material. These contaminants may erroneously lengthen post-mortem interval estimates if no pupae or puparia are genuinely associated with the body. Three forensic entomology case studies are presented, in which contamination either occurred or was suspected. In the first case, blow fly puparia collected near the body were detected as contaminants because the species was inactive both when the body was found and when the deceased was last sighted reliably. The second case illustrates that contamination may be suspected at particularly squalid death scenes because of the likely presence of carcasses or organic material. The third case involves the presence at the body discovery site of numerous potentially contaminating animal carcasses. Soil samples were taken along transects to show that pupae and puparia were clustered around their probable sources.

  5. Cancer Chemoprevention Effects of Ginger and its Active Constituents: Potential for New Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is a commonly used spice and herbal medicine worldwide. Besides its extensive use as a condiment, ginger has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the management of various medical conditions. In recent years, ginger has received wide attention due to its observed antiemetic and anticancer activities. This paper reviews the potential role of ginger and its active constituents in cancer chemoprevention. The phytochemistry, bioactivity, and molecular targets of ginger constituents, especially 6-shogaol, are discussed. The content of 6-shogaol is very low in fresh ginger, but significantly higher after steaming. With reported anti-cancer activities, 6-shogaol can be served as a lead compound for new drug discovery. The lead compound derivative synthesis, bioactivity evaluation, and computational docking provide a promising opportunity to identify novel anticancer compounds originating from ginger.

  6. The Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Commissioning with Cosmic Muons and First LHC Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Trocmé, B

    2008-01-01

    In 2009, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will collide protons with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. ATLAS is a general purpose experiment that will allow to explore the wide potential of discovery and achieve high precision measurements. The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters are presented, with an emphasis on their in situ commissioning using cosmic muons and their response during the first LHC single beam runs on September 2008.

  7. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15 of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest.

  8. Atlas of atomic and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This atlas covers the overall domains of nuclear physics. It uses concrete examples and explanations and takes into consideration the recent research discoveries. A chronological list of main discoveries, scientists and Nobel prices is included. (J.S.)

  9. Improving the ATLAS physics potential with the Fast Track Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Cavaliere, Viviana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Fast TracKer (FTK) is a custom electronics system that will operate at the full Level-1 accept rate, 100 kHz, to provide high quality tracks as input to the High-Level Trigger. The event reconstruction is performed in hardware, thanks to the massive parallelism of associative memories (AM) and FPGAs. We present the advantages for the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment and the recent results on the design, technological advancements and testing of some of the core components used in the processor.

  10. Development and exploration of potential routes of discovery of new superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xiao [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis summarizes our efforts to develop and explore potential routes for the discovery of new superconductors. The development of viable solutions for sulfur-bearing compounds is presented. It also provides the details of searching for quantum critical points (QCPs) and possible superconductors by suppressing ferromagnetic states via chemical substitution and the application of pressure. The ferromagnetism in La(VxCr1-x)Ge3 was successfully suppressed by pressure, and, in addition, a potential QCP at ambient pressure was discovered for x = 0.16. On the other hand, the La(VxCr1-x)Sb3 series is likely to evolve into new magnetic state with V-substitution with the Cr-based magnetism appearing to be more local-moment like than for the case of LaCrGe3. We also performed detailed characterization on BaSn5 superconductor, giving further understanding of its superconducting state, and on R3Ni2-xSn7 and RNi1-xBi2±y series putting to rest spurious claims of superconductivity.

  11. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  12. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  13. Microbial P450 Enzymes in Bioremediation and Drug Discovery: Emerging Potentials and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sukanta S; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2018-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are a structurally conserved but functionally diverse group of heme-containing mixed function oxidases found across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic forms of the microbial world. Microbial P450s are known to perform diverse functions ranging from the synthesis of cell wall components to xenobiotic/drug metabolism to biodegradation of environmental chemicals. Conventionally, many microbial systems have been reported to mimic mammalian P450-like activation of drugs and were proposed as the in-vitro models of mammalian drug metabolism. Recent reports suggest that native or engineered forms of specific microbial P450s from these and other microbial systems could be employed for desired specific biotransformation reactions toward natural and synthetic (drug) compounds underscoring their emerging potential in drug improvement and discovery. On the other hand, microorganisms particularly fungi and actinomycetes have been shown to possess catabolic P450s with unusual potential to degrade toxic environmental chemicals including persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Wood-rotting basidiomycete fungi in particular have revealed the presence of exceptionally large P450 repertoire (P450ome) in their genomes, majority of which are however orphan (with no known function). Our pre- and post-genomic studies have led to functional characterization of several fungal P450s inducible in response to exposure to several environmental toxicants and demonstration of their potential in bioremediation of these chemicals. This review is an attempt to summarize the postgenomic unveiling of this versatile enzyme superfamily in microbial systems and investigation of their potential to synthesize new drugs and degrade persistent pollutants, among other biotechnological applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Using Molecular Docking Analysis to Discovery Dregea sinensis Hemsl. Potential Mechanism of Anticancer, Antidepression, and Immunoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiujie; Shi, Yu; Deng, Yulin; Dai, Rongji

    2017-01-01

    Dregea sinensis Hemsl. plant of the genus Dregea volubilis (Asclepiadaceae), plays a vital role in anticancer, antidepression, and immunoregulation. Steroidal glycosides are the main constituents of this herb, which were significant biological active ingredients. The objective of this study is to recognize the mechanism of anticancer, antidepression, and immunoregulation of D. sinensis Hemsl. Seventy-two steroidal glycosides of D. sinensis Hemsl. were evaluated on the docking behavior of tumor-associated proteins (PI3K, Akt, mTOR), depression-related proteins (MAO-A, MAO-B) and immune-related proteins (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 [TNFR2], interleukin-2Rα [IL-2Rα]) using Discovery Studio version 3.1 (Accelrys, San Diego, USA). The molecular docking analysis revealed that mostly steroidal glycosides of D. sinensis Hemsl. exhibited powerful interaction with the depression-related protein (MAO-A) and the immune-related proteins (TNFR2, IL-2Rα). Some ligands exhibited high binding energy for the tumor-associated proteins (PI3K, Akt, mTOR) and the immune-related protein (TNF-α), but MAO-B showed none interaction with the ligands. This study has paved better understanding of steroidal glycosides from D. sinensis Hemsl. as potential constituents to the prevention of associated cancer, depression and disorders of immunoregulation. The ligand database was consist of 72 steroidal glycosides from Dregea sinensis HemslSteroidal glycosides had the potential to dock with the tumor-associated proteins (PI3K, Akt, mTOR)Steroidal glycosides were bounded with MAO-A rather than MAO-B, accorded with the inhibitor selectivity of MAOs, can be considered as potent candidate inhibitors of MAO-A72 ligands got high interaction with TNFR2 and IL-2Rα, regard the steroidal glycoside as powerful candidate inhibitors of TNFR2 and IL-2Rα. Abbreviations used: PI3K: Phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase; Akt: Protein kinase B; mTOR: Mammalian target of

  15. Atlas of current and potential future distributions of common trees of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha M. Prasad; Betsy J. Hale; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    1999-01-01

    This atlas documents the current and possible future distribution of 80 common tree species in the Eastern United States and gives detailed information on environmental characteristics defining these distributions. Also included are outlines of life history characteristics and summary statistics for these species. Much of the data are derived from Forest Inventory and...

  16. Atlas of the Colombian coal, Potential map and rank: Map 5-09; Atlas de los carbones colombianos. Mapa de potencial y rango: Plancha 5-09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulido Gonzalez, Orlando

    1999-07-01

    With the presentation of the Atlas of Coal to scale 1:500.000, it is sought to show to big features the location of the different areas with coal in Colombia, associating with the geologic units, the potential and the range. In the Map 5-09, the formations that include the coal are defined as Umir, Guaduas, Limbo, (Los Cuervos), San Fernando, (Carbonera), defined as Kst, Ksgt and Pgt. For the potential an arbitrary scale settled down, in the following way: in the first place bigger to 1000 million tons; between 1000 and 100; between 100 and 10 and lastly smaller to 10 million tons. These figures are represented in the map by triangles with colors that they are equal before to the figures mentioned. Keeping in mind the scale, it was opted to report the potential in the category of the hypothetical resources; when the resources or reserves are established, they are also reported. As for the range, in the map it is indicated by means of symbols that should be taken as a domain or tendency of the coal in each area in general. The the coal rank understood as the transformation that has reached along the geologic evolution is what is mentioned as anthracitic coal, semi-anthracitic, bituminous low in volatile, bituminous middle in volatile, bituminous high in volatile A, B and C, sub-bituminous and lastly the lignite. For each map are mentioned that there are determined.

  17. Rational Discovery of (+) (S) Abscisic Acid as a Potential Antifungal Agent: a Repurposing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedr, Mohammed A; Massarotti, Alberto; Mohamed, Maged E

    2018-06-04

    Fungal infections are spreading widely worldwide, and the types of treatment are limited due to the lack of diverse therapeutic agents and their associated side effects and toxicity. The discovery of new antifungal classes is vital and critical. We discovered the antifungal activity of abscisic acid through a rational drug design methodology that included the building of homology models for fungal chorismate mutases and a pharmacophore model derived from a transition state inhibitor. Ligand-based virtual screening resulted in some hits that were filtered using molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations studies. Both in silico methods and in vitro antifungal assays were used as tools to select and validate the abscisic acid repurposing. Abscisic acid inhibition assays confirmed the inhibitory effect of abscisic acid on chorismate mutase through the inhibition of phenylpyruvate production. The repositioning of abscisic acid, the well-known and naturally occurring plant growth regulator, as a potential antifungal agent because of its suggested action as an inhibitor to several fungal chorismate mutases was the main result of this work.

  18. Mining the Proteome of subsp. ATCC 25586 for Potential Therapeutics Discovery: An Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Musaweer Habib

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The plethora of genome sequence information of bacteria in recent times has ushered in many novel strategies for antibacterial drug discovery and facilitated medical science to take up the challenge of the increasing resistance of pathogenic bacteria to current antibiotics. In this study, we adopted subtractive genomics approach to analyze the whole genome sequence of the Fusobacterium nucleatum, a human oral pathogen having association with colorectal cancer. Our study divulged 1,499 proteins of F. nucleatum, which have no homolog's in human genome. These proteins were subjected to screening further by using the Database of Essential Genes (DEG that resulted in the identification of 32 vitally important proteins for the bacterium. Subsequent analysis of the identified pivotal proteins, using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG Automated Annotation Server (KAAS resulted in sorting 3 key enzymes of F. nucleatum that may be good candidates as potential drug targets, since they are unique for the bacterium and absent in humans. In addition, we have demonstrated the three dimensional structure of these three proteins. Finally, determination of ligand binding sites of the 2 key proteins as well as screening for functional inhibitors that best fitted with the ligands sites were conducted to discover effective novel therapeutic compounds against F. nucleatum.

  19. Compact Muon Solenoid Experimental Discovery Potential for Supersymmetry is Same-Charge Di-Lepton Events

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhotin, Yuriy Aleksandrovich

    2010-01-01

    Same-charge di-lepton events provide a very clean experimental signature for Supersymmetry (SUSY) search. This work studies the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment search potential for new physics with same-charge, isolated di-leptons accompanied by jets and large missing transverse energy. The results show that CMS sensitivity for new physics at 7 TeV with integrated luminosity 100 pb$^{−1}$ will exceed current Tevatron limits. Muon detection for SUSY discovery in the forward direction is accomplished using cathode strip chambers (CSC). These detectors identify muons, provide a fast muon trigger, and give a precise measurement of the muon trajectory. There are 468 six-plane CSCs in the system. The efficiency of finding muon trigger primitives (muon track segments) was studied using 36 CMS CSCs and cosmic ray muons during the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) exercise conducted by the CMS experiment in 2006. The efficiency of finding 2-dimensional trigger primitives within 6-layer chambers was foun...

  20. A semiparametric modeling framework for potential biomarker discovery and the development of metabonomic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Dipak K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of biomarkers is an important step towards the development of criteria for early diagnosis of disease status. Recently electrospray ionization (ESI and matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI time-of-flight (TOF mass spectrometry have been used to identify biomarkers both in proteomics and metabonomics studies. Data sets generated from such studies are generally very large in size and thus require the use of sophisticated statistical techniques to glean useful information. Most recent attempts to process these types of data model each compound's intensity either discretely by positional (mass to charge ratio clustering or through each compounds' own intensity distribution. Traditionally data processing steps such as noise removal, background elimination and m/z alignment, are generally carried out separately resulting in unsatisfactory propagation of signals in the final model. Results In the present study a novel semi-parametric approach has been developed to distinguish urinary metabolic profiles in a group of traumatic patients from those of a control group consisting of normal individuals. Data sets obtained from the replicates of a single subject were used to develop a functional profile through Dirichlet mixture of beta distribution. This functional profile is flexible enough to accommodate variability of the instrument and the inherent variability of each individual, thus simultaneously addressing different sources of systematic error. To address instrument variability, all data sets were analyzed in replicate, an important issue ignored by most studies in the past. Different model comparisons were performed to select the best model for each subject. The m/z values in the window of the irregular pattern are then further recommended for possible biomarker discovery. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge this is the very first attempt to model the physical process behind the time-of flight mass

  1. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Dam, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN’s LHC has implemented a dedicated tau trigger system to select hadronically decaying tau leptons from the enormous background of QCD jets. This promises a significant increase in the discovery potential to the Higgs boson and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The three level trigger system has been optimised for effciency and good background rejection. The first level uses information from the calorimeters only, while the two higher levels include also information from the tracking detectors. Shower shape variables and the track multiplicity are important variables to distinguish taus from QCD jets. At the initial lumonosity of 10^31 cm^−2 s^−1, single tau triggers with a transverse energy threshold of 50 GeV or higher can be run standalone. Below this level, the tau signatures will be combined with other event signature

  2. The ATLAS FTK system: how to improve the physics potential with a tracking trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Iizawa, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After a very successful data taking run, the ATLAS experiment is being upgraded to cope with the higher luminosity and higher center of mass energy that the Large Hadron Collider will provide in the next years. The Fast Tracker (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to operate at the level-1 trigger output rate. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memories (AM). FTK provides global track reconstruction in the full inner silicon detector, with resolution comparable to the offline algorithms, in approximately 100 microseconds, allowing a fast and precise detection of the primary and secondary vertex information. The track and vertex information is then used by t...

  3. The ATLAS FTK system: how to improve the physics potential with a tracking trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Iizawa, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a very successful data taking run, the ATLAS experiment [1] is being upgraded to cope with the higher luminosity and higher center of mass energy that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide in the next years. The Fast Tracker (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) form an important part of the system architecture, and the large level of computing power required for pattern recognition is provided by incorporating standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memory (AM). FTK provides global track reconstruction in the full inner silicon detector, with resolution comparable to the offline algorithms, in approximately 100 microseconds, allowing a fast and precise detection of the primary and secondary vertex information. The track and vertex information is then used by the high-level trigger (HLT) algorithms, allowing highly improved tr...

  4. Beyond Standard Model searches with top quarks at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, F.

    2008-01-01

    At the Lhc, the top quark is expected to provide a huge and clean signal. With about eight millions of expected top pairs and three millions of single top events produced per year in the low luminosity runs, and with a low level of backgrounds, the Lhc will open a new opportunity for precision measurements of the top quark properties and for exotic topology searches involving top quarks. As the ATLAS discovery potential on new physics with top quarks is being assessed with many analyses, this paper focuses on two particular topics: heavy neutral resonance and charged Higgs boson searches with top quarks. The analyses and the ATLAS expectations are described.

  5. Searches for the Higgs Boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazini, Rachid

    2007-01-01

    Searching for the Higgs boson lies at the heart of the physics program of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The prospects for Higgs searches with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are reviewed. The discovery potential of most prominent Higgs final states predicted by the Standard Model and the MSSM are reviewed. (Author)

  6. A scientometric prediction of the discovery of the first potentially habitable planet with a mass similar to Earth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Arbesman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The search for a habitable extrasolar planet has long interested scientists, but only recently have the tools become available to search for such planets. In the past decades, the number of known extrasolar planets has ballooned into the hundreds, and with it, the expectation that the discovery of the first Earth-like extrasolar planet is not far off. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we develop a novel metric of habitability for discovered planets and use this to arrive at a prediction for when the first habitable planet will be discovered. Using a bootstrap analysis of currently discovered exoplanets, we predict the discovery of the first Earth-like planet to be announced in the first half of 2011, with the likeliest date being early May 2011. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our predictions, using only the properties of previously discovered exoplanets, accord well with external estimates for the discovery of the first potentially habitable extrasolar planet and highlight the the usefulness of predictive scientometric techniques to understand the pace of scientific discovery in many fields.

  7. A scientometric prediction of the discovery of the first potentially habitable planet with a mass similar to Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbesman, Samuel; Laughlin, Gregory

    2010-10-04

    The search for a habitable extrasolar planet has long interested scientists, but only recently have the tools become available to search for such planets. In the past decades, the number of known extrasolar planets has ballooned into the hundreds, and with it, the expectation that the discovery of the first Earth-like extrasolar planet is not far off. Here, we develop a novel metric of habitability for discovered planets and use this to arrive at a prediction for when the first habitable planet will be discovered. Using a bootstrap analysis of currently discovered exoplanets, we predict the discovery of the first Earth-like planet to be announced in the first half of 2011, with the likeliest date being early May 2011. Our predictions, using only the properties of previously discovered exoplanets, accord well with external estimates for the discovery of the first potentially habitable extrasolar planet and highlight the the usefulness of predictive scientometric techniques to understand the pace of scientific discovery in many fields.

  8. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  9. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    A focused strategy has been directed towards the structural characterization of selected proteins from the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The objective is to exploit the resulting structural data, in combination with ligand-binding studies, and to assess the potential of these proteins for early-stage antimicrobial drug discovery. Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns

  10. Novel approaches to develop community-built biological network models for potential drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikka, Marja; Bukharov, Natalia; Hayes, William S; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Alexopoulos, Leonidas; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-08-01

    Hundreds of thousands of data points are now routinely generated in clinical trials by molecular profiling and NGS technologies. A true translation of this data into knowledge is not possible without analysis and interpretation in a well-defined biology context. Currently, there are many public and commercial pathway tools and network models that can facilitate such analysis. At the same time, insights and knowledge that can be gained is highly dependent on the underlying biological content of these resources. Crowdsourcing can be employed to guarantee the accuracy and transparency of the biological content underlining the tools used to interpret rich molecular data. Areas covered: In this review, the authors describe crowdsourcing in drug discovery. The focal point is the efforts that have successfully used the crowdsourcing approach to verify and augment pathway tools and biological network models. Technologies that enable the building of biological networks with the community are also described. Expert opinion: A crowd of experts can be leveraged for the entire development process of biological network models, from ontologies to the evaluation of their mechanistic completeness. The ultimate goal is to facilitate biomarker discovery and personalized medicine by mechanistically explaining patients' differences with respect to disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy outcome.

  11. Open Innovation Drug Discovery (OIDD): a potential path to novel therapeutic chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvim-Gaston, Maria; Grese, Timothy; Mahoui, Abdelaziz; Palkowitz, Alan D; Pineiro-Nunez, Marta; Watson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The continued development of computational and synthetic methods has enabled the enumeration or preparation of a nearly endless universe of chemical structures. Nevertheless, the ability of this chemical universe to deliver small molecules that can both modulate biological targets and have drug-like physicochemical properties continues to be a topic of interest to the pharmaceutical industry and academic researchers alike. The chemical space described by public, commercial, in-house and virtual compound collections has been interrogated by multiple approaches including biochemical, cellular and virtual screening, diversity analysis, and in-silico profiling. However, current drugs and known chemical probes derived from these efforts are contained within a remarkably small volume of the predicted chemical space. Access to more diverse classes of chemical scaffolds that maintain the properties relevant for drug discovery is certainly needed to meet the increasing demands for pharmaceutical innovation. The Lilly Open Innovation Drug Discovery platform (OIDD) was designed to tackle barriers to innovation through the identification of novel molecules active in relevant disease biology models. In this article we will discuss several computational approaches towards describing novel, biologically active, drug-like chemical space and illustrate how the OIDD program may facilitate access to previously untapped molecules that may aid in the search for innovative pharmaceuticals.

  12. Discovery potential of xenon-based neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in light of small angular scale CMB observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Vidal, J. Muñoz; Peña-Garay, C.

    2013-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has probed an expanded angular range of the CMB temperature power spectrum. Their recent analysis of the latest cosmological data prefers nonzero neutrino masses, with Σm ν = (0.32±0.11) eV. This result, if confirmed by the upcoming Planck data, has deep implications on the discovery of the nature of neutrinos. In particular, the values of the effective neutrino mass m ββ involved in neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) are severely constrained for both the direct and inverse hierarchy, making a discovery much more likely. In this paper, we focus in xenon-based ββ0ν experiments, on the double grounds of their good performance and the suitability of the technology to large-mass scaling. We show that the current generation, with effective masses in the range of 100 kg and conceivable exposures in the range of 500 kg·year, could already have a sizeable opportunity to observe ββ0ν events, and their combined discovery potential is quite large. The next generation, with an exposure in the range of 10 ton·year, would have a much more enhanced sensitivity, in particular due to the very low specific background that all the xenon technologies (liquid xenon, high-pressure xenon and xenon dissolved in liquid scintillator) can achieve. In addition, a high-pressure xenon gas TPC also features superb energy resolution. We show that such detector can fully explore the range of allowed effective Majorana masses, thus making a discovery very likely

  13. SUSY Searches at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Urquijo, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We review the current strategies to search for Supersymmetry (SUSY) with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC. The early data discovery potential will be presented for search channels based on missing transverse momentum from undetected neutralinos and multiple high transverse momentum jets. We describe the search for models of gauge-mediated SUSY breaking for which the next to lightest SUSY particle is a neutralino that decays into a photon and gravitino. Examples of measurement techniques that probe the SUSY mass scale in the first data, through reconstruction of kinematic endpoints, are also shown.

  14. Searches for Supersymmetry in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cervelli, Alberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson in ATLAS first run of data taking, and due to the lack of observation of new physics, searches for new particles such as Supersymmetric states are one of the main area of interest for the general purpose detectors operating at LHC. In this talk we will present a review of the searches for Supersymmetric particles, performed by the ATLAS experiment

  15. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  16. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  17. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2 which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics.

  18. Discovery of potential cholesterol esterase inhibitors using in silico docking studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirumalaisamy Sivashanmugam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available New drug discovery is considered broadly in terms of two kinds of investiga-tional activities such as exploration and exploitation. This study deals with the evaluation of the cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity of flavonoids apigenin, biochanin, curcumin, diosmetin, epipervilline, glycitein, okanin, rhamnazin and tangeritin using in silico docking studies. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -7.08 kcal/mol to -5.64 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard compound gallic acid (-4.11 kcal/mol. Intermolecular energy (-9.13 kcal/mol to -7.09 kcal/mol and inhibition constant (6.48 µM to 73.18 µM of the ligands also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity, these molecular docking analyses could lead to the further develop-ment of potent cholesterol esterase inhibitors for the treatment of obesity.

  19. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Plants as Anti-Microbials for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of traditional medicinal plants for primary health care have steadily increased worldwide in recent years. Scientists are in search of new phytochemicals that could be developed as useful anti-microbials for treatment of infectious diseases. Currently, out of 80% of pharmaceuticals derived from plants, very few are now being used as anti-microbials. Plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites that have found anti-microbial properties. This review highlights the current status of traditional medicine, its contribution to modern medicine, recent trends in the evaluation of anti-microbials with a special emphasis upon some tribal medicine, in vitro and in vivo experimental design for screening, and therapeutic efficacy in safety and human clinical trails for commercial outlet. Many of these commercially available compounds are crude preparations administered without performing human clinical trials. Recent methods are useful to standardize the extraction for scientific investigation of new phytochemicals and anti-microbials of traditionally used plants. It is concluded that once the local ethnomedical preparations of traditional sources are scientifically evaluated before dispensing they should replace existing drugs commonly used for the therapeutic treatment of infection. This method should be put into practice for future investigations in the field of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, ethnobotany and other biological fields for drug discovery.

  1. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, O; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Alexandre, G; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bee, C; Behera, P; Bell, P; Bendel, M; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I, P; Brelier, B; Brooks, W; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Casadei, D; Casado, P; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; De Santo, A; Degenhardt, J; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Diaz, M; Djilkibaev, R; Dobson, E; Dova, M, T; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Faulkner, P J W; Ferland, J; Flacher, H; Fleckner, J E; Flowerdew, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Fratina, S; Fhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Gallacher, M P; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gee, C N P; George, S; Gillman, A R; Goncalo, R; Grabowska-Bold, I; Groll, M; Gringer, C; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hauser, R; Hellman, S; Hidvgi, A; Hillier, S J; Hryn'ova, T; Idarraga, J; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Kalinowski, A; Khoriauli, G; Kirk, J; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Koeneke, K; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kwee, R; Landon, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit, F; Lei, X; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Losada, M; Maettig, S; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Maltrana, D; Marino, C; Masik, J; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Mincer, A; Moa, T; Monticelli, F; Moreno, D; Morris, J D; Mller, F; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nemethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Oltmann, B; Olvito, D; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Parodi, F; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Perez Reale, V; Petersen, B; Pinzon, G; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Prokishin, F; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reinsch, A; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Rodriguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Rhr, F; Saavedra, A; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina Rios, C; Scannicchio, D; Schiavi, C; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schfer, U; Segura, E; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S; Sivoklokov, S; Sjlin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strom, D; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Torrence, E; Tripiana, M; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Vachon, B; Vercesi, V; Vorwerk, V; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Weidberg, T; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Whiteson, D; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wildt, M; Winklmeier, F; Wu, X; Xella, S; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; de Seixas, J M; dos Anjos, A; Asman, B; Özcan, E

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 105 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  2. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igonkina, O; Achenbach, R; Andrei, V; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Bauss, B; Bendel, M; Alexandre, G; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Bogaerts, A; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bee, C; P, Behera; Bell, P; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bohm, C

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 | 10 5 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  3. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; Booth, J.R.A.; Bosman, M.; Boyd, J.; Bracinik, J.; Brawn, I.P.; Brelier, B.; Brooks, W.; Brunet, S.; Bucci, F.; Casadei, D.; Casado, P.; Cerri, A.; Charlton, D.G.; Childers, J.T.; Collins, N.J.; Conde Muino, P.; Coura Torres, R.; Cranmer, K.; Curtis, C.J.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Damazio, D.; Davis, A.O.; De Santo, A.; Degenhardt, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10 5 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  4. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igonkina, O [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Achenbach, R; Andrei, V [Kirchhoff Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Adragna, P [Physics Department, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Aharrouche, M; Bauss, B; Bendel, M [Institut fr Physik, Universitt Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Alexandre, G [Section de Physique, Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Anduaga, X [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Aracena, I [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford (United States); Backlund, S; Bogaerts, A [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Baines, J; Barnett, B M [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom); Bee, C [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, IN2P3-CNRS, Marseille (France); P, Behera [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (United States); Bell, P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Benslama, K [University of Regina, Regina (Canada); Berry, T [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, Egham (United Kingdom); Bohm, C [Fysikum, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-04-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 | 10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  5. The battle of Alzheimer disease - the beginning of the futureUnleashing the potential of academic discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan eLundkvist

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease (AD is the most common form of dementia, affecting approximately 36 million people worldwide. To date there is no preventive or curative treatment available for AD, and in absence of major progress in therapeutic development, AD manifests a concrete socioeconomic threat. The awareness of the growing problem of AD is increasing, exemplified by the recent G8 Dementia Summit, a meeting held in order to set the stage and steer the compass for the future. Simultaneously, and paradoxically, we have seen key players in the pharmaceutical industry that have recently closed or significantly decreased their R&D spending on AD and other CNS disorders. Given the pressing need for new treatments in this area, other actors need to step-in and enter this drug discovery arena complementing the industrial efforts, in order to turn biological and technological progress into novel therapeutics. In this article, we present an example of a novel drug discovery initiative that in a non-profit setting, aims to integrate with both preclinical and clinical academic groups and pharmaceutical industry to explore the therapeutic potential of new concepts in patients, using novel biology, state of the art technologies and rapid concept

  6. The battle of Alzheimer’s Disease – the beginning of the future Unleashing the potential of academic discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist, Johan; Halldin, Magnus M.; Sandin, Johan; Nordvall, Gunnar; Forsell, Pontus; Svensson, Samuel; Jansson, Liselotte; Johansson, Gunilla; Winblad, Bengt; Ekstrand, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, affecting approximately 36 million people worldwide. To date there is no preventive or curative treatment available for AD, and in absence of major progress in therapeutic development, AD manifests a concrete socioeconomic threat. The awareness of the growing problem of AD is increasing, exemplified by the recent G8 Dementia Summit, a meeting held in order to set the stage and steer the compass for the future. Simultaneously, and paradoxically, we have seen key players in the pharmaceutical industry that have recently closed or significantly decreased their R&D spending on AD and other CNS disorders. Given the pressing need for new treatments in this area, other actors need to step-in and enter this drug discovery arena complementing the industrial efforts, in order to turn biological and technological progress into novel therapeutics. In this article, we present an example of a novel drug discovery initiative that in a non-profit setting, aims to integrate with both preclinical and clinical academic groups and pharmaceutical industry to explore the therapeutic potential of new concepts in patients, using novel biology, state of the art technologies and rapid concept testing. PMID:24847271

  7. In Silico discovery of transcription factors as potential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2011-09-19

    Background: Our study focuses on identifying potential biomarkers for diagnosis and early detection of ovarian cancer (OC) through the study of transcription regulation of genes affected by estrogen hormone.Results: The results are based on a set of 323 experimentally validated OC-associated genes compiled from several databases, and their subset controlled by estrogen. For these two gene sets we computationally determined transcription factors (TFs) that putatively regulate transcription initiation. We ranked these TFs based on the number of genes they are likely to control. In this way, we selected 17 top-ranked TFs as potential key regulators and thus possible biomarkers for a set of 323 OC-associated genes. For 77 estrogen controlled genes from this set we identified three unique TFs as potential biomarkers.Conclusions: We introduced a new methodology to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers for OC. This report is the first bioinformatics study that explores multiple transcriptional regulators of OC-associated genes as potential diagnostic biomarkers in connection with estrogen responsiveness. We show that 64% of TF biomarkers identified in our study are validated based on real-time data from microarray expression studies. As an illustration, our method could identify CP2 that in combination with CA125 has been reported to be sensitive in diagnosing ovarian tumors. 2011 Kaur et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. In Silico discovery of transcription factors as potential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep; MacPherson, Cameron R; Schmeier, Sebastian; Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Choolani, Mahesh; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our study focuses on identifying potential biomarkers for diagnosis and early detection of ovarian cancer (OC) through the study of transcription regulation of genes affected by estrogen hormone.Results: The results are based on a set of 323 experimentally validated OC-associated genes compiled from several databases, and their subset controlled by estrogen. For these two gene sets we computationally determined transcription factors (TFs) that putatively regulate transcription initiation. We ranked these TFs based on the number of genes they are likely to control. In this way, we selected 17 top-ranked TFs as potential key regulators and thus possible biomarkers for a set of 323 OC-associated genes. For 77 estrogen controlled genes from this set we identified three unique TFs as potential biomarkers.Conclusions: We introduced a new methodology to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers for OC. This report is the first bioinformatics study that explores multiple transcriptional regulators of OC-associated genes as potential diagnostic biomarkers in connection with estrogen responsiveness. We show that 64% of TF biomarkers identified in our study are validated based on real-time data from microarray expression studies. As an illustration, our method could identify CP2 that in combination with CA125 has been reported to be sensitive in diagnosing ovarian tumors. 2011 Kaur et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Therapeutic potential of the SARMs: revisiting the androgen receptor for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T

    2006-04-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMS) bind to the androgen receptor and demonstrate anabolic activity in a variety of tissues; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents are able to induce bone and muscle growth, as well as shrinking the prostate. The potential of SARMS is to maximise the positive attributes of steroidal androgens as well as minimising negative effects, thus providing therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty and hypogonadism. This review summarises androgen physiology, the current status of the R&D of SARMS and potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs.

  10. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Michael; Oh, Dong-Chan; Clardy, Jon

    2011-01-01

    and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15...... and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding...... phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest....

  11. Appropriate experimental approaches for predicting abuse potential and addictive qualities in preclinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Andy N

    2014-11-01

    Drug abuse is an increasing social and public health issue, putting the onus on drug developers and regulatory agencies to ensure that the abuse potential of novel drugs is adequately assessed prior to product launch. This review summarizes the core preclinical data that frequently contribute to building an understanding of abuse potential for a new molecular entity, in addition to highlighting models that can provide increased resolution regarding the level of risk. Second, an important distinction between abuse potential and addiction potential is drawn, with comments on how preclinical models can inform on each. While the currently adopted preclinical models possess strong predictive validity, there are areas for future refinement and research. These areas include a more refined use of self-administration models to assess relative reinforcement; and the need for open innovation in pursuing improvements. There is also the need for careful scientifically driven application of models rather than a standardization of methodologies, and the need to explore the opportunities that may exist for enhancing the value of physical dependence and withdrawal studies by focusing on withdrawal-induced drug seeking, rather than broad symptomology.

  12. The marine nitrogen cycle: recent discoveries, uncertainties and the potential relevance of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Maren; Bange, Hermann W.; Dippner, Joachim W.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Ward, Bess

    2013-01-01

    The ocean's nitrogen cycle is driven by complex microbial transformations, including nitrogen fixation, assimilation, nitrification, anammox and denitrification. Dinitrogen is the most abundant form of nitrogen in sea water but only accessible by nitrogen-fixing microbes. Denitrification and nitrification are both regulated by oxygen concentrations and potentially produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a climate-relevant atmospheric trace gas. The world's oceans, including the coastal areas and upwelli...

  13. Discovery of Acupoints and Combinations with Potential to Treat Vascular Dementia: A Data Mining Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuwei Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of vascular dementia (VaD is high among the elderly. Acupuncture, a popular therapeutic method in China, can improve memory, orientation, calculation, and self-managing ability in VaD patients. However, in clinical acupuncture and acupuncture research, the selection of acupoints to treat VaD remains challenging. This study aimed to discover acupoints and acupoint combinations with potential for VaD based on data mining. After database searching and screening for articles on clinical trials evaluating the effects of acupuncture on VaD, 238 acupuncture prescriptions were included for further analysis. Baihui (GV 20, Sishencong (EX-HN 1, Fengchi (GB 20, Shuigou (GV 26, and Shenting (GV 24 appeared most frequently in the modern literature and are potential acupoints for VaD. Combinations between Baihui (GV 20, Sishencong (EX-HN 1, Fengchi (GB 20, Shenting (GV 24, Shuigou (GV 26, and Zusanli (ST 36 were most frequent and represent potential combinations for VaD treatment. These results provide a reference for the selection and combination of acupoints to treat VaD in clinical acupuncture and acupuncture research.

  14. Search for high mass resonances in the dimuon channel using the muon spectrometer of the atlas experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helsens, C.

    2009-06-01

    This thesis covers the search of new neutral gauge bosons decaying into a pair of muons in the ATLAS detector. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will produce parton collisions with very high center of mass energy and may produce Z' predicted by many theories beyond the standard model. Such a resonance should be detected by the ATLAS experiment. For the direct search of Z' decaying into two muons, a small number of events is enough for its discovery, which is possible with the first data. We shall study in particular the effects of the muon spectrometer alignment on high p T tracks and on the Z' discovery potential in the ATLAS experiment. The discovery potentials computed with this method have been officially approved by the ATLAS collaboration and published. At the start of the LHC operation, the muon spectrometer alignment will not have reached the nominal performances. This analysis aims at optimizing the discovery potential of ATLAS for a Z' boson in this degraded initial conditions. The impact on track reconstruction of a degraded alignment is estimated with simulated high p T tracks. Results are given in terms of reconstruction efficiency, momentum and invariant mass resolutions, charge identification and sensitivity to discovery or exclusion. With the first data, an analysis using only the muon spectrometer in stand alone mode will be very useful. Finally, a study on how to determine the initial geometry of the spectrometer (needed for its absolute alignment) is performed. This study uses straight tracks without a magnetic field and also calculates the beam time necessary for reaching a given accuracy of the alignment system. (author)

  15. Cure from the cave: volcanic cave actinomycetes and their potential in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheeptham N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic caves have been little studied for their potential as sources of novel microbial species and bioactive compounds with new scaffolds. We present the f irst study of volcanic cave microbiology from Canada and suggest that this habitat has great potential for the isolation of novel bioactive substances. Sample locat ions were plot ted on a contour map that was compiled in ArcView 3.2. Over 400 bacterial isolates were obtained from the Helmcken Falls cave in Wells Gray Provincial Park, British Columbia. From our preliminary screen, of 400 isolates tested, 1% showed activity against extended spectrum ß-lactamase E. coli, 1.75% against Escherichia coli, 2.25% against Acinetobacter baumannii, and 26.50% against Klebsiella pneumoniae. In addition, 10.25% showed activity against Micrococcus luteus, 2% against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 9.25% against Mycobacterium smegmatis, 6.25% Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 7.5% against Candida albicans. Chemical and physical characteristics of three rock wall samples were studied using scanning electron microscopy and f lame atomic absorption spectrometry. Calcium (Ca, iron (Fe, and aluminum (Al were the most abundant components while magnesium (Mg, sodium (Na, arsenic (As, lead (Pb, chromium (Cr, and barium (Ba were second most abundant with cadmium (Cd and potassium (K were the least abundant in our samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed the presence of microscopic life forms in all three rock wall samples. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 82 isolates revealed that 65 (79.3% of the strains belong to the Streptomyces genus and 5 (6.1% were members of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Nocardia and Erwinia genera. Interestingly, twelve (14.6% of the 16S rRNA sequences showed similarity to unidentif ied ribosomal RNA sequences in the library databases, the sequences of these isolates need to be further investigated using the EzTaxon-e database (http://eztaxon-e. ezbiocloud.net/ to determine whether

  16. Anglo-Saxon pharmacopoeia revisited: a potential treasure in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Frances; Pendry, Barbara; Corcoran, Olivia; Sanchez-Medina, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Three of the four major Anglo-Saxon collections reporting medicinal formulations in England from the 10th century, the Old English Herbarium, Bald's Leechbook and the Lacnunga, could contain leads and insights into new medicinal uses. Previous pharmacological studies of medicinal plants mentioned in Anglo-Saxon medical texts suggested that some were effective and led to the identification and isolation of natural compounds. For example, matricin from yarrow Achillea millefolium L., is a proprionic acid analogue that yields chamazulene carboxylic acid with cyclooxygenase-2 activity similar to that of ibuprofen. As we discuss here, multidisciplinary projects could further explore historical texts to discover additional plant metabolites with potential pharmacological applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Discovery and identification of potential biomarkers of pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Ziyou

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a common form of cancer in children. Currently, bone marrow biopsy is used for diagnosis. Noninvasive biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pediatric ALL are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to discover potential protein biomarkers for pediatric ALL. Methods Ninety-four pediatric ALL patients and 84 controls were randomly divided into a "training" set (45 ALL patients, 34 healthy controls and a test set (49 ALL patients, 30 healthy controls and 30 pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Serum proteomic profiles were measured using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (SELDI-TOF-MS. A classification model was established by Biomarker Pattern Software (BPS. Candidate protein biomarkers were purified by HPLC, identified by LC-MS/MS and validated using ProteinChip immunoassays. Results A total of 7 protein peaks (9290 m/z, 7769 m/z, 15110 m/z, 7564 m/z, 4469 m/z, 8937 m/z, 8137 m/z were found with differential expression levels in the sera of pediatric ALL patients and controls using SELDI-TOF-MS and then analyzed by BPS to construct a classification model in the "training" set. The sensitivity and specificity of the model were found to be 91.8%, and 90.0%, respectively, in the test set. Two candidate protein peaks (7769 and 9290 m/z were found to be down-regulated in ALL patients, where these were identified as platelet factor 4 (PF4 and pro-platelet basic protein precursor (PBP. Two other candidate protein peaks (8137 and 8937 m/z were found up-regulated in the sera of ALL patients, and these were identified as fragments of the complement component 3a (C3a. Conclusion Platelet factor (PF4, connective tissue activating peptide III (CTAP-III and two fragments of C3a may be potential protein biomarkers of pediatric ALL and used to distinguish pediatric ALL patients from healthy controls and pediatric AML patients. Further studies with

  18. Discovery and identification of potential biomarkers of pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linan; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Peng; Feng, Kai; Li, Jing; Xie, Zhensheng; Xue, Peng; Cai, Tanxi; Cui, Ziyou; Chen, Xiulan; Hou, Junjie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yang, Fuquan

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a common form of cancer in children. Currently, bone marrow biopsy is used for diagnosis. Noninvasive biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pediatric ALL are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to discover potential protein biomarkers for pediatric ALL. Methods Ninety-four pediatric ALL patients and 84 controls were randomly divided into a "training" set (45 ALL patients, 34 healthy controls) and a test set (49 ALL patients, 30 healthy controls and 30 pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients). Serum proteomic profiles were measured using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (SELDI-TOF-MS). A classification model was established by Biomarker Pattern Software (BPS). Candidate protein biomarkers were purified by HPLC, identified by LC-MS/MS and validated using ProteinChip immunoassays. Results A total of 7 protein peaks (9290 m/z, 7769 m/z, 15110 m/z, 7564 m/z, 4469 m/z, 8937 m/z, 8137 m/z) were found with differential expression levels in the sera of pediatric ALL patients and controls using SELDI-TOF-MS and then analyzed by BPS to construct a classification model in the "training" set. The sensitivity and specificity of the model were found to be 91.8%, and 90.0%, respectively, in the test set. Two candidate protein peaks (7769 and 9290 m/z) were found to be down-regulated in ALL patients, where these were identified as platelet factor 4 (PF4) and pro-platelet basic protein precursor (PBP). Two other candidate protein peaks (8137 and 8937 m/z) were found up-regulated in the sera of ALL patients, and these were identified as fragments of the complement component 3a (C3a). Conclusion Platelet factor (PF4), connective tissue activating peptide III (CTAP-III) and two fragments of C3a may be potential protein biomarkers of pediatric ALL and used to distinguish pediatric ALL patients from healthy controls and pediatric AML patients. Further studies with additional

  19. Multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Fang, A; Nguyen, B T; Raphel, J K; Jagannathan, L; Raghavan, R; Bryan, R N; Miller, G A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of developing multiple, complementary, fully labeled electronic brain atlases and an atlas-based neuroimaging system for analysis, quantification, and real-time manipulation of cerebral structures in two and three dimensions, we have digitized, enhanced, segmented, and labeled the following print brain atlases: Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain by Talairach and Tournoux, Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren, Referentially Oriented Cerebral MRI Anatomy by Talairach and Tournoux, and Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci by Ono, Kubik, and Abernathey. Three-dimensional extensions of these atlases have been developed as well. All two- and three-dimensional atlases are mutually preregistered and may be interactively registered with an actual patient's data. An atlas-based neuroimaging system has been developed that provides support for reformatting, registration, visualization, navigation, image processing, and quantification of clinical data. The anatomical index contains about 1,000 structures and over 400 sulcal patterns. Several new applications of the brain atlas database also have been developed, supported by various technologies such as virtual reality, the Internet, and electronic publishing. Fusion of information from multiple atlases assists the user in comprehensively understanding brain structures and identifying and quantifying anatomical regions in clinical data. The multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system have substantial potential impact in stereotactic neurosurgery and radiotherapy by assisting in visualization and real-time manipulation in three dimensions of anatomical structures, in quantitative neuroradiology by allowing interactive analysis of clinical data, in three-dimensional neuroeducation, and in brain function studies.

  20. Potential Use of American College of Radiology BI-RADS Mammography Atlas for Reporting and Assessing Lesions Detected on Dedicated Breast CT Imaging: Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hae Kyoung; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Kim, Keum Won; Choi, Na Mi; Kim, Hye Jeong; Langman, Eun Lee; Yoon, Sora; Steen, Doreen; Zeng, Donglin; Gao, Fei

    2017-11-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (DBCT) is an emerging and promising modality for breast lesions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential use of applying the BI-RADS Mammography Atlas 5th Edition for reporting and assessing breast lesions on DBCT. Currently, no atlas exists for DBCT. Four radiologists trained in breast imaging were recruited in this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study. The enrolled radiologists, who were blinded to mammographic and histopathologic findings, individually reviewed 30 randomized DBCT cases that contained marked lesions. Thirty-four lesions were included in this study: 24 (70.6%) masses, 7 (20.6%) calcifications, and 3 (8.8%) architectural distortions. Eight (23.5%) lesions were malignant and 26 (76.5%) were benign. The reader was asked to specify according to the BI-RADS Mammography Atlas for each marked DBCT lesion: primary findings, features, breast density, and final assessment. We calculated readers' diagnostic performances for differentiating between benign and malignant lesions and interobserver variability for reporting and assessing lesions using a generalized estimating equation and the Fleiss kappa (κ) statistic. The estimated overall sensitivity of the readers was 0.969, and the specificity was 0.529. There were no significant differences in the sensitivity and the specificity between lesion types. For reporting the presence of a primary finding, the overall substantial agreement (κ = 0.70) was seen. In assigning the breast density and the final assessment, the overall agreement was moderate (κ = 0.53) and fair (κ = 0.30). The use of the BI-RADS Mammography Atlas 5th Edition for DBCT showed high performance and good agreement among readers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Renewable energies 2020. Potential atlas Germany; Erneuerbare Energien 2020. Potenzialatlas Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Janine; Muehlenhoff, Joerg

    2009-11-15

    A future energy policy equally has to pursue environmental protection and climate protection, economic efficiency as well as supply security. Renewable energies substantially contribute to this. In the last decade, the Federal Government of Germany showed that a strong development of renewable energies is possible within a short time. For the year 2020, the industry prognosticates an amount of the renewable energies of 47 % at the consumption of electricity, 25 % at the heat consumption, and 22 % at the fuel consumption in the traffic. The contribution under consideration shows that the surface which is needed for this is small. Depending upon climate, landscape, settlement structure and agrarian structure, each region offers its own different potentials.

  2. Renewable energies 2020. Potential atlas Germany. 2. ed.; Erneuerbare Energien 2020. Potenzialatlas Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Janine; Muehlenhoff, Joerg

    2010-02-15

    A future energy policy equally has to pursue environmental protection and climate protection, economic efficiency as well as supply security. Renewable energies substantially contribute to this. In the last decade, the Federal Government of Germany showed that a strong development of renewable energies is possible within a short time. For the year 2020, the industry prognosticates an amount of the renewable energies of 47% at the consumption of electricity, 25% at the heat consumption, and 22% at the fuel consumption in the traffic. The contribution under consideration shows that the surface which is needed for this is small. Depending upon climate, landscape, settlement structure and agrarian structure, each region offers its own different potentials.

  3. Assessment and evaluation of geothermal potential in Switzerland; Atlas des ressources geothermiques suisses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andenmatten-Berthoud, N. [Geowatt AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Kohl, T. [Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Institut de Geophysique, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy presents the first part of a project that aims at assessing the geothermal energy potential of Switzerland's underground. Due to the presence of the Alps the Swiss underground is highly heterogeneous with numerous geologic faults. Geothermal energy assessment has to be carried out region after region. The first steps consisted in collecting existing geological and hydrogeological data and finding out the best appropriate methodology. Analysis was restricted to the Northwest of Switzerland (Basle-Zurich area), which has a dense population - an important factor for future applications - and is better known than others, thanks to previous studies performed in conjunction with site pre-selection for future radioactive waste disposal facilities. In this area, sandstones and limestones are found on the crystalline bottom rock. Mathematical models and computer codes were developed for interpolation and extrapolation of local and regional data. Three dimensional finite-element techniques were used. The results are presented in diagrams and maps.

  4. The ATLAS TDAQ DataCollection Software

    CERN Document Server

    Haeberli, C; Pretzl, K

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, which is currently under construction at CERN near Geneva, will collide protons with a center-of-mass energy of 14TeV. This high energy offers the possibility to discover particles with masses on the TeV scale. Bunches of 1.15 10^11 protons will cross at a rate of 40 MHz. 23 proton-proton collisions will happen at every bunch-crossing, which results in a total proton-proton interaction rate of almost one GHz. The biggest part of these interactions do not contain new physics but mostly QCD background. Therefore the detectors to discovery physics, such as ATLAS, need to select the ~100 bunch-crossings with the biggest discovery potential out of the 40 10^6 bunch-crossings per second. In case of the ATLAS experiment this reduction will be achieved on a three level trigger system. The first level trigger runs on custom hardware, the two higher trigger levels run as software algorithms on farms of hundreds of commodity PCs. The second level trigger will run at a rate of up to 100 kHz on ...

  5. Computational science and re-discovery: open-source implementation of ellipsoidal harmonics for problems in potential theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Knepley, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    We present two open-source (BSD) implementations of ellipsoidal harmonic expansions for solving problems of potential theory using separation of variables. Ellipsoidal harmonics are used surprisingly infrequently, considering their substantial value for problems ranging in scale from molecules to the entire solar system. In this paper, we suggest two possible reasons for the paucity relative to spherical harmonics. The first is essentially historical—ellipsoidal harmonics developed during the late 19th century and early 20th, when it was found that only the lowest-order harmonics are expressible in closed form. Each higher-order term requires the solution of an eigenvalue problem, and tedious manual computation seems to have discouraged applications and theoretical studies. The second explanation is practical: even with modern computers and accurate eigenvalue algorithms, expansions in ellipsoidal harmonics are significantly more challenging to compute than those in Cartesian or spherical coordinates. The present implementations reduce the 'barrier to entry' by providing an easy and free way for the community to begin using ellipsoidal harmonics in actual research. We demonstrate our implementation using the specific and physiologically crucial problem of how charged proteins interact with their environment, and ask: what other analytical tools await re-discovery in an era of inexpensive computation?

  6. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S., E-mail: Sergio.Gonzalez.Sevilla@cern.ch [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Barbier, G. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Anghinolfi, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cadoux, F.; Clark, A. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Dabrowski, W.; Dwuznik, M. [AGH University of Sceince and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Ferrere, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Garcia, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ikegami, Y. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hara, K. [University of Tsukuba, School of Pure and Applied Sciences, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Jakobs, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Kaplon, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Koriki, T. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Lacasta, C. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); La Marra, D. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Marti i Garcia, S. [IFIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (CSIC-Universitat de Valencia), Edificio Investigacion Paterna, Apartado 22085 46071 Valencia (Spain); Parzefall, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pohl, M. [DPNC, University of Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Terada, S. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-04-21

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown.

  7. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Belinda A., E-mail: Belinda.Campbell@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Simoens, Nathalie [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Everitt, Sarah [Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Burbury, Kate [Department of Haematology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); MacManus, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  8. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Belinda A.; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required

  9. Charged Higgs boson searches and SemiConductor Tracker commissioning for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mohn, Bjarte Alsaker

    The ATLAS (A Toroidal Lhc ApparatuS) experiment is one of four major experiments presently being installed at the upcoming Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) outside Geneva. In this thesis we present work done on both the simulation of the ATLAS physics potential for a charged Higgs boson and the construction of the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) - a subdetector within the ATLAS Inner Detector. The discovery of a charged Higgs boson would be an unambiguous sign of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) and it is thus of great interest to study the ATLAS potential for a charged Higgs discovery. Two such studies have been conducted for this thesis. In the first study a large-mass-splitting Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is assumed in which the charged Higgs boson decays into a W boson and a neutral Higgs may receive a large branching ratio.We conclude, however, that charged Higgs searches in this decay channel are made difficult by a large irreducible SM ba...

  10. Search of new Z' resonances in the dielectron channel with the Atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.

    2008-11-01

    This thesis covers the search and identification of new neutral gauge bosons decaying into an electron pair with the ATLAS detector. The Large Hadron Collider at CERN will produce partons collisions with very high center of mass energy and may produce Z' predicted by many theories beyond the standard model. Such a resonance should be detected by the ATLAS experiment. Z' studies will be done in two part: searching for a new resonance and identifying the new particle properties and the underlying theory. If the discovery part will consist in looking for a deviation between standard model prediction end experimental data, the underlying theory can only be probed by studying the Z' phenomenology. Thus, in order to estimate the ATLAS discovery potential, the dielectron invariant mass spectrum was studied for several models with extra-dimensions or coming from grand unified theories. To perform these studies, a model independent parametrization of the dielectron invariant mass shape has been developed. The discovery potentials computed with this method have been officially approved by the ATLAS collaboration and published. We have shown that an integrated luminosity of 10 fb -1 is sufficient to discover such new resonances at a mass below 3 TeV. In addition to the estimation of the discovery potential, a study based on the Z' rapidity spectrum has been conducted in order to demonstrate the interest of this observable in the discrimination of the different theoretical models predicting new spin 1 resonances. For a luminosity of 100 fb -1 , our study shows that the rapidity could be an interesting observable for the identification of Z'

  11. Physics Prospects at the HL-LHC with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anna Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC aims to provide a total integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 from p-p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV over the course of $\\sim$ 10 years, reaching instantaneous luminosities of up to L = 7.5 $\\times$ 1034cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, corresponding to an average ($\\mu$) of 200 inelastic p-p collisions per bunch crossing. The upgraded ATLAS detector must be able to cope well with increased occupancies and data rates. The performance of the upgrade has been estimated in full simulation studies, assuming expected HL-LHC conditions and a detector configuration intended to maximise physics performance and discovery potential at the HL-LHC. The performance is expected to be similar to what we have now. Simulation studies have been carried out to evaluate the prospects of various benchmark physics analyses to be performed using the upgraded ATLAS detector with the full HL-LHC dataset.

  12. Evaluation of the discovery potential of an underwater Mediterranean neutrino telescope taking into account the estimated directional resolution and energy of the reconstructed tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisos, A.; Tsirigotis, A.G.; Tzamarias, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the development of search methods for point-like and extended neutrino sources, utilizing the tracking and energy estimation capabilities of an underwater, Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescope (VLVnT). We demonstrate that the developed techniques offer a significant improvement on the telescope's discovery potential. We also present results on the potential of the Mediterranean KM3NeT to discover galactic neutrino sources

  13. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 1 - ATLAS: ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN is one of the largest and most complex scientific endeavours ever assembled. The detector, located at collision point 1 of the LHC, is designed to explore the fundamental components of nature and to study the forces that shape our universe. The past year’s discovery of a Higgs boson is one of the most important scientific achievements of our time, yet this is only one of many key goals of ATLAS. During a brief break in their journey, some of the 3000-member ATLAS collaboration will be taking time to share the excitement of this exploration with you. On surface no restricted access  The exhibit at Point 1 will give visitors a chance to meet these modern-day explorers and to learn from them how answers to the most fundamental questions of mankind are being sought. Activities will include a visit to the ATLAS detector, located 80m below ground; watching the prize-winning ATLAS movie in the ATLAS cinema; seeing real particle tracks in a cloud chamber and discussi...

  14. Solar energy potential atlas for planning energy system off-grid electrification in the Republic of Djibouti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillot, Benjamin; Muselli, Marc; Poggi, Philippe; Haurant, Pierrick; Hared, Idriss

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► First disaggregated solar atlas of Djibouti from satellite data. ► Supply energy to remote populations by using solar systems requires planning. ► Assessment of the O and SI SAF SSI satellite-based radiation model accuracy. ► Implementation of a DEM-based disaggregation methodology. ► Establishment of a solar radiation atlas for Djibouti energy management. - Abstract: Nowadays, energy supply of rural populations is one of the most important challenges in African developing countries, and more particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. With only one third of the population connected to the grid and the high economical and environmental cost of classical energy resources, the use of renewable energies within the rural energy supply pattern is a reliable alternative solution to improve human development of remote populations. Djibouti is a little poor country of Sub-Saharan Africa which perfectly symbolizes this way of life. Electrification rate is only about 30% and the important scattering of rural peoples throughout the country makes grid extension and fuel transportation unsuitable economic solutions to carry energy. The geographically diffused solar resource can therefore be an interesting mean to produce energy where it is consumed. The aim of this study was the creation of the first Djibouti’s global horizontal irradiation atlas, including assessment and improvement. To realize this atlas, a satellite-derived irradiance model was used (EUMETSAT O and SI SAF). To validate this model over Djibouti, we installed two temporary weather stations during the year 2010 in Djibouti-city and Dikhil and we compared hourly, daily and monthly irradiation estimates against ground-based measurements. Results showed a good agreement between measures and estimates, with a maximum Relative Root Mean Squared Error (RRMSE) over the hourly solar atlas of 12.43% and 15.44%, for Dikhil and Djibouti-city respectively. In order to improve geographic information and

  15. Probing TeV gravity with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lendermann, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Models with compactified extra space dimensions offer a new way to address outstanding problems in and beyond the Standard Model. In these models, the strength of gravity is strongly increased at small distances, which opens up the possibility of observing quantum gravity effects in the TeV energy range reachable by the LHC. One of the most spectacular phenomena would be the production of microscopic black holes. Searches for black holes are foreseen in the ATLAS experiment with the start-up of data taking in 2009. We present feasibility studies for the triggering, selection and reconstruction of the black hole event topologies, the black hole discovery potential and their identification.

  16. LUCID: the ATLAS Luminosity Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of luminosity is a key component of the ATLAS program: its uncertainty is a systematics for all cross-section measurements, from Standard Model processes to new discoveries, and for some precise measurements it can be dominant. To be predictive a precision compatible with PDF uncertainty ( 1-2%) is desired. LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) is sensitive to charged particles generated by the pp collisions. It is the only ATLAS dedicated detector for this purpose and the referred one during the second run of LHC data taking.

  17. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  18. Finding potentially new multimorbidity patterns of psychiatric and somatic diseases: exploring the use of literature-based discovery in primary care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Rein; Aarts, Sil; van Mulligen, Erik; Metsemakers, Job; van Boxtel, Martin P; Verhey, Frans; van den Akker, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of two or more chronic medical conditions within a single individual, is increasingly becoming part of daily care of general medical practice. Literature-based discovery may help to investigate the patterns of multimorbidity and to integrate medical knowledge for improving healthcare delivery for individuals with co-occurring chronic conditions. To explore the usefulness of literature-based discovery in primary care research through the key-case of finding associations between psychiatric and somatic diseases relevant to general practice in a large biomedical literature database (Medline). By using literature based discovery for matching disease profiles as vectors in a high-dimensional associative concept space, co-occurrences of a broad spectrum of chronic medical conditions were matched for their potential in biomedicine. An experimental setting was chosen in parallel with expert evaluations and expert meetings to assess performance and to generate targets for integrating literature-based discovery in multidisciplinary medical research of psychiatric and somatic disease associations. Through stepwise reductions a reference set of 21,945 disease combinations was generated, from which a set of 166 combinations between psychiatric and somatic diseases was selected and assessed by text mining and expert evaluation. Literature-based discovery tools generate specific patterns of associations between psychiatric and somatic diseases: one subset was appraised as promising for further research; the other subset surprised the experts, leading to intricate discussions and further eliciting of frameworks of biomedical knowledge. These frameworks enable us to specify targets for further developing and integrating literature-based discovery in multidisciplinary research of general practice, psychology and psychiatry, and epidemiology.

  19. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  20. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  1. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  2. Identification of b-jets and investigation of the discovery potential of a Higgs boson in the $WH --> l \

    CERN Document Server

    Piacquadio, Giacinto

    2010-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes three of the four known fundamental interactions between the elementary particles: the electromagnetic, weak and strong forces.It provides an extremely accurate description of the electroweak interactions up to the energy scales so far explored in high energy physics experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is presently starting to operate, will provide proton-proton collisions with an unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 14~{\\rm TeV}$ and with instantaneous luminosities of up to $10^{34}~{\\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$, and is therefore ideally suited to explore the TeV energy domain. Two multipurpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, were built to analyse the collisions. The high instantaneous luminosities achievable at the LHC will result in a significant contamination of the signal processes by additional soft proton-proton collisions, usually known as pile-up interactions. In the course of this thesis several algorithms were developed for the ATLAS...

  3. ATLAS Grid Workflow Performance Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The CERN ATLAS experiment grid workflow system manages routinely 250 to 500 thousand concurrently running production and analysis jobs to process simulation and detector data. In total more than 300 PB of data is distributed over more than 150 sites in the WLCG. At this scale small improvements in the software and computing performance and workflows can lead to significant resource usage gains. ATLAS is reviewing together with CERN IT experts several typical simulation and data processing workloads for potential performance improvements in terms of memory and CPU usage, disk and network I/O. All ATLAS production and analysis grid jobs are instrumented to collect many performance metrics for detailed statistical studies using modern data analytics tools like ElasticSearch and Kibana. This presentation will review and explain the performance gains of several ATLAS simulation and data processing workflows and present analytics studies of the ATLAS grid workflows.

  4. Baby brain atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Kenichi; Chang, Linda; Huang, Hao

    2018-04-03

    The baby brain is constantly changing due to its active neurodevelopment, and research into the baby brain is one of the frontiers in neuroscience. To help guide neuroscientists and clinicians in their investigation of this frontier, maps of the baby brain, which contain a priori knowledge about neurodevelopment and anatomy, are essential. "Brain atlas" in this review refers to a 3D-brain image with a set of reference labels, such as a parcellation map, as the anatomical reference that guides the mapping of the brain. Recent advancements in scanners, sequences, and motion control methodologies enable the creation of various types of high-resolution baby brain atlases. What is becoming clear is that one atlas is not sufficient to characterize the existing knowledge about the anatomical variations, disease-related anatomical alterations, and the variations in time-dependent changes. In this review, the types and roles of the human baby brain MRI atlases that are currently available are described and discussed, and future directions in the field of developmental neuroscience and its clinical applications are proposed. The potential use of disease-based atlases to characterize clinically relevant information, such as clinical labels, in addition to conventional anatomical labels, is also discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. HiggsToFourLeptonsEV in the ATLAS EventView Analysis Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Lagouri, T; Del Peso, J

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. This experiment has been designed to study a large range of physics topics, including searches for previously unobserved phenomena such as the Higgs Boson and super-symmetry. The physics analysis package HiggsToFourLeptonsEV for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs to four leptons channel with ATLAS is presented. The physics goal is to investigate with the ATLAS detector, the SM Higgs boson discovery potential through its observation in the four-lepton (electron and muon) final state. HiggsToFourLeptonsEV is based on the official ATLAS software ATHENA and the EventView (EV) analysis framework. EventView is a highly flexible and modular analysis framework in ATHENA and it is one of several analysis schemes for ATLAS physics user analysis. At the core of the EventView is the representative "view" of an event, which defines the contents of event data suitable for event-level physics analysis. The HiggsToFourLeptonsEV package, presented in ...

  6. ATLAS Installation: Building a Modern-day "Ship in a Bottle"

    CERN Multimedia

    Eisenstein, R

    By now, almost everyone connected with the ATLAS project is aware of its tremendously exciting discovery potential for physics. ATLAS is designed both to search for an as-yet-undiscovered piece of the Standard Model - the Higgs boson - as well as to search for indications of possible new physics - such as Supersymmetry - that lie beyond it. It is just this excitement that has propelled more than 2000 physicists, engineers, technical workers and students from all over the world to commit a significant part of their research careers to this massive undertaking. As the sub-detector components of ATLAS continue to arrive regularly here at CERN, the magnitude - and the quality - of that commitment has become very real. Actual objects exist, in building 180 and other places around the CERN site, waiting for installation into the ATLAS cavern, UX15. That installation will begin next April when ATLAS takes delivery of the experimental hall and associated other buildings and underground structures at Point 1. Indeed,...

  7. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  8. Physics potential and experimental challenges of the LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gianotti, F.; Virdee, T.; Abdullin, S.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.; Barberis, D.; Belyaev, A.; Bloch, P.; Bosman, M.; Casagrande, L.; Cavalli, D.; Chumney, Pamela R.K.; Cittolin, S.; Dasu, S.; De Roeck, A.; Ellis, N.; Farthouat, P.; Fournier, D.; Hansen, J.B.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Huhtinen, M.; Jakobs, K.; Joram, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mikenberg, G.; Miagkov, A.; Moretti, M.; Moretti, S.; Niinikoski, T.; Nikitenko, A.; Nisati, A.; Paige, F.; Palestini, S.; Papadopoulos, C.G.; Piccinini, F.; Pittau, R.; Polesello, G.; Richter-Was, E.; Sharp, P.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Smith, W.H.; Stapnes, S.; Tonelli, G.; Tsesmelis, E.; Usubov, Z.; Vacavant, L.; van der Bij, J.; Watson, A.; Wielers, M.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the physics potential and the experimental challenges of an upgraded LHC running at an instantaneous luminosity of 10**35 cm-2s-1. The detector R&D needed to operate ATLAS and CMS in a very high radiation environment and the expected detector performance are discussed. A few examples of the increased physics potential are given, ranging from precise measurements within the Standard Model (in particular in the Higgs sector) to the discovery reach for several New Physics processes

  9. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    The price discovery literature investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate information into prices. We take this literature one step further and investigate how these markets contribute to stochastic volatility (volatility discovery). We formally show...... that the realized measures from homogenous securities share a fractional stochastic trend, which is a combination of the price and volatility discovery measures. Furthermore, we show that volatility discovery is associated with the way that market participants process information arrival (market sensitivity......). Finally, we compute volatility discovery for 30 actively traded stocks in the U.S. and report that Nyse and Arca dominate Nasdaq....

  10. Heavy ion collisions with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevski, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to study high-p T physics in proton-proton collisions at the LHC design luminosity. The detector capabilities for heavy-ion physics are now being evaluated. This paper reports on a preliminary assessment of the baseline ATLAS detector potential for heavy-ion physics. The ATLAS sensitivity to some of the expected signatures from the quark-gluon plasma (e.g. jet quenching, Υ suppression) is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Making Sense of Turmoil: How Women Reconcile Their Emotional Response to Discovery of a Potential Breast Cancer Symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Máirín; Hegarty, Josephine; Rooney, Vivien M

    2017-11-07

    Breast cancer continues to be a major public health problem for women. Early detection and treatment are key to improved outcomes. Whereas most women seek help promptly, some postpone seeking help for self-discovered breast symptoms. Investigation of women's help-seeking behavior and the associated influencing factors on self-discovery of a breast symptom were sought. The aim of this article is to report the qualitative data from women who had self-discovered a breast symptom. Women (n = 167) with a self-discovered breast symptom (who were part of a large quantitative correlational study) commented in an open-ended question on their overall experience. Comments were analyzed using Discourse Analysis. Four linked discourses were identified: (1) "being and remaining normal," (2) "emotion," (3) "becoming and being abnormal," and (4) "rationality." A sidelined discourse of emotion is drawn on to defer taking action based on rational knowledge. The tension between discourses "emotion" and "rationality" further informs our understanding of women's help-seeking behavior following self-discovered symptoms. Findings provide a deeper understanding of the emotional aspects of women's experience around symptom discovery. Findings will be of benefit to all healthcare professionals involved in assessment and screening of breast changes suggestive of breast cancer. They provide a novel insight into the meaning of breast cancer, its diagnosis and treatment, and how this impacts women's emotions as they await consultation in a breast clinic.

  12. The potential value of a pictorial atlas for aid in the visual diagnosis of 123I FP-CIT SPECT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethals, I.; Ham, H.; Dobbeleir, A.; D'Asseler, Y.; Santens, P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the value of a pictorial atlas of 123 I FP-CIT SPECT images for aid in the visual diagnosis. Patients, materials, methods: Sixty patients, of whom 20 were clinically diagnosed as 'non-parkinsonian' and 40 as having Parkinson's disease or any related disorder, were included in the study. An atlas consisting of 12 123 I FP-CIT SPECT images was constructed first. Validity of the atlas was investigated by performing a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with the clinical diagnosis as the gold standard. The remaining 48 SPECT images were visually assessed twice by 5 observers, first with and secondly without consulting the atlas, or vice versa. The added value of the atlas was investigated by comparing the diagnostic accuracy and the interobserver variability for both methods. Results: ROC analysis performed on the atlas yielded an area under the curve of 1 for a threshold discriminating between clinically non-parkinsonian and parkinsonian patients that was situated between image 4 and 5 of the atlas, For the diagnostic accuracy, we found that the area under the ROC curve was systematically higher if observers had access to the atlas compared to when they had not (Wilcoxon's test, p 123 I FP-CIT SPECT scans. (orig.)

  13. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  14. Preparation of the ATLAS experiment in the LHC proton collider, performances of the electromagnetic calorimeter and its potentialities for the top quark; Preparation de l'experience ATLAS aupres du futur grand collisionneur de protons LHC: performances du calorimetre electromagnetique et potentiels pour la physique du quark top

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubaut, F

    2007-03-15

    ATLAS is the biggest and the more complex detector ever built, it will operate on the LHC and is the outcome of a huge international collaboration of 2000 physicists. This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of one of them, his collaboration spread over 7 years and has followed 2 axis. First, the design, construction and test of the electromagnetic calorimeter of ATLAS and secondly, the development of analysis strategies in the physics of the top quark. The expected important production of top quarks in LHC will allow an accurate measurement of the properties of this particle and in the same way will provide new testing areas for the standard model. The top quark, being extremely massive, might play a significant role in the mechanism of electro-weak symmetry breaking. This document is organized into 5 chapters: 1) ATLAS detector, performance and progress, 2) the optimization of the energy measurement with the electromagnetic calorimeter, 3) the performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter, 4) the physics of the top quark, and 5) the potentialities of ATLAS in the top quark sector. This document presented before an academic board will allow its author to manage research works and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  15. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobre, M

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC was ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, which will deliver of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb −1 expected for LHC running by the end of 2018 to 3000 fb −1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extensions to larger pseudorapidity, particularly in tracking and muon systems. This report summarizes various improvements to the ATLAS detector required to cope with the anticipated evolution of the LHC luminosity during this decade and the next. A brief overview is also given on physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. (paper)

  16. Education modules using EnviroAtlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proposal #1: Exploration and Discovery through Maps: Teaching Science with Technology (Elementary)Online maps have the power to bring students closer to their local natural environments. EnviroAtlas is an interactive, web-based tool that was designed by the EPA and its partners ...

  17. Education modules using EnviroAtlas (#2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Session Title #1: Exploration and Discovery through Maps: Teaching Science with Technology. Online maps have the power to spark student interest and bring students closer to their local natural environments. EnviroAtlas is an interactive, web-based tool that was designed by the...

  18. The ATLAS Education and Outreach Group

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Barnett

    With the unprecedented scale and duration of ATLAS and the unique possibilities to make groundbreaking discoveries in physics, ATLAS has special opportunities to communicate the importance and role of our accomplishments. We want to participate in educating the next generation of scientific and other leaders in our society by involving students of many levels in our research. The Education and Outreach Group has focused on producing informational material of various sorts - like brochures, posters, a film, animations and a public website - to assist the members of the collaboration in their contacts with students, teachers and the general public. Another aim is to facilitate the teaching of particle physics and particularly the role of the ATLAS Experiment by providing ideas and educational material. The Education and Outreach Group meets every ATLAS week, with an attendance of between 25 and 40 people. The meetings have become an interesting forum for education and outreach projects and new ideas. The comi...

  19. Beyond Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Sassmannshausen, Sean Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we explore four alternatives to the dominant discovery view of entrepreneurship; the development view, the construction view, the evolutionary view, and the Neo-Austrian view. We outline the main critique points of the discovery presented in these four alternatives, as well...

  20. Chemical Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Herbert C.

    1974-01-01

    The role of discovery in the advance of the science of chemistry and the factors that are currently operating to handicap that function are considered. Examples are drawn from the author's work with boranes. The thesis that exploratory research and discovery should be encouraged is stressed. (DT)

  1. The ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dunford, Monica Lynn

    2014-01-01

    In particle physics experiments, the discovery of increasingly more massive particles has brought deep understanding of the basic constituents of matter and of the fundamental forces among them. In order to explore Nature in its deepest elementary secrets, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was built at CERN, Geneva. The LHC provides the highest energy collisions in a laboratory, at very high rates to allow one to study very rare reactions. Two independent sophisticated huge instruments, called ATLAS and CMS detectors, are operated to explore in a most broad way the physics of these collisions. In addition to these two general-purpose detectors, smaller specialized experiments (LHCb, ALICE and some others) are collecting collision data as well.

  2. ATLAS muon detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Muon detectors from the outer layer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Over a million individual detectors combine to make up the outer layer of ATLAS. All of this is exclusively to track the muons, the only detectable particles to make it out so far from the collision point. How the muon’s path curves in the magnetic field depends on how fast it is travelling. A fast muon curves only a very little, a slower one curves a lot. Together with the calorimeters, the muon detectors play an essential role in deciding which collisions to store and which to ignore. Certain signals from muons are a sure sign of exciting discoveries. To make sure the data from these collisions is not lost, some of the muon detectors react very quickly and trigger the electronics to record. The other detectors take a little longer, but are much more precise. Their job is to measure exactly where the muons have passed, calculating the curvature of their tracks in the magnetic field to the nearest five hundredths of a ...

  3. Bioinformatics for cancer immunotherapy target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Barnkob, Mike Stein

    2014-01-01

    therapy target discovery in a bioinformatics analysis pipeline. We describe specialized bioinformatics tools and databases for three main bottlenecks in immunotherapy target discovery: the cataloging of potentially antigenic proteins, the identification of potential HLA binders, and the selection epitopes...

  4. Studies of b-associated production and muonic decays of neutral Higgs bosons at the ATLAS experiment within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warsinsky, Markus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents a Monte Carlo study of neutral Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) decaying into muons at the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Signal and background processes are simulated using novel Monte Carlo generators that incorporate parts of higher order corrections and are expected to give a more accurate prediction than previous programs. The SHERPA Monte Carlo generator is validated for its use in the analysis and compared to results obtained with other programs. Where possible, the Monte Carlo event samples are normalized to higher order calculations. To increase the available Monte Carlo statistics, this study is based on the ATLAS fast detector simulation ATLFAST. Differences between ATLFAST and the detailed detector simulation of ATLAS are examined, and, where possible, correction procedures are devised. A cut based analysis is performed assuming an integrated luminosity of 30 fb -1 , and optimized with respect to the discovery potential for MSSM Higgs bosons. The systematic uncertainties of the event selection and the Monte Carlo predictions are estimated. A method that can be used to estimate the background from data is presented and evaluated. Last, the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment in the CP conserving benchmark scenarios of the MSSM is evaluated. One or more of the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM can be discovered in the muonic decay mode using 30 fb -1 of data for low masses of the pseudoscalar boson A 0 , if the model parameter tan β is at least 20. For higher masses of the A 0 , tan β would need to be significantly higher to ensure a discovery in the studied decay channel. The sensitivity of ATLAS to MSSM Higgs bosons is multiple times larger than the one of previous and currently running experiments. (orig.)

  5. Studies of b-associated production and muonic decays of neutral Higgs bosons at the ATLAS experiment within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warsinsky, Markus

    2008-09-15

    This thesis presents a Monte Carlo study of neutral Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) decaying into muons at the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Signal and background processes are simulated using novel Monte Carlo generators that incorporate parts of higher order corrections and are expected to give a more accurate prediction than previous programs. The SHERPA Monte Carlo generator is validated for its use in the analysis and compared to results obtained with other programs. Where possible, the Monte Carlo event samples are normalized to higher order calculations. To increase the available Monte Carlo statistics, this study is based on the ATLAS fast detector simulation ATLFAST. Differences between ATLFAST and the detailed detector simulation of ATLAS are examined, and, where possible, correction procedures are devised. A cut based analysis is performed assuming an integrated luminosity of 30 fb{sup -1}, and optimized with respect to the discovery potential for MSSM Higgs bosons. The systematic uncertainties of the event selection and the Monte Carlo predictions are estimated. A method that can be used to estimate the background from data is presented and evaluated. Last, the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment in the CP conserving benchmark scenarios of the MSSM is evaluated. One or more of the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM can be discovered in the muonic decay mode using 30 fb{sup -1} of data for low masses of the pseudoscalar boson A{sup 0}, if the model parameter tan {beta} is at least 20. For higher masses of the A{sup 0}, tan {beta} would need to be significantly higher to ensure a discovery in the studied decay channel. The sensitivity of ATLAS to MSSM Higgs bosons is multiple times larger than the one of previous and currently running experiments. (orig.)

  6. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sørensen, Mette Aamand

    2014-01-01

    Progress in MS-based methods for veterinary research and diagnostics is lagging behind compared to the human research, and proteome data of domestic animals is still not well represented in open source data repositories. This is particularly true for the equine species. Here we present a first...... Equine PeptideAtlas encompassing high-resolution tandem MS analyses of 51 samples representing a selection of equine tissues and body fluids from healthy and diseased animals. The raw data were processed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline to yield high quality identification of proteins and peptides....... The current release comprises 24 131 distinct peptides representing 2636 canonical proteins observed at false discovery rates of 0.2% at the peptide level and 1.4% at the protein level. Data from the Equine PeptideAtlas are available for experimental planning, validation of new datasets, and as a proteomic...

  7. The Human Cell Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A; Lander, Eric S; Amit, Ido; Benoist, Christophe; Birney, Ewan; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Campbell, Peter; Carninci, Piero; Clatworthy, Menna; Clevers, Hans; Deplancke, Bart; Dunham, Ian; Eberwine, James; Eils, Roland; Enard, Wolfgang; Farmer, Andrew; Fugger, Lars; Göttgens, Berthold; Hacohen, Nir; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Hemberg, Martin; Kim, Seung; Klenerman, Paul; Kriegstein, Arnold; Lein, Ed; Linnarsson, Sten; Lundberg, Emma; Lundeberg, Joakim; Majumder, Partha; Marioni, John C; Merad, Miriam; Mhlanga, Musa; Nawijn, Martijn; Netea, Mihai; Nolan, Garry; Pe'er, Dana; Phillipakis, Anthony; Ponting, Chris P; Quake, Stephen; Reik, Wolf; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Sanes, Joshua; Satija, Rahul; Schumacher, Ton N; Shalek, Alex; Shapiro, Ehud; Sharma, Padmanee; Shin, Jay W; Stegle, Oliver; Stratton, Michael; Stubbington, Michael J T; Theis, Fabian J; Uhlen, Matthias; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Wagner, Allon; Watt, Fiona; Weissman, Jonathan; Wold, Barbara; Xavier, Ramnik; Yosef, Nir

    2017-12-05

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

  8. Higgs Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    has been challenged by the discovery of a not-so-heavy Higgs-like state. I will therefore review the recent discovery \\cite{Foadi:2012bb} that the standard model top-induced radiative corrections naturally reduce the intrinsic non-perturbative mass of the composite Higgs state towards the desired...... via first principle lattice simulations with encouraging results. The new findings show that the recent naive claims made about new strong dynamics at the electroweak scale being disfavoured by the discovery of a not-so-heavy composite Higgs are unwarranted. I will then introduce the more speculative......I discuss the impact of the discovery of a Higgs-like state on composite dynamics starting by critically examining the reasons in favour of either an elementary or composite nature of this state. Accepting the standard model interpretation I re-address the standard model vacuum stability within...

  9. Screening Method for the Discovery of Potential Bioactive Cysteine-Containing Peptides Using 3D Mass Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosten, L.N.; Pieterse, M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Animal venoms and toxins are a valuable source of bioactive peptides with pharmacologic relevance as potential drug leads. A large subset of biologically active peptides discovered up till now contain disulfide bridges that enhance stability and activity. To discover new members of this class of

  10. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  11. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  12. Development of a benchmark parameter scan for Higgs bosons in the NMSSM Model and a study of the sensitivity for H{yields}AA{yields}4{tau} in vector boson fusion with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rottlaender, Iris

    2008-08-15

    An evaluation of the discovery potential for NMSSM Higgs bosons of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is presented. For this purpose, seven two-dimensional benchmark planes in the six-dimensional parameter space of the NMSSM Higgs sector are defined. These planes include different types of phenomenology for which the discovery of NMSSM Higgs bosons is especially challenging and which are considered typical for the NMSSM. They are subsequently used to give a detailed evaluation of the Higgs boson discovery potential based on Monte Carlo studies from the ATLAS collaboration. Afterwards, the possibility of discovering NMSSM Higgs bosons via the H{sub 1}{yields}A{sub 1}A{sub 1}{yields}4{tau}{yields}4{mu}+8{nu} decay chain and with the vector boson fusion production mode is investigated. A particular emphasis is put on the mass reconstruction from the complex final state. Furthermore, a study of the jet reconstruction performance at the ATLAS experiment which is of crucial relevance for vector boson fusion searches is presented. A good detectability of the so-called tagging jets that originate from the scattered partons in the vector boson fusion process is of critical importance for an early Higgs boson discovery in many models and also within the framework of the NMSSM. (orig.)

  13. Development of thin sensors and a novel interconnection technology for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system

    CERN Document Server

    Beimforde, Michael

    To extend the discovery potential of the experiments at the LHC accelerator a luminosity upgrade towards the super LHC (sLHC) with an up to ten-fold peak luminosity is planned. Within this thesis a new module concept was developed and evaluated for the operation within an ATLAS pixel detector at the sLHC. This module concept utilizes a novel thin sensor production process for thin n-in-p silicon sensors which potentially allow for a higher radiation hardness at a reduced cost. Furthermore, the new 3D-integration technology ICV-SLID is explored which will allow for increasing the active area of the modules and hence, for employing the modules in the innermost layer of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector.

  14. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extens...

  15. ATLAS detector upgrade prospects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00184940; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the successful operation at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the centre-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb$^{-1}$ expected for LHC running to 3000 fb $^{-1}$ by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of ...

  16. Glycoblotting method allows for rapid and efficient glycome profiling of human Alzheimer's disease brain, serum and cerebrospinal fluid towards potential biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizaw, Solomon T; Ohashi, Tetsu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the significance of posttranslational glycosylation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of growing importance for the investigation of the pathogenesis of AD as well as discovery research of the disease-specific serum biomarkers. We designed a standard protocol for the glycoblotting combined with MALDI-TOFMS to perform rapid and quantitative profiling of the glycan parts of glycoproteins (N-glycans) and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) using human AD's post-mortem samples such as brain tissues (dissected cerebral cortices such as frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal domains), serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The structural profiles of the major N-glycans released from glycoproteins and the total expression levels of the glycans were found to be mostly similar between the brain tissues of the AD patients and those of the normal control group. In contrast, the expression levels of the serum and CSF protein N-glycans such as bisect-type and multiply branched glycoforms were increased significantly in AD patient group. In addition, the levels of some gangliosides such as GM1, GM2 and GM3 appeared to alter in the AD patient brain and serum samples when compared with the normal control groups. Alteration of the expression levels of major N- and GSL-glycans in human brain tissues, serum and CSF of AD patients can be monitored quantitatively by means of the glycoblotting-based standard protocols. The changes in the expression levels of the glycans derived from the human post-mortem samples uncovered by the standardized glycoblotting method provides potential serum biomarkers in central nervous system disorders and can contribute to the insight into the molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and future drug discovery. Most importantly, the present preliminary trials using human post-mortem samples of AD patients suggest that large-scale serum glycomics cohort by means of various-types of human AD patients as well as the normal

  17. High Potential Source for Biomass Degradation Enzyme Discovery and Environmental Aspects Revealed through Metagenomics of Indian Buffalo Rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex microbiomes of the rumen functions as an effective system for plant cell wall degradation, and biomass utilization provide genetic resource for degrading microbial enzymes that could be used in the production of biofuel. Therefore the buffalo rumen microbiota was surveyed using shot gun sequencing. This metagenomic sequencing generated 3.9 GB of sequences and data were assembled into 137270 contiguous sequences (contigs. We identified potential 2614 contigs encoding biomass degrading enzymes including glycoside hydrolases (GH: 1943 contigs, carbohydrate binding module (CBM: 23 contigs, glycosyl transferase (GT: 373 contigs, carbohydrate esterases (CE: 259 contigs, and polysaccharide lyases (PE: 16 contigs. The hierarchical clustering of buffalo metagenomes demonstrated the similarities and dissimilarity in microbial community structures and functional capacity. This demonstrates that buffalo rumen microbiome was considerably enriched in functional genes involved in polysaccharide degradation with great prospects to obtain new molecules that may be applied in the biofuel industry.

  18. Discovery of a natural product-like iNOS inhibitor by molecular docking with potential neuroprotective effects in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Jing Zhong

    Full Text Available In this study, we applied structure-based virtual screening techniques to identify natural product or natural product-like inhibitors of iNOS. The iNOS inhibitory activity of the hit compounds was characterized using cellular assays and an in vivo zebrafish larvae model. The natural product-like compound 1 inhibited NO production in LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 macrophages, without exerting cytotoxic effects on the cells. Significantly, compound 1 was able to reverse MPTP-induced locomotion deficiency and neurotoxicity in an in vivo zebrafish larval model. Hence, compound 1 could be considered as a scaffold for the further development of iNOS inhibitors for potential anti-inflammatory or anti-neurodegenerative applications.

  19. Combined serum and EPS-urine proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology for discovery of potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mo; Chen, Lizhu; Yuan, Zhengwei; Yang, Zeyu; Li, Yue; Shan, Liping; Yin, Bo; Fei, Xiang; Miao, Jianing; Song, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignant tumors and a major cause of cancer-related death for men worldwide. The aim of our study was to identify potential non-invasive serum and expressed prostatic secretion (EPS)-urine biomarkers for accurate diagnosis of PCa. Here, we performed a combined isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to compare protein profiles using pooled serum and EPS-urine samples from 4 groups of patients: benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), localized PCa and metastatic PCa. The differentially expressed proteins were rigorously selected and further validated in a large and independent cohort using classical ELISA and Western blot assays. Finally, we established a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of 3 proteins (serum PF4V1, PSA, and urinary CRISP3) with an excellent diagnostic capacity to differentiate PCa from BPH [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.941], which showed an evidently greater discriminatory ability than PSA alone (AUC, 0.757) (P<0.001). Importantly, even when PSA level was in the gray zone (4-10 ng/mL), a combination of PF4V1 and CRISP3 could achieve a relatively high diagnostic efficacy (AUC, 0.895). Furthermore, their combination also had the potential to distinguish PCa from HGPIN (AUC, 0.934). Our results demonstrated that the combined application of serum and EPS-urine biomarkers can improve the diagnosis of PCa and provide a new prospect for non-invasive PCa detection.

  20. Integrative subtype discovery in glioblastoma using iCluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronglai Shen

    Full Text Available Large-scale cancer genome projects, such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project, are comprehensive molecular characterization efforts to accelerate our understanding of cancer biology and the discovery of new therapeutic targets. The accumulating wealth of multidimensional data provides a new paradigm for important research problems including cancer subtype discovery. The current standard approach relies on separate clustering analyses followed by manual integration. Results can be highly data type dependent, restricting the ability to discover new insights from multidimensional data. In this study, we present an integrative subtype analysis of the TCGA glioblastoma (GBM data set. Our analysis revealed new insights through integrated subtype characterization. We found three distinct integrated tumor subtypes. Subtype 1 lacks the classical GBM events of chr 7 gain and chr 10 loss. This subclass is enriched for the G-CIMP phenotype and shows hypermethylation of genes involved in brain development and neuronal differentiation. The tumors in this subclass display a Proneural expression profile. Subtype 2 is characterized by a near complete association with EGFR amplification, overrepresentation of promoter methylation of homeobox and G-protein signaling genes, and a Classical expression profile. Subtype 3 is characterized by NF1 and PTEN alterations and exhibits a Mesenchymal-like expression profile. The data analysis workflow we propose provides a unified and computationally scalable framework to harness the full potential of large-scale integrated cancer genomic data for integrative subtype discovery.

  1. Computational methods in drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sumudu P. Leelananda; Steffen Lindert

    2016-01-01

    The process for drug discovery and development is challenging, time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided drug discovery (CADD) tools can act as a virtual shortcut, assisting in the expedition of this long process and potentially reducing the cost of research and development. Today CADD has become an effective and indispensable tool in therapeutic development. The human genome project has made available a substantial amount of sequence data that can be used in various drug discovery project...

  2. Discovery of potential drugs for human-infecting H7N9 virus containing R294K mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He JY

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jiao-Yu He,1,* Cheng Li,2,* Guo Wu3 1College of Life Sciences and Key Laboratory for Bio-resources of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, 2College of Agronomy, Sichuan Agricultural University, 3College of Life Sciences, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: After the first epidemic wave from February through May 2013, the influenza A (H7N9 virus emerged and has followed a second epidemic wave since June 2013. As of June 27, 2014, the outbreak of H7N9 had caused 450 confirmed cases of human infection, with 165 deaths included. The case-fatality rate of all confirmed cases is about 36%, making the H7N9 virus a significant threat to people’s health. At present, neuraminidase inhibitors are the only licensed antiviral medications available to treat H7N9 infections in humans. Oseltamivir is the most commonly used inhibitor, and it is also a front-line drug for the threatening H7N9. Unfortunately, it has been reported that patients treated with oseltamivir can induce R294K (Arg294Lys substitution in the H7N9 virus, which is a rare mutation and can reduce the antiviral efficacy of inhibitors. Even worse, deaths caused by such mutation after oseltamivir treatment have already been reported, indicating that the need to find substitutive neuraminidase inhibitors for currently available drugs to treat drug-resistant H7N9 is really pressing.Materials and methods: First, the structure of H7N9 containing the R294K substitution was downloaded from the Protein Data Bank, and structural information of approved drugs was downloaded from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial database. Taking oseltamivir carboxylate as a reference drug, we then filtered these molecules through virtual screening to find out potential inhibitors targeting the mutated H7N9 virus. For further evaluation, we carried out a 14 ns molecular dynamic simulation for each H7N9–drug complex and

  3. Proteomics-Based Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response in Sporotrichosis: Toward Discovery of Potential Diagnostic and Vaccine Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; Araujo, Leticia Mendes; Della Terra, Paula Portella; dos Santos, Priscila Oliveira; Pereira, Sandro Antonio; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; Burger, Eva; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii and associated species are agents of human and animal sporotrichosis that cause large sapronoses and zoonoses worldwide. Epidemiological surveillance has highlighted an overwhelming occurrence of the highly pathogenic fungus Sporothrix brasiliensis during feline outbreaks, leading to massive transmissions to humans. Early diagnosis of feline sporotrichosis by demonstrating the presence of a surrogate marker of infection can have a key role for selecting appropriate disease control measures and minimizing zoonotic transmission to humans. We explored the presence and diversity of serum antibodies (IgG) specific against Sporothrix antigens in cats with sporotrichosis and evaluated the utility of these antibodies for serodiagnosis. Antigen profiling included protein extracts from the closest known relatives S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting enabled us to characterize the major antigens of feline sporotrichosis from sera from cats with sporotrichosis (n = 49), healthy cats (n = 19), and cats with other diseases (n = 20). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based quantitation of anti-Sporothrix IgG exhibited high sensitivity and specificity in cats with sporotrichosis (area under the curve, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1; Psporotrichosis. Two-dimensional immunoblotting revealed six IgG-reactive isoforms of gp60 in the S. brasiliensis proteome, similar to the humoral response found in human sporotrichosis. A convergent IgG-response in various hosts (mice, cats, and humans) has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of Sporothrix and its warm-blooded hosts. We propose that 3-carboxymuconate cyclase has potential for the serological diagnosis of sporotrichosis and as target for the development of an effective multi-species vaccine against sporotrichosis in animals and humans.

  4. Cosmic gamma ray detection and discovery potential with the AMS-2 spectrometer; Detection de rayons {gamma} cosmiques et potentiel de decouvertes avec le spectrometre AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, L

    2004-12-15

    Yet designed to measure charged component of the cosmic rays, the foreseen Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) could also release {gamma}-ray studies, in the energy range from GeV to TeV, using the tracker system, for {gamma}-rays converted in e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, and the electromagnetic calorimeter. In the first part of the thesis are described the calibrations and the performances of the engineering model of the calorimeter, obtained from the analysis of data taken during a test-beam performed at CERN in July 2002. In the second part of the thesis, the AMS-02 discovery potential for {gamma}-astrophysics is presented. While exposure maps of the {gamma}--sky are computed for one year of data taking with the {gamma}--detectors, the acceptance of the calorimeter is obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. The AMS-02 potential is then estimated for signals from the Vela pulsar and for some supersymmetric signals from the Galactic Center. (author)

  5. A metagenomic viral discovery approach identifies potential zoonotic and novel mammalian viruses in Neoromicia bats within South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldenhuys, Marike; Mortlock, Marinda; Weyer, Jacqueline; Bezuidt, Oliver; Seamark, Ernest C J; Kearney, Teresa; Gleasner, Cheryl; Erkkila, Tracy H; Cui, Helen; Markotter, Wanda

    2018-01-01

    Species within the Neoromicia bat genus are abundant and widely distributed in Africa. It is common for these insectivorous bats to roost in anthropogenic structures in urban regions. Additionally, Neoromicia capensis have previously been identified as potential hosts for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-related coronaviruses. This study aimed to ascertain the gastrointestinal virome of these bats, as viruses excreted in fecal material or which may be replicating in rectal or intestinal tissues have the greatest opportunities of coming into contact with other hosts. Samples were collected in five regions of South Africa over eight years. Initial virome composition was determined by viral metagenomic sequencing by pooling samples and enriching for viral particles. Libraries were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq and NextSeq500 platforms, producing a combined 37 million reads. Bioinformatics analysis of the high throughput sequencing data detected the full genome of a novel species of the Circoviridae family, and also identified sequence data from the Adenoviridae, Coronaviridae, Herpesviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Phenuiviridae, and Picornaviridae families. Metagenomic sequencing data was insufficient to determine the viral diversity of certain families due to the fragmented coverage of genomes and lack of suitable sequencing depth, as some viruses were detected from the analysis of reads-data only. Follow up conventional PCR assays targeting conserved gene regions for the Adenoviridae, Coronaviridae, and Herpesviridae families were used to confirm metagenomic data and generate additional sequences to determine genetic diversity. The complete coding genome of a MERS-related coronavirus was recovered with additional amplicon sequencing on the MiSeq platform. The new genome shared 97.2% overall nucleotide identity to a previous Neoromicia-associated MERS-related virus, also from South Africa. Conventional PCR analysis detected diverse adenovirus and

  6. Proteomics-Based Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response in Sporotrichosis: Toward Discovery of Potential Diagnostic and Vaccine Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Messias Rodrigues

    understanding of the coevolution of Sporothrix and its warm-blooded hosts. We propose that 3-carboxymuconate cyclase has potential for the serological diagnosis of sporotrichosis and as target for the development of an effective multi-species vaccine against sporotrichosis in animals and humans.

  7. ATLAS Distributed Computing: Experience and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb-1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centers around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics program including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2014 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  8. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nairz, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25/fb of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100~PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, e...

  9. Evaluating the potential of natural reproduction and artificial techniques to increase Acropora cervicornis populations at Discovery Bay, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman J Quinn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Shallow water Acropora species have become uncommon on north coast Jamaican coral reefs owing to a number of factors. On many reefs, algae have taken their place. The result is loss of habitat for many species of fish and invertebrates and less attractive reefs with fewer fish. These reefs appear to be prime candidates for coral restoration. However, the potential for coral to naturally recover should be examined before efforts to restore reefs are undertaken. Reef restoration is unnecessary if the population has the capacity to recovery through natural means. We observed that the rate of settlement of Acropora spat in the Caribbean is much lower than the spat settlement rate of several other Caribbean coral families and much lower than Acropora spat settlement rates in the South Pacific. A very low percentage of apparently healthy colonies of A. cervicornis possessed developing gametes in July 2005, a month before spawning. It appears that the long-term survival of remnant A. cervicornis populations is threatened unless successful sexual reproduction is restored. Several techniques were used to test transplant methods for restoring A. cervicornis populations. The mean survivorship and growth rate of one technique was >75% and nearly 250% per annum, respectively. Working with hotel operators, environmental groups, and local fishers, we are attempting to reintroduce A. cervicornis to sites where it previously existed and increase coral biomass and complexity at these sites. Reefs with greater A. cervicornis biomass have larger edible fish populations. With localized protection of these restored reefs we anticipate an increase of larger edible fish not only on reefs within the restored protected areas but also on adjacent reefs. Furthermore, increased coral and fish biodiversity improves the attractiveness of the reef community for divers and snorkelers. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 105-116. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.Las especies someras de Acropora se

  10. The Cognitive Atlas: Towards a knowledge foundation for cognitive neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell A Poldrack

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive neuroscience aims to map mental processes onto brain function, which begs the question of what ``mental processes'' exist and how they relate to the tasks that are used to manipulate and measure them. This topic has been addressed informally in prior work, but we propose that cumulative progress in cognitive neuroscience requires a more systematic approach to representing the mental entities that are being mapped to brain function and the tasks used to manipulate and measure mental processes. We describe a new open collaborative project that aims to provide a knowledge base for cognitive neuroscience, called the Cognitive Atlas (accessible online at http://www.cognitiveatlas.org, and outline how this project has the potential to drive novel discoveries about both mind and brain.

  11. Tau lepton reconstruction with energy flow and the search for R-parity violating supersymmetry at the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, Sebastian

    2012-10-15

    This thesis investigates the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric (SUSY) models in the framework of mSUGRA, where the stau ({tau}) is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). Hence, the LSP is charged and decays in contrast to R-parity conserving models. For the first time in the framework of this RPV model a detailed signal to background analysis is performed for a specific benchmark scenario using a full Monte Carlo simulation of the ATLAS detector. Furthermore a feasibility study for an estimate of the stau LSP mass is given. The fast track simulation FATRAS is a new approach for the Monte Carlo simulation of particles in the tracking systems of the ATLAS experiment. Its results are compared to first data at {radical}(s) = 900 GeV. Additionally, two generic detector simulations are compared to the full simulation. The reconstruction of tau leptons is crucial for many searches for new physics with ATLAS. Therefore, the reconstruction of tracks for particles from tau decays is studied. A novel method, PanTau, is presented for the tau reconstruction in ATLAS. It is based on the energy flow algorithm eflowRec. Its performance is evaluated in Monte Carlo simulations. The dependency of the identification variables on the jet energy are studied in detail. Finally, the energy flow quantities and the identification variables are compared between Monte Carlo simulations and measured multijet events with first ATLAS data at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV.

  12. Tau lepton reconstruction with energy flow and the search for R-parity violating supersymmetry at the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    This thesis investigates the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric (SUSY) models in the framework of mSUGRA, where the stau (τ) is the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). Hence, the LSP is charged and decays in contrast to R-parity conserving models. For the first time in the framework of this RPV model a detailed signal to background analysis is performed for a specific benchmark scenario using a full Monte Carlo simulation of the ATLAS detector. Furthermore a feasibility study for an estimate of the stau LSP mass is given. The fast track simulation FATRAS is a new approach for the Monte Carlo simulation of particles in the tracking systems of the ATLAS experiment. Its results are compared to first data at √(s) = 900 GeV. Additionally, two generic detector simulations are compared to the full simulation. The reconstruction of tau leptons is crucial for many searches for new physics with ATLAS. Therefore, the reconstruction of tracks for particles from tau decays is studied. A novel method, PanTau, is presented for the tau reconstruction in ATLAS. It is based on the energy flow algorithm eflowRec. Its performance is evaluated in Monte Carlo simulations. The dependency of the identification variables on the jet energy are studied in detail. Finally, the energy flow quantities and the identification variables are compared between Monte Carlo simulations and measured multijet events with first ATLAS data at √(s) = 7 TeV.

  13. Discovery and Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discovery and Innovation is a journal of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS) ... World (TWAS) meant to focus attention on science and technology in Africa and the ... of Non-wood Forest Products: Potential Impacts and Challenges in Africa ...

  14. Promzea: a pipeline for discovery of co-regulatory motifs in maize and other plant species and its application to the anthocyanin and phlobaphene biosynthetic pathways and the Maize Development Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liseron-Monfils, Christophe; Lewis, Tim; Ashlock, Daniel; McNicholas, Paul D; Fauteux, François; Strömvik, Martina; Raizada, Manish N

    2013-03-15

    The discovery of genetic networks and cis-acting DNA motifs underlying their regulation is a major objective of transcriptome studies. The recent release of the maize genome (Zea mays L.) has facilitated in silico searches for regulatory motifs. Several algorithms exist to predict cis-acting elements, but none have been adapted for maize. A benchmark data set was used to evaluate the accuracy of three motif discovery programs: BioProspector, Weeder and MEME. Analysis showed that each motif discovery tool had limited accuracy and appeared to retrieve a distinct set of motifs. Therefore, using the benchmark, statistical filters were optimized to reduce the false discovery ratio, and then remaining motifs from all programs were combined to improve motif prediction. These principles were integrated into a user-friendly pipeline for motif discovery in maize called Promzea, available at http://www.promzea.org and on the Discovery Environment of the iPlant Collaborative website. Promzea was subsequently expanded to include rice and Arabidopsis. Within Promzea, a user enters cDNA sequences or gene IDs; corresponding upstream sequences are retrieved from the maize genome. Predicted motifs are filtered, combined and ranked. Promzea searches the chosen plant genome for genes containing each candidate motif, providing the user with the gene list and corresponding gene annotations. Promzea was validated in silico using a benchmark data set: the Promzea pipeline showed a 22% increase in nucleotide sensitivity compared to the best standalone program tool, Weeder, with equivalent nucleotide specificity. Promzea was also validated by its ability to retrieve the experimentally defined binding sites of transcription factors that regulate the maize anthocyanin and phlobaphene biosynthetic pathways. Promzea predicted additional promoter motifs, and genome-wide motif searches by Promzea identified 127 non-anthocyanin/phlobaphene genes that each contained all five predicted promoter

  15. Windows on the brain: the emerging role of atlases and databases in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C.; VanEssen, D. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Brain atlases and associated databases have great potential as gateways for navigating, accessing, and visualizing a wide range of neuroscientific data. Recent progress towards realizing this potential includes the establishment of probabilistic atlases, surface-based atlases and associated databases, combined with improvements in visualization capabilities and internet access.

  16. ATLAS book wins the IPPY awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2014-01-01

    Hunting the Higgs, published by Papadakis Publishers in collaboration with the ATLAS experiment has won the Bronze prize in the Science category of the Independent Publisher Book Awards (see here). The Award ceremony will be held on 28 May in New York on the eve of the BookExpo America (see here).   “Ours is a souvenir book that gives viewers a glimpse of the discovery of the Higgs boson and the collaborative effort behind it of thousands of scientists in ATLAS,” says Claudia Marcelloni, communications officer of the ATLAS Experiment, who worked on the book with freelance science writer Colin Barras. “The science is noble and the collaboration heartwarming, and the IPPY Award is a great way to celebrate the mind-blowing story of human achievement.” Hunting the Higgs is the inside story of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. It tells the journey of the experiment, from before the detector was born to the announcement of the discovery of t...

  17. Development of the detector control system for the ATLAS Level-1 trigger and measurement of the single top production cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Christopher J

    This thesis discusses the development of the Detector Control System (DCS) for the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger. Microcontroller code has been developed to read out slow controls data from the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger modules into the wider DCS. Back-end software has been developed for archiving this data. A Finite State Machine (FSM) has also been developed to offer remote access to the L1 Trigger hardware from the ATLAS Control Room. This Thesis also discusses the discovery potential for electroweak single top production during early running. Using Monte Carlo data some of the major systematics are discussed. A potential upper limit on the production cross section is calculated to be 45.2 pb. If the Standard Model prediction is assumed, a measured signal could potentially have a significance of up to 2.23¾ using 200 pb−1 of data.

  18. Discovery potential for new phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, S.; Price, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examine the ability of future facilities to discover and interpret non-supersymmetric new phenomena. The authors first explore explicit manifestations of new physics, including extended gauge sectors, leptoquarks, exotic fermions, and technicolor models. They then take a more general approach where new physics only reveals itself through the existence of effective interactions at lower energy scales

  19. Physics with Photons at the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Reale, V.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of photons in the ATLAS experiment is crucial for the study of a number of physics channels, including the search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs, and measurements of direct production of single photons and photon pairs. The photon-photon and photon-jet channels are interesting in their own right, allowing the study of QCD at the new energy range of the LHC. The photon-identification strategy in ATLAS will be presented along with photon-jet cross section measurements and the potential ATLAS constrains on the gluon structure function

  20. Discovery of novel enzymes with industrial potential from a cold and alkaline environment by a combination of functional metagenomics and culturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of cold-active enzymes has many advantages, including reduced energy consumption and easy inactivation. The ikaite columns of SW Greenland are permanently cold (4-6°C) and alkaline (above pH 10), and the microorganisms living there and their enzymes are adapted to these condit......Background: The use of cold-active enzymes has many advantages, including reduced energy consumption and easy inactivation. The ikaite columns of SW Greenland are permanently cold (4-6°C) and alkaline (above pH 10), and the microorganisms living there and their enzymes are adapted...... to these conditions. Since only a small fraction of the total microbial diversity can be cultured in the laboratory, a combined approach involving functional screening of a strain collection and a metagenomic library was undertaken for discovery of novel enzymes from the ikaite columns.Results: A strain collection...... complemented each other by targeting different microbial communities, highlighting the usefulness of combining methods for bioprospecting. Finally, we document here that ikaite columns constitute an important source of cold- and/or alkaline-active enzymes with industrial application potential....

  1. Discovery of novel enzymes with industrial potential from a cold and alkaline environment by a combination of functional metagenomics and culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2014-05-20

    The use of cold-active enzymes has many advantages, including reduced energy consumption and easy inactivation. The ikaite columns of SW Greenland are permanently cold (4-6°C) and alkaline (above pH 10), and the microorganisms living there and their enzymes are adapted to these conditions. Since only a small fraction of the total microbial diversity can be cultured in the laboratory, a combined approach involving functional screening of a strain collection and a metagenomic library was undertaken for discovery of novel enzymes from the ikaite columns. A strain collection with 322 cultured isolates was screened for enzymatic activities identifying a large number of enzyme producers, with a high re-discovery rate to previously characterized strains. A functional expression library established in Escherichia coli identified a number of novel cold-active enzymes. Both α-amylases and β-galactosidases were characterized in more detail with respect to temperature and pH profiles and one of the β-galactosidases, BGalI17E2, was able to hydrolyze lactose at 5°C. A metagenome sequence of the expression library indicated that the majority of enzymatic activities were not detected by functional expression. Phylogenetic analysis showed that different bacterial communities were targeted with the culture dependent and independent approaches and revealed the bias of multiple displacement amplification (MDA) of DNA isolated from complex microbial communities. Many cold- and/or alkaline-active enzymes of industrial relevance were identified in the culture based approach and the majority of the enzyme-producing isolates were closely related to previously characterized strains. The function-based metagenomic approach, on the other hand, identified several enzymes (β-galactosidases, α-amylases and a phosphatase) with low homology to known sequences that were easily expressed in the production host E. coli. The β-galactosidase BGalI17E2 was able to hydrolyze lactose at low

  2. Physics prospects at the HL-LHC with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anna Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC aims to provide a total integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 TeV over the course of $\\sim$ 10 years, reaching instantaneous luminosities of up to $L = 7.5 \\times 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$, corresponding to an average of 200 inelastic p-p collisions per bunch crossing ($\\mu = 200)$. The upgraded ATLAS detector and trigger system must be able to cope well with increased occupancies and data rates. The performance of the upgrade has been estimated in full simulation studies, assuming expected HL-LHC conditions and a detector configuration intended to maximise physics performance and discovery potential at the HL-LHC, and is expected to be similar to current performance. Fast simulation studies have been carried out to evaluate the prospects of various benchmark physics analyses to be performed using the upgraded ATLAS detector with the full HL-LHC dataset.

  3. EnviroAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web...

  4. ATLAS Virtual Visits bringing the world into the ATLAS control room

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051192; The ATLAS collaboration; Yacoob, Sahal

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  5. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  6. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  7. 10 CFR 2.1018 - Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery. 2.1018 Section 2.1018 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Geologic Repository § 2.1018 Discovery. (a)(1) Parties, potential parties, and interested governmental participants in the high-level waste licensing proceeding may obtain discovery by one or more of the following...

  8. Electron Energy Resolution of the ATLAS TILECAL Modules with Flat Filter Method (July 2002 test beam)

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitskii, Yu A; Vinogradov, V B

    2005-01-01

    The constructed ATLAS detector at the LHC will have the great physics discovery potential, in particular in the detection of a heavy Higgs boson. Calorimeters will play a crucial role in it. It is necessary to have confidence that the calorimeters will perform as expected. With the aim of understanding of performance of the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter to electrons 12\\% of modules have been exposed in electron beams with various energies by three possible ways: cell-scan at $\\theta =20^o$ at the centers of the front face cells, $\\eta$-scan and tilerow scan at $\\theta = 90^o$ for the module side cells. We have extracted the electron energy resolutions of the $EBM-$ (ANL-44), $EBM+$ (IFA-42) and $BM$ (JINR-55) Modules of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at energies E = 10, 20, 50, 100 and 180 GeV and $\\theta = 20^o$ and $90^o $ and $\\eta$ scan from the July 2002 testbeam run data using the flat filter method of the PMT signal reconstruction. We have determined the statistical and constant terms for the electron en...

  9. Electron Energy Resolution of the ATLAS TILECAL Modules with Fit Filter Method (July 2002 test beam)

    CERN Document Server

    Kulchitskii, Yu A; Vinogradov, V B

    2006-01-01

    The constructed ATLAS detector at the LHC will have the great physics discovery potential, in particular in the detection of a heavy Higgs boson. Calorimeters will play a crucial role in it. It is necessary to have confidence that the calorimeters will perform as expected. With the aim of understanding of performance of the ATLAS Tile hadronic calorimeter to electrons 12\\% of modules have been exposed in electron beams with various energies by three possible ways: cell-scan at $\\theta =20^o$ at the centers of the front face cells, $\\eta$-scan and tilerow scan at $\\theta = 90^o$ for the module side cells. We have extracted the electron energy resolutions of the $EBM-$ (ANL-44), $EBM+$ (IFA-42) and $BM$ (JINR-55) Modules of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at energies E = 10, 20, 50, 100 and 180 GeV and $\\theta = 20^o$ and $90^o $ and $\\eta$ scan from the July 2002 testbeam run data using the fit filter method of the PMT signal reconstruction. We have determined the statistical and constant terms for the electron ene...

  10. Expected performance of the upgrade ATLAS experiment for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Peilian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been successfully delivering proton-proton collision data at the unprecedented center of mass energy of 13 TeV. An upgrade is planned to increase the instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC in what is called the HL-LHC, aiming to deliver a total of up 3000/fb to 4000/fb of data per experiment. To cope with the expected data-taking conditions ATLAS is planning major upgrades of the detector. It is now a critical time for these upgrade projects and during the last year and a half, six Technical Design Reports (TDR) were produced by the ATLAS Collaboration. In these TDRs the physics motivation and benefits of such upgrades are discussed together with details on the upgrade project itself. In this contribution we review the expected performance of the upgraded ATLAS detector and the expected reach for physics measurements as well as the discovery potential for new physics that is expected by the end of the HL-LHC data-taking. The performance of object reconstruction under...

  11. Commissioning of the Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Sune; Hansen, Peter; Hansen, Jørgen Beck

    The startup of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) has initialized a new era in particle physics. The standard model of particle physics has for the last 40 years with tremendous success described all measurements with phenomenal precision. The experiments at the LHC are testing the standard model in a new energy regime. To normalize the measurements and understand the potential discoveries of the LHC experiments it is often crucial to know the interaction rate - the absolute luminosity. The ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) detector will measure luminosity by numerous methods. But for most of the methods only the relative luminosity is measured with good precision. The absolute scale has to be provided from elsewhere. ATLAS is like the other LHC experiments mainly relying of absolute luminosity calibration from van der Meer scans (beam separation scans). To cross check and maybe even improve the precision; ATLAS has built a sub-detector to measure the flux of protons scattered under very small angles as this flux...

  12. A silicon strip module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade in the super LHC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Parzefall, U; Clark, A; Ikegami, Y; Hara, K; Garcia, C; Jakobs, K; Dwuznik, M; Terada, S; Barbier, G; Koriki, T; Lacasta, C; Unno, Y; Anghinolfi, F; Cadoux, F; Garcia, S M I; Ferrere, D; La Marra, D; Pohl, M; Dabrowski, W; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is a general purpose experiment designed to fully exploit the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a nominal luminosity of 10(34)cm(-2)s(-1). It is expected that after several years of successful data-taking, the LHC physics program will be extended by increasing the peak luminosity by one order of magnitude. For ATLAS, an upgrade scenario will imply the complete replacement of the Inner Detector (ID), since the current tracker will not provide the required performance due to cumulated radiation damage and a dramatic increase in the detector occupancy. In this paper, a proposal of a double-sided silicon micro-strip module for the short-strip region of the future ATLAS ID is presented. The expected thermal performance based upon detailed FEA simulations is discussed. First electrical results from a prototype version of the next generation readout front-end chips are also shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  14. Discovery Mondays

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Many people don't realise quite how much is going on at CERN. Would you like to gain first-hand knowledge of CERN's scientific and technological activities and their many applications? Try out some experiments for yourself, or pick the brains of the people in charge? If so, then the «Lundis Découverte» or Discovery Mondays, will be right up your street. Starting on May 5th, on every first Monday of the month you will be introduced to a different facet of the Laboratory. CERN staff, non-scientists, and members of the general public, everyone is welcome. So tell your friends and neighbours and make sure you don't miss this opportunity to satisfy your curiosity and enjoy yourself at the same time. You won't have to listen to a lecture, as the idea is to have open exchange with the expert in question and for each subject to be illustrated with experiments and demonstrations. There's no need to book, as Microcosm, CERN's interactive museum, will be open non-stop from 7.30 p.m. to 9 p.m. On the first Discovery M...

  15. Report to users of ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Glagola, B.

    1995-05-01

    This report contains discussing in the following areas: Status of the Atlas accelerator; highlights of recent research at Atlas; concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on Atlas; program advisory committee; Atlas executive committee; and Atlas and ANL physics division on the world wide web

  16. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  17. Superconducting rf development at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Clifft, B.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India); Givens, J.; Potter, J.; Crandall, K. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Added, N. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac began operation in 1978 and has operated nearly continuously since that time, while undergoing a series of upgrades and expansions, the most recent being the ``uranium upgrade`` completed earlier this year and described below. In its present configuration the ATLAS linac consists of an array of 64 resonant cavities operating from 48 to 145 MHz, which match a range of particle velocities .007 < {beta} = v/c < .2. The linac provides approximately 50 MV of effective accelerating potential for ions of q/m > 1/10 over the entire periodic table. Delivered beams include 5 {minus} 7 pnA of {sup 238}U{sup 39+} at 1535 MeV. At present more than 10{sup 6} cavity-hours of operation at surface electric fields of 15 MV/m have been accumulated. Superconducting structure development at ATLAS is aimed at improving the cost/performance of existing low velocity structures both for possible future ATLAS upgrades, and also for heavy-ion linacs at other institutions. An application of particular current interest is to develop structures suitable for accelerating radioactive ion beams. Such structures must accelerate very low charge to mass ratio beams and must also have very large transverse acceptance.

  18. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  19. Production of the Finnish Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammelin, Bengt; Vihma, Timo; Atlaskin, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    ) the parameterization method for gust factor was extended to be applicable at higher altitudes; and (vii) the dissemination of the Wind Atlas was based on new technical solutions. The AROME results were calculated for the heights of 50, 75, 100, 125, 150, 200, 300 and 400 m, and the WAsP results for the heights of 50......, 75, 100, 125 and 150 m. In addition to the wind speed, the results included the values of the Weibull distribution parameters, the gust factor, wind power content and the potential power production, which was calculated for three turbine sizes. The Wind Atlas data are available for each grid point......The Finnish Wind Atlas was prepared applying the mesoscale model AROME with 2.5 km horizontal resolution and the diagnostic downscaling method Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programme (WAsP) with 250 m resolution. The latter was applied for areas most favourable for wind power production: a 30...

  20. Luminosity Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Maettig, Stefan; Pauly, T

    For almost all measurements performed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) one crucial ingredient is the precise knowledge about the integrated luminosity. The determination and precision on the integrated luminosity has direct implications on any cross-section measurement, and its instantaneous measurement gives important feedback on the conditions at the experimental insertions and on the accelerator performance. ATLAS is one of the main experiments at the LHC. In order to provide an accurate and reliable luminosity determination, ATLAS uses a variety of different sub-detectors and algorithms that measure the luminosity simultaneously. One of these sub-detectors are the Beam Condition Monitors (BCM) that were designed to protect the ATLAS detector from potentially dangerous beam losses. Due to its fast readout and very clean signals this diamond detector is providing in addition since May 2011 the official ATLAS luminosity. This thesis describes the calibration and performance of the BCM as a luminosity detec...

  1. ERCP atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pott, G.; Schrameyer, B.

    1989-01-01

    Endoscopic-retrograde cholangio-pancreatography is a diagnostic tool that has become a routine method also in medical centres other than those specializing in the field of gastroenterology. It is estimated that there are about 1000 hospitals in the Federal Republic of Germany applying cholangio-pancreatography as a diagnostic method. Frequently, data interpretation is difficult, because imaging of subsequently detected lesions is found to have been insufficiently differential, or incomplete. The experienced examiner, who knows the pathological processes involved and hence to be expected, will perform the ERCP examination in a specific manner, i.e. purposefully. The ERCP atlas now presents a selection of typical, frequently found conditions, and of rarely encountered lesions. The material has been chosen from a total of 15 000 retrograde cholangio-pancreatographies. The introductory text is relatively short, as it is not so much intended to enhance experienced readers' skill in endoscopic diagnostics, - there is other literature for this purpose -, but rather as a brief survey for less experienced readers. (orig./MG) With 280 figs [de

  2. Physics potential and experimental challenges of the LHC luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, F.; Ball, A.; Bloch, P.; Casagrande, L.; Cittolin, S.; Roeck, A. de; Ellis, N.; Farthouat, P.; Hansen, J.-B. [CERN, Experimental Physics Division, Geneva (Switzerland); Mangano, M.L. [CERN, Theoretical Physics Division, Geneva (Switzerland); Virdee, T. [CERN, Experimental Physics Division, Geneva (Switzerland); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Abdullin, S. [University of Maryland (United States); Azuelos, G. [University of Montreal, Group of Particle Physics, Montreal (Canada); Barberis, D. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN (Italy); Belyaev, A. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Bosman, M. [IFAE, Barcelona (Spain); Cavalli, D. [INFN, Milano (Italy); Chumney, P.; Dasu, S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fournier, D. [LAL, Orsay (France); Hinchliffe, I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Huhtinen, M.; Jakobs, K.; Joram, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mikenberg, G.; Miagkov, A.; Moretti, M.; Moretti, S.; Niinikoski, T.; Nikitenko, A.; Nisati, A.; Paige, F.; Palestini, S.; Papadopoulos, C.G.; Piccinini, F.; Pittau, R.; Polesello, G.; Richter-Was, E.; Sharp, P.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Smith, W.H.; Stapnes, S.; Tonelli, G.; Tsesmelis, E.; Usubov, Z.; Vacavant, L.; Bij, J. van der; Watson, A.; Wielers, M.

    2004-02-01

    We discuss the physics potential and the experimental challenges of an upgraded LHC running at an instantaneous luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The detector R and D needed to operate ATLAS and CMS in a very high radiation environment and the expected detector performance are discussed. A few examples of the increased physics potential are given, ranging from precise measurements within the Standard Model (in particular in the Higgs sector) to the discovery reach for several New Physics processes. (orig.)

  3. Probabilistic liver atlas construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Esther; Domingo, Juan; Ayala, Guillermo; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Goceri, E

    2017-01-13

    Anatomical atlases are 3D volumes or shapes representing an organ or structure of the human body. They contain either the prototypical shape of the object of interest together with other shapes representing its statistical variations (statistical atlas) or a probability map of belonging to the object (probabilistic atlas). Probabilistic atlases are mostly built with simple estimations only involving the data at each spatial location. A new method for probabilistic atlas construction that uses a generalized linear model is proposed. This method aims to improve the estimation of the probability to be covered by the liver. Furthermore, all methods to build an atlas involve previous coregistration of the sample of shapes available. The influence of the geometrical transformation adopted for registration in the quality of the final atlas has not been sufficiently investigated. The ability of an atlas to adapt to a new case is one of the most important quality criteria that should be taken into account. The presented experiments show that some methods for atlas construction are severely affected by the previous coregistration step. We show the good performance of the new approach. Furthermore, results suggest that extremely flexible registration methods are not always beneficial, since they can reduce the variability of the atlas and hence its ability to give sensible values of probability when used as an aid in segmentation of new cases.

  4. Quantifying the Ease of Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbesman, Samuel

    2011-02-01

    It has long been known that scientific output proceeds on an exponential increase, or more properly, a logistic growth curve. The interplay between effort and discovery is clear, and the nature of the functional form has been thought to be due to many changes in the scientific process over time. Here I show a quantitative method for examining the ease of scientific progress, another necessary component in understanding scientific discovery. Using examples from three different scientific disciplines - mammalian species, chemical elements, and minor planets - I find the ease of discovery to conform to an exponential decay. In addition, I show how the pace of scientific discovery can be best understood as the outcome of both scientific output and ease of discovery. A quantitative study of the ease of scientific discovery in the aggregate, such as done here, has the potential to provide a great deal of insight into both the nature of future discoveries and the technical processes behind discoveries in science.

  5. TU-CD-BRA-04: Evaluation of An Atlas-Based Segmentation Method for Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, AS; Piper, J; Curry, K; Swallen, A [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, RS [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prostate MRI plays an important role in diagnosis, biopsy guidance, and therapy planning for prostate cancer. Prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image fusion for ultrasound biopsy guidance and delivery of radiation. Our goal in this study is to evaluate an automatic atlas-based segmentation method for generating prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) contours on MRI. Methods: T2-weighted MRIs were acquired on 3T-Discovery MR750 System (GE, Milwaukee). The Volumes of Interest (VOIs): prostate and PZ were outlined by an expert radiation oncologist and used to create an atlas library for atlas-based segmentation. The atlas-segmentation accuracy was evaluated using a leave-one-out analysis. The method involved automatically finding the atlas subject that best matched the test subject followed by a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of the atlas subject to the test subject. The prostate and PZ contours were transformed to the test subject using the same deformation. For each test subject the three best matches were used and the final contour was combined using Majority Vote. The atlas-segmentation process was fully automatic. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean Hausdorff values were used for comparison. Results: VOIs contours were available for 28 subjects. For the prostate, the atlas-based segmentation method resulted in an average DSC of 0.88+/−0.08 and a mean Hausdorff distance of 1.1+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.60–0.69(1), 0.70–0.79(2), 0.80–0.89(13), >0.89(11). For the PZ, the average DSC was 0.72+/−0.17 and average Hausdorff of 0.9+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: <0.60(4), 0.60–0.69(6), 0.70–0.79(7), 0.80–0.89(9), >0.89(1). Conclusion: The MRI atlas-based segmentation method achieved good results for both the whole prostate and PZ compared to expert defined VOIs. The technique is fast, fully automatic, and has the potential

  6. TU-CD-BRA-04: Evaluation of An Atlas-Based Segmentation Method for Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, AS; Piper, J; Curry, K; Swallen, A; Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, RS

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate MRI plays an important role in diagnosis, biopsy guidance, and therapy planning for prostate cancer. Prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image fusion for ultrasound biopsy guidance and delivery of radiation. Our goal in this study is to evaluate an automatic atlas-based segmentation method for generating prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) contours on MRI. Methods: T2-weighted MRIs were acquired on 3T-Discovery MR750 System (GE, Milwaukee). The Volumes of Interest (VOIs): prostate and PZ were outlined by an expert radiation oncologist and used to create an atlas library for atlas-based segmentation. The atlas-segmentation accuracy was evaluated using a leave-one-out analysis. The method involved automatically finding the atlas subject that best matched the test subject followed by a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of the atlas subject to the test subject. The prostate and PZ contours were transformed to the test subject using the same deformation. For each test subject the three best matches were used and the final contour was combined using Majority Vote. The atlas-segmentation process was fully automatic. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and mean Hausdorff values were used for comparison. Results: VOIs contours were available for 28 subjects. For the prostate, the atlas-based segmentation method resulted in an average DSC of 0.88+/−0.08 and a mean Hausdorff distance of 1.1+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.60–0.69(1), 0.70–0.79(2), 0.80–0.89(13), >0.89(11). For the PZ, the average DSC was 0.72+/−0.17 and average Hausdorff of 0.9+/−0.9mm. The number of patients (#) in DSC ranges are as follows: 0.89(1). Conclusion: The MRI atlas-based segmentation method achieved good results for both the whole prostate and PZ compared to expert defined VOIs. The technique is fast, fully automatic, and has the potential to provide significant time savings for prostate VOI

  7. ATLAS distributed computing: experience and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairz, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has just concluded its first running period which commenced in 2010. After two years of remarkable performance from the LHC and ATLAS, the experiment has accumulated more than 25 fb −1 of data. The total volume of beam and simulated data products exceeds 100 PB distributed across more than 150 computing centres around the world, managed by the experiment's distributed data management system. These sites have provided up to 150,000 computing cores to ATLAS's global production and analysis processing system, enabling a rich physics programme including the discovery of the Higgs-like boson in 2012. The wealth of accumulated experience in global data-intensive computing at this massive scale, and the considerably more challenging requirements of LHC computing from 2015 when the LHC resumes operation, are driving a comprehensive design and development cycle to prepare a revised computing model together with data processing and management systems able to meet the demands of higher trigger rates, energies and event complexities. An essential requirement will be the efficient utilisation of current and future processor technologies as well as a broad range of computing platforms, including supercomputing and cloud resources. We will report on experience gained thus far and our progress in preparing ATLAS computing for the future

  8. The Education and Outreach Program of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Barnett, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS Education and Outreach (E&O) program began in 1997, but the advent of LHC has placed a new urgency in our efforts. Even a year away, we can feel the approaching impact of starting an experiment that could make revolutionary discoveries. The public and teachers are beginning to turn their attention our way, and the newsmedia are showing growing interest in ATLAS. When datataking begins, the interest will peak, and the demands on us are likely to be substantial. The collaboration is responding to this challenge in a number of ways. ATLAS management has begun consultation with experts. The official budget for the E&O group has been growing as have the contributions of many ATLAS institutions. The number of collaboration members joining these efforts has grown, and their time and effort is increasing. We are in ongoing consultation with the CERN Public Affairs Office, as well as the other LHC experiments and the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. The E&O group has expanded the scope...

  9. Sharing ATLAS data and research with young students

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073758; The ATLAS collaboration; Ould-Saada, Farid; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the International Masterclasses (IMC) featured the use of real experimental data as produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and collected by the detectors. We present ATLAS-based educational material using these data allowing high-school students to learn about properties of known particles and search for new phenomena. The ambition to bring to the “classrooms” important LHC discoveries is realised using the recent discovery of the Higgs boson. Approximately 10% of the ATLAS discovery data are made available for students to search for the Higgs boson: 2 fb−1 at 8 TeV for the Z path, and 1 fb−1 at 7 TeV for the W path, in the 2014 version of IMC. The Higgs study samples constitute one third of the total sample including Z, W and other low mass resonances. The educational material is tuned and expanded to follow LHC “heartbeats”.

  10. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  11. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  12. Future ATLAS Higgs Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, Ben; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will prove a challenging environment to work in, with for example $=200$ expected. It will however also provide great opportunities for advancing studies of the Higgs boson. The ATLAS detector will be upgraded, and Higgs prospects analyses have been performed to assess the reach of ATLAS Higgs studies in the HL-LHC era. These analyses are presented, as are Run-2 ATLAS di-Higgs analyses for comparison.

  13. Consolidation of cloud computing in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224309; The ATLAS collaboration; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; Mcnab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall; Giordano, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the first half of LHC Run 2, ATLAS cloud computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS cloud computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vacuum resources, streamlined usage of the Simulation at Point 1 cloud for offline processing, extreme scaling on Amazon compute resources, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Finally, building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in resp...

  14. Consolidation of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224309; The ATLAS collaboration; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; Mcnab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first year of LHC Run 2, ATLAS Cloud Computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS Cloud Computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vac resources, streamlined usage of the High Level Trigger cloud for simulation and reconstruction, extreme scaling on Amazon EC2, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in response to problems. ...

  15. Consolidation of cloud computing in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan P.; Domingues Cordeiro, Cristovao Jose; Giordano, Domenico; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; McNab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the first half of LHC Run 2, ATLAS cloud computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS cloud computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vacuum resources, streamlined usage of the Simulation at Point 1 cloud for offline processing, extreme scaling on Amazon compute resources, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Finally, building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in response to problems.

  16. A high-resolution gene expression atlas of epistasis between gene-specific transcription factors exposes potential mechanisms for genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameith, Katrin; Amini, Saman; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; van Leenen, Dik; Brok, Mariel; Brabers, Nathalie; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Hooff, Sander R; Benschop, Joris J; Lenstra, Tineke L; Apweiler, Eva; van Wageningen, Sake; Snel, Berend; Holstege, Frank C P; Kemmeren, Patrick

    2015-12-23

    Genetic interactions, or non-additive effects between genes, play a crucial role in many cellular processes and disease. Which mechanisms underlie these genetic interactions has hardly been characterized. Understanding the molecular basis of genetic interactions is crucial in deciphering pathway organization and understanding the relationship between genotype, phenotype and disease. To investigate the nature of genetic interactions between gene-specific transcription factors (GSTFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we systematically analyzed 72 GSTF pairs by gene expression profiling double and single deletion mutants. These pairs were selected through previously published growth-based genetic interactions as well as through similarity in DNA binding properties. The result is a high-resolution atlas of gene expression-based genetic interactions that provides systems-level insight into GSTF epistasis. The atlas confirms known genetic interactions and exposes new ones. Importantly, the data can be used to investigate mechanisms that underlie individual genetic interactions. Two molecular mechanisms are proposed, "buffering by induced dependency" and "alleviation by derepression". These mechanisms indicate how negative genetic interactions can occur between seemingly unrelated parallel pathways and how positive genetic interactions can indirectly expose parallel rather than same-pathway relationships. The focus on GSTFs is important for understanding the transcription regulatory network of yeast as it uncovers details behind many redundancy relationships, some of which are completely new. In addition, the study provides general insight into the complex nature of epistasis and proposes mechanistic models for genetic interactions, the majority of which do not fall into easily recognizable within- or between-pathway relationships.

  17. Report to users of Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Glagola, B.

    1996-06-01

    This report contains the following topics: Status of the ATLAS Accelerator; Highlights of Recent Research at ATLAS; Program Advisory Committee; ATLAS User Group Executive Committee; FMA Information Available On The World Wide Web; Conference on Nuclear Structure at the Limits; and Workshop on Experiments with Gammasphere at ATLAS

  18. Two decision-support tools for assessing the potential effects of energy development on hydrologic resources as part of the Energy and Environment in the Rocky Mountain Area interactive energy atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, Joshua I.; Matherne, Anne Marie; Leib, Kenneth J.; Carr, Natasha B.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Latysh, Natalie; Ignizio, Drew A.; Babel, Nils C.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey project—Energy and Environment in the Rocky Mountain Area (EERMA)—has developed a set of virtual tools in the form of an online interactive energy atlas for Colorado and New Mexico to facilitate access to geospatial data related to energy resources, energy infrastructure, and natural resources that may be affected by energy development. The interactive energy atlas currently (2014) consists of three components: (1) a series of interactive maps; (2) downloadable geospatial datasets; and (3) decison-support tools, including two maps related to hydrologic resources discussed in this report. The hydrologic-resource maps can be used to examine the potential effects of energy development on hydrologic resources with respect to (1) groundwater vulnerability, by using the depth to water, recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of the vadose zone, and hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer (DRASTIC) model, and (2) landscape erosion potential, by using the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE). The DRASTIC aquifer vulnerability index value for the two-State area ranges from 48 to 199. Higher values, indicating greater relative aquifer vulnerability, are centered in south-central Colorado, areas in southeastern New Mexico, and along riparian corridors in both States—all areas where the water table is relatively close to the land surface and the aquifer is more susceptible to surface influences. As calculated by the RUSLE model, potential mean annual erosion, as soil loss in units of tons per acre per year, ranges from 0 to 12,576 over the two-State area. The RUSLE model calculated low erosion potential over most of Colorado and New Mexico, with predictions of highest erosion potential largely confined to areas of mountains or escarpments. An example is presented of how a fully interactive RUSLE model could be further used as a decision-support tool to evaluate the potential hydrologic effects of energy development on a

  19. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  20. ATLAS Brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  1. ATLAS brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  2. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  3. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  4. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  5. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  6. ATLAS OF EUROPEAN VALUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M Ed Uwe Krause

    2008-01-01

    Uwe Krause: Atlas of Eurpean Values De Atlas of European Values is een samenwerkingsproject met bijbehorende website van de Universiteit van Tilburg en Fontys Lerarenopleiding in Tilburg, waarbij de wetenschappelijke data van de European Values Study (EVS) voor het onderwijs toegankelijk worden

  7. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  8. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  9. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  10. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  11. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  12. ATLAS brochure (Norwegian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter. Français

  13. ATLAS Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  14. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  15. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  16. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  17. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  18. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  19. ATLAS Open Data project

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The current ATLAS model of Open Access to recorded and simulated data offers the opportunity to access datasets with a focus on education, training and outreach. This mandate supports the creation of platforms, projects, software, and educational products used all over the planet. We describe the overall status of ATLAS Open Data (http://opendata.atlas.cern) activities, from core ATLAS activities and releases to individual and group efforts, as well as educational programs, and final web or software-based (and hard-copy) products that have been produced or are under development. The relatively large number and heterogeneous use cases currently documented is driving an upcoming release of more data and resources for the ATLAS Community and anyone interested to explore the world of experimental particle physics and the computer sciences through data analysis.

  20. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  1. Software Validation in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgkinson, Mark; Seuster, Rolf; Simmons, Brinick; Sherwood, Peter; Rousseau, David

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration operates an extensive set of protocols to validate the quality of the offline software in a timely manner. This is essential in order to process the large amounts of data being collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011 without complications on the offline software side. We will discuss a number of different strategies used to validate the ATLAS offline software; running the ATLAS framework software, Athena, in a variety of configurations daily on each nightly build via the ATLAS Nightly System (ATN) and Run Time Tester (RTT) systems; the monitoring of these tests and checking the compilation of the software via distributed teams of rotating shifters; monitoring of and follow up on bug reports by the shifter teams and periodic software cleaning weeks to improve the quality of the offline software further.

  2. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  3. Search for the Higgs boson in fermionic channels using the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hageböck Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, the emphasis has shifted towards measurements of its properties. Of particular importance is the direct observation of the coupling of the Higgs boson to fermions. A review of ATLAS results in the search for the Higgs boson in tau, muon and b-quark pairs is presented.

  4. Searches for BSM Higgs Bosons with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Gabriela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of a Higgs-like boson with a mass of about 125GeV has prompted the question of whether or not this particle is part of a much larger and more complex Higgs sector than that envisioned in the Standard Model. In this talk, the current results from the ATLAS Experiment regarding Beyond-the-Standard Model (BSM) Higgs hypothesis tests are outlined. Searches for additional Higgs bosons are presented and interpreted in well-motivated BSM Higgs frameworks, such as two-Higgs-doublet Models and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  5. The ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cindro, V; Dolenc, I; Kramberger, G; Macek, B; Mandic, I; Mikuz', M; Zavrtanik, M; Dobos, D; Gorisek, A; Pernegger, H; Weilhammer, P; Frais-Koelbl, H; Griesmayer, E; Niegl, M; Kagan, H; Tardif, D; Trischuk, W

    2008-01-01

    Beam conditions and the potential detector damage resulting from their anomalies have pushed the LHC experiments to build their own beam monitoring devices. The ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) consists of two stations (forward and backward) of detectors each with four modules. The sensors are required to tolerate doses up to 500 kGy and in excess of 10 15 charged particles per cm 2 over the lifetime of the experiment. Each module includes two diamond sensors read out in parallel. The stations are located symmetrically around the interaction point, positioning the diamond sensors at z = ±184 cm and r = 55 mm (a pseudo- rapidity of about 4.2). Equipped with fast electronics (2 ns rise time) these stations measure time-of-flight and pulse height to distinguish events resulting from lost beam particles from those normally occurring in proton-proton interactions. The BCM also provides a measurement of bunch-by-bunch luminosities in ATLAS by counting in-time and out-of-time collisions. Eleven detector modules have been fully assembled and tested. Tests performed range from characterisation of diamond sensors to full module tests with electron sources and in proton testbeams. Testbeam results from the CERN SPS show a module median-signal to noise of 11:1 for minimum ionising particles incident at a 45-degree angle. The best eight modules were installed on the ATLAS pixel support frame that was inserted into ATLAS in the summer of 2007. This paper describes the full BCM detector system along with simulation studies being used to develop the logic in the back-end FPGA coincidence hardware

  6. The ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cindro, V; Dolenc, I; Kramberger, G; Macek, B; Mandic, I; Mikuz' , M; Zavrtanik, M [Jozef Stefan Institute and Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dobos, D; Gorisek, A; Pernegger, H; Weilhammer, P [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Frais-Koelbl, H; Griesmayer, E; Niegl, M [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt and Fotec, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Kagan, H [Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Tardif, D; Trischuk, W [University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: william@physics.utoronto.ca

    2008-02-15

    Beam conditions and the potential detector damage resulting from their anomalies have pushed the LHC experiments to build their own beam monitoring devices. The ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) consists of two stations (forward and backward) of detectors each with four modules. The sensors are required to tolerate doses up to 500 kGy and in excess of 10{sup 15} charged particles per cm{sup 2} over the lifetime of the experiment. Each module includes two diamond sensors read out in parallel. The stations are located symmetrically around the interaction point, positioning the diamond sensors at z = {+-}184 cm and r = 55 mm (a pseudo- rapidity of about 4.2). Equipped with fast electronics (2 ns rise time) these stations measure time-of-flight and pulse height to distinguish events resulting from lost beam particles from those normally occurring in proton-proton interactions. The BCM also provides a measurement of bunch-by-bunch luminosities in ATLAS by counting in-time and out-of-time collisions. Eleven detector modules have been fully assembled and tested. Tests performed range from characterisation of diamond sensors to full module tests with electron sources and in proton testbeams. Testbeam results from the CERN SPS show a module median-signal to noise of 11:1 for minimum ionising particles incident at a 45-degree angle. The best eight modules were installed on the ATLAS pixel support frame that was inserted into ATLAS in the summer of 2007. This paper describes the full BCM detector system along with simulation studies being used to develop the logic in the back-end FPGA coincidence hardware.

  7. Draft Genome of Scalindua rubra, Obtained from the Interface Above the Discovery Deep Brine in the Red Sea, Sheds Light on Potential Salt Adaptation Strategies in Anammox Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Daan R; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Dutilh, Bas E; Jetten, Mike S M

    2017-07-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that members of the phylum Planctomycetes are abundantly present at the brine-seawater interface (BSI) above multiple brine pools in the Red Sea. Planctomycetes include bacteria capable of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Here, we investigated the possibility of anammox at BSI sites using metagenomic shotgun sequencing of DNA obtained from the BSI above the Discovery Deep brine pool. Analysis of sequencing reads matching the 16S rRNA and hzsA genes confirmed presence of anammox bacteria of the genus Scalindua. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that this Scalindua sp. belongs to a distinct group, separate from the anammox bacteria in the seawater column, that contains mostly sequences retrieved from high-salt environments. Using coverage- and composition-based binning, we extracted and assembled the draft genome of the dominant anammox bacterium. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that this Scalindua species uses compatible solutes for osmoadaptation, in contrast to other marine anammox bacteria that likely use a salt-in strategy. We propose the name Candidatus Scalindua rubra for this novel species, alluding to its discovery in the Red Sea.

  8. Automating ATLAS Computing Operations using the Site Status Board

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Espinal Curull, X; Gayazov, S; Magradze, E; Nowotka, MM; Rinaldi, L; Saiz, P; Schovancova, J; Stewart, GA; Wright, M

    2012-01-01

    The automation of operations is essential to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. The Site Status Board (SSB) is a framework which allows Virtual Organizations to monitor their computing activities at distributed sites and to evaluate site performance. The ATLAS experiment intensively uses SSB for the distributed computing shifts, for estimating data processing and data transfer efficiencies at a particular site, and for implementing automatic exclusion of sites from computing activities, in case of potential problems. ATLAS SSB provides a real-time aggregated monitoring view and keeps the history of the monitoring metrics. Based on this history, usability of a site from the perspective of ATLAS is calculated. The presentation will describe how SSB is integrated in the ATLAS operations and computing infrastructure and will cover implementation details of the ATLAS SSB sensors and alarm system, based on the information in SSB. It will demonstrate the positive impact of the use of SS...

  9. European Wind Atlas and Wind Resource Research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling

    to estimate the actual wind climate at any specific site and height within this region. The Danish and European Wind Atlases are examples of how the wind atlas methodology can be employed to estimate the wind resource potential for a country or a sub-continent. Recently, the methodology has also been used...... - from wind measurements at prospective sites to wind tunnel simulations and advanced flow modelling. Among these approaches, the wind atlas methodology - developed at Ris0 National Laboratory over the last 25 years - has gained widespread recognition and is presently considered by many as the industry......-standard tool for wind resource assessment and siting of wind turbines. The PC-implementation of the methodology, the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP), has been applied in more than 70 countries and territories world-wide. The wind atlas methodology is based on physical descriptions and models...

  10. Computational methods in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumudu P. Leelananda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The process for drug discovery and development is challenging, time consuming and expensive. Computer-aided drug discovery (CADD tools can act as a virtual shortcut, assisting in the expedition of this long process and potentially reducing the cost of research and development. Today CADD has become an effective and indispensable tool in therapeutic development. The human genome project has made available a substantial amount of sequence data that can be used in various drug discovery projects. Additionally, increasing knowledge of biological structures, as well as increasing computer power have made it possible to use computational methods effectively in various phases of the drug discovery and development pipeline. The importance of in silico tools is greater than ever before and has advanced pharmaceutical research. Here we present an overview of computational methods used in different facets of drug discovery and highlight some of the recent successes. In this review, both structure-based and ligand-based drug discovery methods are discussed. Advances in virtual high-throughput screening, protein structure prediction methods, protein–ligand docking, pharmacophore modeling and QSAR techniques are reviewed.

  11. Renewable energy atlas of the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiper, J.A.; Hlava, K.Greenwood, H.; Carr, A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2012-05-01

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. It is designed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS) and other federal land management agencies to evaluate existing and proposed renewable energy projects. Much of the content of the Atlas was compiled at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to support recent and current energy-related Environmental Impact Statements and studies, including the following projects: (1) West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) (BLM 2008); (2) Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2010); (3) Supplement to the Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2011); (4) Upper Great Plains Wind Energy PEIS (WAPA/USFWS 2012, in progress); and (5) Energy Transport Corridors: The Potential Role of Federal Lands in States Identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 368(b) (in progress). This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software; describes each of the components of the Atlas; lists the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and provides a brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies.

  12. Sharing scientific discovery globally: toward a CERN virtual visit service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, S.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Lapka, M.; Papanestis, A.

    2017-10-01

    The installation of virtual visit services by the LHC collaborations began shortly after the first high-energy collisions were provided by the CERN accelerator in 2010. The experiments: ATLAS [1], CMS [2], LHCb [3], and ALICE [4] have all joined in this popular and effective method to bring the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery into classrooms and other public venues around the world. Their programmes, which use a combination of video conference, webcast, and video recording to communicate with remote audiences have already reached tens of thousands of viewers, and the demand only continues to grow. Other venues, such as the CERN Control Centre, are also considering similar permanent installations. We present a summary of the development of the various systems in use around CERN today, including the technology deployed and a variety of use cases. We then lay down the arguments for the creation of a CERN-wide service that would support these programmes in a more coherent and effective manner. Potential services include a central booking system and operational management similar to what is currently provided for the common CERN video conference facilities. Certain choices in technology could be made to support programmes based on popular tools including (but not limited to) Skype™ [5], Google Hangouts [6], Facebook Live [7], and Periscope [8]. Successful implementation of the project, which relies on close partnership between the experiments, CERN IT CDA [9], and CERN IR ECO [10], has the potential to reach an even larger, global audience, more effectively than ever before.

  13. Study of ATLAS TRT performance with GRID and supercomputers.

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; The ATLAS collaboration; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Belyaev, Nikita; Ryabinkin, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    After the early success in discovering a new particle consistent with the long awaited Higgs boson, Large Hadron Collider experiments are ready for the precision measurements and further discoveries that will be made possible by much higher LHC collision rates from spring 2015. A proper understanding of the detectors performance at high occupancy conditions is important for many on-going physics analyses. The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is one of these detectors. TRT is a large straw tube tracking system that is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID). TRT contributes significantly to the resolution for high-pT tracks in the ID providing excellent particle identification capabilities and electron-pion separation. ATLAS experiment is using Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. WLCG is a global collaboration of computer centers and provides seamless access to computing resources which include data storage capacity, processing power, sensors, visualisation tools and more. WLCG...

  14. Study of ATLAS TRT performance with GRID and supercomputers.

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; The ATLAS collaboration; Belyaev, Nikita; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Ryabinkin, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    After the early success in discovering a new particle consistent with the long awaited Higgs boson, Large Hadron Collider experiments are ready for the precision measurements and further discoveries that will be made possible by much higher LHC collision rates from spring 2015. A proper understanding of the detectors performance at highoccupancy conditions is important for many on-going physics analyses. The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is one of these detectors. TRT is a large straw tube tracking system that is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector (ID). TRT contributes significantly to the resolution for high-pT tracks in the ID providing excellent particle identification capabilities and electron-pion separation. ATLAS experiment is using Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. WLCG is a global collaboration of computer centers and provides seamless access to computing resources which include data storage capacity, processing power, sensors, visualization tools and more. WLCG ...

  15. ATLAS Future Plans: Upgrade and the Physics with High Luminosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS experiment is planning a series of detector upgrades to cope with the planned increases in instantaneous luminosity and multiple interactions per crossing to maintain its physics capabilities. During the coming decade, the Large Hadron Collider will collide protons on protons at a center of mass energy up to 14 TeV with luminosities steadily increasing in a phased approach to over 5 × 1034 cm−2s−1. The resulting large data sets will significantly enhance the physics reach of the ATLAS detector building on the recent discovery of the Higgs-like boson. The planned detector upgrades being designed to cope with the increasing luminosity and its impact on the ATLAS physics program will be discussed.

  16. 3D atlas of brain connections and functional circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinghong; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Fock, Loe K.; Dow, Douglas E.; Chuan, Teh H.

    1997-05-01

    This work aims at the construction of an extendable brain atlas system which contains: (i) 3D models of cortical and subcortical structures along with their connections; (ii) visualization and exploration tools; and (iii) structures and connections editors. A 3D version of the Talairach- Tournoux brain atlas along with 3D Brodmann's areas are developed, co-registered, and placed in the Talairach stereotactic space. The initial built-in connections are thalamocortical ones. The structures and connections editors are provided to allow the user to add and modify cerebral structures and connections. Visualization and explorations tools are developed with four ways of exploring the brain connections model: composition, interrogation, navigation and diagnostic queries. The atlas is designed as an open system which can be extended independently in other centers according to their needs and discoveries.

  17. The ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian

    2006-06-26

    The contruction of the ATLAS Pixel Detector which is the innermost layer of the ATLAS tracking system is prgressing well. Because the pixel detector will contribute significantly to the ATLAS track and vertex reconstruction. The detector consists of identical sensor-chip-hybrid modules, arranged in three barrels in the centre and three disks on either side for the forward region. The position of the detector near the interaction point requires excellent radiation hardness, mechanical and thermal robustness, good long-term stability for all parts, combined with a low material budget. The final detector layout, new results from production modules and the status of assembly are presented.

  18. Integrating Networking into ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Networking is foundational to the ATLAS distributed infrastructure and there are many ongoing activities related to networking both within and outside of ATLAS. We will report on the progress in a number of areas exploring ATLAS's use of networking and our ability to monitor the network, analyze metrics from the network, and tune and optimize application and end-host parameters to make the most effective use of the network. Specific topics will include work on Open vSwitch for production systems, network analytics, FTS testing and tuning, and network problem alerting and alarming.

  19. Springer Autopsy of measurements with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues

    2017-01-01

    A lot of attention has been devoted to the study of discoveries in high energy physics (HEP), but less on measurements aiming at improving an existing theory like the standard model of particle physics, getting more precise values for the parameters of the theory or establishing relationships between them. This paper provides a detailed and critical study of how measurements are performed in recent HEP experiments, taking examples from differential cross section measurements with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. This study will be used to provide an elucidation of the concept of event used in HEP, in order to determine what constitutes an observation and what does not. It will highlight the essential place taken by theory-ladenness in order to produce observational facts, and will show how uncertainty and sensitivity estimates constitute an operational approach to robustness, inside the practice of science, avoiding potential circularity problem traditionally implied by theory-ladenness. This is in contrast to ...

  20. Atlas poznawczy: W stronę fundamentów wiedzy w neurokognitywistyce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell A. Poldrack

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive neuroscience aims to map mental processes onto brain function, which begs the question of what “mental processes” exist and how they relate to the tasks that are used to manipulate and measure them. This topic has been addressed informally in prior work, but we propose that cumulative progress in cognitive neuroscience requires a more systematic approach to representing the mental entities that are being mapped to brain function and the tasks used to manipulate and measure mental processes. We describe a new open collaborative project that aims to provide a knowledge base for cognitive neuroscience, called the Cognitive Atlas (accessible online at http://www.cognitiveatlas.org, and outline how this project has the potential to drive novel discoveries about both mind and brain.

  1. Expected performance of tracking and vertexing with the HL-LHC ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Calace, Noemi; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) aims to increase the LHC data-set by an order of magnitude in order to increase its potential for discoveries. Starting from the middle of 2026, the HL-LHC is expected to reach the peak instantaneous luminosity of $7.5 \\cdot 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ which corresponds to about 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. To cope with the large radiation doses and high pileup, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new all-silicon Inner Tracker. In this talk the expected performance of tracking and vertexing with the HL-LHC tracker is presented. Comparison is made to the performance with the Run2 detector. Ongoing developments of the track reconstruction for the HL-LHC are also discussed.

  2. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  3. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  4. A Prototype Ontology Tool and Interface for Coastal Atlas Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. J.; Bermudez, L.; O'Dea, L.; Haddad, T.; Cummins, V.

    2007-12-01

    While significant capacity has been built in the field of web-based coastal mapping and informatics in the last decade, little has been done to take stock of the implications of these efforts or to identify best practice in terms of taking lessons learned into consideration. This study reports on the second of two transatlantic workshops that bring together key experts from Europe, the United States and Canada to examine state-of-the-art developments in coastal web atlases (CWA), based on web enabled geographic information systems (GIS), along with future needs in mapping and informatics for the coastal practitioner community. While multiple benefits are derived from these tailor-made atlases (e.g. speedy access to multiple sources of coastal data and information; economic use of time by avoiding individual contact with different data holders), the potential exists to derive added value from the integration of disparate CWAs, to optimize decision-making at a variety of levels and across themes. The second workshop focused on the development of a strategy to make coastal web atlases interoperable by way of controlled vocabularies and ontologies. The strategy is based on web service oriented architecture and an implementation of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web services, such as Web Feature Services (WFS) and Web Map Service (WMS). Atlases publishes Catalog Web Services (CSW) using ISO 19115 metadata and controlled vocabularies encoded as Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs). URIs allows the terminology of each atlas to be uniquely identified and facilitates mapping of terminologies using semantic web technologies. A domain ontology was also created to formally represent coastal erosion terminology as a use case, and with a test linkage of those terms between the Marine Irish Digital Atlas and the Oregon Coastal Atlas. A web interface is being developed to discover coastal hazard themes in distributed coastal atlases as part of a broader International Coastal

  5. The Latest from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Since November 2008, ATLAS has undertaken detailed maintenance, consolidation and repair work on the detector (see Bulletin of 20 July 2009). Today, the fraction of the detector that is operational has increased compared to last year: less than 1% of dead channels for most of the sub-systems. "We are going to start taking data this year with a detector which is even more efficient than it was last year," agrees ATLAS Spokesperson, Fabiola Gianotti. By mid-September the detector was fully closed again, and the cavern sealed. The magnet system has been operated at nominal current for extensive periods over recent months. Once the cavern was sealed, ATLAS began two weeks of combined running. Right now, subsystems are joining the run incrementally until the point where the whole detector is integrated and running as one. In the words of ATLAS Technical Coordinator, Marzio Nessi: "Now we really start physics." In parallel, the analysis ...

  6. ATLAS soft QCD results

    CERN Document Server

    Sykora, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Recent results of soft QCD measurements performed by the ATLAS collaboration are reported. The measurements include total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, inclusive spectra, underlying event and particle correlations in p-p and p-Pb collisions.

  7. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  8. Apollo Image Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Apollo Image Atlas is a comprehensive collection of Apollo-Saturn mission photography. Included are almost 25,000 lunar images, both from orbit and from the...

  9. Consolidated Lunar Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Consolidated Lunar Atlas is a collection of the best photographic images of the moon, including low-oblique photography, full-moon photography, and tabular and...

  10. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-16

    Nov 16, 2012 ... laboration has set up a framework to automatically process the ... ing (FPM) is complementary to data quality monitoring as problems may ... the full power of the ATLAS software framework Athena [4] and the availability of the.

  11. Printed circuit for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A printed circuit board made by scientists in the ATLAS collaboration for the transition radiaton tracker (TRT). This will read data produced when a high energy particle crosses the boundary between two materials with different electrical properties.

  12. ATLAS Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The poster details the different aspects of the ATLAS Distributed Computing experience after the first year of LHC data taking. We describe the performance of the ATLAS distributed computing system and the lessons learned during the 2010 run, pointing out parts of the system which were in a good shape, and also spotting areas which required improvements. Improvements ranged from hardware upgrade on the ATLAS Tier-0 computing pools to improve data distribution rates, tuning of FTS channels between CERN and Tier-1s, and studying data access patterns for Grid analysis to improve the global processing rate. We show recent software development driven by operational needs with emphasis on data management and job execution in the ATLAS production system.

  13. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  14. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  15. ATLAS accelerator laboratory report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, P.

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the ATLAS Accelerator is reported. Modifications are reported, including the installation of conductive tires for the Pelletron chain pulleys, installation of a new high frequency sweeper system at the entrance to the linac, and improvements to the rf drive ports of eight resonators to correct failures in the thermally conductive ceramic insulators. Progress is reported on the positive-ion injector upgrade for ATLAS. Also reported are building modifications and possible new uses for the tandem injector

  16. The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Michel Mathieu, a technician for the ATLAS collaboration, is cabling the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter's first end-cap, before insertion into its cryostat. Millions of wires are connected to the electromagnetic calorimeter on this end-cap that must be carefully fed out from the detector so that data can be read out. Every element on the detector will be attached to one of these wires so that a full digital map of the end-cap can be recreated.

  17. Budker INP in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Novosibirsk group has proposed a new design for the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter with a constant thickness of absorber plates. This design has signifi- cant advantages compared to one in the Technical Proposal and it has been accepted by the ATLAS Collaboration. The Novosibirsk group is responsible for the fabrication of the precision aluminium structure for the e.m.end-cap calorimeter.

  18. ATLAS construction status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenni, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is being constructed at the LHC, in view of a data-taking startup in 2007. This report concentrates on the progress and the technical challenges of the detector construction, and summarizes the status of the work as of August 2004. The project is on track to allow the highly motivated ATLAS Collaboration to enter into a new exploratory domain of high-energy physics in 2007. (author)

  19. The Detector Safety System of the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltramello, O; Burckhart, H J; Franz, S; Jaekel, M; Jeckel, M; Lueders, S; Morpurgo, G; Santos Pedrosa, F dos; Pommes, K; Sandaker, H

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is one of the most advanced detectors for High Energy Physics experiments ever built. It consists of the order of ten functionally independent sub-detectors, which all have dedicated services like power, cooling, gas supply. A Detector Safety System has been built to detect possible operational problems and abnormal and potentially dangerous situations at an early stage and, if needed, to bring the relevant part of ATLAS automatically into a safe state. The procedures and the configuration specific to ATLAS are described in detail and first operational experience is given.

  20. Usability of Discovery Portals

    OpenAIRE

    Bulens, J.D.; Vullings, L.A.E.; Houtkamp, J.M.; Vanmeulebrouk, B.

    2013-01-01

    As INSPIRE progresses to be implemented in the EU, many new discovery portals are built to facilitate finding spatial data. Currently the structure of the discovery portals is determined by the way spatial data experts like to work. However, we argue that the main target group for discovery portals are not spatial data experts but professionals with limited spatial knowledge, and a focus outside the spatial domain. An exploratory usability experiment was carried out in which three discovery p...

  1. Causality discovery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Ertl, T.; Jirotka, M.; Trefethen, A.; Schmidt, A.; Coecke, B.; Bañares-Alcántara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Causality is the fabric of our dynamic world. We all make frequent attempts to reason causation relationships of everyday events (e.g., what was the cause of my headache, or what has upset Alice?). We attempt to manage causality all the time through planning and scheduling. The greatest scientific discoveries are usually about causality (e.g., Newton found the cause for an apple to fall, and Darwin discovered natural selection). Meanwhile, we continue to seek a comprehensive understanding about the causes of numerous complex phenomena, such as social divisions, economic crisis, global warming, home-grown terrorism, etc. Humans analyse and reason causality based on observation, experimentation and acquired a priori knowledge. Today's technologies enable us to make observations and carry out experiments in an unprecedented scale that has created data mountains everywhere. Whereas there are exciting opportunities to discover new causation relationships, there are also unparalleled challenges to benefit from such data mountains. In this article, we present a case for developing a new piece of ICT, called Causality Discovery Technology. We reason about the necessity, feasibility and potential impact of such a technology.

  2. ATLAS Facility Description Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Moon, Sang Ki; Park, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki Yong

    2009-04-01

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The ATLAS has the same two-loop features as the APR1400 and is designed according to the well-known scaling method suggested by Ishii and Kataoka to simulate the various test scenarios as realistically as possible. It is a half-height and 1/288-volume scaled test facility with respect to the APR1400. The fluid system of the ATLAS consists of a primary system, a secondary system, a safety injection system, a break simulating system, a containment simulating system, and auxiliary systems. The primary system includes a reactor vessel, two hot legs, four cold legs, a pressurizer, four reactor coolant pumps, and two steam generators. The secondary system of the ATLAS is simplified to be of a circulating loop-type. Most of the safety injection features of the APR1400 and the OPR1000 are incorporated into the safety injection system of the ATLAS. In the ATLAS test facility, about 1300 instrumentations are installed to precisely investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior in simulation of the various test scenarios. This report describes the scaling methodology, the geometric data of the individual component, and the specification and the location of the instrumentations in detail

  3. ATLAS-AWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrcke, Jan-Philip; Stonjek, Stefan; Kluth, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We show how the ATLAS offline software is ported on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). We prepare an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) on the basis of the standard ATLAS platform Scientific Linux 4 (SL4). Then an instance of the SLC4 AMI is started on EC2 and we install and validate a recent release of the ATLAS offline software distribution kit. The installed software is archived as an image on the Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and can be quickly retrieved and connected to new SL4 AMI instances using the Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS). ATLAS jobs can then configure against the release kit using the ATLAS configuration management tool (cmt) in the standard way. The output of jobs is exported to S3 before the SL4 AMI is terminated. Job status information is transferred to the Amazon SimpleDB service. The whole process of launching instances of our AMI, starting, monitoring and stopping jobs and retrieving job output from S3 is controlled from a client machine using python scripts implementing the Amazon EC2/S3 API via the boto library working together with small scripts embedded in the SL4 AMI. We report our experience with setting up and operating the system using standard ATLAS job transforms.

  4. Usability of Discovery Portals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulens, J.D.; Vullings, L.A.E.; Houtkamp, J.M.; Vanmeulebrouk, B.

    2013-01-01

    As INSPIRE progresses to be implemented in the EU, many new discovery portals are built to facilitate finding spatial data. Currently the structure of the discovery portals is determined by the way spatial data experts like to work. However, we argue that the main target group for discovery portals

  5. Discovery and the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    ''Discovery and the Atom'' tells the story of the founding of nuclear physics. This programme looks at nuclear physics up to the discovery of the neutron in 1932. Animation explains the science of the classic experiments, such as the scattering of alpha particles by Rutherford and the discovery of the nucleus. Archive film shows the people: Lord Rutherford, James Chadwick, Marie Curie. (author)

  6. Virtual Machine Logbook - Enabling virtualization for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yushu; Calafiura, Paolo; Leggett, Charles; Poffet, Julien; Cavalli, Andrea; Frederic, Bapst

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS software has been developed mostly on CERN linux cluster lxplus or on similar facilities at the experiment Tier 1 centers. The fast rise of virtualization technology has the potential to change this model, turning every laptop or desktop into an ATLAS analysis platform. In the context of the CernVM project we are developing a suite of tools and CernVM plug-in extensions to promote the use of virtualization for ATLAS analysis and software development. The Virtual Machine Logbook (VML), in particular, is an application to organize work of physicists on multiple projects, logging their progress, and speeding up ''context switches'' from one project to another. An important feature of VML is the ability to share with a single 'click' the status of a given project with other colleagues. VML builds upon the save and restore capabilities of mainstream virtualization software like VMware, and provides a technology-independent client interface to them. A lot of emphasis in the design and implementation has gone into optimizing the save and restore process to makepractical to store many VML entries on a typical laptop disk or to share a VML entry over the network. At the same time, taking advantage of CernVM's plugin capabilities, we are extending the CernVM platform to help increase the usability of ATLAS software. For example, we added the ability to start the ATLAS event display on any computer running CernVM simply by clicking a button in a web browser. We want to integrate seamlessly VML with CernVM unique file system design to distribute efficiently ATLAS software on every physicist computer. The CernVM File System (CVMFS) download files on-demand via HTTP, and cache it locally for future use. This reduces by one order of magnitude the download sizes, making practical for a developer to work with multiple software releases on a virtual machine.

  7. Distributed analysis in ATLAS using GANGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; Brochu, Frederic; Egede, Ulrik; Reece, Will; Williams, Michael; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Maier, Andrew; Moscicki, Jakub; Vanderster, Daniel; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Pajchel, Katarina; Samset, Bjorn; Slater, Mark; Soroko, Alexander; Cowan, Greig

    2010-01-01

    Distributed data analysis using Grid resources is one of the fundamental applications in high energy physics to be addressed and realized before the start of LHC data taking. The needs to manage the resources are very high. In every experiment up to a thousand physicists will be submitting analysis jobs to the Grid. Appropriate user interfaces and helper applications have to be made available to assure that all users can use the Grid without expertise in Grid technology. These tools enlarge the number of Grid users from a few production administrators to potentially all participating physicists. The GANGA job management system (http://cern.ch/ganga), developed as a common project between the ATLAS and LHCb experiments, provides and integrates these kind of tools. GANGA provides a simple and consistent way of preparing, organizing and executing analysis tasks within the experiment analysis framework, implemented through a plug-in system. It allows trivial switching between running test jobs on a local batch system and running large-scale analyzes on the Grid, hiding Grid technicalities. We will be reporting on the plug-ins and our experiences of distributed data analysis using GANGA within the ATLAS experiment. Support for all Grids presently used by ATLAS, namely the LCG/EGEE, NDGF/NorduGrid, and OSG/PanDA is provided. The integration and interaction with the ATLAS data management system DQ2 into GANGA is a key functionality. An intelligent job brokering is set up by using the job splitting mechanism together with data-set and file location knowledge. The brokering is aided by an automated system that regularly processes test analysis jobs at all ATLAS DQ2 supported sites. Large numbers of analysis jobs can be sent to the locations of data following the ATLAS computing model. GANGA supports amongst other things tasks of user analysis with reconstructed data and small scale production of Monte Carlo data.

  8. Study of Rare Beauty Decays with ATLAS Detector at LHC and MDT Chamber Perfomances

    CERN Document Server

    Policicchio, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton-proton collider that will operate at a center of mass energy of $14~TeV$ and at a maximum luminosity of $L=10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$. The LHC will reproduce interactions similar to those which existed when the universe was only $\\sim 10^{-12}s$ old, conditions which have not been achieved in any previous collider. The primary goals of the LHC project are to discover the origin of particle masses, to explain why different particles have different masses and to search for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Also heavy quark systems and precision measurements on Standard Model parameters will be subject of LHC physics studies. ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is one of the two LHC general purpose experiments. The guiding principle in optimizing the ATLAS experiment has been maximizing the discovery potential for New Physics such as Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles, while keeping the capability of high precision measurements of known objects such as heavy quar...

  9. Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural eGamma Identification with ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Da Fonseca Pinto, Joao Victor; The ATLAS collaboration; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Seixas, Jose

    2016-01-01

    \\title{Ring-shaped Calorimetry Information for a Neural e/$\\gamma$ Identification with ATLAS Detector} After the successful operation of the Large Hadron Collider resulting with the discovery of the Higgs boson, a new data-taking period (Run 2) has started. For the first time, collisions are produced with energies of 13 TeV in the centre of mass. It is foreseen the luminosity increase, reaching values as high as $10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ yet in 2015. These changes in experimental conditions bring a proper environment for possible new physics key-findings. ATLAS is the largest LHC detector and was designed for general-purpose physics studies. Many potential physics channels have electrons or photons in their final states. For efficient studies on these channels precise measurement and identification of such particles is necessary. The identification task consists of disentangling those particles (signal) from collimated hadronic jets (background). Reported work concerns the identification process based on the cal...

  10. TeV jets at ATLAS. A probe for new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehr, Frederik

    2009-01-01

    The production of particle jets will be the dominant process at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and jets will thus be the signal or de ne the environment of many analyses at the ATLAS experiment. Their precise measurement is a vital requirement for many potential discoveries of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The first part of this thesis introduces a new method to constrain and correct errors of the energy measurement of jets in the TeV regime. The emphasis is on a very high reach in transverse jet momenta even with earliest ATLAS data. This is achievable by an intercalibration utilizing the large inclusive jet production cross section. In the second part inclusive jet measurements are used to probe the validity of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Several analyses are presented and their sensitivity is estimated using simulated data of an effective theory of a possible quark substructure. The search is then extended to effects of quantum gravity that could emerge at the LHC in scenarios of new physics, demonstrating that inclusive jet measurements are a powerful tool to probe QCD and a broad range of new physics models. (orig.)

  11. TeV jets at ATLAS. A probe for new physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehr, Frederik

    2009-01-29

    The production of particle jets will be the dominant process at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and jets will thus be the signal or de ne the environment of many analyses at the ATLAS experiment. Their precise measurement is a vital requirement for many potential discoveries of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The first part of this thesis introduces a new method to constrain and correct errors of the energy measurement of jets in the TeV regime. The emphasis is on a very high reach in transverse jet momenta even with earliest ATLAS data. This is achievable by an intercalibration utilizing the large inclusive jet production cross section. In the second part inclusive jet measurements are used to probe the validity of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Several analyses are presented and their sensitivity is estimated using simulated data of an effective theory of a possible quark substructure. The search is then extended to effects of quantum gravity that could emerge at the LHC in scenarios of new physics, demonstrating that inclusive jet measurements are a powerful tool to probe QCD and a broad range of new physics models. (orig.)

  12. TeV Jets at ATLAS - A Probe for New Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rühr, Frederik

    2009-01-01

    The production of particle jets will be the dominant process at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and jets will thus be the signal or de ne the environment of many analyses at the ATLAS experiment. Their precise measurement is a vital requirement for many potential discoveries of new physics beyond the Standard Model. The rst part of this thesis introduces a new method to constrain and correct errors of the energy measurement of jets in the TeV regime. The emphasis is on a very high reach in transverse jet momenta even with earliest ATLAS data. This is achievable by an intercalibration utilizing the large inclusive jet production cross section. In the second part inclusive jet measurements are used to probe the validity of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Several analyses are presented and their sensitivity is estimated using simulated data of an e ective theory of a possible quark substructure. The search is then extended to e ects of quantum gravity that could emerge at the LHC in scenarios of new physics, demo...

  13. The ATLAS Trigger Algorithms for General Purpose Graphics Processor Units

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger Algorithms for General Purpose Graphics Processor Units Type: Talk Abstract: We present the ATLAS Trigger algorithms developed to exploit General­ Purpose Graphics Processor Units. ATLAS is a particle physics experiment located on the LHC collider at CERN. The ATLAS Trigger system has two levels, hardware-­based Level 1 and the High Level Trigger implemented in software running on a farm of commodity CPU. Performing the trigger event selection within the available farm resources presents a significant challenge that will increase future LHC upgrades. are being evaluated as a potential solution for trigger algorithms acceleration. Key factors determining the potential benefit of this new technology are the relative execution speedup, the number of GPUs required and the relative financial cost of the selected GPU. We have developed a trigger demonstrator which includes algorithms for reconstructing tracks in the Inner Detector and Muon Spectrometer and clusters of energy deposited in the Cal...

  14. Report to users of ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Glagola, B.

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the following topics: (1) status of the ATLAS accelerator; (2) progress in R and D towards a proposal for a National ISOL Facility; (3) highlights of recent research at ATLAS; (4) the move of gammasphere from LBNL to ANL; (5) Accelerator Target Development laboratory; (6) Program Advisory Committee; (7) ATLAS User Group Executive Committee; and (8) ATLAS user handbook available in the World Wide Web. A brief summary is given for each topic

  15. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: June ATLAS Plenary Meeting Tutorial on Physics EDM and Tools (June) Freiburg Overview Week Ketevi Assamagan's Tutorial on Analysis Tools Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  16. Iran atlas of offshore renewable energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbaspour, M.; Rahimi, R. [Sharif University of Technology, School of Mechanical engineering, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the present study is to provide an Atlas of IRAN Offshore Renewable Energy Resources (hereafter called 'the Atlas') to map out wave and tidal resources at a national scale, extending over the area of the Persian Gulf and Sea of Oman. Such an Atlas can provide necessary tools to identify the areas with greatest resource potential and within reach of present technology development. To estimate available tidal energy resources at the site, a two-dimensional tidally driven hydrodynamic numerical model of Persian Gulf was developed using the hydrodynamic model in the MIKE 21 Flow Model (MIKE 21HD), with validation using tidal elevation measurements and tidal stream diamonds from Admiralty charts. The results of the model were used to produce a time series of the tidal stream velocity over the simulation period. Moreover, to assess the potential of the wave energy in this site, a model was developed based on six-hourly data from a third generation ocean wave model (ISWM-Iranian Sea Wave Model) covering the period 1992-2003. To ensure the information provided to the Atlas is managed and maintained most effectively, all the derived marine resource parameters have been captured in a structured database, within a Geographical Information System (GIS), so enabling effective data management, presentation and interrogation. (author)

  17. Yucca Mountain Project Site Atlas: Volume 1: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project Site Atlas is a reference document of field activities which have been, or are being, conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to support investigations of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. These investigations, as well as future investigations, will yield geologic, geophysical, geochemical, geomechanical, hydrologic, volcanic, seismic, and environmental data necessary to characterize Yucca Mountain and its regional setting. This chapter summarizes the background of the NNWSI Project and the objective, scope, structure, and preparation of the Site Atlas. Chapter 2 describes in more detail the bibliography and map portfolio portions of the Atlas, which are presented in Chapter 4 and Volume 2, respectively. Chapter 3 describes how to use the Atlas. The objective of the Site Atlas is to create a management tool for the DOE Waste Management Project Office (WMPO) that will allow the WMPO to compile and disseminate information regarding the location of NNWSI Project field investigations, and document the permits acquired and the environmental, archaeological, and socioeconomic surveys conducted to support those investigations. The information contained in the Atlas will serve as a historical reference of site investigation field activities. A companion document to the Atlas is the NNWSI Project Surface Based Investigations Plan (SBIP)

  18. Topology Discovery Using Cisco Discovery Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Sergio R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of discovering network topology in proprietary networks. Namely, we investigate topology discovery in Cisco-based networks. Cisco devices run Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) which holds information about these devices. We first compare properties of topologies that can be obtained from networks deploying CDP versus Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Management Information Base (MIB) Forwarding Database (FDB). Then we describe a method of discovering topology ...

  19. ATLAS Review Office

    CERN Multimedia

    Szeless, B

    The ATLAS internal reviews, be it the mandatory Production Readiness Reviews, the now newly installed Production Advancement Reviews, or the more and more requested different Design Reviews, have become a part of our ATLAS culture over the past years. The Activity Systems Status Overviews are, for the time being, a one in time event and should be held for each system as soon as possible to have some meaning. There seems to a consensus that the reviews have become a useful project tool for the ATLAS management but even more so for the sub-systems themselves making achievements as well as possible shortcomings visible. One other recognized byproduct is the increasing cross talk between the systems, a very important ingredient to make profit all the systems from the large collective knowledge we dispose of in ATLAS. In the last two months, the first two PARs were organized for the MDT End Caps and the TRT Barrel Modules, both part of the US contribution to the ATLAS Project. Furthermore several different design...

  20. ATLAS MPGD production status

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) chambers are Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors designed to provide a high spatial resolution and reasonable good time resolution in highly irradiated environments. In 2007 an ambitious long-term R\\&D activity was started in the context of the ATLAS experiment, at CERN: the Muon ATLAS Micromegas Activity (MAMMA). After years of tests on prototypes and technology breakthroughs, Micromegas chambers were chosen as tracking detectors for an upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. These novel detectors will be installed in 2020 at the end of the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider, and will serve mainly as precision detectors in the innermost part of the forward ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. Four different types of Micromegas modules, eight layers each, up to $3 m^2$ area (of unprecedented size), will cover a surface of $150 m^2$ for a total active area of about $1200 m^2$. With this upgrade the ATLAS muon system will maintain the full acceptance of its excellent...

  1. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  2. Diphoton measurements with the ATLAS detector at the LHC: search for new resonances and study of diphoton production in association with jets.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)735473; Delmastro, Marco

    This thesis studies pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV with pairs of photons in the final state, as collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2012. The diphoton final state has proven to be crucial to the discovery of the Higgs boson. The motivation for searching for additional resonances decaying into two photons is very strong due to many models predicting an extended Higgs sector. At the same time, detailed measurements of diphoton cross sections are necessary to establish the quality of the theoretical predictions currently available for these processes. The measurement of photons by ATLAS relies on an excellent calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter response. For this reason, studies related to the calibration of the photon response in the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter are initially performed, including a measurement of the calorimeter layer energy scale relative calibration using photons, and the potential need of an inter-calibration of the photon energy response as a function ...

  3. Prospects for early discoveries at the LHC with dileptons, jets and no missing energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaccio, A. di; Thompson, E.

    2009-01-01

    Final states with high p T leptons and jets, without missing energy, are predicted by several BSM models at the LHC, including LR symmetric models and Leptoquarks. The prospects for an early discovery of particles predicted by these models, using the ATLAS experiment, are discussed. These particles include in particular first and second generation leptoquarks, right-handed W and heavy neutrinos. (author)

  4. The ATLAS Fast Tracker system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00353645; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    From 2010 to 2012 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operated at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, colliding bunches of particles every 50 ns. During operation, the ATLAS trigger system has performed efficiently contributing to important results, including the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. The LHC restarted in 2015 and will operate for four years at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV and bunch crossing of 50 ns and 25 ns. These running conditions result in the mean number of overlapping proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing increasing from 20 to 60. The Fast Tracker (FTK) system is designed to deliver full event track reconstruction for all tracks with transverse momentum above 1 GeV at a Level-1 rate of 100 kHz with an average latency below 100 microseconds. This will allow the trigger to utilize tracking information from the entire detector at an earlier event selection stage than ever before, allowing for more efficient event rejection. To achieve this goal the system uses a parallel ...

  5. AGIS: The ATLAS Grid Information System

    CERN Document Server

    Anisenkov, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Senchenko, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and computing resources able to meet ATLAS requirements of petabytes scale data operations. In this paper we present ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS) designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of whole ATLAS Grid needed by ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  6. The discovery and measurements of a Higgs boson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, F; Virdee, T S

    2015-01-13

    In July 2012, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at CERN's Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of a Higgs-like boson, a new heavy particle at a mass more than 130 times the mass of a proton. Since then, further data have revealed its properties to be strikingly similar to those of the Standard Model Higgs boson, a particle expected from the mechanism introduced almost 50 years ago by six theoreticians including British physicists Peter Higgs from Edinburgh University and Tom Kibble from Imperial College London. The discovery is the culmination of a truly remarkable scientific journey and undoubtedly the most significant scientific discovery of the twenty-first century so far. Its experimental confirmation turned out to be a monumental task requiring the creation of an accelerator and experiments of unprecedented capability and complexity, designed to discern the signatures that correspond to the Higgs boson. Thousands of scientists and engineers, in each of the ATLAS and CMS teams, came together from all four corners of the world to make this massive discovery possible.

  7. Discovery of Potential Inhibitors of Squalene Synthase from Traditional Chinese Medicine Based on Virtual Screening and In Vitro Evaluation of Lipid-Lowering Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yankun; Chen, Xi; Luo, Ganggang; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Fang; Qiao, Liansheng; He, Wenjing; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2018-04-28

    Squalene synthase (SQS), a key downstream enzyme involved in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, plays an important role in treating hyperlipidemia. Compared to statins, SQS inhibitors have shown a very significant lipid-lowering effect and do not cause myotoxicity. Thus, the paper aims to discover potential SQS inhibitors from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by the combination of molecular modeling methods and biological assays. In this study, cynarin was selected as a potential SQS inhibitor candidate compound based on its pharmacophoric properties, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Cynarin could form hydrophobic interactions with PHE54, LEU211, LEU183 and PRO292, which are regarded as important interactions for the SQS inhibitors. In addition, the lipid-lowering effect of cynarin was tested in sodium oleate-induced HepG2 cells by decreasing the lipidemic parameter triglyceride (TG) level by 22.50%. Finally. cynarin was reversely screened against other anti-hyperlipidemia targets which existed in HepG2 cells and cynarin was unable to map with the pharmacophore of these targets, which indicated that the lipid-lowering effects of cynarin might be due to the inhibition of SQS. This study discovered cynarin is a potential SQS inhibitor from TCM, which could be further clinically explored for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

  8. Travel in the heart of matter: the Atlas experiment at CERN, pop-up book; Voyage au coeur de la matiere: l'experience Atlas au CERN, Livre anime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Emma; Radevsky, Anton; Blanche, Eugenie

    2011-12-01

    This 'pop-up' book, fully illustrated, proposes a travel towards the birth of the universe through Atlas, one of the four particle physics experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC). The ATLAS detector is searching for new discoveries in the head-on collisions of protons of extraordinarily high energy. ATLAS will learn about the basic forces that have shaped our Universe since the beginning of time and that will determine its fate. Among the possible unknowns are the search for the Higgs boson, the origin of mass, the extra dimensions of space, the unification of fundamental forces, and evidence for dark matter candidates in the Universe

  9. ATLAS production system

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Klimentov, Alexei; Golubkov, Dmitry; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Wenaus, Torre; Padolski, Siarhei

    2016-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS production system called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager which used by thousands of physicists to analyze the data remotely, with the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, across a more than hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based on many criterias, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kind of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteering computers. Besides jobs definition Production System also includes flexible web user interface, which implements user-friendly environment for main ATLAS workflows, e.g. simple way of combining different data flows, and real-time monitoring, optimised for using with huge amount of information to present. We present an overview of the ATLAS Production System major components: job and task definition, workflow manager web user i...

  10. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211497; The ATLAS collaboration; Boudreau, Joseph; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Martyniuk, Alex; Moyse, Edward; Thomas, Juergen; Waugh, Ben; Yallup, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  11. The ATLAS Inner Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, HM; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is equipped with a charged particle tracking system, the Inner Detector, built on three subdetectors, which provide high precision measurements made from a fine detector granularity. The Pixel and microstrip (SCT) subdetectors, which use the silicon technology, are complemented with the Transition Radiation Tracker. Since the LHC startup in 2009, the ATLAS inner tracker has played a central role in many ATLAS physics analyses. Rapid improvements in the calibration and alignment of the detector allowed it to reach nearly the nominal performance in the timespan of a few months. The tracking performance proved to be stable as the LHC luminosity increased by five orders of magnitude during the 2010 proton run, New developments in the offline reconstruction for the 2011 run will improve the tracking performance in high pile-up conditions as well as in highly boosted jets will be discussed.

  12. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Showing excellence in mechanics, electronics and cryogenics, three industries are honoured for their contributions to the ATLAS experiment. Representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony. For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Close interaction with CERN was a key factor in the selection of each rewarded company, in addition to the high-quality products they delivered to the experiment. Alu Menziken Industrie AG, of Switzerland, was honoured for the production of 380,000 aluminium tubes for the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). As Giora Mikenberg, the Muon System Project Leader stressed, the aluminium tubes were delivered on time with an extraordinary quality and precision. Between October 2000 and Jan...

  13. Two ATLAS suppliers honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recognised the outstanding contribution of two firms to the pixel detector. Recipients of the supplier award with Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, and Maximilian Metzger, CERN Secretary-General.At a ceremony held at CERN on 28 November, the ATLAS collaboration presented awards to two of its suppliers that had produced sensor wafers for the pixel detector. The CiS Institut für Mikrosensorik of Erfurt in Germany has supplied 655 sensor wafers containing a total of 1652 sensor tiles and the firm ON Semiconductor has supplied 515 sensor wafers (1177 sensor tiles) from its foundry at Roznov in the Czech Republic. Both firms have successfully met the very demanding requirements. ATLAS’s huge pixel detector is very complicated, requiring expertise in highly specialised integrated microelectronics and precision mechanics. Pixel detector project leader Kevin Einsweiler admits that when the project was first propo...

  14. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  15. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration:

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Christopher Jon; The ATLAS collaboration; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Ballestrero, Sergio; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Voronkov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of ̃3000 servers, processing the data readout from ̃100 million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. During the data taking only critical security updates are applied and broken hardware is replaced to ensure a stable operational environment. The LS1 provided an excellent opportunity to look into new technologies and applications that would help to improve and streamline the daily tasks of not only the System Administrators, but also of the scientists who wil...

  16. PanDA: distributed production and distributed analysis system for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, T

    2008-01-01

    A new distributed software system was developed in the fall of 2005 for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. This system, called PANDA, provides an integrated service architecture with late binding of jobs, maximal automation through layered services, tight binding with ATLAS Distributed Data Management system [1], advanced error discovery and recovery procedures, and other features. In this talk, we will describe the PANDA software system. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolution of PANDA based on one and half year of real experience in carrying out Computer System Commissioning data production [2] for ATLAS. The architecture of PANDA is well suited for the computing needs of the ATLAS experiment, which is expected to be one of the first HEP experiments to operate at the petabyte scale

  17. Integration Of PanDA Workload Management System With Supercomputers for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Oleynik, Danila; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Wenaus, Torre; Maeno, Tadashi; Barreiro Megino, Fernando Harald; Nilsson, Paul; Guan, Wen; Panitkin, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production ANd Distributed Analysis system) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 150 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more t...

  18. Heavy Ion Physics with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzupek, A.

    2009-01-01

    The heavy-ion program at LHC will be pursued by three experiments including ATLAS, a multipurpose detector to study p + p collisions. A report on the potential of the ATLAS detector to uncover new physics in Pb + Pb collisions at energies thirty times larger than energy available at RHIC will be presented. Key aspects of the heavy-ion program of the ATLAS experiment, implied by measurements at RHIC, will be discussed. They include measurement capability of high-p T hadronic and electromagnetic probes, quarkonia as well as elliptic flow and other bulk phenomena. Measurements by the ATLAS experiment will provide crucial information about the formation of a quark-gluon plasma at the new energy scale accessible at the LHC. (author)

  19. ATLAS@Home: Harnessing Volunteer Computing for HEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam-Bourdarios, C; Cameron, D; Filipčič, A; Lancon, E; Wu, W

    2015-01-01

    A recent common theme among HEP computing is exploitation of opportunistic resources in order to provide the maximum statistics possible for Monte Carlo simulation. Volunteer computing has been used over the last few years in many other scientific fields and by CERN itself to run simulations of the LHC beams. The ATLAS@Home project was started to allow volunteers to run simulations of collisions in the ATLAS detector. So far many thousands of members of the public have signed up to contribute their spare CPU cycles for ATLAS, and there is potential for volunteer computing to provide a significant fraction of ATLAS computing resources. Here we describe the design of the project, the lessons learned so far and the future plans. (paper)

  20. ATLAS@Home: Harnessing Volunteer Computing for HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdarios, Claire; Filipcic, Andrej; Lancon, Eric; Wu, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    A recent common theme among HEP computing is exploitation of opportunistic resources in order to provide the maximum statistics possible for Monte-Carlo simulation. Volunteer computing has been used over the last few years in many other scientific fields and by CERN itself to run simulations of the LHC beams. The ATLAS@Home project was started to allow volunteers to run simulations of collisions in the ATLAS detector. So far many thousands of members of the public have signed up to contribute their spare CPU cycles for ATLAS, and there is potential for volunteer computing to provide a significant fraction of ATLAS computing resources. Here we describe the design of the project, the lessons learned so far and the future plans.

  1. World-wide online monitoring interface of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Mineev, M; Hauser, R; Salnikov, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration accounts for more than 3000 members located all over the world. The efficiency of the experiment can be improved allowing system experts not present on site to follow the ATLAS operations in real-time, spotting potential problems which otherwise may remain unattended for a non-negligible time. Taking into account the wide geographical spread of the ATLAS collaboration, the solution of this problem is to have all monitoring information with minimal access latency available world-wide. We have implemented a framework which defines a standard approach for retrieving arbitrary monitoring information from the ATLAS private network via HTTP. An information request is made by specifying one of the predefined URLs with some optional parameters refining data which has to be shipped back in XML format. The framework takes care of receiving, parsing and forwarding such requests to the appropriate plugins. The plugins retrieve the requested data and convert it to XML (or optionally to JSON) format...

  2. Distributed Data Analysis in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis using grid resources is one of the fundamental challenges to be addressed before the start of LHC data taking. The ATLAS detector will produce petabytes of data per year, and roughly one thousand users will need to run physics analyses on this data. Appropriate user interfaces and helper applications have been made available to ensure that the grid resources can be used without requiring expertise in grid technology. These tools enlarge the number of grid users from a few production administrators to potentially all participating physicists. ATLAS makes use of three grid infrastructures for the distributed analysis: the EGEE sites, the Open Science Grid, and NorduGrid. These grids are managed by the gLite workload management system, the PanDA workload management system, and ARC middleware; many sites can be accessed via both the gLite WMS and PanDA. Users can choose between two front-end tools to access the distributed resources. Ganga is a tool co-developed with LHCb to provide a common interfa...

  3. The ATLAS Detector Safety System

    CERN Multimedia

    Helfried Burckhart; Kathy Pommes; Heidi Sandaker

    The ATLAS Detector Safety System (DSS) has the mandate to put the detector in a safe state in case an abnormal situation arises which could be potentially dangerous for the detector. It covers the CERN alarm severity levels 1 and 2, which address serious risks for the equipment. The highest level 3, which also includes danger for persons, is the responsibility of the CERN-wide system CSAM, which always triggers an intervention by the CERN fire brigade. DSS works independently from and hence complements the Detector Control System, which is the tool to operate the experiment. The DSS is organized in a Front- End (FE), which fulfills autonomously the safety functions and a Back-End (BE) for interaction and configuration. The overall layout is shown in the picture below. ATLAS DSS configuration The FE implementation is based on a redundant Programmable Logical Crate (PLC) system which is used also in industry for such safety applications. Each of the two PLCs alone, one located underground and one at the s...

  4. Discovery of the Potential Role of Sensors in a Personal Emergency Response System: What Can We Learn from a Single Workshop?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke De Backere

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Capturing knowledge from domain experts is important to effectively integrate novel technological support in existing care processes. In this paper, we present our experiences in using a specific type of workshop, which we identified as a decision-tree workshop, to determine the process and information exchange during the usage of a Personal Emergency Response System (PERS. We conducted the workshop with current and possible future users of a PERS system to investigate the potential of context- and social awareness for such a system. We discuss the workshop format as well as the results and reflection on this workshop.

  5. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M.A.B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Y.S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Navarro, J.E.; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E.N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M.H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S.M.; Gilbert, L.M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gingrich, D.M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F.M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P.F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K.W.; Glonti, G.L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L.S.; Goncalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J.J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H.A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorisek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M.I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.P.; Goussiou, A.G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H.M.; Gray, J.A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Gregor, I.M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A.A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y.V.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C.B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H.K.; Hadley, D.R.; Haefner, P.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, J.B.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G.A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R.D.; Harris, O.M.; Harrison, K; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.J.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H.S.; Haywood, S.J.; Head, S.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A.M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henss, T.; Hernandez Jimenez, Y.; Hershenhorn, A.D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N.P.; Higon-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J.C.; Hiller, K.H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S.J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M.C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M.R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J.L.; Homma, Y.; Horazdovsky, T.; Hori, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howe, T.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P.J.; Hsu, S.C.; Huang, G.S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Hughes, E.W.; Hughes, G.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Isobe, T.; Issakov, V.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A.V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J.M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J.N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M.R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D.K.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R.C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jez, P.; Jezequel, S.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K.E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S; Johns, K.A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Jones, T.J.; Jorge, P.M.; Joseph, J.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V.V.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L.V.; Kalinowski, A.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V.A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A.N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R.D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M.S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V.A.; Kazarinov, M.Y.; Keates, J.R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P.T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kelly, M.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.S.; Kim, P.C.; Kim, S.H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B.T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P.F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N.S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B.R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Koneke, K.; Konig, A.C.; Koenig, S.; Kopke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S.D.; Komar, A.A.; Komaragiri, J.R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S.P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E.V.; Korotkov, V.A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V.V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V.M.; Kotov, K.Y.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A.S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M.W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Kruger, H.; Krumshteyn, Z.V.; Kubota, T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Kurochkin, Y.A.; Kus, V.; Kwee, R.; La Rotonda, L.; Labbe, J.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V.R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lamanna, M.; Lampen, C.L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lane, J.L.; Lankford, A.J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J.F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Lazarev, A.B.; Lazzaro, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; Le Vine, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebel, C.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J.S.H.; Lee, S.C.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; LeGeyt, B.C.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; 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Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  6. Atlas of Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Marcus, A. W.; Meachan, J. E.; Rodman, A. W.; Steingisser, A. Y.; Allan, Stuart; West, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Established in 1872, Yellowstone National Park was the world’s first national park. In a fitting tribute to this diverse and beautiful region, the Atlas of Yellowstone is a compelling visual guide to this unique national park and its surrounding area. Ranging from art to wolves, from American Indians to the Yellowstone Volcano, and from geysers to population, each page explains something new about the dynamic forces shaping Yellowstone. Equal parts reference and travel guide, the Atlas of Yellowstone is an unsurpassed resource.

  7. ATLAS-Canada Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, I; Sobie, R J [HEPnet/Canada, Victoria, BC (Canada); Bedinelli, M; Butterworth, S; Groer, L; Kupchinsky, V [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Caron, B; McDonald, S; Payne, C [TRIUMF Laboratory, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chambers, R [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fitzgerald, B [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hatem, R; Marshall, P; Pobric, D [CANARIE Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Maddalena, P; Mercure, P; Robertson, S; Rochefort, M [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); McWilliam, D [BCNet, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Siegert, M [Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada)], E-mail: igable@uvic.ca (and others)

    2008-12-15

    The ATLAS-Canada computing model consists of a WLCG Tier-1 computing centre located at the TRIUMF Laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, and two distributed Tier-2 computing centres in eastern and western Canadian universities. The TRIUMF Tier-1 is connected to the CERN Tier-0 via a 10G dedicated circuit provided by CANARIE. The Canadian institutions hosting Tier-2 facilities are connected to TRIUMF via 1G lightpaths, and routing between Tier-2s occurs through TRIUMF. This paper discusses the architecture of the ATLAS-Canada network, the challenges of building the network, and the future plans.

  8. LUCID in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Groth-Jensen, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    This talk is to be given at the workshop DIFF2010 : Diffractive and electromagnetic processes at the LHC , early January next year. The aim of the talk is to give a overview/status update of the LUCID detector in ATLAS. As such the presentation will be focused on the design and current layout of the detector - with emphasis on the hardware side. The first few slides will be used to give an overview of the location, design and layout LUCID with respect to ATLAS. Afterwards some hardware issues will be address and finally some results from first LHC data will be shown.

  9. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  10. The Herschel ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  11. Population genetic structure of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with avocado in California and the discovery of a potentially recent introduction of a new clonal lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaccia, D; Pond, E; McKee, B; Douhan, G W

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) of avocado (Persea americana), caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, is the most serious disease of avocado worldwide. Previous studies have determined that this pathogen exhibits a primarily clonal reproductive mode but no population level studies have been conducted in the avocado-growing regions of California. Therefore, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism based on 22 polymorphic loci and mating type to investigate pathogen diversity from 138 isolates collected in 2009 to 2010 from 15 groves from the Northern and Southern avocado-growing regions. Additional isolates collected from avocado from 1966 to 2007 as well as isolates from other countries and hosts were also used for comparative purposes. Two distinct clades of A2 mating-type isolates from avocado were found based on neighbor joining analysis; one clade contained both newer and older collections from Northern and Southern California, whereas the other clade only contained isolates collected in 2009 and 2010 from Southern California. A third clade was also found that only contained A1 isolates from various hosts. Within the California population, a total of 16 genotypes were found with only one to four genotypes identified from any one location. The results indicate significant population structure in the California avocado P. cinnamomi population, low genotypic diversity consistent with asexual reproduction, potential evidence for the movement of clonal genotypes between the two growing regions, and a potential introduction of a new clonal lineage into Southern California.

  12. Petrographic atlas characterisation of aggregates regarding potential reactivity to alkalis : RILEM TC 219-ACS recommended guidance AAR-1.2, for use with the RILEM AAR-1.1 petrographic examination method

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Maria; Broekmans, Maarten; Sims, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This RILEM AAR 1.2 Atlas is complementary to the petrographic method described in RILEM AAR 1.1. It is designed and intended to assist in the identification of alkali-reactive rock types in concrete aggregate by thin-section petrography. Additional issues include: • optical thin-section petrography conforming to RILEM AAR 1.1 is considered the prime assessment method for aggregate materials, being effective regarding cost and time. Unequivocal identification of minerals in very-fine grained rock types may however require use of supplementary methods. • the atlas adheres to internationally adopted schemes for rock classification and nomenclature, as recommended in AAR 1.1. Thus, rock types are classified as igneous, sedimentary or metamorphic based upon mineral content, microstructure and texture/fabric. • in addition, the atlas identifies known alkali-reactive silica types in each rock type presented. It also identifies consistent coincidence between certain lithologies and silica types; however, it ref...

  13. ATLAS and LHC computing on CRAY

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Sigve; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Access and exploitation of large scale computing resources, such as those offered by general purpose HPC centres, is one import measure for ATLAS and the other Large Hadron Collider experiments in order to meet the challenge posed by the full exploitation of the future data within the constraints of flat budgets. We report on the effort moving the Swiss WLCG T2 computing, serving ATLAS, CMS and LHCb from a dedicated cluster to the large CRAY systems at the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre CSCS. These systems do not only offer very efficient hardware, cooling and highly competent operators, but also have large backfill potentials due to size and multidisciplinary usage and potential gains due to economy at scale. Technical solutions, performance, expected return and future plans are discussed.

  14. ATLAS and LHC computing on CRAY

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00297774; The ATLAS collaboration; Haug, Sigve

    2017-01-01

    Access and exploitation of large scale computing resources, such as those offered by general purpose HPC centres, is one important measure for ATLAS and the other Large Hadron Collider experiments in order to meet the challenge posed by the full exploitation of the future data within the constraints of flat budgets. We report on the effort of moving the Swiss WLCG T2 computing, serving ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, from a dedicated cluster to the large Cray systems at the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre CSCS. These systems do not only offer very efficient hardware, cooling and highly competent operators, but also have large backfill potentials due to size and multidisciplinary usage and potential gains due to economy at scale. Technical solutions, performance, expected return and future plans are discussed.

  15. CMS discovery potential for the Higgs boson in the H → ZZ* → 4e± decay channel, contribution to the construction of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puljak, I.

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the study of CMS (compact muon solenoid) potential for the Higgs boson search through the H→ ZZ * →4e ± channel. The theoretical arguments and the experimental data from the electroweak precision measurements, combined with the direct search results, tend to prefer the intermediate mass Higgs boson where this channel is expected to be used for the Higgs boson search at the LHC. After indicating the importance of the electromagnetic calorimeter in the electron reconstruction process, the mechanical structure and the optical properties of alveolar containers are described. The system for the quality control of the alveolar structures is developed, consisting of the production process monitoring system, the precise geometrical measurements and the optical quality control. For the optical quality control, the apparatus is constructed for measuring the reflexivity and the diffusivity of the raw material before the production and the alveolar structure after the complete production process. The developed quality control system ensures that the alveolar containers properties remain on the level not deteriorating the properties of the electromagnetic calorimeter. The evaluation of the CMS potential for the Higgs search through its four electrons decay consists of the signal and background studies at the particle level and the reconstruction studies including the precise detector description. To combine the Monte Carlo generated events with the recent theoretical calculations, the distributions of the Higgs transverse momentum predicted by the parton shower model and the soft gluon resummation calculations are compared. The agreement is found for the low transverse momentum, while for the agreement at higher values the parton shower model can be adjusted. The evaluation of the Zbb-bar background is done with properly modeling the phase space generation and the up date theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations are used for two other

  16. Metabolic profiling study on potential toxicity and immunotoxicity-biomarker discovery in rats treated with cyclophosphamide using HPLC-ESI-IT-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lin, Wensi; Lin, Weiwei; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Jianmei; Yang, Haisong; Ling, Xiaomei

    2015-05-01

    Despite the recent advances in understanding toxicity mechanism of cyclophosphamide (CTX), the development of biomarkers is still essential. CTX-induced immunotoxicity in rats by a metabonomics approach was investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-IT-TOF-MS). The rats were orally administered CTX (30 mg/kg/day) for five consecutive days, and on the fifth day samples of urine, thymus and spleen were collected and analyzed. A significant difference in metabolic profiling was observed between the CTX-treated group and the control group by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), which indicated that metabolic disturbances of immunotoxicity in CTX-treated rats had occurred. One potential biomarker in spleen, three in urine and three in thymus were identified. It is suggested that the CTX-toxicity mechanism may involve the modulation of tryptophan metabolism, phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism. This research can help to elucidate the CTX-influenced pathways at a low dose and can further help to indicate the patients' pathological status at earlier stages of toxicological progression after drug administration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Discovery of novel PDE9 inhibitors capable of inhibiting Aβ aggregation as potential candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tao; Zhang, Tianhua; Xie, Shishun; Yan, Jun; Wu, Yinuo; Li, Xingshu; Huang, Ling; Luo, Hai-Bin

    2016-02-01

    Recently, phosphodiesterase-9 (PDE9) inhibitors and biometal-chelators have received much attention as potential therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel series of PDE9 inhibitors with the ability to chelate metal ions. The bioassay results showed that most of these molecules strongly inhibited PDE9 activity. Compound 16 showed an IC50 of 34 nM against PDE9 and more than 55-fold selectivity against other PDEs. In addition, this compound displayed remarkable metal-chelating capacity and a considerable ability to halt copper redox cycling. Notably, in comparison to the reference compound clioquinol, it inhibited metal-induced Aβ1-42 aggregation more effectively and promoted greater disassembly of the highly structured Aβ fibrils generated through Cu2+-induced Aβ aggregation. These activities of 16, together with its favorable blood-brain barrier permeability, suggest that 16 may be a promising compound for treatment of AD.

  18. Study of R-parity Violating Decays of Supersymmetric Particles with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2101187; Flowerdew, Micheal

    Supersymmetry is a space-time symmetry that postulates the existence of new particles. It assigns to each Standard Model fermion (boson) an associated supersymmetric boson (fermion) partner with the same quantum numbers except for spin. The introduction of these new supersymmetric particles provides a potential solution to the hierarchy problem. Discovery of such particles or alternatively an exclusion of a certain supersymmetic parameter space is one of the main purposes of collider experiments. A special scenario of Supersymmetry that enables the decay of the lightest supersymmetric particle to Standard Model particles is studied using proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The searched signal is characterized by a final state of at least four leptons, which leads to extraordinarily low background contributions from Standard Model processes. The work described in this thesis assisted to an exclusion of the considered supersymmetric model for hypoth...

  19. Calculation of Wakefields and Higher Order Modes for the Vacuum Chamber of the ATLAS Experiment for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wanzenberg, R

    2013-01-01

    A design study for a High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) was started to extend the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The HL-LHC study implies also an upgraded configuration of the ATLAS detector with a new beam pipe. The trapped Higher Order Modes (HOMs) and the short range wakefields for the new design of the vacuum chamber are calculated using the computer codes MAFIA and ECHO2D. The short range wakefields are characterized in terms of kick and loss parameters. For the HOMs the frequency the R/Q and the Q-values are given which can directly converted into impedance data. The obtained data are intended to be included into the impedance database of the HL-LHC.

  20. An algorithm for optimal fusion of atlases with different labeling protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugenio Iglesias, Juan; Sabuncu, Mert Rory; Aganj, Iman

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel label fusion algorithm suited for scenarios in which different manual delineation protocols with potentially disparate structures have been used to annotate the training scans (hereafter referred to as "atlases"). Such scenarios arise when atlases have missing str...

  1. Service Discovery At Home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Scholten, Johan; Jansen, P.G.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    Service discovery is a fady new field that kicked off since the advent of ubiquitous computing and has been found essential in the making of intelligent networks by implementing automated discovery and remote control between deviies. This paper provides an ovewiew and comparison of several prominent

  2. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  3. Decades of Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    For the past two-and-a-half decades, the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy has been at the forefront of scientific discovery. Over 100 important discoveries supported by the Office of Science are represented in this document.

  4. Service discovery at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundramoorthy, V.; Scholten, Johan; Jansen, P.G.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2003-01-01

    Service discovery is a fairly new field that kicked off since the advent of ubiquitous computing and has been found essential in the making of intelligent networks by implementing automated discovery and remote control between devices. This paper provides an overview and comparison of several

  5. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  6. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  7. The ATLAS event filter

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, H P; Boissat, C; Davis, R; Duval, P Y; Etienne, F; Fede, E; Francis, D; Green, P; Hemmer, F; Jones, R; MacKinnon, J; Mapelli, Livio P; Meessen, C; Mommsen, R K; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Nacasch, R; Negri, A; Pinfold, James L; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rafflin, C; Scannicchio, D A; Stanescu, C; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the studies for the ATLAS Event Filter is given. The architecture and the high level design of the DAQ-1 prototype is presented. The current status if the prototypes is briefly given. Finally, future plans and milestones are given. (11 refs).

  8. Tema-atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Michael; Olsen, S.

    I dette tema-atlas viser forskere på By og Byg, hvordan registre over befolkning, bygninger og forbrug kan overføres til kort ved hjælp af GIS-teknologi. Atlasset er samtidig en illustration af de muligheder, som tegner sig i kommunerne for at udnytte eksisterende registre i forbindelse med...

  9. Taus at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, Sarah M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-06

    The grant "Taus at ATLAS" supported the group of Sarah Demers at Yale University over a period of 8.5 months, bridging the time between her Early Career Award and her inclusion on Yale's grant cycle within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The work supported the functioning of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and the analysis of ATLAS data. The work included searching for the Higgs Boson in a particular mode of its production (with a W or Z boson) and decay (to a pair of tau leptons.) This was part of a broad program of characterizing the Higgs boson as we try to understand this recently discovered particle, and whether or not it matches our expectations within the current standard model of particle physics. In addition, group members worked with simulation to understand the physics reach of planned upgrades to the ATLAS experiment. Supported group members include postdoctoral researcher Lotte Thomsen and graduate student Mariel Pettee.

  10. ATLAS Pixel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The first upgrade for higher luminosity at LHC for the ATLAS pixel detector is the insertion of a forth layer, the IBL. The talk gives an overview about what the IBL is and how it will be set up, as well as to give a status of the research and develoment work.

  11. Prime wires for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In an award ceremony on 3 September, ATLAS honoured the French company Axon Cable for its special coaxial cables, which were purpose-built for the Liquid Argon calorimeter modules. Working for CERN since the 1970s, Axon' Cable received the ATLAS supplier award last week for its contribution to the liquid argon calorimeter cables of ATLAS (LAL/Orsay, France and University of Victoria, Canada), started in 1996. Its two sets of minicoaxial cables, called harnesses "A" and "B", are designed to function in the harsh conditions in the liquid argon (at 90 Kelvin or -183°C) and under extreme radiation (up to several Mrads). The cables are mainly used for the readout of the calorimeters, and are connected to the outside world by 114 signal feedthroughs with 1920 channels each. The signal from the detectors is transmitted directly without any amplification, which imposes tight restrictions on the impedance and on the signal propagation time of the cables. Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, gives the award for best s...

  12. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1 March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day.

  13. A thermosiphon for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2013-01-01

    A new thermosiphon cooling system, designed for the ATLAS silicon detectors by CERN’s EN-CV team in collaboration with the experiment, will replace the current system in the next LHC run in 2015. Using the basic properties of density difference and making gravity do the hard work, the thermosiphon promises to be a very reliable solution that will ensure the long-term stability of the whole system.   Former compressor-based cooling system of the ATLAS inner detectors. The system is currently being replaced by the innovative thermosiphon. (Photo courtesy of Olivier Crespo-Lopez). Reliability is the major issue for the present cooling system of the ATLAS silicon detectors. The system was designed 13 years ago using a compressor-based cooling cycle. “The current cooling system uses oil-free compressors to avoid fluid pollution in the delicate parts of the silicon detectors,” says Michele Battistin, EN-CV-PJ section leader and project leader of the ATLAS thermosiphon....

  14. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m...

  15. Prototype ATLAS straw tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This is an early prototype of the straw tracking device for the ATLAS detector at CERN. This detector will be part of the LHC project, scheduled to start operation in 2008. The straw tracker will consist of thousands of gas-filled straws, each containing a wire, allowing the tracks of particles to be followed.

  16. Top Physics at Atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    This talk is an overview of recent results on top-quark physics obtained by the ATLAS collaboration from the analysis of p-p collisions at 7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Total and differential top pair cross section, single top cross section and mass measurements are presented.

  17. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking).

  18. Web proxy auto discovery for the WLCG

    CERN Document Server

    Dykstra, D; Blumenfeld, B; De Salvo, A; Dewhurst, A; Verguilov, V

    2017-01-01

    All four of the LHC experiments depend on web proxies (that is, squids) at each grid site to support software distribution by the CernVM FileSystem (CVMFS). CMS and ATLAS also use web proxies for conditions data distributed through the Frontier Distributed Database caching system. ATLAS & CMS each have their own methods for their grid jobs to find out which web proxies to use for Frontier at each site, and CVMFS has a third method. Those diverse methods limit usability and flexibility, particularly for opportunistic use cases, where an experiment’s jobs are run at sites that do not primarily support that experiment. This paper describes a new Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) system for discovering the addresses of web proxies. The system is based on an internet standard called Web Proxy Auto Discovery (WPAD). WPAD is in turn based on another standard called Proxy Auto Configuration (PAC). Both the Frontier and CVMFS clients support this standard. The input into the WLCG system comes from squids regis...

  19. Optimization of the ATLAS detector to search for the two-photon decaying Higgs boson at LHC; Optimisation du detecteur ATLAS pour la recherche du boson de Higgs se desintegrant en deux photons au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisserand, V [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de l' Accelerateur Lineaire; [Universite de Paris Sud, 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-02-03

    The two photon decay channel is the most clear and promising way to detect a Higgs boson of an intermediate mass between 80 GeV/c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2} at the future large proton collider of CERN (LHC). As the Higgs mass is narrow in this range, the observation of this channel relies on the performance of the electromagnetic calorimeter. A full simulation study has been performed to evaluate the discovery potential of the ATLAS detector. The results of this simulation have been confirmed by beam tests with a prototype. This simulation includes different contributions such as energy resolution sampling term, electronic and pile-up noise, global constant term and angular measurement of the two photon opening angle. The levels of the irreducible background from prompt di-photon production and the reducible background from jets with isolated leading neutrals pions have been estimated, taking into account the rejection capability of the detector. After the computation of the two photon invariant mass resolution, and the evaluation of signal and background rates, the discovery potential of the Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector was calculated. The Higgs can be discovered at five sigma confidence level after less than a year of data taking at LHC with the nominal luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} if the Higgs mass is between 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. The Higgs mass window between 80 GeV/c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2} will be covered with an integrated luminosity of 3.10{sup 5} pb{sup -1}. In the case of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model (MSSM) the plane (m{sub A{sup 0}}, tan({beta})) will be fully explored if m{sub A{sup 0}} > 175 GeV/c{sup 2}. (author)

  20. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  1. "Eureka, Eureka!" Discoveries in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Accidental discoveries have been of significant value in the progress of science. Although accidental discoveries are more common in pharmacology and chemistry, other branches of science have also benefited from such discoveries. While most discoveries are the result of persistent research, famous accidental discoveries provide a fascinating…

  2. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  3. ATLAS: A High-cadence All-sky Survey System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, J. L.; Denneau, L.; Heinze, A. N.; Stalder, B.; Smith, K. W.; Smartt, S. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Weiland, H. J.; Rest, A.

    2018-06-01

    Technology has advanced to the point that it is possible to image the entire sky every night and process the data in real time. The sky is hardly static: many interesting phenomena occur, including variable stationary objects such as stars or QSOs, transient stationary objects such as supernovae or M dwarf flares, and moving objects such as asteroids and the stars themselves. Funded by NASA, we have designed and built a sky survey system for the purpose of finding dangerous near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). This system, the “Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System” (ATLAS), has been optimized to produce the best survey capability per unit cost, and therefore is an efficient and competitive system for finding potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) but also for tracking variables and finding transients. While carrying out its NASA mission, ATLAS now discovers more bright (m day cadence. ATLAS discovered the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst independent of the high energy trigger and has released a variable star catalog of 5 × 106 sources. This is the first of a series of articles describing ATLAS, devoted to the design and performance of the ATLAS system. Subsequent articles will describe in more detail the software, the survey strategy, ATLAS-derived NEA population statistics, transient detections, and the first data release of variable stars and transient light curves.

  4. On the road to Supersymmetry with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsman, Alex; Verkerke, W

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with physics performance of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, and can roughly be divided into two parts. The first part has to do with the discovery of supersymmetry in events with one lepton, specifically one muon. Chapter 4 describes a data-driven method to estimate the Standard Model backgrounds to supersymmetry searches, describing the techniques and possible results using simulated data. Due to the delay in the LHC start-up, it was not possible to reproduce this study on collision data, on the time scale of this thesis. However it was possible and very exciting to take part in studies with the very first data coming out of ATLAS, since the LHC started colliding protons at 7 TeV collision energy from march 2010. In Chapter 5 the inclusive muon spectrum is studied and compared to simulation. The focus lies on the composition of muons, distinguishing muons coming from pion and kaon decays inside the detector, from the muons coming from the interaction point. First the results based o...

  5. National Atlas of Arctic: structure and creation approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Kasimov

    2015-01-01

    . Touristic maps will serve as guides for the Arctic with its bio-landscape and cultural diversity. Content of the Atlas should meet requirements of education standard in the field of geography. Ten sections are proposed for this version of the Atlas: introductory, geological structure, relief and resources, climate, permafrost and glaciers, land waters, seas of the Russian part of the Arctic, its flora and fauna, soils, population and economics, and conclusion Scientific and social results of the Atlas publication together with editorial and advertizing effects are demonstrated. Proposals for a format, scales of maps and type of edition are given, and potential participants of this project are indicated. 

  6. The ATLAS distributed analysis system

    OpenAIRE

    Legger, F.

    2014-01-01

    In the LHC operations era, analysis of the multi-petabyte ATLAS data sample by globally distributed physicists is a challenging task. To attain the required scale the ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing, realized in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), the largest distributed computational resource existing in the sciences. The ATLAS experiment currently stores over 140 PB of data and runs about 140,000 concurrent jobs continuously at WLCG sites. During...

  7. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Mansoora

    2012-01-01

    The extensive tau physics programs of the ATLAS experiment relies heavily on trigger to select hadronic decays of tau lepton. Such a trigger is implemented in ATLAS to efficiently collect signal events, while keeping the rate of multi-jet background within the allowed bandwidth. This contribution summarizes the performance of the ATLAS hadronic tau trigger system during 2011 data taking period and improvements implemented for the 2012 data collection.

  8. Taking ATLAS to new heights

    CERN Document Server

    Abha Eli Phoboo, ATLAS experiment

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this month, 51 members of the ATLAS collaboration trekked up to the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains, Mt. Toubkal (4,167m), in North Africa.    The physicists were in Marrakech, Morocco, attending the ATLAS Overview Week (7 - 11 October), which was held for the first time on the African continent. Around 300 members of the collaboration met to discuss the status of the LS1 upgrades and plans for the next run of the LHC. Besides the trek, 42 ATLAS members explored the Saharan sand dunes of Morocco on camels.  Photos courtesy of Patrick Jussel.

  9. The Greatest Mathematical Discovery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2010-05-12

    What mathematical discovery more than 1500 years ago: (1) Is one of the greatest, if not the greatest, single discovery in the field of mathematics? (2) Involved three subtle ideas that eluded the greatest minds of antiquity, even geniuses such as Archimedes? (3) Was fiercely resisted in Europe for hundreds of years after its discovery? (4) Even today, in historical treatments of mathematics, is often dismissed with scant mention, or else is ascribed to the wrong source? Answer: Our modern system of positional decimal notation with zero, together with the basic arithmetic computational schemes, which were discovered in India about 500 CE.

  10. Current and expected performance of tracking and vertexing with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and the HL-LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Kastanas, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has had an extremely successful data collecting period during 2017, recording over 45 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV. This was achieved, in part, by running the LHC at a high instantaneous lumi- nosity level of over 1.5 x 10+34 cm-2s-1, which corresponds to over 57 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. This talk will highlight the tracking and vertexing performance of the tracking detector within ATLAS (Inner Detector) throughout this successful year of data taking. In order to increase its potential for discoveries, the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) aims to increase the LHC data-set by an order of magnitude by collecting 3,000 fb-1 of recorded data. Starting, from mid-2026, the HL-LHC is expected to reach the peak instantaneous luminosity of 7.5 x 10+34 cm-2s-1, which corresponds to about 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per beam crossing. To cope with the large radiation doses and high pile...

  11. submitter Search for supersymmetric particles in final states with jets and missing energy with the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Janet

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN it is now possible to study physics at the TeV-scale for the first time. At this unprecedented energy range it is expected that the Standard Model of particle physics will reach its limits and new phenomena can appear. One of the main goals of the ATLAS experiment is the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. This includes observing supersymmetric particles, which are predicted to have masses of several hundred GeV up to a few TeV. The subject of this thesis is the search for supersymmetric particles in final states with jets and missing transverse energy and the evaluation of the ATLAS discovery potential for supersymmetric particles in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) parameter space for these channels. Different centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 14 TeV, 10 TeV and 7 TeV are assumed. For many R-parity conserving SUSY models, the decay of supersymmetric particles leads to detector signatures characterized by missing transve...

  12. The ATLAS ITk strip detector. Status of R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Argos, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.garcia.argos@cern.ch

    2017-02-11

    While the LHC at CERN is ramping up luminosity after the discovery of the Higgs Boson in the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2012, upgrades to the LHC and experiments are planned. The major upgrade is foreseen for 2024, with a roughly tenfold increase in luminosity, resulting in corresponding increases in particle rates and radiation doses. In ATLAS the entire Inner Detector will be replaced for Phase-II running with an all-silicon system. This paper concentrates on the strip part. Its layout foresees low-mass and modular yet highly integrated double-sided structures for the barrel and forward region. The design features conceptually simple modules made from electronic hybrids glued directly onto the silicon. Modules will then be assembled on both sides of large carbon-core structures with integrated cooling and electrical services.

  13. ATLAS EventIndex General Dataflow and Monitoring Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, Dario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS EventIndex has been running in production since mid-2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure at CERN. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database for fast datasets discovery, event-picking, crosschecks with other ATLAS systems and checks for event duplication. The system design and its optimization is serving event picking from requests of a few events up to scales of tens of thousand of events, and in addition, data consistency checks are performed for large production campaigns. Detecting duplicate events with a scope of physics collections has recently arisen as an important use case. This paper describes the general architecture of the project and the data flow and operation issues, which are addressed by recent developments to improve the throughput of the overall system. In this direction, the data collection system is reducing the usage of the messaging infrastructure to overcome t...

  14. ATLAS EventIndex general dataflow and monitoring infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)638886; The ATLAS collaboration; Barberis, Dario; Favareto, Andrea; Garcia Montoro, Carlos; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Hrivnac, Julius; Prokoshin, Fedor; Salt, Jose; Sanchez, Javier; Toebbicke, Rainer; Yuan, Ruijun

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS EventIndex has been running in production since mid-2015, reliably collecting information worldwide about all produced events and storing them in a central Hadoop infrastructure at CERN. A subset of this information is copied to an Oracle relational database for fast dataset discovery, event-picking, crosschecks with other ATLAS systems and checks for event duplication. The system design and its optimization is serving event picking from requests of a few events up to scales of tens of thousand of events, and in addition, data consistency checks are performed for large production campaigns. Detecting duplicate events with a scope of physics collections has recently arisen as an important use case. This paper describes the general architecture of the project and the data flow and operation issues, which are addressed by recent developments to improve the throughput of the overall system. In this direction, the data collection system is reducing the usage of the messaging infrastructure to overcome th...

  15. Web Proxy Auto Discovery for the WLCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, D.; Blomer, J.; Blumenfeld, B.; De Salvo, A.; Dewhurst, A.; Verguilov, V.

    2017-10-01

    All four of the LHC experiments depend on web proxies (that is, squids) at each grid site to support software distribution by the CernVM FileSystem (CVMFS). CMS and ATLAS also use web proxies for conditions data distributed through the Frontier Distributed Database caching system. ATLAS & CMS each have their own methods for their grid jobs to find out which web proxies to use for Frontier at each site, and CVMFS has a third method. Those diverse methods limit usability and flexibility, particularly for opportunistic use cases, where an experiment’s jobs are run at sites that do not primarily support that experiment. This paper describes a new Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) system for discovering the addresses of web proxies. The system is based on an internet standard called Web Proxy Auto Discovery (WPAD). WPAD is in turn based on another standard called Proxy Auto Configuration (PAC). Both the Frontier and CVMFS clients support this standard. The input into the WLCG system comes from squids registered in the ATLAS Grid Information System (AGIS) and CMS SITECONF files, cross-checked with squids registered by sites in the Grid Configuration Database (GOCDB) and the OSG Information Management (OIM) system, and combined with some exceptions manually configured by people from ATLAS and CMS who operate WLCG Squid monitoring. WPAD servers at CERN respond to http requests from grid nodes all over the world with a PAC file that lists available web proxies, based on IP addresses matched from a database that contains the IP address ranges registered to organizations. Large grid sites are encouraged to supply their own WPAD web servers for more flexibility, to avoid being affected by short term long distance network outages, and to offload the WLCG WPAD servers at CERN. The CERN WPAD servers additionally support requests from jobs running at non-grid sites (particularly for LHC@Home) which they direct to the nearest publicly accessible web proxy servers. The responses

  16. The top quark as a probe for searching new physics at the LHC using the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukla, Romain

    2016-01-01

    The work of this thesis focuses on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model in the compositeness framework, which postulates strongly coupled sectors at the TeV-scale consisting of exotic particles. Their existence can be tested at the CERN proton-proton collider, the LHC, using the ATLAS detector. The production of an heavy quark, such as the T5/3 predicted in those models, can be inferred from an enhancement of the cross-section of a given signature. Some final states, such as the one studied in this thesis involving 2 same-sign leptons, are very rare and have an excellent sensitivity. Searches for T5/3 production at the LHC using 8 and 13 TeV ATLAS data are presented. A small excess is seen at 8 TeV. Preliminary results of the 13 TeV analysis are presented and do not show any excess. The inferior limits put on the T5/3 mass is 745 GeV at 8 TeV and 990 GeV at 13 TeV. Composite models include also heavy bosons such as top-philic Z' coupled only to the top quark whose production in association to a top quark pair gives a final state similar to those from 4 tops events. A phenomenological study on the discovery potential of those exotic (Z' and effective theory) or standard (tttt) processes at 13 and 14 TeV is done and gives the minimal luminosities needed to observe deviations from the Standard Model. An instrumental study for the conception of the new LTDB card, part of the electromagnetic calorimeter's level 1 trigger system is described in the context of the ATLAS upgrade program. (author) [fr

  17. Multidimensional process discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, J.T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Typically represented in event logs, business process data describe the execution of process events over time. Business process intelligence (BPI) techniques such as process mining can be applied to get strategic insight into business processes. Process discovery, conformance checking and

  18. Fateful discovery almost forgotten

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    "The discovery of the fission of uranium exactly half a century ago is at risk of passing unremarked because of the general ambivalence towards the consequences of this development. Can that be wise?" (4 pages)

  19. Toxins and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Defining Creativity with Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Nicholas Charles; Martin, Lee

    2017-01-01

    The standard definition of creativity has enabled significant empirical and theoretical advances, yet contains philosophical conundrums concerning the nature of novelty and the role of recognition and values. In this work we offer an act of conceptual valeting that addresses these issues and in doing so, argue that creativity definitions can be extended through the use of discovery. Drawing on dispositional realist philosophy we outline why adding the discovery and bringing into being of new ...

  1. On the antiproton discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccioni, O.

    1989-01-01

    The author of this article describes his own role in the discovery of the antiproton. Although Segre and Chamberlain received the Nobel Prize in 1959 for its discovery, the author claims that their experimental method was his idea which he communicated to them informally in December 1954. He describes how his application for citizenship (he was Italian), and other scientists' manipulation, prevented him from being at Berkeley to work on the experiment himself. (UK)

  2. Discovery Driven Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august......Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august...

  3. The π discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper traces the discovery of the Π meson. The discovery was made by exposure of nuclear emulsions to cosmic radiation at high altitudes, with subsequent scanning of the emulsions for meson tracks. Disintegration of nuclei by a negative meson, and the decay of a Π meson were both observed. Further measurements revealed the mass of the meson. The studies carried out on the origin of the Π-mesons, and their mode of decay, are both described. (U.K.)

  4. ATLAS Upgrade Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, S J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the already outstanding LHC luminosity performance, and planned LHC upgrades in the upcoming shutdowns, it is expected that within a short time-scale, the general purpose LHC experiments will have to cope with luminosities beyond their original design. In order to maintain detector performance and sensitivity to expected and new physics processes, ATLAS has defined a continuous upgrade programme which foresees staged enhancements during the next 10 years of operation, and then more widespread changes before the transition to the highest luminosities after 2022. This talk will describe several components of the ATLAS upgrade, focusing in particular on the Inner Detector and Trigger. The Inner Detector faces two challenges in the higher luminosity environment: high particle multiplicities and increased radiation dose. These will be addressed in the short term by a new layer of Pixel detectors, and in the long term by a complete replacement. The Trigger faces an increasingly difficult task of distinguishing...

  5. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  6. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  7. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  8. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rados, Petar Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (W' and Z'), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented. (authors)

  9. Analysis Streamlining in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Lukas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present recent work within the ATLAS collaboration centrally provide tools to facilitate analysis management and highly automated container-based analysis execution in order to both enable non-experts to benefit from these best practices as well as the collaboration to track and re-execute analyses indpendently, e.g. during their review phase. Through integration with the ATLAS GLANCE system, users can request a pre-configured, but customizable version control setup, including continuous integration for automated build and testing as well as continuous Linux Container image building for software preservation purposes. As analyses typically require many individual steps, analysis workflow pipelines can then be defined using such images and the yadage workflow description language. The integration into the workflow exection service REANA allows the interactive or automated reproduction of the main analysis results by orchestrating a large number of container jobs using the Kubernetes. For long-term archival,...

  10. Jet physics in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet performance and physics measurements, together with results from new physics searches using the 2011 dataset. They include studies of the underlying event and fragmentation models, measurements of the inclusive jet, dijet and multijet cross sections, parton density functions, heavy flavours, jet shape, mass and substructure. Searches for new physics in monojet, dijet and photon-jet final states are also presented.

  11. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  12. Teaching atlas of mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabar, L.; Dean, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The illustrated case reports in this teaching atlas cover practically the entire range of possible pathological changes and are based on in-patient case material and 80,000 screening documents. The two basic approaches, - detection and analysis of changes -, are taught comprehensively and in great detail. A systematic procedure for analysing the mammographies, in order to detect even the very least changes, and its practical application is explained using mammographies showing unclear findings at first sight. A system of coordinates is presented which allows precise localisation of the changes. Exercises for practising the technique of identifying the pathological changes round up the methodolical chapters. Additional imaging technical enhancements and detail enlargements are of great help in interpreting the findings. The specific approach adopted for this teaching atlas is a 'reverse procedure', which leaves the beaten track and starts with analysing the mammographies and evaluating the radiographic findings, in order to finally derive the diagnosis. (orig./CB) [de

  13. A strategy for efficient discovery of new natural compounds by integrating orthogonal column chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis: Its application in Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolium and Panax notoginseng to characterize 437 potential new ginsenosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-zhi; Ye, Min; Qiao, Xue; Liu, Chun-fang; Miao, Wen-juan; Bo, Tao; Tao, Hai-yan; Guo, De-an

    2012-08-20

    To discover new natural compounds from herbal medicines tends to be more and more difficult. In this paper, a strategy integrating orthogonal column chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis was proposed, and was applied for rapid discovery of new ginsenosides from Panax ginseng (PG), Panax quinquefolium (PQ), and Panax notoginseng (PN). The ginsenosides extracts were fractionated by MCI gel×silica gel orthogonal column chromatography. The fractions were then separated on a C(18) HPLC column, eluted with a three-component mobile phase (CH(3)CN/CH(3)OH/3mM CH(3)COONH(4)H(2)O), and detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The structures of unknown ginsenosides were elucidated by analyzing negative and positive ion mass spectra, which provided complementary information on the sapogenins and oligosaccharide chains, respectively. A total of 623 comprising 437 potential new ginsenosides were characterized from the ethanol extracts of PG, PQ and PN. New acylations, diversified saccharide chains and C-17 side chains constituted novelty of the newly identified ginsenosides. An interpretation guideline was proposed for structural characterization of unknown ginsenosides by LC/MS. To confirm reliability of this strategy, two targeted unknown trace ginsenosides were obtained in pure form by LC/MS-guided isolation. Based on extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis and other techniques, they were identified as 3-O-[6-O-(E)-butenoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl]-20(S)-protopanaxadiol-20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (named ginsenoside IV) and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3β,12β,20(S),24(R)-tetra hydroxy-dammar-25-ene-20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1,6)-β-D-glucopyranoside (ginsenoside V), respectively. The fully established structures were consistent with the MS-oriented structural elucidation. This study expanded our understanding on ginsenosides of Panax species, and the

  14. Boosted tops at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Villaplana, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    A sample of candidate events for highly boosted top quarks is selected following the standard ATLAS selection for semi-leptonic ttbar events plus a requirement that the invariant mass of the reconstructed ttbar pair is greater than 700 GeV. Event displays are presented for the most promising candidates, as well as quantitative results for observables designed to isolate a boosted top quark signal.

  15. The ATLAS simulation infrastructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Bazalová, Magdalena; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gallus, Petr; Gunther, Jaroslav; Havránek, Miroslav; Hruška, I.; Jahoda, M.; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Kvasnička, Jiří; Lipinský, L.; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Panušková, M.; Popule, Jiří; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Šťastný, Jan; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Tomášek, Lukáš; Tomášek, Michal; Valenta, J.; Vrba, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 3 (2010), s. 823-874 ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk LA08015; GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : ATLAS * simulation Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.248, year: 2010 http://arxiv.org/pdf/1005.4568

  16. The atlas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrodo, P.

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector, one of the two multi-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, is currently being built in order to meet the first proton-proton collisions in time. A description of the detector components will be given, corresponding to the most up to date design and status of construction, completed with test beam results and performances of the first serial modules. (author)

  17. Exotics searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Renjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new physics accessible by the LHC. The ATLAS experiment all have rigorous search programs ongoing with the aim to find indications for new physics involving state of the art analysis techniques. This talk reports on new results obtained using the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  18. Higgs results from ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM) Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb-bar, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM) results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed

  19. The ATLAS TRT electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Çetin, Serkant Ali; ATLAS Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS inner detector consists of three sub-systems: the pixel detector spanning the radius range 4cm-20cm, the semiconductor tracker at radii from 30 to 52 cm, and the transition radiation tracker (TRT), tracking from 56 to 107 cm. The TRT provides a combination of continuous tracking with many projective measurements based on individual drift tubes (or straws) and of electron identification based on transition radiation from fibres or foils interleaved between the straws themselves. This...

  20. The ATLAS Analysis Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranmer, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of the ATLAS analysis architecture including the relevant aspects of the computing model and the major architectural aspects of the Athena framework. Emphasis will be given to the interplay between the analysis use cases and the technical aspects of the architecture including the design of the event data model, transient-persistent separation, data reduction strategies, analysis tools, and ROOT interoperability

  1. Atlas de fitoplancton marino.

    OpenAIRE

    Amaya, Oscar; Alvarado, Yaneth; Chávez, Isaias; Ruíz, Gerrado; Lopez, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    En El Salvador existe un fenómeno natural que afecta a las costas marítimas que son los fitoplancton; mediante el cual se expone el Atlas de fitoplancton marino que contiene 100 p. con imágenes, mapas, etc., con el fin de dar a conocer más de 200 especies de fitoplancton identificada hasta el momento, algunos son tóxicas, inocuas y nocivas.

  2. Measurement of the production cross-section of top quark pairs in the lepton+jets channel at D0 and ATLAS, and interpretation in terms of charged Higgs boson in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, F.

    2007-05-01

    One of the main challenges of the current and future colliders TeVatron and LHC is the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model. This goal may be accessible through precision measurements in the top quark sector. Deviations from theoretical predictions may bring to light the first indirect signs of new physics. The work exposed in this thesis deals with the production cross-section of top quark pairs via the strong interaction, within both D0 and ATLAS collaborations. Firstly, I have worked at D0 on the improvement of the reconstruction of soft electrons, in order to tag b-jets produced in top-anti top quarks events. Then I focused myself on the measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section with 420 pb -1 of D0 data. The measured cross-section is in agreement with the Standard Model expectations. In the ATLAS experiment, I tried to develop a procedure in order to select top quark pair events, using the knowledge and the techniques from the D0 experiment. This work also high-lighted the main systematic sources that can affect the sensitivity of the measurement. After one year of data taking at low luminosity, this preliminary analysis obtains a sensitivity at a few percent level, leading to a good discovery potential of new physic signs, like charged Higgs bosons. These new particles appear in non minimal standard models, and modify the phenomenology of top pair events. This new analysis has shown a good sensitivity for some regions of the parameter space. (author)

  3. ATLAS Upgrade Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000/fb by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new...

  4. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to `transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  5. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to 'transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  6. ATLAS overview week highlights

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Froidevaux

    2005-01-01

    A warm and early October afternoon saw the beginning of the 2005 ATLAS overview week, which took place Rue de La Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the heart of the Quartier Latin in Paris. All visitors had been warned many times by the ATLAS management and the organisers that the premises would be the subject of strict security clearance because of the "plan Vigipirate", which remains at some level of alert in all public buildings across France. The public building in question is now part of the Ministère de La Recherche, but used to host one of the so-called French "Grandes Ecoles", called l'Ecole Polytechnique (in France there is only one Ecole Polytechnique, whereas there are two in Switzerland) until the end of the seventies, a little while after it opened its doors also to women. In fact, the setting chosen for this ATLAS overview week by our hosts from LPNHE Paris has turned out to be ideal and the security was never an ordeal. For those seeing Paris for the first time, there we...

  7. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  8. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Petra; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), made up from silicon micro-strip detectors is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shape: 99.3% of the SCT strips are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance. TWEPP Summary In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV and this was followed by the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signal from the strips is processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data i...

  9. Discovery Mondays - The detectors: tracking particles

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    View of a module from the LHCb vertex detector, which will be presented at the next Discovery Monday. How do you observe the invisible? In order to deepen still further our knowledge of the infinitely small, physicists accelerate beams of particles and generate collisions between them at extraordinary energies. The collisions give birth to showers of new particles. What are they? In order to find out, physicists slip into the role of detectives thanks to the detectors. At the next Discovery Monday you will find out about the different methods used at CERN to detect particles. A cloud chamber will allow you to see the tracks of cosmic particles live. You will also be given the chance to see real modules for the ATLAS and for the LHCb experiments. Strange materials will be on hand, such as crystals that are heavier than iron and yet as transparent as glass... Come to the Microcosm and become a top detective yourself! This event will take place in French. Join us at the Microcosm (Reception Building 33, M...

  10. Atlas of the potential vegetation of Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Demissew, Sebsebe; van Breugel, Paulo

    Based on many years of field work by the two senior authors (Ib Friis and Sebsebe Demissew) and with the application of GIS analyses (by P. van Breugel) 15 major vegetation types in Ethiopia are described and mapped. The book descibes the structure and floristic composition of the vegetation types...

  11. Measurement of the production cross-section of top quark pairs in the lepton+jets channel at D0 and ATLAS, and interpretation in terms of charged Higgs boson in ATLAS; Mesure de la section efficace de production de quarks top en paires dans le canal lepton+jets a D0 et a ATLAS et interpretation en terme de boson de Higgs charge dans ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, F

    2007-05-15

    One of the main challenges of the current and future colliders TeVatron and LHC is the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model. This goal may be accessible through precision measurements in the top quark sector. Deviations from theoretical predictions may bring to light the first indirect signs of new physics. The work exposed in this thesis deals with the production cross-section of top quark pairs via the strong interaction, within both D0 and ATLAS collaborations. Firstly, I have worked at D0 on the improvement of the reconstruction of soft electrons, in order to tag b-jets produced in top-anti top quarks events. Then I focused myself on the measurement of the top quark pair production cross-section with 420 pb{sup -1} of D0 data. The measured cross-section is in agreement with the Standard Model expectations. In the ATLAS experiment, I tried to develop a procedure in order to select top quark pair events, using the knowledge and the techniques from the D0 experiment. This work also high-lighted the main systematic sources that can affect the sensitivity of the measurement. After one year of data taking at low luminosity, this preliminary analysis obtains a sensitivity at a few percent level, leading to a good discovery potential of new physic signs, like charged Higgs bosons. These new particles appear in non minimal standard models, and modify the phenomenology of top pair events. This new analysis has shown a good sensitivity for some regions of the parameter space. (author)

  12. ATLAS end-cap detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Three scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Phyiscs at Novossibirsk with one of the end-caps of the ATLAS detector. The end-caps will be used to detect particles produced in the proton-proton collisions at the heart of the ATLAS experiment that are travelling close to the axis of the two beams.

  13. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  14. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance has just been attributed to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months ago at their headquarters in Japan.

  15. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the LHC Computing Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous...

  16. Scientific Discoveries: What Is Required for Lasting Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lømo, Terje

    2016-01-01

    I have been involved in two scientific discoveries of some impact. One is the discovery of long-term potentiation (LTP), the phenomenon that brief, high-frequency impulse activity at synapses in the brain can lead to long-lasting increases in their efficiency of transmission. This finding demonstrated that synapses are plastic, a property thought to be necessary for learning and memory. The other discovery is that nerve-evoked muscle impulse activity, rather than putative trophic factors, controls the properties of muscle fibers. Here I describe how these two discoveries were made, the unexpected difficulties of reproducing the first discovery, and the controversies that followed the second discovery. I discuss why the first discovery took many years to become generally recognized, whereas the second caused an immediate sensation and entered textbooks and major reviews but is now largely forgotten. In the long run, discovering a new phenomenon has greater impact than falsifying a popular hypothesis.

  17. Nerve Surgeons' Assessment of the Role of Eduard Pernkopf's Atlas of Topographic and Applied Human Anatomy in Surgical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Andrew; Coombs, Demetrius M; Hildebrandt, Sabine; Seidelman, William E; Coert, J Henk; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-05-08

    Pernkopf's atlas of Anatomy contains anatomical plates with detailed images of the peripheral nerves. Its use is controversial due to the author's association with the "Third Reich" and the potential depiction of victims of the Holocaust. The ethical implications of using this atlas for informing surgical planning have not been assessed. To (1) assess the role of Pernkopf's atlas in nerve surgeons' current practice and (2) determine whether a proposal for its ethical handling may provide possible guidance for use in surgery and surgical education. Members of American Society for Peripheral Nerve and PASSIO Education (video-based learning platform) were surveyed and 182 responses collected. The survey introduced the historical origin of Pernkopf's atlas, and respondents were asked whether they would use the atlas under specific conditions to serve as a recommendation for its ethical handling. An anatomical plate comparison between Netter's and Pernkopf's atlases was performed to compare anatomical accuracy and surgical utility. Fifty-nine percent of respondents were aware of Pernkopf's atlas, with 13% currently using it. Aware of the historical facts, 69% were comfortable using the atlas, 15% uncomfortable, and 17% undecided. Additional information on conditions for an ethical approach to the use of the atlas led 76% of those "uncomfortable" and "undecided" to becoming "comfortable" with use. While the use of Pernkopf's atlas remains controversial, a proposal detailing conditions for an ethical approach in its use provides new guidance in surgical planning and education.

  18. The ATLAS Experiment Laboratory - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malecki, P.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: ATLAS Experiment Laboratory has been created by physicists and engineers preparing a research programme and detector for the LHC collider. This group is greatly supported by members of other Departments taking also part (often full time) in the ATLAS project. These are: J. Blocki, J. Godlewski, Z. Hajduk, P. Kapusta, B. Kisielewski, W. Ostrowicz, E. Richter-Was, and M. Turala. Our ATLAS Laboratory realizes its programme in very close collaboration with the Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Technology of the University of Mining and Metallurgy. ATLAS, A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS Collaboration groups about 1700 experimentalists from about 150 research institutes. This apparatus, a huge system of many detectors, which are technologically very advanced, is going to be ready by 2005. With the start of the 2 x 7 TeV LHC collider ATLAS and CMS (the sister experiment at LHC) will begin their fascinating research programme at beam energies and intensities which have never been exploited. (author)

  19. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  20. Discussion on the electromagnetic calorimeters of ATLAS and CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksa, Martin, E-mail: martin.aleksa@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Diemoz, Marcella [INFN Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2013-12-21

    This document summarizes a discussion on the electromagnetic calorimeters of ATLAS and CMS, two experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), that took place at the 13th Vienna Conference on Instrumentation in February 2013. During the discussion each electromagnetic calorimeter and its performance was described in response to ten questions chosen to cover a wide range from the design and construction of the calorimeters over the calibration and performance to their role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and upgrade plans.

  1. Reconstruction of tau leptons and prospects for SUSY in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zendler, Carolin

    2010-01-01

    Final states with tau leptons may play a special role among the broad variety of signatures for the production of supersymmetric particles at the LHC. The algorithms for tau reconstruction and identification are discussed, which are essential ingredients to reject the huge background from QCD processes. The status of analyses of SUSY tau lepton final states within the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are presented, which range from a study of semi-inclusive discovery prospects to more exclusive processes with two tau leptons from χ-tilde 2 0 decays and their implications for the determination of SUSY parameters. Also, the prospects for exploiting tau lepton polarization are discussed.

  2. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  3. Cyberinfrastructure for the digital brain: spatial standards for integrating rodent brain atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, Ilya; Baldock, Richard A; Boline, Jyl

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research entails capture and analysis of massive data volumes and new discoveries arise from data-integration and mining. This is only possible if data can be mapped onto a common framework such as the genome for genomic data. In neuroscience, the framework is intrinsically spatial and based on a number of paper atlases. This cannot meet today's data-intensive analysis and integration challenges. A scalable and extensible software infrastructure that is standards based but open for novel data and resources, is required for integrating information such as signal distributions, gene-expression, neuronal connectivity, electrophysiology, anatomy, and developmental processes. Therefore, the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) initiated the development of a spatial framework for neuroscience data integration with an associated Digital Atlasing Infrastructure (DAI). A prototype implementation of this infrastructure for the rodent brain is reported here. The infrastructure is based on a collection of reference spaces to which data is mapped at the required resolution, such as the Waxholm Space (WHS), a 3D reconstruction of the brain generated using high-resolution, multi-channel microMRI. The core standards of the digital atlasing service-oriented infrastructure include Waxholm Markup Language (WaxML): XML schema expressing a uniform information model for key elements such as coordinate systems, transformations, points of interest (POI)s, labels, and annotations; and Atlas Web Services: interfaces for querying and updating atlas data. The services return WaxML-encoded documents with information about capabilities, spatial reference systems (SRSs) and structures, and execute coordinate transformations and POI-based requests. Key elements of INCF-DAI cyberinfrastructure have been prototyped for both mouse and rat brain atlas sources, including the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, UCSD Cell-Centered Database, and Edinburgh Mouse Atlas Project.

  4. Cyberinfrastructure for the digital brain: spatial standards for integrating rodent brain atlases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya eZaslavsky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical research entails capture and analysis of massive data volumes and new discoveries arise from data-integration and mining. This is only possible if data can be mapped onto a common framework such as the genome for genomic data. In neuroscience, the framework is intrinsically spatial and based on a number of paper atlases. This cannot meet today’s data-intensive analysis and integration challenges. A scalable and extensible software infrastructure that is standards based but open for novel data and resources, is required for integrating information such as signal distributions, gene-expression, neuronal connectivity, electrophysiology, anatomy, and developmental processes. Therefore, the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF initiated the development of a spatial framework for neuroscience data integration with an associated Digital Atlasing Infrastructure (DAI. A prototype implementation of this infrastructure for the rodent brain is reported here. The infrastructure is based on a collection of reference spaces to which data is mapped at the required resolution, such as the Waxholm Space (WHS, a 3D reconstruction of the brain generated using high-resolution, multi-channel microMRI. The core standards of the digital atlasing service-oriented infrastructure include Waxholm Markup Language (WaxML: XML schema expressing a uniform information model for key elements such as coordinate systems, transformations, points of interest (POIs, labels, and annotations; and Atlas Web Services: interfaces for querying and updating atlas data. The services return WaxML-encoded documents with information about capabilities, spatial reference systems and structures, and execute coordinate transformations and POI-based requests. Key elements of INCF-DAI cyberinfrastructure have been prototyped for both mouse and rat brain atlas sources, including the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, UCSD Cell-Centered Database, and Edinburgh Mouse Atlas

  5. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - 15m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  14. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - 15m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 15-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Des Moines, IA - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. Forest is defined as Trees & Forest. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the riparian buffer is less forested. The displayed line represents the center of the analyzed riparian buffer. The water bodies analyzed include hydrologically connected streams, rivers, connectors, reservoirs, lakes/ponds, ice masses, washes, locks, and rapids within the EnviroAtlas community area. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets)

  16. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the riparian buffer is less vegetated. The displayed line represents the center of the analyzed riparian buffer. The water bodies analyzed include hydrologically connected streams, rivers, connectors, reservoirs, lakes/ponds, ice masses, washes, locks, and rapids within the Atlas Area. EnviroAtlas defines vegetated buffer for this community as trees and forest and grass and herbaceous. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  17. EnviroAtlas - Des Moines, IA - 51m Riparian Buffer Vegetated Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is vegetated. Vegetated cover is defined as Trees & Forest and Grass & Herbaceous. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the riparian buffer is less vegetated. The displayed line represents the center of the analyzed riparian buffer. The water bodies analyzed include hydrologically connected streams, rivers, connectors, reservoirs, lakes/ponds, ice masses, washes, locks, and rapids within the EnviroAtlas community area. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets)

  18. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - 51m Riparian Buffer Forest Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of a 51-m riparian buffer that is forested. There is a potential for decreased water quality in areas where the riparian buffer is less forested. The displayed line represents the center of the analyzed riparian buffer. The water bodies analyzed include hydrologically connected streams, rivers, connectors, reservoirs, lakes/ponds, ice masses, washes, locks, and rapids within the Atlas Area. EnviroAtlas defines tree buffer for this community as only trees and forest. This dataset was produced by the US EPA to support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas. EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas) allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the contiguous United States. The dataset is available as downloadable data (https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/EnviroAtlas) or as an EnviroAtlas map service. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this dataset can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  19. Electromagnetic calorimeter and accurate measurement with the ATLAS detector of the LHC collider; Calorimetrie electromagnetique et mesures de precision avec le detecteur ATLAS aupres du collisionneur LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pralavorio, P

    2007-06-15

    The main purpose of the ATLAS experiment is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that drive the breaking of the electro-weak symmetry through the discovery of Higgs bosons. An important element to achieve this aim was the design of an electromagnetic calorimeter able to investigate the decay channels: H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} and H {yields} 4e. The high performance of the calorimeter will allow us to get a better accuracy on the measuring values of W and top masses which is essential to indirectly constrain the mass of the Higgs. In the same way, accurate measurements of top and W properties during the decays of top and tWb vertex will be necessary to question the standard model and to see beyond. The author has been working for 9 years in the ATLAS project, he has been involved in the design, construction, qualification and testing phases of the electromagnetic calorimeter of ATLAS. This document is a detailed presentation of the calorimeter, of its qualification and of its expectations when LHC is operating. This document is organized into 4 chapters: 1) assets and weaknesses of the standard model, 2) the ATLAS experiment, 3) the electromagnetic calorimeter, and 4) accurate measurements with ATLAS. This document presented before an academic board will allow its author to manage research works and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  20. Discovery of the neutron (to the fiftieth anniversary of neutron discovery)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasechnik, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Development of neutron physics in the USSR for the recent 50 years from the moment of neutron discovery is considered. History of neutron discovery is presented in brief. Neutron properties and fundamental problems of physics: electric dipole neutron moment, neutron β-decay, neutron interaction with nuclei and potential of nucleon interaction not conserving spatial parity are discussed. Main aspects of neutron physics application in power engineering, nuclear technology and other branches of science and technique are set forth