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Sample records for atlas cryostat odyssey

  1. 2001, the ATLAS Cryostat Odyssey

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    After a journey of several thousand kilometres, over sea and land, by canal and highway, the cryogenics barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter finally arrived at CERN last week. Installed in Hall 180, the cryogenics barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter will be fitted out to take the central superconducting solenoid and the electromagnetic calorimeter. On Monday 2 July, different French police units and EDF officials were once again keeping careful watch around the hairpin bends of the road twisting down from the Col de la Faucille: a special load weighing 100 tonnes, 7 metres high, 5.8 metres wide and 7.2 metres long was being brought down into the Pays de Gex to the Meyrin site of CERN. This time the destination was the ATLAS experiment. A huge blue tarpaulin cover concealed the cryogenics barrel of the experiment's liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter. The cryostat consists of a vacuum chamber, a cylinder that is 5.5 metres in diameter, 7 metres long, and a concentric cold chamber ...

  2. The ATLAS cryostat comes into the lime-light

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Jean-Jacques Aubert, director of IN2P3, addresses the teams involved in the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter. At the rear, the barrel cryostat being equipped. In response to an invitation from IN2P3, the French national institute for nuclear and particle physics, the ATLAS experiment teams have celebrated progress made in the construction of their Liquid Argon Detector. In particular they wanted to salute the arrival of the cryostat for one of the end-caps, built by the company Simic in Italy. The second is expected at the end of January 2003. The cryostats are the fruit of a collaboration between IN2P3, the Max Planck Institute in Munich and the German Ministry for education and research (BMBF). The barrel cryostat arrived from Japan last year. The three cryostats will contain four types of different detectors made by the collaboration. They will contain in total nearly 400 modules including electromagnetic modules. More than half the modules for one of the two electromagnetic calorimeter barrels have bee...

  3. Design of the LHC US ATLAS Barrel Cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    Rehak, M L; Farah, Y; Grandinetti, R; Müller, T; Norton, S; Sondericker, J

    2002-01-01

    One of the experiments of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the ATLAS Liquid Argon detector. The Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat is part of the United States contribution to the LHC project and its design is presented here. The device is made up of four concentric cylinders: the smallest and largest of which form a vacuum vessel enclosing a cold vessel cryostat filled with liquid argon. The Cryostat serves as the housing for an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter, supports and provides space in vacuum for a solenoid magnet while the toroidal opening furnishes room for a tracker detector. Design requirements are determined by its use in a collider experiment: the construction has to be compact, the material between the interaction region and the calorimeter has to be minimal and made of aluminum to reduce the amount of absorbing material. The design complies with code regulations while being optimized for its use in a physics environment. (2 refs).

  4. Arrival of the last cryostat for the ATLAS LAr calorimeter at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M; Oberlack, H

    On Wednesday, 4th June the last cryostat for the ATLAS LAr calorimeter (end-cap A) arrived at CERN and was immediately unloaded from the truck in building 180 (see Figures 1 and 2), where the integration of the LAr calorimeters into their cryostats takes place. The transport from the Italian company SIMIC, where both end-cap calorimeters have been produced took longer than expected due to delays because of the G8 summit. Thanks to the great effort by the CERN Host State office and the French-German steering group that supplies the end-cap cryostat as an in-kind contribution to the LAr collaboration, an exceptional convoy was finally available and the cryostat could make its way to CERN. Fig.1 (left): Truck with the end-cap cryostat. Fig.2 (right): Unloading the cryostat in bldg. 180. Each end-cap cryostat will contain an electromagnetic calorimeter wheel, two wheels of a hadronic calorimeter, and a forward calorimeter. The design of the cryostat as a double vessel structure made of Aluminum fulfills t...

  5. An ATLAS inner detector end-cap is placed in its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The instrumentation housed inside the inner end-cap must be kept cool to avoid thermal noise. This cooling is achieved on ATLAS by placing the end-cap inside a liquid argon cryostat. The end-cap measures particles that are produced close to the direction of the beam pipe and would otherwise be missed.

  6. Insertion of the first half-barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The first cylinder of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel and the presampler have been inserted in the cryostat.The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter is intended to detect electrons, positrons and photons by measuring the energy they deposit on being absorbed. The cylinder of the calorimeter is in two halves, that will be sunk in a liquid-argon bath cooled to 90 kelvin (-180°C). Each half-barrel is 3.2 metres long, 53 cm thick and formed by assembling 16 modules. Each module is made up of alternate lead absorbers and electrodes pressed into 64 layers folded accordion-fashion. The presampler, set up inside the cylinder, is an integral part of the calorimeter system: It measures the energy lost by a particle before it reaches the calorimeter. To ensure an ultra-clean environment, a tent (visible here) was erected round the calorimeter and entry point to the cryostat. The detector and presampler, fitted together, could then be slid gradually into the cryostat like a drawer. To do so, the insertion team...

  7. Insertion of the first half-barrel of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter into its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The first cylinder of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel and the presampler have been inserted in the cryostat. The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter is intended to detect electrons, positrons and photons by measuring the energy they deposit on being absorbed. The cylinder of the calorimeter is in two halves, that will be sunk in a liquid-argon bath cooled to 90 kelvin (-180°C). Each half-barrel is 3.2 metres long, 53 cm thick and formed by assembling 16 modules. Each module is made up of alternate lead absorbers and electrodes pressed into 64 layers folded accordion-fashion. The presampler, set up inside the cylinder, is an integral part of the calorimeter system: It measures the energy lost by a particle before it reaches the calorimeter. To ensure an ultra-clean environment, a tent was erected round the calorimeter and entry point to the cryostat. The detector and presampler, fitted together, could then be slid gradually into the cryostat like a drawer. To do so, the insertion team had to fine-t...

  8. Cryostat Design

    CERN Document Server

    Parma, V

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to give non-expert engineers and scientists working in the domain of accelerators a general introduction to the main disciplines and technologies involved in the design and construction of accelerator cryostats. Far from being an exhaustive coverage of these topics, an attempt is made to provide simple design and calculation rules for a preliminary design of cryostats. Recurrent reference is made to the Large Hadron Collider magnet cryostats, as most of the material presented is taken from their design and construction at CERN.

  9. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  10. Manufactured by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd of Harima, in Japan, the cryostat of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel underwent very strict cryogenic tests before being shipped to Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The cryostat consists of a vacuum chamber, a cylinder that is 5.5 metres in diameter, 7 metres long, and a concentric cold chamber to be filled with liquid argon that will house the detector. The whole unit is made out of aluminium 5083 and will weigh 210 tonnes when put together with the detector.

  11. Small Business Innovations (Cryostat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    General Pneumatics Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ, developed an anti- clogging cryostat that liquifies gases by expansion for high pressure through a nozzle to produce cryorefrigeration based on their Kennedy Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) work to develop a Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion valve that is less susceptible to clogging by particles or condensed contaminants in the flow than a non-contaminating compressor in a closed cycle Linde-Hampson cryocooler used to generate cryogenic cooling for infrared sensors, super conductors, supercooled electronics and cryosurgery.

  12. Cryostat design case studies, principles and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book enables the reader to learn the fundamental and applied aspects of practical cryostat design by examining previous design choices and resulting cryostat performance. Through a series of extended case studies the book presents an overview of existing cryostat design covering a wide range of cryostat types and applications, including the magnet cryostats that comprise the majority of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, space-borne cryostats containing sensors operating below 1 K, and large cryogenic liquid storage vessels. It starts with an introductory section on the principles of cryostat design including practical data and equations. This section is followed by a series of case studies on existing cryostats, describing the specific requirements of the cryostat, the challenges involved and the design choices made along with the resulting performance of the cryostat. The cryostat examples used in the studies are chosen to cover a broad range of cryostat applications and the authors of each case are ...

  13. Odyssey, an optimized personal communications satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Roger J.

    Personal communications places severe demands on service providers and transmission facilities. Customers are not satisfied with the current levels of service and want improvements. Among the characteristics that users seek are: lower service rates, hand held convenience, acceptable time delays, ubiquitous service, high availability, reliability, and high quality. The space industry is developing commercial space systems for providing mobile communications to personal telephones. Provision of land mobile satellite service is fundamentally different from the fixed satellite service provided by geostationary satellites. In fixed service, the earth based antennas can depend on a clear path from user to satellite. Mobile users in a terrestrial environment commonly encounter blockage due to vegetation, terrain or buildings. Consequently, high elevation angles are of premium value. TRW studied the issues and concluded that a Medium Earth Orbit constellation is the best solution for Personal Communications Satellite Service. TRW has developed Odyssey, which uses twelve satellites in medium altitude orbit to provide personal communications satellite service. The Odyssey communications system projects a multibeam antenna pattern to the Earth. The attitude control system orients the satellites to ensure constant coverage of land mass and coastal areas. Pointing can be reprogrammed by ground control to ensure optimized coverage of the desired service areas. The payload architecture features non-processing, "bent pipe" transponders and matrix amplifiers to ensure dynamic power delivery to high demand areas. Circuit capacity is 3000 circuits per satellite. Each satellite weighs 1917 kg (4226 pounds) at launch and the solar arrays provide 3126 Watts of power. Satellites are launched in pairs on Ariane, Atlas, or other vehicles. Each satellite is placed in a circular orbit at an altitude of 10,354 km. There are three orbit planes inclined at 55° to the equatorial plane

  14. ATLAS rewards two Japanese suppliers of major detector components.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS supplier award in recognition of excellence has just been attributed to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, who produced the liquid-argon barrel cryostat. Kawasaki received its award in Hall 189 on the Meyrin site, where the cryostat is currently located. Toshiba Corporation's award for the superconducting central solenoid was presented two months ago at the Toshiba headquarters in Japan. Photo 01: P. Pailler, project leader for the ATLAS liquid-argon cryostats, addressing the Kawasaki delegation. Photo 04: H. Oberlack, project leader for the ATLAS liquid-argon system, addressing the Kawasaki delegation. Photo 11: P. Jenni (left), ATLAS Collaboration spokesperson, presenting the ATLAS supplier award for the barrel cryostat for the liquid-argon calorimeter to Mr. S. Nose, General Manager of Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. Photo 18: J. Sondericker (left), liquid-argon barrel cryostat project engineer (BNL), presenting Mr. Nose (Kawasaki) an award from Brookhaven for the barrel cryostat for the ATLAS liquid-argo...

  15. HFE and Spherical Cryostats MC Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Jason P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-26

    The copper vessel containing the nEXO TPC is surrounded by a buffer of HFE, a liquid refrigerant with very low levels of radioactive element contamination. The HFE is contained within the cryostat’s inner vessel, which is in turn inside the outer vessel. While some HFE may be necessary for stable cooling of nEXO, it is possible that using substantially more than necessary for thermal reasons will help reduce backgrounds originating in the cryostats. Using a larger amount of HFE is accomplished by making the cryostat vessels larger. By itself, increasing the cryostat size somewhat increases the background rate, as the thickness of the cryostat wall must increase at larger sizes. However, the additional space inside the cryostat will be filled with HFE which can absorb gamma rays headed for the TPC. As a result, increasing the HFE reduces the number of backgrounds reaching the TPC. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between HFE thickness and background rate. Ultimately, this work should support choosing a cryostat and HFE size that satisfies nEXO’s background budget. I have attempted to account for every consequence of changing the cryostat size, although naturally this remains a work in progress until a final design is achieved. At the moment, the scope of the study includes only the spherical cryostat design. This study concludes that increasing cryostat size reduces backgrounds, reaching neglible backgrounds originating from the cryostat at the largest sizes. It also shows that backgrounds originating from the inherent radioactivity of the HFE plateau quickly, so may be considered essentially fixed at any quantity of HFE.

  16. 2001 Mars Odyssey Project Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David A.; Gibbs, Roger G.; Mase, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey Project is the latest in an ongoing series of robotic missions to Mars within NASA's Mars Exploration Program. The Program goals include the global observation of Mars, to enable understanding of the Mars climatic and geologic history, including the search for liquid water and the evidence of prior or extant life. The Odyssey orbiter carries scientific payloads that will determine surface elemental composition, mineralogy and morphology, and measure the Mars radiation environment from orbit. In addition, the orbiter will serve as a data relay for future landers. Odyssey was designed and developed through a partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver, Colorado. Odyssey was launched atop a Boeing 7925 launch vehicle on April 7, 2001, from Kennedy Space Center. The 200-day journey to Mars was marked by four trajectory correction maneuvers, and numerous spacecraft and payload calibration activities. The final maneuver was performed 12 days prior to encounter, and successfully targeted the spacecraft to the desired arrival conditions 300 km above the North Pole of Mars. The 20-minute orbit insertion burn was the only use of the bipropellant propulsion system on the spacecraft. The burn executed as planned on October 24, 2001, capturing the spacecraft into an 18.6-hour orbit around Mars. The subsequent aerobraking phase was designed to gradually reduce the orbit period by flying through the upper atmosphere of Mars on each orbit, allowing atmospheric drag to remove energy from the orbit. Aerobraking was the most demanding operational phase of the mission, requiring continuous monitoring and control of the spacecraft to ensure health and safety. The aerobraking phase was successfully completed on January 11, 2002 after 76 days and 332 drag passes through the Martian atmosphere. Following completion of the aerobraking phase, a series of five propulsive maneuvers were performed to

  17. HL-LHC vertical cryostat during construction

    CERN Multimedia

    Lanaro, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    7m high "Cluster D" vertical test cryostat during construction at contractor's premises, Alca Technology Srl, in Schio, Italy. The inner helium vessel with its heat exchanger are visible. To be installed in the D pit in SMA18.

  18. Overview and status of ITER Cryostat manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Anil K., E-mail: anil.bhardwaj@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Sector-25, Gandhinagar 382016 (India); Gupta, Girish; Prajapati, Rajnikant; Joshi, Vaibhav; Patel, Mitul; Bhavsar, Jagrut; More, Vipul; Jindal, Mukesh; Bhattacharya, Avik; Jogi, Gourav; Palaliya, Amit; Jha, Saroj; Pandey, Manish; Shukla, Dileep [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Sector-25, Gandhinagar 382016 (India); Iyer, Ganesh; Jadhav, Pandurang; Goyal, Dipesh; Desai, Anish [Larsen & Toubro Limited, Heavy Engineering, Hazira Manufacturing Complex, Gujarat (India); Sekachev, I.; Vitupier, Guillaume [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon – CS 90046, 13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Manufacturing status of one of the largest and the heaviest fully welded stainless steel vacuum chambers in the world (ITER Cryostat). • Overview of manufacturing stages and its segmentation. • Overview of manufacturing procedures and assembly and installation. - Abstract: One of ITER-India's commitments to the ITER Organization is procurement of the ITER Cryostat. It is a large vacuum vessel (∼29 m dia. and ∼29 m height), which is made up of 304/304 L dual marked stainless steel and has a total mass over 3500 t. The thickness of the vessel wall varies from 50 mm to 190 mm. It is one of the largest and the heaviest fully welded stainless steel vacuum chambers in the world which provides vacuum thermal insulation for the superconducting magnets operating at 4.5 K and for the thermal shield operating at 80 K. It also mechanically supports the magnet system along with the vacuum vessel (VV). The cryostat is designed and constructed according to ASME Section-VIII Division-2 with additional ITER Vacuum Handbook requirements and it is classified as protection important component (PIC-2). Manufacturing of cryostat segments is ongoing in India; sub-assembly of four major sections of the cryostat from the segments will be done at the ITER site in a temporary workshop building and the final assembly will be done in the pit of the tokamak building, the final location. The cryostat manufacturing contract has been awarded to Larsen and Toubro Limited in August 2012 after completion of design [4] and signing of Procurement Arrangement [1] with ITER Organization. Manufacturing of the cryostat was started in January 2014 after approval of the manufacturing drawings and procedures. The temporary workshop of 44 m × 110 m × 26 m in height has been completed in November 2014 at the ITER site with a 200 t crane installed. This paper gives an overview and the status of the cryostat manufacturing.

  19. Cryostat and CCD for MEGARA at GTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Ferrusca, D.; Tulloch, S.; Velázquez, M.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez, F. M.; Vílchez Medina, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the new integral field unit (IFU) and multi-object spectrograph (MOS) instrument for the GTC. The spectrograph subsystems include the pseudo-slit, the shutter, the collimator with a focusing mechanism, pupil elements on a volume phase holographic grating (VPH) wheel and the camera joined to the cryostat through the last lens, with a CCD detector inside. In this paper we describe the full preliminary design of the cryostat which will harbor the CCD detector for the spectrograph. The selected cryogenic device is an LN2 open-cycle cryostat which has been designed by the "Astronomical Instrumentation Lab for Millimeter Wavelengths" at INAOE. A complete description of the cryostat main body and CCD head is presented as well as all the vacuum and temperature sub-systems to operate it. The CCD is surrounded by a radiation shield to improve its performance and is placed in a custom made mechanical mounting which will allow physical adjustments for alignment with the spectrograph camera. The 4k x 4k pixel CCD231 is our selection for the cryogenically cooled detector of MEGARA. The characteristics of this CCD, the internal cryostat cabling and CCD controller hardware are discussed. Finally, static structural finite element modeling and thermal analysis results are shown to validate the cryostat model.

  20. ID Barrel installed in cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Apsimon, R.; Romaniouk, A.

    Wednesday 23rd August was a memorable day for the Inner Detector community as they witnessed the transport and installation of the central part of the inner detector (ID-barrel) into the ATLAS detector. Many members of the collaboration gathered to witness this moment at Point 1. After years of design, construction and commissioning, the outer two detectors (TRT and SCT) of the ID barrel were moved from the SR1 cleanroom to the ATLAS cavern. The barrel was moved across the car park from building 2175 to SX1. Although only a journey of about 100 metres, this required weeks of planning and some degree of luck as far as the weather was concerned. Accelerometers were fitted to the barrel to provide real-time monitoring and no values greater than 0.1 g were recorded, fully satisfying the transport specification for this extremely precise and fragile detector. Muriel, despite her fear of heights, bravely volunteered to keep a close eye on the detector. Swapping cranes to cross the entire parking lot, while Mur...

  1. CC Cryostat Vacuum Pumping Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, J.B.; /Fermilab

    1987-10-13

    This report calculates the effect of the conductances of the pumping lines on the pumping speeds of the vacuum pumps being used to pump the inner vessel, and annular space, vacuum tight during the CC Cryostat testing. Effective pumping speeds were calculated for various values of pressure via the above stated formulas (see calculations). Conductances of valves, elbows, and tees were calculated with the help of ref. 1, and the volumes of the inner vessel and annular space were calculated wtth the aid of ref. 2. The major results of these calculations follow. The attached graphs show the effective pumping speed vs. pressure, as well as the pressure vs. pumpdown time for both the inner vessel pumpdown and the annular space pumpdown. Many intervals of pressure were chosen in order to give a complete picture of the effects on the pumping speed, and pumpdown time. An important rule of thumb is that the effective pumping speed be close to the intrinsic pump speed in the region of interest for the best efficiency. With an infinite conductance, these quantities become equal. In the case of the annular space pumpdown. the effective pumping speed is within approximately 15% of the intrinsic pump speed for pressures down to 6000{mu}, and at that point, the conductance effects slow the system down and provide a 49% difference at 1000{mu}. To Improve these numbers, the line length must be shortened, or even better, the line diameter increased. As far as pumpdown time is concerned, the actual pumpdown was completed in a reasonable amount of time, and would have been even better if the pumping system did not lag due to a leaK and its repair time. The inner vessel pumpdown shows a pumpdown time near 1 hour to reach 100{mu} pressure. The effective pumping speed matches to within 10% of the intrinsic pump speed to 6000{mu}, and then the conductance effects become more important and provide a 41% difference at 1000{mu}. The actual pumpdown was completed in a reasonable amount of time

  2. Cryogen free cryostat for neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most very low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in the cost of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat with a standard KelvinoxVT® dilution refrigerator insert which provides sample environment for neutron scattering experiments in the temperature range 35 mK - 300 K. The dilution refrigerator insert operates in a continuous regime. The cooling time of the insert is similar to one operated in the Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  3. Low Friction Cryostat for HTS Power Cable of Dutch Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chevtchenko, Oleg; Zuijderduin, Roy; Smit, Johan

    2012-01-01

    . A flexible dummy HTS cable was inserted into this cryostat and sub-cooled liquid nitrogen was circulated in the annulus between the dummy cable surface and the inner cryostat surface. In the paper details are presented of the cryostat, of the measurement setup, of the experiment and of the results....

  4. Construction, assembly and testing of the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Pinfold, J L; Soukup, J; Axen, D; Cojocaru, C; Oakham, G; O'Neill, M; Vincter, M G; Aleksa, M; Bremer, J; Chalifour, M; Fabre, C; Fassnacht, P; Gonidec, A; Pailler, P; Vandoni, G; Cheplakov, A; Datskov, V; Drobin, V; Fedorov, A; Golubykh, S; Javadov, N; Kalinnikov, V; Kakurin, S; Kazarinov, M; Kukhtin, V; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Neganov, A; Pisarev, I; Rousakovitch, N; Serochkin, E; Shilov, S N; Shalyugin, A N; Usov, Yu; Bán, J; Bruncko, D; Kladiva, E; Stavina, P; Strízenec, P; Heldmann, M; Hohlfeld, M; Jakobs, K; Köpke, L; Marschalkowski, E; Meder, D; Othegraven, R; Schäfer, U; Schroff, D; Secker, H; Thomas, J; Walkowiak, W; Zeitnitz, C; Azuelos, Georges; Delsart, P-A; Leroy, C; Mazini, R; Mehdiyev, R; Akimov, A; Blagov, M; Komar, A; Snesarev, A; Speransky, M N; Sulin, V; Yakimenko, M; Aderholz, M; Barillari, T; Brettel, H; Cwienk, W; Fent, J; Fischer, A; Habring, J; Huber, J; Karev, A; Kiryunin, A E; Kurchaninov, L; Laskus, H; Menke, S; Mooshofer, P; Oberlack, H; Salihagic, D; Schacht, P; Schmücker, H; Stenzel, H; Striegel, D; Tribanek, W; Zimmer, J; Chen, T; Ping, J; Qi, M; Falou, A; Mace, G; Chekulaev, S V; Denisov, S; Levitsky, M; Minaenko, A; Mitrofanov, G Ya; Moiseev, A; Pleskatch, A; Sytnik, V V; Zakamsky, L; Benoit, P; Hoyle, K W; Honma, A; Losty, M J; Maharaj, R; Oram, C J; Pattyn, E W; Rosvick, M; Sbarra, C; Wellisch, H P; Wielers, M; Birney, P S; Dobbs, M; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fortin, D; Hodges, T A; Ince, T; Kanaya, N; Keeler, R K; Langstaf, R; Lefebvre, M; McPherson, R A; O'Neil, D C; Seuster, R; Forbush, D; Mockett, P; Toevs, F; Braun, H M

    2007-01-01

    The construction and assembly of the four wheels of the ATLAS hadronic end-cap calorimeter and their insertion into the two end-cap cryostats are described. The results of the qualification tests prior to installation of the two cryostats in the ATLAS experimental cavern are reviewed.

  5. Old women in the Odyssey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Skafte Jensen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Being a heroic epic, the Odyssey is peopled by male protagonists in their prime. Nevertheless, the poem gives attention also to humbler figures, among them old women. They are few, but important. A couple of them belong to the highest stratum of society, the rest are slaves. Especially, they are trophoi, nurses, and the impression given is that such nurses are an indispensable part of any big household. The most impressive of them is Odysseus’ nurse Eurycleia, who has a role to play all the way through the poem. When her story is traced from beginning to end it unfolds as a poem inside the poem, with its own inner coherence. Her character is ambiguous: in some scenes she is the quintessence of care and kindness, in others she is brutal, so much so as to make of her one of the scariest characters in the poem. What has made her so full of hatred? the hard life as a slave. She has accustomed herself to her fate and shows unbroken solidarity with her masters, only to feel all the more offended by the amount of work the feasting suitors have caused. Besides, a traditional fairy tale pattern runs as an undercurrent through the epic, with Penelope and Eurycleia filling in the same tale role so that good and bad is split between them.

  6. Building Bigger, Better Instruments with Dry Cryostats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Voellmer, George

    2010-01-01

    The cylindrical instrument volume allowable n SOFIA is large, comprising perhaps 400 liters at 4K. However, the cryogen accommodation to enable this environment consumes roughly 20% of the volume, and worsens rues, airworthiness/safety, and handling/operation, Present-day pulse tube coolers have negligible cold volumes, provide adequate cooling powers, and reach colder temperatures than stored cryogen. In addition, they permit safer, more reliable, lower maintenance instrument operation. While the advantages of dry cryostats are well-known and commonly used in labs and ground-based astronomical facilities, SOFIA would require some charges in accommodations to permit a pulse tube cooler to operate on board, Whil e these changes are not negligible, we present our investigation into the feasibility and desirability of making SOFIA a dry cryostat-capable observatory

  7. Comet Odyssey: Comet Surface Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Bradley, J.; Smythe, W. D.; Brophy, J. R.; Lisano, M. E.; Syvertson, M. L.; Cangahuala, L. A.; Liu, J.; Carlisle, G. L.

    2010-10-01

    Comet Odyssey is a proposed New Frontiers mission that would return the first samples from the surface of a cometary nucleus. Stardust demonstrated the tremendous power of analysis of returned samples in terrestrial laboratories versus what can be accomplished in situ with robotic missions. But Stardust collected only 1 milligram of coma dust, and the 6.1 km/s flyby speed heated samples up to 2000 K. Comet Odyssey would collect two independent 800 cc samples directly from the surface in a far more benign manner, preserving the primitive composition. Given a minimum surface density of 0.2 g/cm3, this would return two 160 g surface samples to Earth. Comet Odyssey employs solar-electric propulsion to rendezvous with the target comet. After 180 days of reconnaissance and site selection, the spacecraft performs a "touch-and-go” maneuver with surface contact lasting 3 seconds. A brush-wheel sampler on a remote arm collects up to 800 cc of sample. A duplicate second arm and sampler collects the second sample. The samples are placed in a return capsule and maintained at colder than -70 C during the return flight and at colder than -30 C during re-entry and for up to six hours after landing. The entire capsule is then refrigerated and transported to the Astromaterials Curatorial Facility at NASA/JSC for initial inspection and sample analysis by the Comet Odyssey team. Comet Odyssey's planned target was comet 9P/Tempel 1, with launch in December 2017 and comet arrival in June 2022. After a stay of 300 days at the comet, the spacecraft departs and arrives at Earth in May 2027. Comet Odyssey is a forerunner to a flagship Cryogenic Comet Sample Return mission that would return samples from deep below the nucleus surface, including volatile ices. This work was supported by internal funds from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Cryogenic System for the Test Facilities of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Chalifour, M; Haug, F; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1998-01-01

    To perform cold tests on the different modules of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, a cryogenic system has been constructed and is now operated at the CERN North Experimental Area. Three different test cryostats will house the modules, which can also be exposed to particle beams for calibration purposes. The three cryostats share a common liquid argon and liquid nitrogen distribution system. The system is rather complex since it has to allow operations of the three cryostats at the same time. Liquid nitrogen is used as cold source for both the cool-down of the cryostats and for normal operation of the cryostats filled with liquid argon.

  9. Connection Cryostats for LHC Dispersion Suppressors

    CERN Document Server

    Marque, S; Genet, M; Skoczen, B

    2004-01-01

    The lattice of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) being built at CERN is based on 8 standard arcs of 2.5 km length. Each arc is bounded on either side by Dispersion Suppressors connected to the arc by connection cryostats providing 15m long drift spaces. As for a dipole magnet, the connection cryostat provides a continuity of beam and insulation vacuum, electrical powering, cryogenic circuits, thermal and radiation shielding. In total 16 modules will be constructed. The stringent functional specification has led to various design options. Among them, a light mechanical structure has been developed with a stiffness comparable to that of a dipole magnet, for alignment purpose. Thermal studies, including lambda front propagation, have been performed to ensure a cooling down time to 1.9 K within the time budget. A special cooling scheme around the beam tubes has been chosen to cope with heat loads produced during operation. We report on the general design of these modules and on the adopted manufacturing process whi...

  10. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  11. Design of cryostat for testing high-Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho Myung; Baik, Joun Hoon; Lee, Hoon; Kim, Young Kwon; Park, Jeong Soo; Song, Seung Jae [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    This project is proposed to develop several design techniques concerning the gas-cooled or the refrigerator-cooled cryostats to test the HTS at temperature ranges between 20 K and 100 K. (1) It is shown by a numerical analysis that the thermal stability of HTS in a gas-cooled cryostat is satisfactory, mainly because of large heat capacity. The feasibility of the gas-cooled cryostat is demonstrated after the cooling load calculation, the selection of the cryocooler, and the detailed design and fabrication. It is also found that the current leads in the gas-cooled cryostat increases the cooling load but can make the cool-down time shorter to a considerable degree. (2) The thermal stability and the cooling load of HTS in a refrigerator-cooled cryostat do not differ much from those in a gas-cooled cryostat. On the other hand, it has been known that the thermal switches and the soft-contact materials in the refrigerator-superconductor interface are necessary to shorten the coo-down time and to provide a flexibility in the configuration of cryostat. Various shapes and designs are demonstrated for the refrigerator-cooled cryostat. (3) Binary current leads are indispensable in a refrigerator-cooled cryostat. The current lead is a series combination of a normal metal at warm side and a HTS at cold side. It is shown that the optimal diameter-length relation exits for the minimum refrigeration work. It is also found that the refrigerator work decreases as the length of HTS increases. For a given length of HTS, there is an optimal cross-sectional area and it increases with the length. 54 refs., 9 tabs., 56 figs. (author)

  12. European standardization activities on safety of liquid helium cryostats

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This talk gives a general overview on the challenges of designing safety units for liquid helium cryostats with regard to existing industry standards. It reviews the work of a national working group that published the technical guideline DIN SPEC 4683 in April 2015, which is dedicated to the particular conditions in liquid helium cryostats. Based on both this guideline and equivalent documents from e.g. CEA, CERN, a working group is being formed at the European Committee for Standardization, associated to CEN/TC 268, which will work on a European standard on safety of liquid helium cryostats. The actual status and the schedule of this project are presented.

  13. A compact and versatile dynamic flow cryostat for photon science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Peter J E M; Moretti Sala, Marco; Henriquet, Christian; Rossi, Matteo; Ohgushi, Kenya; Fauth, François; Simonelli, Laura; Marini, Carlo; Fraga, Edmundo; Murray, Claire; Potter, Jonathan; Krisch, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a helium gas flow cryostat for use on synchrotron tender to hard X-ray beamlines. Very efficient sample cooling is achieved because the sample is placed directly in the cooling helium flow on a removable sample holder. The cryostat is compact and easy to operate; samples can be changed in less than 5 min at any temperature. The cryostat has a temperature range of 2.5-325 K with temperature stability better than 0.1 K. The very wide optical angle and the ability to operate in any orientation mean that the cryostat can easily be adapted for different X-ray techniques. It is already in use on different beamlines at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility (ALBA), and Diamond Light Source (DLS) for inelastic X-ray scattering, powder diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Results obtained at these beamlines are presented here.

  14. A compact and versatile dynamic flow cryostat for photon science

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Peter J. E. M.; Moretti Sala, Marco; Henriquet, Christian; Rossi, Matteo; Ohgushi, Kenya; Fauth, François; Simonelli, Laura; Marini, Carlo; Fraga, Edmundo; Murray, Claire; Potter, Jonathan; Krisch, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a helium gas flow cryostat for use on synchrotron tender to hard X-ray beamlines. Very efficient sample cooling is achieved because the sample is placed directly in the cooling helium flow on a removable sample holder. The cryostat is compact and easy to operate; samples can be changed in less than 5 min at any temperature. The cryostat has a temperature range of 2.5-325 K with temperature stability better than 0.1 K. The very wide optical angle and the ability to operate in any orientation mean that the cryostat can easily be adapted for different X-ray techniques. It is already in use on different beamlines at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility (ALBA), and Diamond Light Source (DLS) for inelastic X-ray scattering, powder diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Results obtained at these beamlines are presented here.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscope with continuous flow cryostat sample cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, S.; Rose, M.K.; Dunphy, J.C.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chapelier, C. [Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    1997-06-01

    We have constructed an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for operation in the temperature range 20{endash}300 K. The design consists of a vibration isolated sample holder mounted on a continuous flow cryostat. By rotation and linear motion of the cryostat, the sample can be positioned in front of various surface preparation and analysis instruments contained in a single vacuum chamber. A lightweight beetle-type STM head is lowered from the top onto the sample by a linear manipulator. To minimize helium convection in the cryostat, the entire vacuum system, including a liquid helium storage Dewar, can be tilted by a few degrees perpendicular to the cryostat axis, which improves the operation. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of the Pd(111) surface and adsorbed CO molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Thermal architecture for the SPIDER flight cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bonetti, J. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Burger, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J.; Fissel, L. M.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Montroy, T. E.; Morford, T. A.; Netterfield, C. B.; O'Dea, D. T.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Schenker, M. A.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the cryogenic system for SPIDER, a balloon-borne microwave polarimeter that will map 8% of the sky with degree-scale angular resolution. The system consists of a 1284 L liquid helium cryostat and a 16 L capillary-filled superfluid helium tank, which provide base operating temperatures of 4 K and 1.5 K, respectively. Closed-cycle 3He adsorption refrigerators supply sub-Kelvin cooling power to multiple focal planes, which are housed in monochromatic telescope inserts. The main helium tank is suspended inside the vacuum vessel with thermally insulating fiberglass flexures, and shielded from thermal radiation by a combination of two vapor cooled shields and multi-layer insulation. This system allows for an extremely low instrumental background and a hold time in excess of 25 days. The total mass of the cryogenic system, including cryogens, is approximately 1000 kg. This enables conventional long duration balloon flights. We will discuss the design, thermal analysis, and qualification of the cryogenic system.

  17. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  18. The design of the new LHC connection cryostats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Craen, A.; Barlow, G.; Eymin, C.; Moretti, M.; Parma, V.; Ramos, D.

    2017-12-01

    In the frame of the High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC, improved collimation schemes are needed to cope with the superconducting magnet quench limitations due to the increasing beam intensities and particle debris produced in the collision points. Two new TCLD collimators have to be installed on either side of the ALICE experiment to intercept heavy-ion particle debris. Beam optics solutions were found to place these collimators in the continuous cryostat of the machine, in the locations where connection cryostats, bridging a gap of about 13 m between adjacent magnets, are already present. It is therefore planned to replace these connection cryostats with two new shorter ones separated by a bypass cryostat allowing the collimators to be placed close to the beam pipes. The connection cryostats, of a new design when compared to the existing ones, will still have to ensure the continuity of the technical systems of the machine cryostat (i.e. beam lines, cryogenic and electrical circuits, insulation vacuum). This paper describes the functionalities and the design solutions implemented, as well as the plans for their construction.

  19. [Figures of anima in the Odyssey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Feminine characters in the Odyssey show different aspects of the archetype: Mother and Anima (C.G. Jung). From an Analytical Psychology perspective the encounters of Odysseus with goddesses: Circe, Calypso, Ino are looked at as different and successive stages of the hero's way into the inconscious, who shows himself in feminine figures, being masculine the consciousness of the hero. Nausicaa is a new, nearly-human figure of Anima who appears after the symbolic death of Odysseus and leads him to the royal couple Alcinous-Arete: in front of them all he finds his new, reborn, personality by creating and narrating his own myth.

  20. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Figure 1: Some members of the solenoid and liquid argon teams proudly pose in front of the barrel cryosat, complete with detector and magnet. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. Figure 2: The alignment survey by Dirk Mergelkuhl and Aude Wiart. (EST-SU) At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. Figure 3: The solenoid on the insertion stand, with Akira Yamamoto the solenoid designer and project leader. Figure 4: Taka Kondo, ATLAS Japan spokesperson, and Shoichi Mizumaki, Toshiba project engineer for the ATLAS solenoid, celebrate the insertion. Aft...

  1. Conceptual study of the cryostats for the cold powering system for the triplets of the High Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarino, A.; Giannelli, S.; Jacquemod, A.; Leclercq, Y.; Ortiz Ferrer, C.; Parma, V.

    2017-12-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is a project aiming to upgrade the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) after 2020-2025 in order to increase the integrated luminosity by about one order of magnitude and extend the operational capabilities until 2035. The upgrade of the focusing triplet insertions for the Atlas and CMS experiments foresees using superconducting magnets operating in a pressurised superfluid helium bath at 1.9 K. The increased radiation levels from the particle debris produced by particle collisions in the experiments require that the power converters are placed in radiation shielded zones located in a service gallery adjacent to the main tunnel. The powering of the magnets from the gallery is achieved by means of MgB2 superconducting cables in a 100-m long flexible cryostat transfer line, actively cooled by 4.5 K to 20 K gaseous helium generated close to the magnets. At the highest temperature end, the helium flow cools the High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads before being recovered at room temperature. At the magnet connection side, a dedicated connection box allows connection to the magnets and a controlled boil-off production of helium for the cooling needs of the powering system. This paper presents the overall concept of the cryostat system from the magnet connection boxes, through the flexible cryostat transfer line, to the connection box of the current leads.

  2. Progress in ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Haruyama, T; Yamaoka, H; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Mine, S; Wada, K; Meguro, S; Sotoki, T; Kikuchi, K; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being developed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking volume of the ATLAS detector under construction at the CERN/LHC project. The solenoid coil design features high-strength aluminum stabilized superconductor to make the coil thinnest while maintaining its stability and the pure-aluminum strip technique for quench protection and safety. The solenoid coil is installed in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter in order to minimize the cryostat wall. A transparency of 0.66 radiation length is achieved with these integrated efforts. The progress in the solenoid coil fabrication is reported. (8 refs).

  3. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Akhnazarov, V; Canepa, A; Bremer, J; Burckhart, H; Cattai, A; Voss, R; Hervas, L; Kaplon, J; Nessi, M; Werner, P; Ten kate, H; Tyrvainen, H; Vandelli, W; Krasznahorkay, A; Gray, H; Alvarez gonzalez, B; Eifert, T F; Rolando, G; Oide, H; Barak, L; Glatzer, J; Backhaus, M; Schaefer, D M; Maciejewski, J P; Milic, A; Jin, S; Von torne, E; Limbach, C; Medinnis, M J; Gregor, I; Levonian, S; Schmitt, S; Waananen, A; Monnier, E; Muanza, S G; Pralavorio, P; Talby, M; Tiouchichine, E; Tocut, V M; Rybkin, G; Wang, S; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Ocariz, J H; Bertoli, W; Malaescu, B; Sbarra, C; Yamamoto, A; Sasaki, O; Koriki, T; Hara, K; Da silva gomes, A; Carvalho maneira, J; Marcalo da palma, A; Chekulaev, S; Tikhomirov, V; Snesarev, A; Buzykaev, A; Maslennikov, A; Peleganchuk, S; Sukharev, A; Kaplan, B E; Swiatlowski, M J; Nef, P D; Schnoor, U; Oakham, G F; Ueno, R; Orr, R S; Abouzeid, O; Haug, S; Peng, H; Kus, V; Vitek, M; Temming, K K; Dang, N P; Meier, K; Schultz-coulon, H; Geisler, M P; Sander, H; Schaefer, U; Ellinghaus, F; Rieke, S; Nussbaumer, A; Liu, Y; Richter, R; Kortner, S; Fernandez-bosman, M; Ullan comes, M; Espinal curull, J; Chiriotti alvarez, S; Caubet serrabou, M; Valladolid gallego, E; Kaci, M; Carrasco vela, N; Lancon, E C; Besson, N E; Gautard, V; Bracinik, J; Bartsch, V C; Potter, C J; Lester, C G; Moeller, V A; Rosten, J; Crooks, D; Mathieson, K; Houston, S C; Wright, M; Jones, T W; Harris, O B; Byatt, T J; Dobson, E; Hodgson, P; Hodgkinson, M C; Dris, M; Karakostas, K; Ntekas, K; Oren, D; Duchovni, E; Etzion, E; Oren, Y; Ferrer, L M; Testa, M; Doria, A; Merola, L; Sekhniaidze, G; Giordano, R; Ricciardi, S; Milazzo, A; Falciano, S; De pedis, D; Dionisi, C; Veneziano, S; Cardarelli, R; Verzegnassi, C; Soualah, R; Ochi, A; Ohshima, T; Kishiki, S; Linde, F L; Vreeswijk, M; Werneke, P; Muijs, A; Vankov, P H; Jansweijer, P P M; Dale, O; Lund, E; Bruckman de renstrom, P; Dabrowski, W; Adamek, J D; Wolters, H; Micu, L; Pantea, D; Tudorache, V; Mjoernmark, J; Klimek, P J; Ferrari, A; Abdinov, O; Akhoundov, A; Hashimov, R; Shelkov, G; Khubua, J; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Glagolev, V; Dedovich, D; Lykasov, G; Zhemchugov, A; Zolnikov, Y; Ryabenko, M; Sivoklokov, S; Vasilyev, I; Shalimov, A; Lobanov, M; Paramoshkina, E; Mosidze, M; Bingul, A; Nodulman, L J; Guarino, V J; Yoshida, R; Drake, G R; Calafiura, P; Haber, C; Quarrie, D R; Alonso, J R; Anderson, C; Evans, H; Lammers, S W; Baubock, M; Anderson, K; Petti, R; Suhr, C A; Linnemann, J T; Richards, R A; Tollefson, K A; Holzbauer, J L; Stoker, D P; Pier, S; Nelson, A J; Isakov, V; Martin, A J; Adelman, J A; Paganini, M; Gutierrez, P; Snow, J M; Pearson, B L; Cleland, W E; Savinov, V; Wong, W; Goodson, J J; Li, H; Lacey, R A; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H; Lanni, F; Nevski, P; Rescia, S; Kierstead, J A; Liu, Z; Yu, W W H; Bensinger, J; Hashemi, K S; Bogavac, D; Cindro, V; Hoeferkamp, M R; Coelli, S; Iodice, M; Piegaia, R N; Alonso, F; Wahlberg, H P; Barberio, E L; Limosani, A; Rodd, N L; Jennens, D T; Hill, E C; Pospisil, S; Smolek, K; Schaile, D A; Rauscher, F G; Adomeit, S; Mattig, P M; Wahlen, H; Volkmer, F; Calvente lopez, S; Sanchis peris, E J; Pallin, D; Podlyski, F; Says, L; Boumediene, D E; Scott, W; Phillips, P W; Greenall, A; Turner, P; Gwilliam, C B; Kluge, T; Wrona, B; Sellers, G J; Millward, G; Adragna, P; Hartin, A; Alpigiani, C; Piccaro, E; Bret cano, M; Hughes jones, R E; Mercer, D; Oh, A; Chavda, V S; Carminati, L; Cavasinni, V; Fedin, O; Patrichev, S; Ryabov, Y; Nesterov, S; Grebenyuk, O; Sasso, J; Mahmood, H; Polsdofer, E; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Liu, H; Hegazy, K H; Benjamin, D P; Zobernig, G; Ban, J; Brooijmans, G H; Keener, P; Williams, H H; Le geyt, B C; Hines, E J; Fadeyev, V; Schumm, B A; Law, A T; Kuhl, A D; Neubauer, M S; Shang, R; Gagliardi, G; Calabro, D; Conta, C; Zinna, M; Jones, G; Li, J; Stradling, A R; Hadavand, H K; Mcguigan, P; Chiu, P; Baldelomar, E; Stroynowski, R A; Kehoe, R L; De groot, N; Timmermans, C; Lach-heb, F; Addy, T N; Nakano, I; Moreno lopez, D; Grosse-knetter, J; Tyson, B; Rude, G D; Tafirout, R; Benoit, P; Danielsson, H O; Elsing, M; Fassnacht, P; Froidevaux, D; Ganis, G; Gorini, B; Lasseur, C; Lehmann miotto, G; Kollar, D; Aleksa, M; Sfyrla, A; Duehrssen-debling, K; Fressard-batraneanu, S; Van der ster, D C; Bortolin, C; Schumacher, J; Mentink, M; Geich-gimbel, C; Yau wong, K H; Lafaye, R; Crepe-renaudin, S; Albrand, S; Hoffmann, D; Pangaud, P; Meessen, C; Hrivnac, J; Vernay, E; Perus, A; Henrot versille, S L; Le dortz, O; Derue, F; Piccinini, M; Polini, A; Terada, S; Arai, Y; Ikeno, M; Fujii, H; Nagano, K; Ukegawa, F; Aguilar saavedra, J A; Conde muino, P; Castro, N F; Eremin, V; Kopytine, M; Sulin, V; Tsukerman, I; Korol, A; Nemethy, P; Bartoldus, R; Glatte, A; Chelsky, S; Van nieuwkoop, J; Bellerive, A; Sinervo, J K; Battaglia, A; Barbier, G J; Pohl, M; Rosselet, L; Alexandre, G B; Prokoshin, F; Pezoa rivera, R A; Batkova, L; Kladiva, E; Stastny, J; Kubes, T; Vidlakova, Z; Esch, H; Homann, M; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Pfeifer, B; Stenzel, H; Andrei, G V; Wessels, M; Buescher, V; Kleinknecht, K; Fiedler, F M; Schroeder, C D; Fernandez, E; Mir martinez, L; Vorwerk, V; Bernabeu verdu, J; Salt, J; Civera navarrete, J V; Bernard, R; Berriaud, C P; Chevalier, L P; Hubbard, R; Schune, P; Nikolopoulos, K; Batley, J R; Brochu, F M; Phillips, A W; Teixeira-dias, P J; Rose, M B D; Buttar, C; Buckley, A G; Nurse, E L; Larner, A B; Boddy, C; Henderson, J; Costanzo, D; Tarem, S; Maccarrone, G; Laurelli, P F; Alviggi, M; Chiaramonte, R; Izzo, V; Palumbo, V; Fraternali, M; Crosetti, G; Marchese, F; Yamaguchi, Y; Hessey, N P; Mechnich, J M; Liebig, W; Kastanas, K A; Sjursen, T B; Zalieckas, J; Cameron, D G; Banka, P; Kowalewska, A B; Dwuznik, M; Mindur, B; Boldea, V; Hedberg, V; Smirnova, O; Sellden, B; Allahverdiyev, T; Gornushkin, Y; Koultchitski, I; Tokmenin, V; Chizhov, M; Gongadze, A; Khramov, E; Sadykov, R; Krasnoslobodtsev, I; Smirnova, L; Kramarenko, V; Minaenko, A; Zenin, O; Beddall, A J; Ozcan, E V; Hou, S; Wang, S; Moyse, E; Willocq, S; Chekanov, S; Le compte, T J; Love, J R; Ciocio, A; Hinchliffe, I; Tsulaia, V; Gomez, A; Luehring, F; Zieminska, D; Huth, J E; Gonski, J L; Oreglia, M; Tang, F; Shochet, M J; Costin, T; Mcleod, A; Uzunyan, S; Martin, S P; Pope, B G; Schwienhorst, R H; Brau, J E; Ptacek, E S; Milburn, R H; Sabancilar, E; Lauer, R; Saleem, M; Mohamed meera lebbai, M R; Lou, X; Reeves, K B; Rijssenbeek, M; Novakova, P N; Rahm, D; Steinberg, P A; Wenaus, T J; Paige, F; Ye, S; Kotcher, J R; Assamagan, K A; Oliveira damazio, D; Maeno, T; Henry, A; Dushkin, A; Costa, G; Meroni, C; Resconi, S; Lari, T; Biglietti, M; Lohse, T; Gonzalez silva, M L; Monticelli, F G; Saavedra, A F; Patel, N D; Ciodaro xavier, T; Asevedo nepomuceno, A; Lefebvre, M; Albert, J E; Kubik, P; Faltova, J; Turecek, D; Solc, J; Schaile, O; Ebke, J; Losel, P J; Zeitnitz, C; Sturm, P D; Barreiro alonso, F; Modesto alapont, P; Soret medel, J; Garzon alama, E J; Gee, C N; Mccubbin, N A; Sankey, D; Emeliyanov, D; Dewhurst, A L; Houlden, M A; Klein, M; 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Fenyuk, A; Djobava, T; Salukvadze, G; Cetin, S A; Brau, B P; Pais, P R; Proudfoot, J; Van gemmeren, P; Zhang, Q; Beringer, J A; Ely, R; Leggett, C; Pengg, F X; Barnett, M R; Quick, R E; Williams, S; Gardner jr, R W; Huston, J; Brock, R; Wanotayaroj, C; Unel, G N; Taffard, A C; Frate, M; Baker, K O; Tipton, P L; Hutchison, A; Walsh, B J; Norberg, S R; Su, J; Tsybyshev, D; Caballero bejar, J; Ernst, M U; Wellenstein, H; Vudragovic, D; Vidic, I; Gorelov, I V; Toms, K; Alimonti, G; Petrucci, F; Kolanoski, H; Smith, J; Jeng, G; Watson, I J; Guimaraes ferreira, F; Miranda vieira xavier, F; Araujo pereira, R; Poffenberger, P; Sopko, V; Elmsheuser, J; Wittkowski, J; Glitza, K; Gorfine, G W; Ferrer soria, A; Fuster verdu, J A; Sanchis lozano, A; Reinmuth, G; Busato, E; Haywood, S J; Mcmahon, S J; Qian, W; Villani, E G; Laycock, P J; Poll, A J; Rizvi, E S; Foster, J M; Loebinger, F; Forti, A; Plano, W G; Brown, G J A; Kordas, K; Vegni, G; Ohsugi, T; Iwata, Y; Cherkaoui el moursli, R; Sahin, M; Akyazi, E; Carlsen, A; Kanwal, B; Cochran jr, J H; Aronnax, M V; Lockner, M J; Zhou, B; Levin, D S; Weaverdyck, C J; Grom, G F; Rudge, A; Ebenstein, W L; Jia, B; Yamaoka, J; Jared, R C; Wu, S L; Banerjee, S; Lu, Q; Hughes, E W; Alkire, S P; Degenhardt, J D; Lipeles, E D; Spencer, E N; Savine, A; Cheu, E C; Lampl, W; Veatch, J R; Roberts, K; Atkinson, M J; Odino, G A; Polesello, G; Martin, T; White, A P; Stephens, R; Grinbaum sarkisyan, E; Vartapetian, A; Yu, J; Sosebee, M; Thilagar, P A; Spurlock, B; Bonde, R; Filthaut, F; Klok, P; Hoummada, A; Ouchrif, M; Pellegrini, G; Rafi tatjer, J M; Navarro, G A; Blumenschein, U; Weingarten, J C; Mueller, D; Graber, L; Gao, Y; Bode, A; Capeans garrido, M D M; Carli, T; Wells, P; Beltramello, O; Vuillermet, R; Dudarev, A; Salzburger, A; Torchiani, C I; Serfon, C L G; Sloper, J E; Duperrier, G; Lilova, P T; Knecht, M O; Lassnig, M; Anders, G; Deviveiros, P; Young, C; Sforza, F; Shaochen, C; Lu, F; Wermes, N; Wienemann, P; Schwindt, T; Hansen, P H; Hansen, J B; Pingel, A M; Massol, N; Elles, S L; Hallewell, G D; Rozanov, A; Vacavant, L; Fournier, D A; Poggioli, L; Puzo, P M; Tanaka, R; Escalier, M A; Makovec, N; Rezynkina, K; De cecco, S; Cavalleri, P G; Massa, I; Zoccoli, A; Tanaka, S; Odaka, S; Mitsui, S; Tomasio pina, J A; Santos, H F; Satsounkevitch, I; Harkusha, S; Baranov, S; Nechaeva, P; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V; Asai, M; Mount, R P; Nelson, T K; Smith, D; Kenney, C J; Malone, C M; Kobel, M; Friedrich, F; Grohs, J P; Jais, W J; O'neil, D C; Warburton, A T; Vincter, M; Mccarthy, T G; Groer, L S; Pham, Q T; Taylor, W J; La marra, D; Perrin, E; Wu, X; Bell, W H; Delitzsch, C M; Feng, C; Zhu, C; Tokar, S; Bruncko, D; Kupco, A; Marcisovsky, M; Jakoubek, T; Bruneliere, R; Aktas, A; Narrias villar, D I; Tapprogge, S; Mattmann, J; Kroha, H; Crespo, J; Korolkov, I; Cavallaro, E; Cabrera urban, S; Mitsou, V; Kozanecki, W; Mansoulie, B; Pabot, Y; Etienvre, A; Bauer, F; Chevallier, F; Bouty, A R; Watkins, P; Watson, A; Faulkner, P J W; Curtis, C J; Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; Sadrozinski, H; Lockman, W S; Martinez-mc kinney, G; Goussiou, A; Jones, A; Lie, K; Hasegawa, Y; Olcese, M; Gilewsky, V; Harrison, P F; Janus, M; Spangenberg, M; De, K; Ozturk, N; Pal, A K; Darmora, S; Bullock, D J; Oviawe, O; Derkaoui, J E; Rahal, G; Sircar, A; Frey, A S; Stolte, P; Rosien, N; Zoch, K; Li, L; Schouten, D W; Catinaccio, A; Ciapetti, M; Delruelle, N; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Hoecker, A; Klioutchnikova, T; Macina, D; Malyukov, S; Spiwoks, R D; Unal, G P; Vandoni, G; Petersen, B A; Pommes, K; Nairz, A M; Wengler, T; Mladenov, D; Solans sanchez, C A; Lantzsch, K; Schmieden, K; Jakobsen, S; Ritsch, E; Sciuccati, A; Alves dos santos, A M; Ouyang, Q; Zhou, M; Brock, I C; Janssen, J; Katzy, J; Anders, C F; Nilsson, B S; Bazan, A; Di ciaccio, L; Yildizkaya, T; Collot, J; Malek, F; Trocme, B S; Breugnon, P; Godiot, S; Adam bourdarios, C; Coulon, J; Duflot, L; Petroff, P G; Zerwas, D; Lieuvin, M; Calderini, G; Laporte, D; Ocariz, J; Gabrielli, A; Ohska, T K; Kurochkin, Y; Kantserov, V; Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  4. Thermal Performance of the LHC Short Straight Section Cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    Bergot, J B; Nielsen, L; Parma, Vittorio; Rohmig, P; Roy, E

    2002-01-01

    The LHC Short Straight Section (SSS) cryostat houses and thermally protects in vacuum the cold mass which contains a twin-aperture superconducting quadrupole magnet and superconducting corrector magnets operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium. In addition to mechanical requirements, the cryostat is designed to minimize the heat in-leak from the ambient temperature to the cold mass. Mechanical components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel such as support posts and an insulation vacuum barrier are designed to have minimum heat conductivity with efficient thermalisations for heat interception. Heat in-leak by radiation is reduced by employing multilayer insulation wrapped around the cold mass and an actively cooled aluminium thermal shield. The recent commissioning and operation of two SSS prototypes in the LHC Test String 2 have given a first experimental validation of the thermal performance of the SSS cryostat in nominal operating conditions. Temperature sensors mounted in critical locations provide a...

  5. LHC interaction region quadrupole cryostat design and fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Nicol, T H; Huang, Y; Page, Thomas M

    2002-01-01

    The cryostat of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Interaction Region (IR) quadrupole magnet consists of all components of the inner triplet except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, to house all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. It must function reliably during storage, shipping and handling, normal magnet operation, quenches, and seismic excitations, and must be able to be manufactured at low cost. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multilayer insulation system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system. The overall design of a cryostat for superconducting accelerator magnets requires consideration of fluid flow, proper selection of materials for their thermal and structural performance at both ambient and operating temperature, and knowledge of the environment to which the magnets will be subjected over the course of their...

  6. LHC interaction region quadrupole cryostat production, alignment, and performance summary

    CERN Document Server

    Nicol, T H; Kerby, J S; Page, Thomas M; Peterson, Thomas J; Rabehl, Roger Jon

    2004-01-01

    The cryostat of a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Interaction Region (IR) quadrupole magnet consists of all components of the inner triplet except the magnet assembly itself. It serves to support the magnet accurately and reliably within the vacuum vessel, to provide all required cryogenic piping, and to insulate the cold mass from heat radiated and conducted from the environment. The major components of the cryostat are the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation system, cryogenic piping, interconnections, and suspension system. While responsibility for the design and manufacture of the main quadrupole elements is divided between Fermilab and KEK, Fermilab alone is responsible for the design and final assembly of the cryostat for the LHC inner triplets. This paper describes the experience gained during fabrication of the first complete Q2 magnets, the alignment operation and results, and the cryogenic performance of the magnet on the test stand at Fermilab. 4 Refs.

  7. Spacecraft Status Report: 2001 Mars Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Fourth extension of Odyssey mission continues, with orbital science investigations and relay services for landed assets. Mitigation of aging IMU and UHF transceiver. ODY has responded to Program Office/board recommendations. All Stellar mode has been certified for flight operations and is now standard for nadir point operations on the A-side. Investigating options to mitigate aging Battery. Gradual transfer to a later LMST orbit node to shorten eclipse durations. Reduce spacecraft loads during the longer eclipses. Optimize battery performance. ODY is preparing for E5 Proposal and Planetary Science Division FY12 Senior Review activities. ODY is on track to support MSL EDL and surface operations. ODY is managing consumables in order to remain in operations until 2020.

  8. A flow cryostat for cooling of eight independent pipe guns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Hansen, J.E.; Sass, B.

    1991-01-01

    A flow cryostat allowing independent cooling of eight pipe guns in a multishot deuterium pellet injector is described. The pipe guns are placed symmetrically around the flow cryostat and with a liquid helium consumption of 4-5 l/h the cooling is sufficient for simultaneous formation of eight...... pellets at 8-9 K with a diameter of 2.1 mm containing up to 8 x 10(20) atoms/pellet. The thermal interaction between the eight pipe guns is sufficiently low to allow successive firing of the guns with time intervals of up to 1 s....

  9. ODYSSEY MARS MARIE CALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment), aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft, was launched on April 7, 2001, and arrived at Mars on October 24,...

  10. Cryostat for a high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevtchenko, O.A.; Smit, J.J.; Geschiere, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cryostat for a high-temperature superconducting power cable, comprising concentric tubes, an annular region between said tubes, wherein a multilayer thermal insulation and getter material for supporting high vacuum conditions are provided in said annular region, and wherein the multilayer insulation

  11. Alternate Design of ITER Cryostat Skirt Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manish Kumar; Jha, Saroj Kumar; Gupta, Girish Kumar; Bhattacharya, Avik; Jogi, Gaurav; Bhardwaj, Anil Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The skirt support of ITER cryostat is a support system which takes all the load of cryostat cylinder and dome during normal and operational condition. The present design of skirt support has full penetration weld joints at the bottom (shell to horizontal plate joint). To fulfil the requirements of tolerances and control the welding distortions, we have proposed to change the full penetration weld into fillet weld. A detail calculation is done to check the feasibility and structural impact due to proposed design. The calculations provide the size requirements of fillet weld. To verify the structural integrity during most severe load case, finite element analysis (FEA) has been done in line with ASME section VIII division 2 [1]. By FEA ‘Plastic Collapse’ and ‘Local Failure’ modes has been assessed. 5° sector of skirt clamp has been modelled in CATIA V5 R21 and used in FEA. Fillet weld at shell to horizontal plate joint has been modelled and symmetry boundary condition at ± 2.5° applied. ‘Elastic Plastic Analysis’ has been performed for the most severe loading case i.e. Category IV loading. The alternate design of Cryostat Skirt support system has been found safe by analysis against Plastic collapse and Local Failure Modes with load proportionality factor 2.3. Alternate design of Cryostat skirt support system has been done and validated by FEA. As per alternate design, the proposal of fillet weld has been implemented in manufacturing.

  12. Majorana One-Tonne Cryostat Cooling Conceptual Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Douglas J.; Orrell, John L.; Fast, James E.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2011-02-17

    This report evaluates the conceptual plans for a one-tonne (S4) cryostat cooling design. This document is based upon previous design work and experimental results used to evaluate the current MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) thermal design. A feasibility study of a cooling system for S4 based on the MJD thermosyphon experiment is presented. The one-tonne experiment will be a scaled up version of the MJD. There will be many cryostats for the S4 experiment. In this document a cryostat with up to 19 strings of Germanium crystals is analyzed. Aside from an extra outer ring of crystals, the geometry of both systems’ cryostats is very similar. The materials used in the fabrication of both ultra-low background experiments will be underground electroformed copper. The current MJD uses a two-phase liquid-gas cooling system to ensure constant operating temperature. This document presents a theoretical investigation of a cooling system for the S4 experiment and evaluates the heat transfer performance requirements for such a system.

  13. ITER In-Cryostat inspection and repair feasibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, J., E-mail: Jens.Reich@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Cordier, J.-J.; Houtte, D. van [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Evrard, D. [Sogeti High Tech, 180 rue Rene Descartes, 13857 Aix en Provence (France); Mercier, E. [AREVA CNIM KAH System Engineering Support, CS 50497, 13593 Aix en Provence Cedex 3 (France); Popa, T.; Doshi, B. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13115 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    The ITER In-Cryostat maintenance study is an important precondition to guarantee the operation over the ITER lifetime. The ITER operation is subdivided mainly into two phases: 1.Hydrogen phase (non-nuclear operation phase). 2.Deuterium/Tritium phase (nuclear DT phase). The commissioning phase includes the initial phase of assembly. Within the first phase the ITER components will be tested; afterwards they will go into operation. The In-Cryostat maintenance shall facilitate all operations that could be required by In-Cryostat systems and the Cryostat itself. In cases of failures or unlikely events (e.g. earthquakes) it is necessary to provide man and tool access to In-Cryostat components. Overall functions which have to be implemented are: {center_dot}Inspection of components including leak localization (helium, water, air). {center_dot}Repair and replacement of component (instrumentation, parts or complete components). {center_dot}Regulatory inspections. It is presumed that most of component failure would occur at the beginning of the operational phase. This failure rate is expected to be very unlikely when ITER is being operating during the nuclear phase. For maintenance activities it is assumed that: {center_dot}The intervention frequency on each component is limited during its lifetime (e.g. inspections/repair during global shutdown). {center_dot}Most of these interventions will be required during the inactive phase. According to ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) rules maintenance activities will be planned in order to minimize the required human interventions during the active phase. Different tools have to be designed to perform the maintenance actions. As there are quiet all heavy components to be handled and removed, humans cannot perform the work without semi hands-on tools. The required permanent fixtures and tools are considered and pre-designed.

  14. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  15. CryoModel: a cryostat thermal performance simulation tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez Caparrós, D

    2011-01-01

    In the design process of cryostats for accelerators equipment (magnets or RF cavities), it is of interest to estimate downtime for intervention. For this purpose, it is necessary to understand the temperature transients of the accelerator components during warm-up and cool-down processes. In this report, a mathematical model and a simulation tool to study the main heat transfer phenomena of a generic horizontal cryostat (radiation, with or without multilayer insulation system, actively cooled thermal shielding, thermal conduction through supporting systems, etc.) is presented. The thermal model and simulator have been benchmarked on experimental data from transients of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The presented tool is now being used to estimate the warm-up time needed for machine intervention in case of replacement of one cryomodule of the Superconducting Proton Linear accelerator (SPL).

  16. Deformation mechanism of the Cryostat in the CADS Injector II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiandong; Zhang, Bin; Wan, Yuqin; Sun, Guozhen; Bai, Feng; Zhang, Juihui; He, Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Thermal contraction and expansion of the Cryostat will affect its reliability and stability. To optimize and upgrade the Cryostat, we analyzed the heat transfer in a cryo-vacuum environment from the theoretical point first. The simulation of cryo-vacuum deformation based on a finite element method was implemented respectively. The completed measurement based on a Laser Tracker and a Micro Alignment Telescope was conducted to verify its correctness. The monitored deformations were consistent with the simulated ones. After the predictable deformations in vertical direction have been compensated, the superconducting solenoids and Half Wave Resonator cavities approached the ideal "zero" position under liquid helium conditions. These guaranteed the success of 25 MeV@170 uA continuous wave protons of Chinese accelerator driven subcritical system Injector II. By correlating the vacuum and cryo-deformation, we have demonstrated that the complete deformation was the superposition effect of the atmospheric pressure, gravity and thermal stress during both the process of cooling down and warming up. The results will benefit to an optimization for future Cryostat's design.

  17. Injuries to the head and neck in Homer's Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Ghaly, Ghaly Adly; Azari, Afroditi

    2016-07-01

    The Odyssey and the Iliad are the most prominent works of ancient Greek epic poetry, and we have retrieved injuries to the head and neck mentioned in the Odyssey. We studied the texts both in ancient Greek and the translations in modern Greek and English and searched for references to trauma to the head and neck. We recorded the injuries, the attacker and defender, the weapons used, the site, and the result. There were 11 injuries of the head and neck, nine of which were fatal. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Creative Inclusion in Community Theatre: A Journey with Odyssey Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooster, Roger

    2009-01-01

    What does "inclusion" mean in practice? This article considers the work of Odyssey Theatre, a group of learning-disabled and non-learning-disabled performers as they put together a production with the support of professional theatre workers. Working processes are examined and the balance of empowerment and professional leadership…

  19. Preliminary test of the prototype modular cryostat for a 10 MW offshore superconducting wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiuce; Ramalingam, R.; Sanz, Santiago; Neumann, Holger

    2017-02-01

    The SUPerconducting Reliable lightweight And more POWERful offshore wind turbine (SUPRAPOWER), an EU FP7 funded research project, are under development for an innovative superconducting 10 MW class offshore wind turbine. Due to the requirements of handling, maintenance, reliability of long term and offshore operation, the cryostats are divided in two major parts: the modular cryostat able to accommodate a single coil and a thermal collector that links all the modules. The prototype modular cryostat was designed, manufactured and assembled in Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The paper reports preliminary test results of proto-type modular cryostat with a two-stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler.

  20. Fluid dynamics analysis of loss of vacuum accident of ITER cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, Rosa; Aquaro, Donato; Olivi, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of the Cryostat LOVA (CrLOVA) by Ansys{sup ©}CFX. • Investigation of the consequences of different breach sizes of the Cryostat boundary. • Magnet Quench (MQ) and No Magnet Quench (NMQ) cases are discussed. • Evaluation of mass flow, temperature and pressure evolution in the Cryostat environment. • The pressure values in LOVA conditions are below the design limit pressure. - Abstract: The cryostat is one of the most important components of the ITER reactor because it provides a vacuum environment limiting the convective heat exchange between the components, especially the magnets. That's why it is designed to withstand negative pressure loads. In this paper a postulated breach of the cryostat boundary leading accident conditions involving the ingress of air into the ITER cryostat has been analyzed with ANSYS{sup ©}CFX. In the performed fluid-dynamic simulations suitable geometry, materials properties and initial and boundary conditions, thoroughly discussed, have been used. The main results indicated that the cryostat, even in the worst condition, seemed to withstand well LOVA without any relevant mechanical failure. The maximum pressure value resulted below the design limit pressure for the cryostat of 0.2 MPa for this accident. Finally it is worthy to remark that these results will be used for a further in depth evaluation of the structural performances of the cryostat itself.

  1. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dris, Zakaria bin, E-mail: zakariadris@gmail.com [College of Graduate Studies, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Putrajaya Campus, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Centre for Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Putrajaya Campus, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A. [Centre for Nuclear Energy, Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN), Putrajaya Campus, Jalan IKRAM-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  2. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dris, Zakaria bin; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A.; Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  3. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance was attributed on 2nd September 2002 during a ceremony in Hall 180 to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months before at their headquarters in Japan. The ATLAS experiment will become a reality thanks to a large international collaboration partnership. The industrial suppliers for the components all over the world play a major role in the construction of this gigantic jigsaw for the LHC. And sometimes they perform so well, that their work deserves specially to be recognised. This is the case for Kawasaki Heavy Industries and Toshiba Corporation, producers of the Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat and of the Superconducting Central Solenoid, respectively. With these awards, the ATLAS Collaboration wants to congratulate Kawasaki and Toshiba for fulfilling the hi...

  4. MGS and Odyssey - Relay Satellites for the MER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Pasquale B.; Bhat, R.; Demcak, S.; Ardakab, S.; Breeden, J.; Helfrich, C.; Jefferson, D.; Stauch, J.

    2004-01-01

    Both Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and Mars Odyssey are currently in low altitude, nearly circular and highly inclined orbits about Mars. Thus, they are available and compatible to serve as relay satellites for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission. Consequently, the MER project developed requirements for MGS to be overhead, at a specific time with a 30 second tolerance, during the atmospheric entry, descent and landing (EDL) phase of both MER vehicles. The result, after execution of a single orbit synchronization maneuver (OSM) on 10/03/03, 92.4 days or 1130 orbits before Spirit's EDL, was that MGS was over Spirit 8 seconds past the required time. This maneuver, with a delta-velocity of 0.534 m/s, caused the orbital period to change by 3.34 s and resulted in a time-phasing change of 62 min 19 s in order to achieve the EDL overflight. Based on the navigation and execution of an OSM on 01/04/04, MGS was overhead for the Opportunity EDL on 01/25/04,3.5 seconds after the required epoch. Requirements also existed for the Odyssey over-flight of the MER rovers after landing and various equipment deployments had been completed. Thus, these requirements were that Odyssey should rise no earlier than specified times with respect to each of the landing sites. The Odyssey over-flights of both Spirit and Opportunity on sol 1 were equally successful. This paper will present the navigation plan, trajectory propagation accuracy and maneuver execution for the successful MGS and Odyssey over-flights of both the MER rovers.

  5. Moving one of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    One of the end-cap calorimeters for the ATLAS experiment is moved using a set of rails. This calorimeter will measure the energy of particles that are produced close to the axis of the beam when two protons collide. It is kept cool inside a cryostat to allow the detector to work at maximum efficiency.

  6. Update of the ITER MELCOR model for the validation of the Cryostat design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, M.; Labarta, C.; Terrón, S.; Izquierdo, J.; Perlado, J.M.

    2015-07-01

    Some transients can compromise the vacuum in the Cryostat of ITER and cause significant loads. A MELCOR model has been updated in order to assess this loads. Transients have been run with this model and its result will be used in the mechanical assessment of the cryostat. (Author)

  7. Superconducting Quadrupole for the ISR high luminosity insertion assembly in its cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The picture shows the insertion of the quadrupole magnet active part with its thermal shield into the cryostat. Above the cylindrical part of the cryostat one sees the funnel containing the current leads and the helium feed and exhaust lines. Standing onthe left side is Pierre Pugin. See also 7704022, 7906592X, 7812211,7904252,7702690X.

  8. Zero Energy Building Pays for Itself: Odyssey Elementary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-09

    Odyssey Elementary is a large public school in an area of Utah with a growing population. Created as a prototype for the Davis School District, Odyssey is a zero energy building whose design has already been copied for two other new schools, both of which are targeting zero energy. It has a unique design with four 'houses' (or classroom wings) featuring generously daylit classrooms. This design contributes to the school's energy efficiency. In an effort to integrate positive messages about fitness into the learning environment, each house has a different take on the theme of 'bodies in motion' in the natural world. In a postoccupancy survey of parents, students, and teachers, more than 87% were satisfied with the building overall.

  9. Static Heat Loads in the LHC Arc Cryostats: Final Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Parma, V

    2010-01-01

    This note presents the final assessment of the static heat loads in the LHC arc cryostats, using different experimental methods during the first commissioning period in 2007. This assessment further develops and completes previous estimates made during the commissioning of sector 7_8 [1]. The estimate of the helium inventory, a prerequisite for the heat load calculation, is also presented. Heat loads to the cold mass are evaluated from the internal energy balance during natural as well as powered warm-ups of the helium baths in different subsector. The helium inventory is calculated from the internal energy balance during powered warm-ups and matched with previous assessments. Furthermore, heat loads to the thermal shield are estimated from the non-isothermal cooling of the supercritical helium in line E. The comparison of measured heat loads with previous estimates and with budgeted values is then presented, while their correlation with some important parameters like insulation vacuum pressure and some heat ...

  10. Arrival of the ATLAS solenoid from Japan

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01: L. to r.: Photo 01: L. to r.: Herman ten Kate (Magnet Project Leader), Takahiko Kondo (KEK, Solenoid Project Leader), Peter Jenni (Spokesperson). Photo 02: (truck on the right side) with the LAr barrel calorimeter cryostat (also built in Japan) on the left side. From left to right are the following ATLAS people: Herman ten Kate (Magnet Project Leader), Marzio Nessi (Technical Coordinator), Takahiko Kondo (KEK, Solenoid Project Leader), Peter Jenni (Spokesperson)

  11. Dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat for measurements at high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Zahirul; Das, Ritesh K.; Weinstein, Roy

    2015-04-14

    A method and a dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat apparatus are provided for implementing enhanced measurements at high magnetic fields. The dual-stage trapped-flux magnet cryostat system includes a trapped-flux magnet (TFM). A sample, for example, a single crystal, is adjustably positioned proximate to the surface of the TFM, using a translation stage such that the distance between the sample and the surface is selectively adjusted. A cryostat is provided with a first separate thermal stage provided for cooling the TFM and with a second separate thermal stage provided for cooling sample.

  12. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, pictured in front of a barrel toroid cryostat vessel in the ATLAS assembly hall. The air-core ATLAS barrel toroid magnet system will consist of eight large superconducting coils, each in its own vacuum vessel, built by Spanish company Felguera Construcciones Mecanicas SA under the responsibility of IFAE (Institute for High Energy Physics), Barcelona. Photo 01: The Minister in front of the cryostat vessel. Photo 02: The Minister (right) with H.E. Mr Joaquin Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Spanish Ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva. Photo 03: (left to right) Manuel Delfino, leader of the Information Technology division at CERN; Matteo Cavalli-Sforza of CERN; Juan Antonio Rubio, leader of the Education and Technology Transfer division at CERN; The Minister; and Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson.

  13. High-power closed-cycle 4He cryostat with top-loading sample exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegsa, F. M.; van den Brandt, B.; Kirch, K.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the development of a versatile cryogen-free laboratory cryostat based upon a commercial pulse tube cryocooler. It provides enough cooling power for continuous recondensation of circulating 4He gas at a condensation pressure of approximately 250 mbar. Moreover, the cryostat allows for exchange of different cryostat-inserts as well as fast and easy ;wet; top-loading of samples directly into the 1 K pot with a turn-over time of less than 75 min. Starting from room temperature and using a 4He cryostat-insert, a base temperature of 1.0 K is reached within approximately seven hours and a cooling power of 250 mW is established at 1.24 K.

  14. Thermodynamic optimization of the cryostat for Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductors thermal research

    CERN Document Server

    Chorowski, Maciej

    2005-01-01

    NED activity within work package TSQP includes a task to study the thermal behavior of new ceramic electrical insulation. This insulation with good wrapping and excellent thermal resistance during heat treatment would eliminate complex coil fabrication, lower cost and reduce fabrication time. Tests of the insulation's thermal features require a superfluid helium cryostat. The cryostat is constructed at Wroclaw University of Technology in co-operation with CEA and CERN. Heat transfer measurements should be realized in saturated He I (4.2 K), in supercritical He (4.2...5 K, 1...6 bar), and in pressurized He II (1.9 K, 1 bar). The cryostat thermal insulation has been optimized on the basis of the generated entropy minimization method. The total heat flux to the super-fluid helium has been estimated at 3 W. The cryostat, after the tests done at Wroclaw University of Technology, will be delivered to CEA, Saclay to perform thermal measurements of the insulation.

  15. A precision cryostat design for manual and semi-automated cryo-plunge instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Christopher J.; Scotcher, Steve; Kyte, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe a bench-top cryostat system to control the temperature of liquid ethane in a cryo-plunge apparatus designed for biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy. It comprises a foam insulated Dewar containing a copper cryostat cup, whose temperature is controlled via an active feedback system to within 0.1 K. The device can easily be incorporated into existing manual and semi-automatic cryo-plunge instruments that are not equipped with cryogenic temperature control. Over the course of normal use, we find that using a cryostat is convenient, fast, and does not require special mixtures of cryogens like ethane/propane. This simple cryostat improves the reliability and reproducibility of biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy.

  16. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  17. Cryogen Free Ultra-Low Temperature Cryostat for Neutron Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downa, R. B. E.; Kirichek, O.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    Most ultra-low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in liquid helium costs; caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat which provides neutron scattering sample environment within the temperature range 1.25 - 300 K. The high cooling power of the cryostat 0.23 W at 1.9 K enables the operation of a dilution refrigerator insert in a continuous regime; which expands the low temperature margin of the temperature range to 35 mK. The cooling time of the dilution refrigerator insert is similar to one operated in an Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in an ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  18. Performance and Results of the LBNE 35 Ton Membrane Cryostat Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  19. Climate Odyssey: Communicating Coastal Change through Art, Science, and Sail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, P. Z.; Holtsnider, L.

    2016-12-01

    Climate Odyssey (climateodyssey.org) is a year-long sailing expedition and continuing collaboration aimed at using overlaps in science and visual art to communicate coastal climate change impacts and solutions. We, visual artist Lucy Holtsnider and climate scientist Zion Klos, are using our complimentary skills in art, science and communication to engage audiences both affectively and cognitively regarding the urgency of climate change through story and visualization. In July of 2015, we embarked on the sailing portion of Climate Odyssey, beginning in Lake Michigan, continuing along the Eastern Seaboard, and concluding in May 2016 in the tropics. Along the way we photographed climate change impacts and adaptation strategies, interviewed stakeholders, scientists, and artists. We are now sharing our photographs and documented encounters through a tangible artist's book, interactive digital map, and blog. Each of our images added to the artist's book and digital map are linked to relevant blog entries and other external scientific resources, making the map both an aesthetic piece of art and an engaging tool for sharing the science of climate change impacts and solutions. After completing the sailing component of the project, we are now working to finalize our media and share our pieces with the public via libraries, galleries, and classrooms in coastal communities. At AGU, we will share with our peers the completed version of the artist's book, digital map, and online blog so we can both discuss public engagement strategies and showcase this example of art-science outreach with the broader science communication community.

  20. Performance of a proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Y; Makida, Y; Kondo, Y; Kawai, M; Aoki, K; Haruyama, T; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Wachi, Y; Mine, S; Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Passardi, Giorgio; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet has been designed and constructed as a collaborative work between KEK and CERN for the ATLAS experiment in the LHC project The solenoid provides an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla at the center of the tracking volume of the ATLAS detector. The solenoid is installed in a common cryostat of a liquid-argon calorimeter in order to minimize the mass of the cryostat wall. The coil is cooled indirectly by using two-phase helium flow in a pair of serpentine cooling line. The cryogen is supplied by the ATLAS cryogenic plant, which also supplies helium to the Toroid magnet systems. The proximity cryogenic system for the solenoid has two major components: a control dewar and a valve unit In addition, a programmable logic controller, PLC, was prepared for the automatic operation and solenoid test in Japan. This paper describes the design of the proximity cryogenic system and results of the performance test. (7 refs).

  1. Installation and Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Read-Out Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Perrot, G

    2008-01-01

    The cryostats of the ATLAS LAr calorimeter system are installed in the ATLAS cavern since several years. Following this, an effort to install and commission the front-end and back-end read-out electronics as well as the timing, trigger and control electronics (infrastructure, crates, and boards) has been ongoing and is finished now, in time for the cavern closure. Following cautious procedures and with continuous testing-campaigns of the electronics at each step of the installation advancemen...

  2. Features and analyses of W7-X cryostat system FE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eeten, Paul van, E-mail: paul.van.eeten@ipp.mpg.de; Bräuer, Torsten; Bykov, Victor; Carls, Andre; Fellinger, Joris; Kallmeyer, J.P.

    2015-10-15

    The Wendelstein 7-X stellarator is presently under construction at the Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics in Greifswald with the goal to verify that a stellarator magnetic confinement concept is a viable option for a fusion power plant. The main components of the W7-X cryostat system are the plasma vessel (PV), outer vessel (OV), ports, thermal insulation, vessel supports and the machine base (MB). The main task of the cryostat system is to provide an insulating vacuum for the cryogenic magnet system while allowing external access to the PV through ports for diagnostic, supply and heating systems. The cryostat is subjected to different types of loads during assembly, maintenance and operation. This ranges from basic weight loads from all installed components to mechanical, vacuum and thermal loads. To predict the behavior of the cryostat in terms of deformations, stresses and support load distribution a finite element (FE) global model has been created called the Global Model of the Cryostat System (GMCS). A complete refurbishment of the GM CS has been done in the last 2 years to prepare the model for future applications. This involved a complete mesh update of the model, an improvement of many model features, an update of the applied operational loads and boundary conditions as well as the creation of automatic post processing procedures. Currently the GMCS is used to support several significant assembly and commissioning steps of W7-X that involve the cryostat system, e.g. the removal of temporary supports beneath the MB, transfer of the PV from temporary to the final supports and evacuation of the cryostat. In the upcoming months the model will be used for further support of the commissioning of W7-X which includes the first evacuation of the PV.

  3. The couple's odyssey: Hollywood's take on love relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Matthew

    2009-06-01

    Psychiatrists need to be aware of how their individual clients are impacted by issues they may be having in their intimate relationships and how couples issues, in turn, impact and are impacted by emotional and mental disorders. In addition, psychiatrists need to be able to offer sound advice to individuals in troubled relationships, know how to make referrals to trained marriage therapists and know how medications they prescribe may impact couples. Over the past twenty years, there have been significant advances in couple research to assist health professionals in offering insight to couples struggling with communication, conflict resolution, affairs, addictions and many other aspects of the couple's odyssey. Movie clips offer an effective way of teaching psychiatrists about common issues in coupling and couple therapy. The use of movies for teaching health professionals is well documented in previous articles and books on cinemeducation. This paper highlights movies and movie clips which are useful for educating psychiatrists about common clinical issues in couple therapy.

  4. The First End-Cap Cryostat is being Tested at Cold

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M

    The integration of the LAr end-cap detector wheels - one electromagnetic calorimeter wheel and two hadronic calorimeter wheels - was finished at the end of 2003 (see Fig. 1). Fig. 1: ECC cryostat after the insertion of the second hadronic end-cap wheel (Dec. 2003), and before the insertion of the forward calorimeter. After the insertion of the forward calorimeter, in summer 2004, the cryostat was closed and welded. Cool-down of the End-Cap C Cryostat: On Nov. 26, 2004, the cool-down of the cryostat started in B180 using forced convection of gaseous N2 in the heat exchangers and He gas in the cryostat (see Fig. 2). The cool-down speed during this time was on average 0.2K/h, hence arriving at a temperature of approximately 120K after about 6 weeks. The speed of the cool down was limited by stringent requirements on the temperature gradients in the detector wheels, which were established from mechanical constraints. The most severe limit was the maximum allowed temperature difference of 6K for the el...

  5. Design, Manufacturing and Integration of LHC Cryostat Components an Example of Collaboration between CERN and Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Slits, Ivo; Canetti, Marco; Colombet, Thierry; Gangini, Fabrizio; Parma, Vittorio; Tock, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The components for the LHC cryostats and interconnections are supplied by European industry. The manufacturing, assembly and testing of these components in accordance with CERN technical specifications require a close collaboration and dedicated approach from the suppliers. This paper presents the different phases of design, manufacturing, testing and integration of four LHC cryostat components supplied by RIAL Vacuum (Parma, Italy), including 112 Insulation Vacuum Barriers (IVB), 482 Cold-mass Extension Tubes (CET), 121 cryostat vacuum vessel Jumper Elbows (JE) and 10800 Interconnection Sleeves (IS). The Quality Assurance Plan, which the four projects have in common, is outlined. The components are all leak-tight thin stainless steel assemblies (<10-8 mbar l/s), most of them operating at cryogenic temperature (2 K), however each having specific requirements. The particularities of each component are presented with respect to manufacturing, assembly and testing. These components are being integrated ...

  6. Geometrical position of the Large Hadron Collider main dipole inside the cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    La China, M; Gubello, G; Hauviller, Claude; Scandale, Walter; Todesco, Ezio

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting dipole of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a cylindrical structure made of a shrinking cylinder containing iron laminations and collared coils. This 15 m long structure, weighing about 28 t, is horizontally bent by 5 mrad. Its geometrical shape should be preserved, from the assembly phase to the operational condition at cryogenic temperature. When inserted in its cryostat, the dipole cold mass is supported by three posts also providing the thermal insulation. Sliding interfaces should minimize the interference between the dipole and the cryostat during cooling down and warming up. Indeed, a possible non-linear response of the sliding interface can detrimentally affect the final dipole shape. This paper presents the results of dedicated tests investigating interferences and of specific simulations with a 3D finite element model (FEM) describing the mechanical behaviour of the dipole inside the cryostat. Comparison between measurements and FEM simulations is also discussed.

  7. Use of microwave oven improves morphology and staining of cryostat sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A; Foulis, A K

    1989-01-01

    The quality of microscopic image of cryostat sections that had been subjected to microwave assisted fixation was compared with that resulting from conventional air drying of the sections. The role of microwaves in producing rapid special stains on cryostat sections was also assessed. Methods used permitted stains such as periodic acid Schiff, alcian blue, Gordon and Sweets's reticulin, Masson Fontana, Elastica, Prussian blue and Van Gieson to be performed within three minutes of cutting a cryostat section. The cytological detail of nuclei was much clearer using the microwave technique, allowing more accurate determination of cell type. The microwave oven seems to have major potential in improving the diagnostic accuracy of surgical frozen sections. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:2466053

  8. The CUORE cryostat: a 10 mK infrastructure for large bolometric arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Oro, S.; Alessandria, F.; Bucci, C.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cappelli, L.; Cereseto, R.; Chott, N.; Copello, S.; Cremonesi, O.; D'Addabbo, A.; Franceschi, M. A.; Gorla, P.; Guetti, M.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T.; Nucciotti, A.; Orlandi, D.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pattavina, L.; Santone, D.; Singh, V.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.

    2017-09-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) experiment is presently in the final phases of its commissioning at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (Italy). The CUORE cryogenic system will have to guarantee the optimal operation temperature of the detector (˜ 10 mK) for a live-time of 5 years. Furthermore, to avoid radioactive background, about 7 tonnes of lead are cooled to below 4 K and only few construction materials are acceptable. The CUORE detector will be by far the largest mass ever cooled to 10 mK. A description of the CUORE cryostat is presented and the specific characteristics and the performances are illustrated. The results of the (recently concluded) cryostat commissioning are also reported. They show that the CUORE cryostat is now ready to host the detector, thus confirming the possibility of realizing large bolometric arrays for rare event physics.

  9. Commissioning of the 4 K Outer Cryostat for the CUORE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ferri, E; Biassoni, M; Bucci, C; Ceruti, G; Chiarini, A; Clemenza, M; Cremonesi, O; Datskov, V; Dossena, S; Faverzani, M; Franceschi, M A; Gaigher, R; Gorla, P; Guetti, M; Ligi, C; Napolitano, T; Nucciotti, A; Pelosi, A; Perego, M; Previtali, E; Sisti, M; Taffarello, L; Terranova, F

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a 1-ton scale bolometric experiment. The CUORE detector is an array of 988 TeO crystals arranged in a cylindrical, compact, and granular structure of 19 towers. These detectors will need a base temperature lower than 10 mK in order to meet the performance specifications. To cool the CUORE detector, a large cryogen free cryostat with five pulse tubes and one custom designed high power dilution refrigerator has been designed. The three vessels that form the outer shell of the CUORE cryostat were produced in 2012 and are now assembled in the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS). We report here the detailed description of the 4 K outer cryostat for the CUORE experiment together with the results of the validation tests done at the production site in 2012 and of the first commissioning to 4 K at LNGS in 2013.

  10. Calibration of the Odyssey Photosynthetic Irradiance Recorder for Absolute Irradiance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers are increasingly interested in measuring hotosynthetically active radiation (PAR) because of its importance in determining the structure and function of lotic ecosystems. The Odyssey Photosynthetic Irradiance Recorder is an affordable PAR meter gaining popularity am...

  11. High Spatial Resolution Visible Color Units on Mars from the Mars Odyssey THEMIS/VIS Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. F., III; McConnochie, T.; Savransky, D.; Stiglitz, B.; Wolff, M. J.; Christensen, P. R.; Mehall, G.; James, P. B.; Malin, M.; Caplinger, M.; Ravine, M.; Cherednik, L. L.; Bender, K. C.; Murray, K.; Themis Science Team

    2003-07-01

    This presentation describes the calibration and new results from the Mars Odyssey THEMIS/VIS instrument, which is obtaining five-color visible wavelength images from Mars orbit at scales of 18 72 m/pixel.

  12. The Thermal Design, Characterization, and Performance of the SPIDER Long-Duration Balloon Cryostat

    OpenAIRE

    Gudmundsson, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O.; Filippini, J. P.; Fraisse, A. A.; Gambrel, A.; Gandilo, N. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the SPIDER flight cryostat, which is designed to cool six millimeter-wavelength telescopes during an Antarctic long-duration balloon flight. The cryostat, one of the largest to have flown on a stratospheric payload, uses liquid helium-4 to deliver cooling power to stages at 4.2 and 1.6 K. Stainless steel capillaries facilitate a high flow impedance connection between the main liquid helium tank and a smaller superfluid tank, allowing the latter to operate at 1.6 K as long as there...

  13. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; de Rijk, G.; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Hanzelka, P.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the R&D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m3 helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  14. ITER cryostat main chamber and vacuum vessel pressure suppression system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Akira; Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tada, Eisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakashima, Yoshitane; Ueno, Osamu

    1999-03-01

    Design of Cryostat Main Chamber and Vacuum Vessel Pressure Suppression System (VVPS) of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been conducted. The cryostat is a cylindrical vessel that includes in-vessel component such as vacuum vessel, superconducting toroidal coils and poloidal coils. This cryostat provides the adiabatic vacuum about 10{sup -4} Pa for the superconducting coils operating at 4 K and forms the second confinement barrier to tritium. The adiabatic vacuum is to reduce thermal loads applied to the superconducting coils and their supports so as to keep their temperature 4 K. The VVPS consists of a suppression tank located under the lower bio-shield and 4 relief pipes to connect the vacuum vessel and the suppression tank. The VVPS is to keep the maximum pressure rise of the vacuum vessel below the design value of 0.5 MPa in case of the in-vessel LOCA (water spillage from in-vessel component). The spilled water and steam are lead to the suppression tank through the relief pipes when the internal pressure of vacuum vessel is over 0.2 MPa, and then the internal pressure is kept below 0.5 MPa. This report summarizes the structural design of the cryostat main chamber and pressure suppression system, together with their fabrication and installation. (author)

  15. Theoretical Modeling and Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Prototype Lattice Cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    Riddone, G

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents the thermal performance of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) prototype cryostats both in steady-state and in transient conditions. LHC will be built in the 27 km LEP tunnel and will provide proton-proton collisions. It will make use of superconducting magnets operating in static bath of superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The thesis is mainly divided in three parts. The first part cont ains three chapters which present a brief overview of the LHC project. Part 1-Chapter 1 gives a short introduction to the LHC design layout and performance. Part 1-Chapter 2 refers to LHC cryogenic s ystem and describes the general architecture of the cryogenic plants, the temperature levels and the heat loads. The 50 m long LHC prototype half-cell contains one twin-bore quadrupole and four twin-a perture dipoles. In Part 1-Chapter 3 the design and construction of the prototype dipole and quadrupole cryostats are presented. The LHC prototype cryostats have integrated cryogenic lines, while the final LHC cryostats hav...

  16. Majorana One-Tonne Cryostat Cooling Conceptual Feasibility Study Rev 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.; Orrell, John L.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2011-06-27

    This report evaluates the conceptual plans for a cryostat cooling design for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR (MJD) one-tonne (S4) experiment. This document is based upon previous design work and experimental results used to evaluate the current MJD thermal design. A feasibility study of a cooling system for S4 based on the MJD thermosiphon experiment is presented. The one-tonne experiment will be a scaled up version of the MJD. There will be many cryostats in the S4 experiment. In this document a cryostat with up to 19 strings of germanium crystals is analyzed. Aside from an extra outer ring of crystals, the geometry of the cryostat for S4 is very similar to that for the MJD thermosiphon experiment. The materials used in the fabrication of both of these ultra-low background experiments will be underground-electroformed copper. The current MJD uses a two-phase liquid-gas cooling system to provide constant operating temperature. This document presents a theoretical investigation of a cooling system for the S4 experiment and evaluates the heat transfer performance requirements for such a system.

  17. A 5 tesla superconducting magnet and cryostats for an EPR/FMR spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuvekamp, E.M.C.M.; Gerritsma, G.J.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of the cryogenic part of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectrometer using Ka-band (26.5-40 GHz) and U-band (40-60 GHz) frequencies for resonance measurements on large magnetic thin-films. The unit has two cryostats; the first has a

  18. ATHENA X-IFU 300 K-50 mK cryochain demonstrator cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouvé, T.; Duval, J. M.; Charles, I.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Shinozaki, K.; Tokoku, C.; Yamamoto, R.; Minami, Y.; Le Du, M.; Andre, J.; Daniel, C.; Linder, M.

    2018-01-01

    In the framework of the ESA X-ray mission ATHENA, scheduled for launch in 2028, an ESA Core Technology Program (CTP) was started in 2016 to build a flight like cryostat demonstrator in parallel with the phase A studies of the ATHENA/X-IFU instrument [1,2]. As part of this CTP, called the Detector Cooling System (DCS), design, manufacturing and test of a cryostat including existing space coolers will be done. In addition to the validation of thermal performance, a Focal Plan Assembly (FPA) demonstrator using Transition Edge Sensors (TES) detector technology will be also integrated and its performance characterized versus the environment provided by the cryostat. This is a unique opportunity to validate many crucial issues of the cryogenic part of such a sensitive instrument. A dedicated activity within this CTP-DCS is the demonstration of the 300 K-50 mK cooling chain in a Ground System Equipment (GSE) cryostat. The studies are focused on the operation of the space coolers, which is made possible by the use of a ground cooler for cooling cryogenic shields and mechanical supports. Thanks to the modularity of the cryostat, several cooling chains could be tested. In the base line configuration described here, the low temperature stage is the CEA hybrid sorption/ADR 50 mK cooler with thermal interfaces at 4 K and 2 K. 4 K cooling is accomplished by a 4 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler and its Stirling precooler provided by JAXA. Regarding the 2 K stage, at first a 2 K JT from JAXA will be used. Alternatively, a 2 K JT cooler from RAL could replace the JAXA 2 K JT. In both cases new prototype(s) of a 2 K JT will be implemented, precooled by the EM 15 K pule tube cooler from Air Liquide. This test program is also the opportunity to validate the operation of the cryochain with respect to various requirements, such as time constant and temperature stabilities. This would bring us valuable inputs to integrate the cryochain in DCS cryostat or for the X-IFU phase A studies

  19. From Gutenberg to Open Science: An Unfulfilled Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triggle, Chris R; Triggle, David J

    2017-02-01

    Preclinical Research With the almost global availability of the Internet comes the expectation of universal accessibility to knowledge, including scientific knowledge-particularly that generated by public funding. Currently this is not the case. In this Commentary we discuss access to this knowledge, the politics that govern peer review and publication, and the role of this knowledge as a public good in medicine.  Gutenberg's invention of the printing press in 1440 opened an avenue for the distribution of scholarly information to the entire world. The scientific literature first appeared in 1665 with Le Journal des Sçavans followed in the same year by Philosophical Transactions. Today there are more than 5000 scientific publishing companies, 25,000 journals and 1.5 million articles published/year generating revenue of $25 billion USD.  The European Union and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development have argued for open access (OA) to scientific data for all publicly funded research by 2020 with a similar initiative in the USA via the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR). However, OA to published science is but one step in this odyssey. If the products of science are not openly available then it can be argued that the norms of science as defined by Merton including "universalism" and "communalism" have yet to be accomplished. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the delivery of medicines to the poor and for rare diseases, the attempts to privatize human genetic information and, not least, dealing with the challenges of antibiotic resistance and new disease pandemics exacerbated by climate change. Drug Dev Res 78 : 3-23, 2017.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. SU-F-J-149: Beam and Cryostat Scatter Characteristics of the Elekta MR-Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duglio, M; Towe, S; Roberts, D [Elekta Limited, Crawley, West Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Elekta MR-Linac combines a digital linear accelerator system with a 1.5T Philips MRI machine. This study aimed to determine key characteristic information regarding the MR-Linac beam and in particular it evaluated the effect of the MR cryostat on the out of field scatter dose. Methods: Tissue phantom ratios, profiles and depth doses were acquired in plastic water with an IC-profiler or with an MR compatible water tank using multiple system configurations (Full (B0= 1.5T), Full (B0=0T) and No cryostat). Additionally, an in-house CAD based Monte Carlo code based on Penelope was used to provide comparative data. Results: With the cryostat in place and B0=0T, the measured TPR for the MR Linac system was 0.702, indicating an energy of around 7MV. Without the cryostat, the measured TPR was 0.669. For the Full (B0=0T) case, out of field dose at a depth of 10 cm in the isocentric plane, 5 cm from the field edge was 0.8%, 3.1% and 5.4% for 3×3 cm{sup 2}, 10×10 cm{sup 2} and 20×20 cm{sup 2} fields respectively.The out of field dose (averaged between 5 cm and 10 cm beyond the field edges) in the “with cryostat” case is 0.78% (absolute difference) higher than without the cryostat for clinically relevant field sizes (i.e. 10×10 cm{sup 2}) and comparable to measured conventional 6MV treatment beams at a depth of 10 cm (within 0.1% between 5 cm and 6 cm from field edge). At dose maximum and at 5 cm from the field edge, the “with cryostat” out of field scatter for a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field is 1.5% higher than “without cryostat', with a modest increase (0.9%) compared to Agility 6MV in the same conditions. Conclusion: The study has presented typical characteristics of the MR-Linac beam and determined that out of field dose is comparable to conventional treatment beams. All authors are employed by Elekta Ltd., who are developing an MR-Linac.

  1. Pressure relief protection in cryostats: CERN’s experience on LHC and HIE Isolde

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Cryostats contain large cold surfaces, cryogenic fluids, and sometimes large stored energy (e.g. energized magnets), with the potential risk of sudden liberation of energy through thermodynamic transformations of the fluids, which can be uncontrolled and lead to a dangerous increase of pressure inside the cryostat envelopes. The consequence, in the case of a rupture of the envelopes, may be serious for personnel (injuries from deflagration, burns, and oxygen deficiency hazard) as well as for the equipment. Performing a thorough risk analysis is an essential step to identify and understand risk hazards that may cause a pressure increase and in order to assess consequences, define mitigation actions, and design adequate safety relief devices to limit pressure accordingly. Lessons learnt from real cases are essential for improving safety awareness for future projects: LHC and HIE Isolde are amongst these examples.

  2. Thermal Modeling and Cryogenic Design of a Helical Superconducting Undulator Cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Fuerst, J.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.

    2017-06-01

    A conceptual design for a helical superconducting undulator (HSCU) for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been completed. The device differs sufficiently from the existing APS planar superconducting undulator (SCU) design to warrant development of a new cryostat based on value engineering and lessons learned from the existing planar SCU. Changes include optimization of the existing cryocooler-based refrigeration system and thermal shield as well as cost reduction through the use of standard vacuum hardware. The end result is a design that provides significantly larger 4.2 K refrigeration margin in a smaller package for greater installation flexibility in the APS storage ring. This paper presents ANSYS-based thermal analysis of the cryostat, including estimated static and dynamic

  3. Final Design and Experimental Validation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Lattice Cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    Bourcey, N; Parma, V; Poncet, A; Rohmig, P; Serio, L; Skoczen, Blazej; Tock, J P; Williams, L R

    2004-01-01

    The recent commissioning and operation of the LHC String 2 have given a first experimental validation of the global thermal performance of the LHC lattice cryostat at nominal cryogenic conditions. The cryostat designed to minimize the heat inleak from ambient temperature, houses under vacuum and thermally protects the cold mass, which contains the LHC twin-aperture superconducting magnets operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium. Mechanical components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel, such as support posts and insulation vacuum barriers are designed with efficient thermalisations for heat interception to minimise heat conduction. Heat inleak by radiation is reduced by employing multilayer insulation (MLI) wrapped around the cold mass and around an aluminium thermal shield cooled to about 60 K. Measurements of the total helium vaporization rate in String 2 gives, after substraction of supplementary heat loads and end effects, an estimate of the total thermal load to a standard LHC cell (107 m) includi...

  4. Characterisation of a cryostat using simultaneous, single-beam multiple-surface laser vibrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissinger, Thomas; Charrett, Thomas O. H.; James, Stephen W.; Tatam, Ralph P., E-mail: r.p.tatam@cranfield.ac.uk [Engineering Photonics, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Adams, Alvin; Twin, Andrew [Oxford Instruments Nanoscience, Tubney Woods, Abingdon, Oxon, OX13 5QX (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    A novel range-resolved interferometric signal processing technique that uses sinusoidal optical frequency modulation is applied to multi-surface vibrometry, demonstrating simultaneous optical measurements of vibrations on two surfaces using a single, collimated laser beam, with a minimum permissible distance of 3.5 cm between surfaces. The current system, using a cost-effective laser diode and a fibre-coupled, downlead insensitive setup, allows an interferometric fringe rate of up to 180 kHz to be resolved with typical displacement noise levels of 8 pm · Hz{sup −05}. In this paper, the system is applied to vibrometry measurements of a table-top cryostat, with concurrent measurements of the optical widow and the sample holder target inside. This allows the separation of common-mode vibrations of the whole cryostat from differential vibrations between the window and the target, allowing any resonances to be identified.

  5. Acquisition of He3 Cryostat Insert for Experiments on Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    facilitated transport experiments on topological insulators and Dirac and Weyl semimetals. These experiments resulted in several notable achievements and...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Acquisition of He3 Cryostat Insert for Experiments on Topological Insulators . The views...Experiments on Topological Insulators . Report Title The award enabled the PI to acquire a complete cryogenic system with a 9-Tesla superconducting magnet. The

  6. Management of severe acute pancreatitis: a surgical odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Edward L; Dexter, Nadine D

    2010-01-01

    Throughout much of history, surgery of the pancreas was restricted to drainage of abscesses and treatment of traumatic wounds. At the turn of the 20th century under the impetus of anesthesia, such surgical stalwarts as Mayo Robson, Mickulicz, and Moynihan began to deploy laparotomy and gauze drainage in an effort to salvage patients afflicted with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Over the next thirty years, surgical intervention in SAP became the therapy for choice, despite surgical mortality rates that often exceeded 50%.When the discovery of the serum test for amylase revealed that clinically milder forms of acute pancreatitis existed that could respond to nonoperative therapy, a wave of conservatism emerged, and, for the next quarter century, surgical intervention for SAP was rarely practiced. However, by the 1960s, conservative mortality rates for SAP were reported to be as high as 60% to 80%, leading surgeons to not only refine the indications for surgery in SAP, but also to consider new approaches. Extensive pancreatic resections for SAP became the vogue in continental surgical centers in the 1960s and 1970s, but often resulted in high mortality rates and inadvertent removal of viable tissue.Accurate diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis by dynamic CT led to new approaches for management. Some surgeons recommended restricting intervention to those with documented infected necrosis, and proposed delayed exploration employing sequestrectomy and open-packing. Others advocated debridement early in the course of the disease for all patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, regardless of the status of infection. In the 1990s, however, a series of prospective studies emerged proving that nonoperative management of patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis was superior to surgical intervention, and that delayed intervention provided improved surgical mortality rates.The surgical odyssey in managing the necrotizing form of SAP, from simple drainage, to resection, to

  7. ATLAS's superconducting solenoid takes up position

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting solenoid was moved to its final destination on 16 January. It has taken up position opposite the ATLAS liquid argon barrel cryostat, which will house the electromagnetic calorimeter. All that remains to do now is to slide it into the insulation vacuum, this will be done in the next few weeks. Built by Toshiba, under responsibility of KEK in Japan, the central solenoid is 2.4 metres in diameter, 5.3 metres long and weighs 5.5 tonnes. "It will provide an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla that will deflect particles inside the inner detector," as Roger Ruber, on-site project coordinator, explains. The inner detector, which consists of three sub-detectors, will be installed inside the solenoid later. The solenoid during one of the transport operations. Securely attached to the overhead travelling crane, the solenoid is situated in front of the opening to the liquid argon calorimeter, it will be inserted soon.

  8. A space odyssey: Experimental manipulation of threat perception and anxiety-related interpretation bias in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.H.M. Muris (Peter); J. Huijding (Jorg); B.N. Mayer (Birgit); M. Hameetman (Marjolein)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study provides a first test of an experimental method, the "space odyssey" paradigm, that was designed to manipulate interpretation bias in children. Seventy non-clinical children aged 8-12 years first completed a standardized anxiety questionnaire. Following this, they completed

  9. Mathematics Intervention Utilizing Carnegie Learning's Cognitive Tutor® and Compass Learning's Odyssey Math®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Carnegie Learning's Cognitive Tutor®The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference between pre-test and post-test achievement scores when Compass Learning's Odyssey Math® is used together with Carnegie Learning's Math Cognitive Tutor® in a mathematics intervention program at ABC Middle School. The…

  10. 2001 Mars Odyssey: Geologic Questions for Global Geochemical and Mineralogical Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, R. S.; Meyer, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    2001 Mars Odyssey has three experiments. GRS will map the surface elemental composition. MARIE will characterize the Mars radiation environment for risk to humans. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology with a camera and thermal IR imaging. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Experience with two large-scale Hell-cryostats for a superconducting RF particle separator working in closed cycle with a 300 W refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, W

    1976-01-01

    The contribution of the Karlsruhe Institut fur Experimental Kernphysik to the RF particle separator at the SPS/CERN consists of the two superconducting deflectors and their Hell-cryostats with the cryogenic and vacuum accessories. The cryostats have to fulfil specifications concerning tightness, thermal insulation, adjustment of the cavities to the beam and reliability. Corresponding cryogenic and RF tests are performed in Karlsruhe before a 300 W refrigerator simulating normal and emergency conditions. Following a description of cryostats design the results of these measurements are compared with the specifications. Operating experience with the cryostats in closed circuit with the refrigerator are reported. (5 refs).

  12. PLC-controlled cryostats for the BlackGEM and MeerLICHT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Gert; Morren, Johan; Pessemier, Wim; Bloemen, Steven; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Roelfsema, Ronald; Groot, Paul; Aerts, Conny

    2016-08-01

    BlackGEM is an array of telescopes, currently under development at the Radboud University Nijmegen and at NOVA (Netherlands Research School for Astronomy). It targets the detection of the optical counterparts of gravitational waves. The first three BlackGEM telescopes are planned to be installed in 2018 at the La Silla observatory (Chile). A single prototype telescope, named MeerLICHT, will already be commissioned early 2017 in Sutherland (South Africa) to provide an optical complement for the MeerKAT radio array. The BlackGEM array consists of, initially, a set of three robotic 65-cm wide-field telescopes. Each telescope is equipped with a single STA1600 CCD detector with 10.5k x 10.5k 9-micron pixels that covers a 2.7 square degrees field of view. The cryostats for housing these detectors are developed and built at the KU Leuven University (Belgium). The operational model of BlackGEM requires long periods of reliable hands-off operation. Therefore, we designed the cryostats for long vacuum hold time and we make use of a closed-cycle cooling system, based on Polycold PCC Joule-Thomson coolers. A single programmable logic controller (PLC) controls the cryogenic systems of several BlackGEM telescopes simultaneously, resulting in a highly reliable, cost-efficient and maintenance-friendly system. PLC-based cryostat control offers some distinct advantages, especially for a robotic facility. Apart of temperature monitoring and control, the PLC also monitors the vacuum quality, the power supply and the status of the PCC coolers (compressor power consumption and temperature, pressure in the gas lines, etc.). Furthermore, it provides an alarming system and safe and reproducible procedures for automatic cool down and warm up. The communication between PLC and higher-level software takes place via the OPC-UA protocol, offering a simple to implement, yet very powerful interface. Finally, a touch-panel display on the PLC provides the operator with a user-friendly and robust

  13. Validation and implementation of sandwich structure bottom plate to rib weld joint in the base section of ITER Cryostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, Rajnikant, E-mail: rajnikant@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Sector-25, Gandhinagar 382016 (India); Bhardwaj, Anil K.; Gupta, Girish; Joshi, Vaibhav; Patel, Mitul; Bhavsar, Jagrut; More, Vipul; Jindal, Mukesh; Bhattacharya, Avik; Jogi, Gaurav; Palaliya, Amit; Jha, Saroj; Pandey, Manish [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC Electronics Estate, Sector-25, Gandhinagar 382016 (India); Jadhav, Pandurang; Desai, Hemal [Larsen & Toubro Limited, Heavy Engineering, Hazira Manufacturing Complex, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • ITER Cryostat base section sandwich structure bottom plate to rib weld joint is qualified through mock-up. • Established welding sequence was successfully implemented on all six sectors of cryostat base section. • Each layer liquid penetrant examination has been carried out for these weld joints and found satisfactory. - Abstract: Cryostat is a large stainless steel vacuum vessel providing vacuum environment to ITER machine components. The cryostat is ∼30 m in diameter and ∼30 m in height having variable thickness from 25 mm to 180 mm. Sandwich structure of cryostat base section withstands vacuum loading and limits the deformation under service conditions. Sandwich structure consists of top and bottom plates internally strengthened with radial and circular ribs. In current work, sandwich structure bottom plate to rib weld joint has been designed with full penetration joint as per ITER Vacuum Handbook requirement considering nondestructive examinations and welding feasibility. Since this joint was outside the scope of ASME Section VIII Div. 2, it was decided to validate through mock-up of bottom plate to rib joint. Welding sequence was established to control the distortion. Tensile test, macro-structural examination and layer by layer LPE were carried out for validation of this weld joint. However possibility of ultrasonic examination method was also investigated. The test results from the welded joint mock-up were found to confirm all code and specification requirements. The same was implemented in first sector (0–60°) of base section sandwich structure.

  14. Design of the second series 15 m LHC prototype dipole magnet cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    Brunet, J C; Peón-Hernández, G; Poncet, Alain; Rohmig, P; Skoczen, Blazej; Williams, L R

    1998-01-01

    A first series of six LHC 10 m long prototype dipole magnets and cryostats have been manufactured in European Industry and the assembled cryo-magnets tested singly and connected in series in a test string at CERN between March 1994 and December 1996. During the same period, an evolution in the requirements for LHC cryogenics distribution has lead the project management to adopt a separate cryo-distribution line running parallel to the LHC machine1. The former standard LHC half-cell, made up of a short straight section unit and four 10 m dipoles, has been discarded and replaced with one composed of a short straight section unit and three 15 m dipoles. The new 15 m LHC dipole magnet cryostats are described. These units house the dipole magnet cold mass standing on three low heat in-leak support columns, and enclosed within an actively cooled radiation screen operating at 4.5-20 K and an actively cooled thermal shield operating at 50-75 K.

  15. The Making of Odysseus the Hero in Homer’s Odyssey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Liang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a sociological manner how the heroic identity of Odysseus is constructed in Homer’s Odyssey. The making of Odysseus the hero requires the constant testing and improving of Odysseus's heroic qualities, the existence of a largely loyal crowd to testify to his charisma, and the weaving of a myth that wraps him up. Various aspects of the Greek hero are fleshed out.

  16. Construction of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Daël, A; Alessandria, F; Berriaud, C; Berthier, R; Broggi, F; Mayri, C; Pabot, Y; Rey, J M; Reytier, M; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Van Hille, H; Volpini, G; Sun, Z

    2001-01-01

    The B0 coil is a technological model for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid coils. The major concepts and the construction procedures are the same as those specified for the BT coils. So the manufacturing feasibility has been extensively proved and the technological developments have been carried out for the industrial production of the conductor, the welding technique of the coil casing, the prestress of the coil with bladders, the cold to warm supports, the construction and assembly of the cryostat. The paper illustrates all these phases. (4 refs).

  17. Localization and cytophotometric analysis of cathepsin B activity in unfixed and undecalcified cryostat sections of whole rat knee joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Vogels, I. M.; Smith, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Cathepsin B activity is demonstrated histochemically with a post-coupling method using Z-Arg-Arg-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide as substrate and Fast Blue BB as coupling reagent in unfixed and undecalcified cryostat sections of whole rat knee joints. Sections were attached to transparent tape to keep the

  18. ALMA Band 1 Optics (35-50 GHz): Tolerance Analysis, Effect of Cryostat Infrared Filters and Cold Beam Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A.; Tapia, V.; Finger, R.; Huang, C.-D.; Asayama, S.; Huang, Y.-D.

    2017-10-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) is currently the largest (sub-)mm wave telescope in the world and will be used for astronomical observations in all atmospheric windows from 35 to 950 GHz when completed. The ALMA band 1 (35-50 GHz) receiver will be used for the longest wavelength observations with ALMA. Because of the longer wavelength, the size of optics and waveguide components will be larger than for other ALMA bands. In addition, all components will be placed inside the ALMA cryostat in each antenna, which will impose severe mechanical constraints on the size and position of receiver optics components. Due to these constraints, the designs of the corrugated feed horn and lens optics are highly optimized to comply with the stringent ALMA optical requirements. In this paper, we perform several tolerance analyses to check the impact of fabrication errors in such an optimized design. Secondly, we analyze the effects of operating this optics inside the ALMA cryostat, in particular the effects of having the cryostat IR filters placed next to the band 1 feed horn aperture, with the consequent near-field effects. Finally, we report on beam measurements performed on the first three ALMA band 1 receivers inside test cryostats, which satisfy ALMA specifications. In these measurements, we can clearly observe the effects of fabrication tolerances and IR filter effects on prototype receiver performance.

  19. The Insulation Vacuum Barrier for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Magnet Cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, M; Parma, Vittorio; Skoczen, Blazej; Trilhe, P

    2000-01-01

    The sectorisation of the insulation vacuum of the LHC magnet cryostats, housing the superconducting magnets, which operate in a 1.9 K superfluid helium bath, is achieved by means of vacuum barriers. Each vacuum barrier is a leak-tight austenitic stainless steel thin-wall structure, mainly composed of large diameter (between 0.6 m and 0.9 m) bellows and concentric corrugated cylinders. It is mounted in the Short Straight Section (SSS) [1], between the magnet helium enclosure and the vacuum vessel. This paper presents the design of the vacuum barrier, concentrating mostly on its expected thermal performance, to fulfil the tight LHC heat in-leak budgets. Pressure and leak test results, confirming the mechanical design of two prototypes manufactured in industry, and the preparation of one of these vacuum barriers for cryogenic testing in an SSS prototype, are also mentioned.

  20. Autometallographic silver enhancement of zinc sulfide crystals created in cryostat sections from human brain biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, G; Juhl, S; Stoltenberg, M

    1997-01-01

    We present a new technique that allows zinc ions in synaptic and secretory vesicles of biopsy and early autopsy material (Human brain biopsies, or other tissue......, and it is demonstrated that zinc ions in the human neocortex are located in synaptic vesicles. In the few human biopsies analyzed thus far, the light microscopic pattern created by the silver-enhanced ZEN terminals resembles that seen in the neocortex of rat brain. The technique has been applied to cryostat sections...... from neocortex biopsies of five individuals undergoing brain surgery. Biopsies from three patients resulted in satisfactory AMG-stained sections. Rat brains removed and frozen immediately after decapitation constituted the material on which the present technique was developed. Such material results...

  1. Building and Testing a Superconductivity Measurement Platform for a Helium Cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Heath; Ostrander, Joshua; Wu, Jim; Ramos, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Superconductivity experiments using Josephson junctions are an excellent environment to study quantum mechanics and materials science. A standard electrical transport technique uses filtered four wire measurement of these superconducting devices. We report our experience as undergraduates in a liberal arts college in building and testing an experimental platform anchored on the cold-finger of a helium cryostat and designed for performing differential conductance measurements in Josephson junctions. To filter out RF, we design, build and test cryogenic filters using ceramic capacitors and inductors and thermocoax cables. We also use fixed attenuators for thermal anchoring and use miniature connectors to connect wires and coax to a sample box. We report on progress in our diagnostic measurements as well as low-temperature tunneling experiments to probe the structure of the energy gap in both single- and multi-gapped superconductors. We acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through NSF Grant DMR-1206561.

  2. The language of the gods : oblique communication and divine persuasion in Homer's Odyssey

    OpenAIRE

    Zekas, Christodoulos

    2010-01-01

    Often praised for its sophistication in the narrator- and character-text, the Odyssey is regarded as the ultimate epic of a warrior’s much-troubled nostos. As a corollary of both its theme and the polytropia of the main hero, the poem explores extensively the motifs of secrecy and disguise. Apart from the lying tales of Odysseus, one important, albeit less obvious, example of the tendency to secrecy and disguise is the exchanges between the gods, which constitute a distinct group of speeches ...

  3. ATLAS superconducting solenoid on-surface test

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, Roger J M Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Makida, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Pavlov, O V; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is presently under construction as one of the five LHC experiment set-ups. It relies on a sophisticated magnet system for the momentum measurement of charged particle tracks. The superconducting solenoid is at the center of the detector, the magnet system part nearest to the proton-proton collision point. It is designed for a 2 Tesla strong axial magnetic field at the collision point, while its thin-walled construction of 0.66 radiation lengths avoids degradation of energy measurements in the outer calorimeters. The solenoid and calorimeter have been integrated in their common cryostat, cooled down and tested on-surface. We review the on-surface set-up and report the performance test results.

  4. Thermal Analysis and Correlation of the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's Solar Array During Aerobraking Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; George, Benjamin E.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft made use of multipass aerobraking to gradually reduce its orbit period from a highly elliptical insertion orbit to its final science orbit. Aerobraking operations provided an opportunity to apply advanced thermal analysis techniques to predict the temperature of the spacecraft's solar array for each drag pass. Odyssey telemetry data was used to correlate the thermal model. The thermal analysis was tightly coupled to the flight mechanics, aerodynamics, and atmospheric modeling efforts being performed during operations. Specifically, the thermal analysis predictions required a calculation of the spacecraft's velocity relative to the atmosphere, a prediction of the atmospheric density, and a prediction of the heat transfer coefficients due to aerodynamic heating. Temperature correlations were performed by comparing predicted temperatures of the thermocouples to the actual thermocouple readings from the spacecraft. Time histories of the spacecraft relative velocity, atmospheric density, and heat transfer coefficients, calculated using flight accelerometer and quaternion data, were used to calculate the aerodynamic heating. During aerobraking operations, the correlations were used to continually update the thermal model, thus increasing confidence in the predictions. This paper describes the thermal analysis that was performed and presents the correlations to the flight data.

  5. Design and optimisation of low heat load liquid helium cryostat to house cryogenic current comparator in antiproton decelerator at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A.; Koettig, T.; Fernandes, M.; Tan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) is installed in the low-energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN to make an absolute measurement of the beam intensity. Operating below 4.2 K, it is based on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and employs a superconducting niobium shield to supress magnetic field components not linked to the beam current. The AD contains no permanent cryogenic infrastructure so the local continuous liquefaction of helium using a pulse-tube is required; limiting the available cooling power to 0.69 W at 4.2K. Due to the sensitivity of the SQUID to variations in magnetic fields, the CCC is highly sensitive to mechanical vibration which is limited to a minimum by the support systems of the cryostat. This article presents the cooling system of the cryostat and discusses the design challenges overcome to minimise the transmission of vibration to the CCC while operating within the cryogenic limits imposed by the cooling system.

  6. Thermal Performance of Aged and Weathered Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) Materials Under Cryogenic Vacuum Conditions (Cryostat-4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center conducted long-term testing of SOFI materials under actual-use cryogenic conditions with Cryostat-4. The materials included in the testing were NCFI 24-124 (acreage foam), BX-265 (close-out foam, including intertank flange and bipod areas), and a potential alternate material, NCFI 27-68, (acreage foam with the flame retardant removed). Specimens of these materials were placed at two locations: a site that simulated aging (the Vehicle Assembly Building [VAB]) and a site that simulated weathering (the Atmospheric Exposure Test Site [beach site]). After aging/weathering intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months, the samples were retrieved and tested for their thermal performance under cryogenic vacuum conditions with test apparatus Cryostat-4.

  7. CAT 2 - An improved version of Cryogenic Analysis Tools for online and offline monitoring and analysis of large size cryostats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliarone, C. E.; Uttaro, S.; Cappelli, L.; Fallone, M.; Kartal, S.

    2017-02-01

    CAT, Cryogenic Analysis Tools is a software package developed using LabVIEW and ROOT environments to analyze the performances of large size cryostats, where many parameters, input, and control variables need to be acquired and studied at the same time. The present paper describes how CAT works and which are the main improvements achieved in the new version: CAT 2. New Graphical User Interfaces have been developed in order to make the use of the full package more user-friendly as well as a process of resource optimization has been carried out. The offline analysis of the full cryostat performances is available both trough ROOT line command interface band also by using the new graphical interfaces.

  8. The LHC Continuous Cryostat Interconnections The Organization of a Logistically Complex Worksite Requiring Strict Quality Standards and High Output

    CERN Document Server

    Fessia, P; Bozzini, D; Cruikshank, P; Jacquemod, A; Maan, W; Musso, A; Oberli, L; Poncet, A; Russenschuck, Stephan; Savary, F; Struik, M; Tock, J Ph; Tommasini, D; Völlinger, C; Kotarba, A; Olek, S; Sulek, Z; Grimaud, A; Vaudaux, L

    2008-01-01

    The interconnections of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continuous cryostat have been completed in fall 2007: 1695 interconnections magnet to magnet and 224 interconnections between the continuous cryostat and the cryogenic distribution line have been executed along the 27 km of the LHC. The very tight schedule, the complexity of the interconnection sequence, the strict quality standards applied have required the creation of an ad hoc organization in order to steer and coordinate the activities on the worksite dispersed along the whole accelerator ring. The concatenation of construction and test phases carried out by CERN staff, CERN collaborating institutes and contractors have led to the necessity of a common approach and of a very effective information flow. In this paper, after having recalled the main technical challenges, we review the organizational choices that have been taken and we briefly analyze the development of the worksite in term of allocated resources and production.

  9. Sub-cooled nitrogen cryostat for 66 kV/750 A superconducting fault current limiter magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtani, Y; Inoue, K; Kuriyama, T; Nomura, S; Ohkuma, T; Takahashi, Y; Yazawa, T

    2004-01-01

    As a part of the Super-conductive AC Equipment (Super-ACE) project presently being performed, an AC magnet for a fault current limiter (FCL) is being developed. The goal of the project is the development of 66 kV/750 A high Tc superconducting (HTS) FCL magnet, which is composed of six HTS coils operating at around 65 K. This paper describes a design of a sub-cooled nitrogen cryostat for the FCL magnet. Three sets of Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler were used for cooling liquid nitrogen in the cryostat. Experimental results of cooling down and temperature stability during current flowing tests of the magnet were reported in this paper. The sub-cooled nitrogen of 65 K was successfully obtained in the vessel with 2.6 m/sup 3/ in volume. And the temperature uniformity was observed in both of the cooling down process and the coil energizing process.

  10. Members of the Science and Technology Commission, Spanish Senate visit ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Members of the Science and Technology Commission, Spanish Senate, in front of a barrel toroid cryostat vessel in the ATLAS assembly hall. The air-core ATLAS barrel toroid magnet system will consist of eight large superconducting coils, each in its own vacuum vessel, built by Spanish company Felguera Construcciones Mecanicas SA under the responsibility of IFAE (Institute for High Energy Physics), Barcelona. Standing (left to right): Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson; Dr Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, delegate for Spain to CERN Council; Mrs Mercedes Senen, Lawyer of the Commission; Mr Alonso Arroyo, President of the Commission; Mr Ramon Antonio Socias, Second Vice-President of the Commission; Mr Francisco Xabier Albistur, Senator; H.E. Mr Joaquin Pérez-Villaneuva Y Tovar, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Spain to the Office of the United Nations in Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland, Spanish delegate to CERN Council; and Miguel Gomez. Seated (left to right): Mr Adolfo Abejon...

  11. New Vertical Cryostat with the new HiLumi Model MQXF5

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC has given rise to the High Luminosity (HL) LHC project. HL-LHC relies on a number of key innovative technologies, representing exceptional technological challenges, such as cutting-edge 13 Tesla superconducting magnets, very compact and ultra-precise superconducting cavities for beam rotation, and 300-metre-long high-power superconducting links with zero energy dissipation. The most technically challenging aspects of the LHC upgrade cannot be done by CERN alone and requires a strong collaboration involving external expertise and modernization of existing CERN Test Facility infrastructure as in the SM18 . The SM18 hall was originally optimized for the NbTi LHC magnet testing, but with the High Luminosity LHC upgrade coming up (http://hilumilhc.web.cern.ch/), a major upgrade of the test facility was done. The images shows the new cryostat called “Cluster D” and its associated electrical circuit while testing the first quadrupole model magnet for the Q2 series.

  12. Leak-Tight Welding Experience from the Industrial Assembly of the LHC Cryostats at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bourcey, N; Chiggiato, P; Limon, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Musso, G; Poncet, A; Parma, V

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of the approximately 1700 LHC main ring cryostats at CERN involved extensive welding of cryogenic lines and vacuum vessels. More than 6 km of welding requiring leak tightness to a rate better than 1.10-9 mbar.l.s-1 on stainless steel and aluminium piping and envelopes was made, essentially by manual welding but also making use of orbital welding machines. In order to fulfil the safety regulations related to pressure vessels and to comply with the leak-tightness requirements of the vacuum systems of the machine, welds were executed according to high qualification standards and following a severe quality assurance plan. Leak detection by He mass spectrometry was extensively used. Neon leak detection was used successfully to locate leaks in the presence of helium backgrounds. This paper presents the quality assurance strategy adopted for welds and leak detection. It presents the statistics of non-conformities on welds and leaks detected throughout the entire production and the advances in the use...

  13. A numerical study of the acoustic radiation due to eddy current-cryostat interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Xiaorong; Li, Yu; Crozier, Stuart

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the acoustic radiation due to eddy current-cryostat interactions and perform a qualitative analysis on noise reduction methods. In order to evaluate the sound pressure level (SPL) of the eddy current induced warm bore wall vibration, a Finite Element (FE) model was created to simulate the noises from both the warm bore wall vibration and the gradient coil assembly. For the SPL reduction of the warm bore wall vibration, we first improved the active shielding of the gradient coil, thus reducing the eddy current on the warm bore wall. A damping treatment was then applied to the warm bore wall to control the acoustic radiation. Initial simulations show that the SPL of the warm bore wall is higher than that of the gradient assembly with typical design shielding ratios at many frequencies. Subsequent simulation results of eddy current control and damping treatment application show that the average SPL reduction of the warm bore wall can be as high as 9.6 dB, and even higher in some frequency bands. Combining eddy current control and suggested damping scheme, the noise level in a MRI system can be effectively reduced. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Liquid Argon Calorimeter - Barrel Cryostat Construction and Testing May-June 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    US, ATLAS

    1999-01-01

    Photo 1 - Outer Cold Cryostat showing 'Y' support. Photo 2 - Outer Cold Vessel half showing 'X' and 'Z' stops and 'Y' supports. Photo 3 - Cold Vessel Bulkhead, End 'C'. Photo 4 - Outer Cold Vessel half, showing EM Calorimeter support rail. Photo 5 - End of Outer Cold Vessel showing EM Calorimeter support rail. Photo 6 - Al/SST Transitions for Signal and High Voltage feedthroughs. Test weld blocks shown in background. Photo 7 - Welding of Al/SST Transitions onto Outer Cold Vessel. Photo 8 - Al/SST Transitions, including test pumpouts. Photo 9 - Machining of Inner Cold vessel. Photo 10 - Warm Vessel being assembled for leak testing Photo 11 - Setting up Warm Vessel on test stand. Photo 12 - Warm Vessel assembly for testing complete. Photo 13 - Dial indicators mounted against the Warm Vessel Bulkhead during testing. Photo 14 - Pumping on Warm Vessel. Photo 15 - Pumping on the Warm Vessel. Photo 16 - Checking the Solenoid Chimney. Photo 17 - Leak checking the Inner Warm Vessel/Bulkhead flange in the area of ID co...

  15. Conceptual & Engineering Design of Plug-in Cryostat Cylinder for Super-Conducting Central Solenoid of SST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Prabal; Santra, Prosenjit; Vasava, Kirit; Jayswal, Snehal; Parekh, Tejas; Chauhan, Pradeep; Patel, Hitesh; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-04-01

    SST-1, country’s first indigenously built steady state super-conducting tokamak is planned to be equipped with an Nb3Sn based superconducting central solenoid, which will replace the existing copper conductor TR1 coil for the purpose of Ohmic breakdown. This central solenoid (CS) of four layers with each layer having 144 turns with an OD of 573 mm, ID of 423 mm length of 2483 mm will be housed inside a high vacuum, CRYO compatible plug-in cryostat thin shell having formed from SS 304L plate duly rolled and welded to form cylinder along with necessary accessories like LN2 bubble panel, current lead chamber, coil and cylinder support structure etc. This paper will present the design drivers, material selection, advantages and constraints of the plug-in cryostat concept, sub-systems of plug-in cryostat, its conceptual and engineering design, CAD models, finite element analysis using ANSYS, safety issues and diagnostics, on-going works about fabrication, quality assurance/control and assembly/integration aspects with in the existing SST-1 machine bore.

  16. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-04ER86191 Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-05-07

    The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

  17. Experimental validation of the thermal performance of the 1.9 K magnet cryostats during the commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Maglioni, C; Poncet, A

    2009-01-01

    The LHC machine, at present in the commissioning phase at CERN, is composed of eight 1.9 K superconducting magnet sectors independently operated. Assembled in 8 continuous segments of approximately 2.7 km length each, the HeII cryostats for the 1232 dipoles magnets and 438 Short Straight Sections (housing the quadrupole magnets) were designed to fulfil tight heat load budgets for an affordable large-scale project. The commissioning of the cryogenic system of the first LHC sectors is under way since January 2007 and 5 sectors have now been operated at their nominal temperatures of 1.9 K. An experimental assessment of the thermal performance of the final machine is therefore possible, allowing comparison with design estimates. After a brief description of the layout of the LHC cryostats, and their associated cryogenic and vacuum sectorisations, calorimetric measurements of the heat loads to the 1.9 K magnets and to the cryostat thermal shielding are presented and discussed.

  18. A method for eliminating Faraday rotation in cryostat windows in longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewko-Klim, A; Uba, S; Uba, L

    2014-07-01

    A solution to the problem of disturbing effect of the background Faraday rotation in the cryostat windows on longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect (LMOKE) measured under vacuum conditions and/or at low temperatures is proposed. The method for eliminating the influence of Faraday rotation in cryostat windows is based on special arrangement of additional mirrors placed on sample holder. In this arrangement, the orientation of the cryostat window is perpendicular to the light beam direction and parallel to an external magnetic field generated by the H-frame electromagnet. The operation of the LMOKE magnetometer with the special sample holder based on polarization modulation technique with a photo-elastic modulator is theoretically analyzed with the use of Jones matrices, and formulas for evaluating of the actual Kerr rotation and ellipticity of the sample are derived. The feasibility of the method and good performance of the magnetometer is experimentally demonstrated for the LMOKE effect measured in Fe/Au multilayer structures. The influence of imperfect alignment of the magnetometer setup on the Kerr angles, as derived theoretically through the analytic model and verified experimentally, is examined and discussed.

  19. Space odysseys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antologi om unge danske arkitekter og designere. Udgivet som Arkitektur DK 5/2006 og som selvstændig publikation. Den indledende artikel er af arkitekturteoretisk karakter, de øvrige formidlende.   ...

  20. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  1. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  2. Realizing "2001: A Space Odyssey": Piloted Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast, piloted outer solar system travel was created predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. The initial requirements were satisfied by the vehicle concept, which could deliver a 172 mt crew payload from Earth to Jupiter rendezvous in 118 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1,690 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all major systems including artificial gravity payload, central truss, nuclear fusion reactor, power conversion, magnetic nozzle, fast wave plasma heating, tankage, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery bank, refrigeration, reaction control, communications, mission design, and space operations. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance/utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/x-ray radiation. Technical comparisons are made between the vehicle concept and the interplanetary spacecraft depicted in the motion picture 2001: A Space Odyssey.

  3. Stand up for epilepsy San Diego photo-shoot: a personal odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R; Kaufman, Nathaniel D

    2013-06-01

    Stigma towards epilepsy results in barriers to social integration, education, employment, and marriage, with increased divorce rates. There is a societal need to realise that many persons with epilepsy (PWE) lead normal lives and can be highly educated with effective employment. Integration of PWE into sports is therapeutic both for PWE (decreased seizure frequency, decreased comorbid conditions, and increased psychosocial skills) and society. Stand Up For Epilepsy (SUFE), overseen by the ILAE Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy, is an international project in which action photographs with PWE were taken as a means to destigmatise epilepsy. This autobiographical narrative describes how SUFE initiated effective athlete-PWE interactions with positive PWE, athlete, and parent responses. Expansion of SUFE is recommended to further destigmatise epilepsy. Participation in SUFE can serve as a personal odyssey for PWE.

  4. Microbial characterization of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft and its encapsulation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Nicholson, Wayne; Kern, Roger; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2003-01-01

    Microbial characterization of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft and the Kennedy Space Center Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF-II) was carried out by both culture-based and molecular methods. The most dominant cultivable microbes were species of Bacillus, with comamonads, microbacteria and actinomycetales also represented. Several spore-forming isolates were resistant to gamma-radiation, UV, H2O2 and desiccation, and one Acinetobacter radioresistens isolate and several Aureobasidium, isolated directly from the spacecraft, survived various conditions. Sequences arising in clone libraries were fairly consistent between the spacecraft and facility; predominant genera included Variovorax, Ralstonia and Aquaspirillum. This study improves our understanding of the microbial community structure, diversity and survival capabilities of microbes in an encapsulation facility and physically associated with colocated spacecraft.

  5. Morphology and composition of the surface of Mars: Mars Odyssey THEMIS results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Philip R; Bandfield, Joshua L; Bell, James F; Gorelick, Noel; Hamilton, Victoria E; Ivanov, Anton; Jakosky, Bruce M; Kieffer, Hugh H; Lane, Melissa D; Malin, Michael C; McConnochie, Timothy; McEwen, Alfred S; McSween, Harry Y; Mehall, Greg L; Moersch, Jeffery E; Nealson, Kenneth H; Rice, James W; Richardson, Mark I; Ruff, Steven W; Smith, Michael D; Titus, Timothy N; Wyatt, Michael B

    2003-06-27

    The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on Mars Odyssey has produced infrared to visible wavelength images of the martian surface that show lithologically distinct layers with variable thickness, implying temporal changes in the processes or environments during or after their formation. Kilometer-scale exposures of bedrock are observed; elsewhere airfall dust completely mantles the surface over thousands of square kilometers. Mars has compositional variations at 100-meter scales, for example, an exposure of olivine-rich basalt in the walls of Ganges Chasma. Thermally distinct ejecta facies occur around some craters with variations associated with crater age. Polar observations have identified temporal patches of water frost in the north polar cap. No thermal signatures associated with endogenic heat sources have been identified.

  6. Metabolism of spacecraft cleaning reagents by Mars Odyssey and Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Barding, Gregory; Baki, Ryan; Perkins, Nicole; Lee, Sooji; Lalla, Sid; Campos, Alexa; Sripong, Kimberly; Madrid, Steve

    2016-07-01

    The metabolomic and proteomic properties that promote microbial survival in spacecraft assembly facilities are important aspects to planetary protection and astrobiology. In this presentation, we will provide molecular and biological evidence that the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter metabolize/degrade spacecraft cleaning reagents such as ethanol, 2-propanol, and Kleenol-30. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) studies on A. radioresistens 50v1 (Mars Odyssey) show that the metabolome is dependent upon growth conditions and that ^{13}C-labeled ethanol is incorporated into metabolites such as TCA/glyoxylate cycle intermediates, amino acids, monosaccharides, and disaccharides (e.g., trehalose). In fact, plate count assays show that ethanol is a sole carbon source under minimal conditions for several Mars Phoenix and Odyssey-associated Acinetobacter strains, which may explain why the Acinetobacter are among the most abundant genera found in spacecraft assembly facilities. Biochemical analyses support the enzymatic oxidation of ethanol and 2-propanol by a membrane-bound and NAD+/PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, with current kinetic data providing similar apparent K _{M} and maximum growth rate values of ˜5 and 8 mM ethanol, respectively. Preliminary GC-MS analysis also suggests that Kleenol-30 is degraded by A. radioresistens 50v1 when grown in ethanol mixtures. Under minimal conditions, A. radioresistens 50v1 (˜10 ^{8} cfu/mL) also displays a remarkable oxidative extremotolerance (˜2-log reduction in 10 mM hydrogen peroxide), which suggests crucial roles for metabolites associated with oxidative stress (e.g., trehalose) and the observed appreciable catalase specific activities. In conclusion, these results provide key insights into the survival strategies of spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter and emphasize the importance of characterizing the carbon metabolism of forward contaminants.

  7. Visible Color Properties of Mars at Sub-100 m Resolutions from Mars Odyssey THEMIS/VIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. F., III; McConnochie, T. H.; Wolff, M. J.; Savransky, D.; Stiglitz, B.; Malin, M.; Christensen, P. R.; Mehall, G. L.; Cherednik, L. L.; Bender, K. C.; THEMIS Science Team

    2003-05-01

    The Mars Odyssey THEMIS instrument's Visible Imaging Subsystem (VIS) has been acquiring one to five color visible wavelength images of Mars at spatial scales of 18 to 72 m/pixel since February 2002. As of late-June 2003 VIS had acquired approximately 8600 image sequences covering approximately 9% of the Martian surface. Roughly two thirds of the VIS images acquired to date have been single-band images (mostly 654 nm); the remaining have been acquired in two or more bands, with most of those acquired through all five VIS filters (425, 540, 654, 749, and 860 nm). Nearly all of the two nominal MER landing ellipses have been imaged by VIS in at least the 654 nm band. We have developed a VIS calibration pipeline using pre-flight and in-flight calibration data to correct for instrumental effects and convert the images to radiance units. Five-color radiance data are also being used to generate true color composite views of VIS scenes. Work is also underway to quantify the surface vs. atmospheric components of the observed radiances using radiative transfer modeling and simultaneous MGS/TES and THEMIS/IRS observations. Initial analyses of the VIS multispectral data are focusing on the search for and identification of anomalous color units associated with intercrater deposits, dunes, wind streaks, and gullies. In general,we are finding that color variability is subtle on Mars even at the fine spatial scale of VIS observations. These results have important implications for testing of competing hypotheses dealing with weathering or alteration of the martian surface, as well as for planning of future MRO CRISM or HiRISE observations at higher spectral or spatial resolution. This work is supported by the NASA Mars Odyssey Participating Scientist Program.

  8. Computer Simulation of the Cool Down of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Korperud, N; Fabre, C; Owren, G; Passardi, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS electromagnetic barrel calorimeter consists of a liquid argon detector with a total mass of 120 tonnes. This highly complicated structure, fabricated from copper, lead, stainless steel and glass-fiber reinforced epoxy will be placed in an aluminum cryostat. The cool down process of the detector will be limited by the maximum temperature differences accepted by the composite structure so as to avoid critical mechanical stresses. A computer program simulating the cool down of the detector by calculating the local heat transfer throughout a simplified model has been developed. The program evaluates the cool down time as a function of different contact gasses filling the spaces within the detector.

  9. Low voltage control for the liquid argon hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brettel, H; Habring, J; Oberlack, H; Schacht, P

    2002-01-01

    At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2 software and a CanBus hardware system. The low voltages for the Hadronic Endcaps of the liquid argon calorimeter are produced by DC/DC-converters in the power boxes and split into 320 channels corresponding to the pre- amplifier and summing boards in the cryostat. Six units of a prototype distribution board are currently under test. Each of it contains 2 ELMBs as CanBus interface, a FPGA of type QL3012 for digital control and 30 low voltage regulators for the individual fine adjustments of the outputs.

  10. ATLAS End Cap Toroid Magnets cold mass design and manufacturing status

    CERN Document Server

    Baynham, D Elwyn; Carr, F S; Densham, C J; Holtom, E; Morrow, D; Towndrow, E F; Luijckx, G; Geerinck, J

    2004-01-01

    The End Cap Toroid Magnets for the ATLAS experiment at LHC, CERN will contain eight racetrack coils mounted as a single cold mass in a cryostat vessel of approximately 10 m diameter. This paper presents the engineering design of the cold mass and gives the status of the industrial production. The cold mass mechanical structure consisting of 8 coils and keystone boxes is described. Coil fabrication from component assembly, coil winding to final impregnation will be reviewed. The design and industrial manufacture of the keystone box elements is given. The cold mass assembly methods and status are described. 3 Refs.

  11. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. After a test insertion on 6th February and a few weeks of preparation work it was finally inserted on 27th February. A couple of hectic 24-hours/7-day weeks followed in order to connect all services in the cryostat bulkhead. But last Monday, 15th March, both warm flanges of the cryostat could be closed. In another week's time we expect to finish the connection of the cryogenic cooling lines and the superconducting bus lines with the external services. Then the cool-down and test will commence... ...

  12. The AGFA and AIRIS separators at ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.

    2017-11-01

    The ATLAS facility is being augmented with two new separators in order to take full advantage of recent and future anticipated beam intensity upgrades to the accelerator. A novel concept is used for the Argonne Gas-Filled Analyzer (AGFA), which employs only two magnetic elements; a quadrupole singlet for vertical focusing and a multipole magnet that provides a dipole field for the separation and a quadrupole field for horizontal focusing of the reaction products. The design allows for placing Gammasphere or GRETINA at the target position. This arrangement enables studies of prompt gamma-ray emission from weakly populated trans-fermium nuclei and those near the doubly-magic N=Z=50 shell closures measured in coincidence with the recoils registered in the AGFA focal plane. The Argonne In-flight Radioactive Ion Separator (AIRIS) is a magnetic chicane that will be installed immediately downstream of the last ATLAS cryostat. It will be used to separate radioactive ion beams generated in flight by the primary beam at an upstream high-intensity production target. These beams will be further purified by a downstream RF sweeper and transported to a number of target stations including HELIOS, the Enge spectrograph, the FMA and Gammasphere.

  13. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles Santillana, I.; Betemps, R.; Gerardin, A.; Guinchard, M.; Langeslag, S. A. E.; Sgobba, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importance for future studies of fracture mechanics at low temperatures. The cryostat features a double-walled vessel consisting of a central cylindrical section with a convex lower end and a flat top end closure. The transmission of the load is guaranteed by a 4 column system and its precise monitoring is assured by an internal load cell positioned next to the sample in the load train. This innovative approach will be discussed together with other nonconventional instrumentation solutions. A validation of the whole system has been carried out, where bending efforts on instrumented samples have been measured. Additionally, dedicated tooling has been fabricated for the device's optimization. The preliminary results obtained confirm an excellent performance of the system and enhance the analysis of materials under extreme conditions with state of the art instrumentation.

  14. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  15. Cryostat for semiautomatic measurement of heat capacity and elastic moduli between 1.6 and 400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Kazuyuki; Soga, Naohiro

    1983-11-01

    An adiabatic cryostat system for the measurement of either heat capacity or elastic moduli was constructed. The vacuum system, electronic equipment to achieve the adiabatic conditions, and instruments for measurements are described. The cube resonance method used for measurement of elastic moduli is shown. Test measurements on the heat capacity of α-Al2O3 show agreement within ±1% of the literature values. The results of heat capacity and elastic moduli measurements on optical fiberglass are described and compared with other data.

  16. Does One Need a 4.5 K Screen in Cryostats of Superconducting Accelerator Devices Operating in Superfluid Helium? Lessons from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph; Tavian, L

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large proj...

  17. Design and fabrication of a cryostat for low temperature mechanical testing for the Mechanical and Materials Engineering group at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles Santillana, I; Gerardin, A; Guinchard, M; Langeslag, S A E; Sgobba, S

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical testing of materials at low temperatures is one of the cornerstones of the Mechanical and Materials Engineering (MME) group at CERN. A long tradition of more than 20 years and a unique know - how of such tests has been developed with an 18 kN double-walled cryostat. Large campaigns of material qualification have been carried out and the mechanical behaviour of materials at 4 K has been vastly studied in sub - size samples for projects like LEP, LHC and its experiments. With the aim of assessing the mechanical properties of materials of higher strength and/or issued from heavy gauge products for which testing standardized specimens of larger cross section might be more adapted, a new 100 kN cryostat capable of hosting different shapes of normalized samples has been carefully designed and fabricated inhouse together with the associated tooling and measurement instrumentation. It has been conceived to be able to adapt to different test frames both dynamic and static, which will be of paramount importa...

  18. The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter C Modules at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Loch, P.

    All three modules of the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter (FCal) for the Liquid Argon Endcap C Cryostat arrived at CERN in July 2002. The modules, which were shipped from Tucson, Arizona, USA (electromagnetic FCal1C), Toronto, Canada (first hadronic FCal2C), and Ottawa, Canada (second hadronic FCal3C), were then cabled in CERN's North Area clean room. Several thousand so-called interconnect boards were mounted on the modules to connect groups of four, six, or nine electrodes in FCal1C, FCal2C and FCal3C, respectively, to one cold signal cable. Great care was taken during this process to avoid electrical shorts in the electrodes. More or less constant testing for shorts and of the connectivity between the interconnect boards and the electrodes, followed by immediate repairs, assured that all three modules were without any electrical problems by the beginning of November 2002. At that time the modules were moved to the H6C cryostat at the end of the H6 beam line in the North Area, and cooled down for the first time to...

  19. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  20. Seasonal and Static Gravity Field of Mars from MGS, Mars Odyssey and MRO Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a spherical harmonic solution of the static gravity field of Mars to degree and order 120, GMM-3, that has been calculated using the Deep Space Network tracking data of the NASA Mars missions, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). We have also jointly determined spherical harmonic solutions for the static and time-variable gravity field of Mars, and the Mars k 2 Love numbers, exclusive of the gravity contribution of the atmosphere. Consequently, the retrieved time-varying gravity coefficients and the Love number k 2 solely yield seasonal variations in the mass of the polar caps and the solid tides of Mars, respectively. We obtain a Mars Love number k 2 of 0.1697 +/-0.0027 (3- sigma). The inclusion of MRO tracking data results in improved seasonal gravity field coefficients C 30 and, for the first time, C 50 . Refinements of the atmospheric model in our orbit determination program have allowed us to monitor the odd zonal harmonic C 30 for approx.1.5 solar cycles (16 years). This gravity model shows improved correlations with MOLA topography up to 15% larger at higher harmonics ( l = 60–80) than previous solutions.

  1. El asunto del “Nuestra señora de la Mercedes” (Odyssey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jesús Carrera Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo constituye, básicamente, una valoración del informe emitido en Estados Unidos por el Juez Pizzo en el que ya podemos calificar como asunto del “Nuestra Señora de La Mercedes”, iniciado hace dos años tras las actividades de expolio desarrolladas por la empresa Odyssey en aguas del Atlántico próximas al Estrecho de Gibraltar. Se trata de un caso que afecta directamente a los intereses españoles en relación con el patrimonio cultural submarino situado en zonas próximas a nuestras costas. De convertirse en jurisprudencia, estaremos dando un paso más en aras de la protección del patrimonio cultural, soslayando la aplicación de legislaciones ancladas enla aplicación de principios de salvamento y hallazgos a bienes que poseen un valor arqueológico, histórico o cultural, y que se encuentran en santuarios de nuestros antepasados.

  2. Equatorial locations of water on Mars: Improved resolution maps based on Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jack T.; Eke, Vincent R.; Massey, Richard J.; Elphic, Richard C.; Feldman, William C.; Maurice, Sylvestre; Teodoro, Luís F. A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a map of the near subsurface hydrogen distribution on Mars, based on epithermal neutron data from the Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer. The map's spatial resolution is approximately improved two-fold via a new form of the pixon image reconstruction technique. We discover hydrogen-rich mineralogy far from the poles, including ∼10 wt.% water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) on the flanks of the Tharsis Montes and >40 wt.% WEH at the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF). The high WEH abundance at the MFF implies the presence of bulk water ice. This supports the hypothesis of recent periods of high orbital obliquity during which water ice was stable on the surface. We find the young undivided channel system material in southern Elysium Planitia to be distinct from its surroundings and exceptionally dry; there is no evidence of hydration at the location in Elysium Planitia suggested to contain a buried water ice sea. Finally, we find that the sites of recurring slope lineae (RSL) do not correlate with subsurface hydration. This implies that RSL are not fed by large, near-subsurface aquifers, but are instead the result of either small ( < 120 km diameter) aquifers, deliquescence of perchlorate and chlorate salts or dry, granular flows.

  3. 4-dimensional model of carbon dioxide seasonal deposition on Mars based on HEND/Odyssey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.

    The carbon dioxide seasonal cycle has been studied on Mars using data from High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard mission Mars Odyssey. The primary task of the HEND experiment is measuring of martian neutron albedo from orbit around Mars. The neutron spectroscopy can be easily used not only for detection of subsurface water bearing layers but also for following up time history of CO2 deposit seasonally condensed from atmosphere down to martian surface. Condensation and sublimation of atmospheric CO2 is happened in vicinity of Mars near polar regions (>60N and >60S) which are characterized by presence of enormous amount of subsurface water ice (20-80% by mass). Atmospheric CO2 deposit covered the surface by relative thick layer with thickness 30-100cm. It effectively hides underlying water ice layers from orbit observations causing significant changes of neutron leakage flux. Detection of these changes allows to deconvolve CO2 cycle time history and estimate column density (g/cm2) and mass (kg) of CO2 deposit. Observations of particular regions on south and north may be combined in 4-dimensional model of CO2 deposit showing how its thickness/mass changes at different regions with time. The primary goal of this study is to present our estimations of CO2 condensed mass on north and south as function of martian seasons during entire martian year. We also add comparison between estimation from HEND data and predictions of AMES climate models.

  4. Bacillus odysseyi sp. nov., a round-spore-forming bacillus isolated from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Satomi, Masataka; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    A round-spore-forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium was isolated from the surface of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and is a Gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped, endospore-forming eubacterium. Ultrathin sections of the spores showed the presence of an exosporium, spore coat, cortex and core. 16S rDNA sequence similarities between this strain, Bacillus fusiformis and Bacillus silvestris were approximately 96% and DNA-DNA reassociation values with these two bacilli were 23 and 17%, respectively. Spores of the novel species were resistant to desiccation, H2O2 and UV and gamma radiation. Of all strains tested, the spores of this strain were the most consistently resistant and survived all of the challenges posed, i.e. exposure to conditions of desiccation (100% survival), H2O2 (26% survival), UV radiation (10% survival at 660 J m(-2)) and gamma radiation (0.4% survival). The name proposed for this novel bacterium is Bacillus odysseyi sp. nov.; the type strain is 34hs-1T (=ATCC PTA-4993T=NRRL B-30641T=NBRC 100172T).

  5. Planetary Data Systems (PDS) Imaging Node Atlas II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanboli, Alice; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Planetary Image Atlas (PIA) is a Rich Internet Application (RIA) that serves planetary imaging data to the science community and the general public. PIA also utilizes the USGS Unified Planetary Coordinate system (UPC) and the on-Mars map server. The Atlas was designed to provide the ability to search and filter through greater than 8 million planetary image files. This software is a three-tier Web application that contains a search engine backend (MySQL, JAVA), Web service interface (SOAP) between server and client, and a GWT Google Maps API client front end. This application allows for the search, retrieval, and download of planetary images and associated meta-data from the following missions: 2001 Mars Odyssey, Cassini, Galileo, LCROSS, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Exploration Rover, Mars Express, Magellan, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MESSENGER, Phoe nix, Viking Lander, Viking Orbiter, and Voyager. The Atlas utilizes the UPC to translate mission-specific coordinate systems into a unified coordinate system, allowing the end user to query across missions of similar targets. If desired, the end user can also use a mission-specific view of the Atlas. The mission-specific views rely on the same code base. This application is a major improvement over the initial version of the Planetary Image Atlas. It is a multi-mission search engine. This tool includes both basic and advanced search capabilities, providing a product search tool to interrogate the collection of planetary images. This tool lets the end user query information about each image, and ignores the data that the user has no interest in. Users can reduce the number of images to look at by defining an area of interest with latitude and longitude ranges.

  6. Final Testing of the ATLAS Central Solenoid before Installation

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Haruyama, T; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Makida, Y; Metselaar, J; Passardi, Giorgio; Pavlov, O; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Ruber, Roger J M Y; Sbrissa, E; ten Kate, H H J; Tyrvainen, H; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    The central solenoid is part of the superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN LHC collider. It provides a 2 tesla axial magnetic field for the inner 24 m3 volume centre particle tracker. Design and construction was done in Japan by KEK and Toshiba in collaboration with CERN. Factory tests were made in Japan with the proximity cryogenics in a geometrical arrangement corresponding to the final installation and, a full magnet test. After shipment to CERN the proximity cryogenics has been installed at a surface hall and recommissioning with load simulations and the instrumentation adapted for radiation hard requirements at the final underground area. The solenoid has recently been integrated in the common cryostat vessel of the liquid argon barrel. Cool down for final surface testing has started. The final control systems architecture and process logics are applied which is tested.

  7. Response Uniformity of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Aharrouche, M; Di Ciaccio, L; El Kacimi, M; Gaumer, O; Gouanère, M; Goujdami, D; Lafaye, R; Laplace, S; Le Maner, C; Neukermans, L; Perrodo, P; Poggioli, L; Prieur, D; Przysiezniak, H; Sauvage, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Lanni, F; Lü, L; Ma, H; Rajagopalan, S; Takai, H; Belymam, A; Benchekroun, D; Hakimi, M; Hoummada, A; Gao, Y; Stroynowsk, R; Aleksa, M; Carli, T; Fassnacht, P; Gianotti, F; Hervás, L; Lampl, W; Collot, J; Hostachy, J Y; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Malek, F; Martin, P; Viret, S; Leltchouk, M; Parsons, J A; Simion, S; Barreiro, F; Del Peso, J; Labarga, L; Oliver, C; Rodier, S; Barrillon, P; Benchouk, C; Djama, F; Hubaut, F; Monnier, E; Pralavorio, P; Sauvage, D; Serfon, C; Tisserant, S; Tóth, J; Banfi, D; Carminati, L; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Delmastro, M; Fanti, M; Mandell, L; Mazzanti, M; Tartarelli, F; Kotov, K; Maslennikov, A; Pospelov, G; Tikhonov, Yu; Bourdarios, C; Fayard, L; Fournier, D; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Kado, M; Parrour, G; Puzo, P; Rousseau, D; Sacco, R; Serin, L; Unal, G; Zerwas, D; Dekhissi, B; Derkaoui, J; EL Kharrim, A; Maaroufi, F; Cleland, W; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Nikolic-Audit, I; Schwemling, Ph; Ghazlane, H; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Boonekamp, M; Kerschen, N; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, P; Schwindlingy, J; Lund-Jensen, B

    2007-01-01

    The construction of the ATLAS electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter modules is completed and all the modules are assembled and inserted in the cryostats. During the production period four barrel and three endcap modules were exposed to test beams in order to assess their performance, ascertain the production quality and reproducibility, and to scrutinize the complete energy reconstruction chain from the readout and calibration electronics to the signal and energy reconstruction. It was also possible to check the full Monte Carlo simulation of the calorimeter. The analysis of the uniformity, resolution and extraction of constant term is presented. Typical non-uniformities of 0.5% and typical global constant terms of 0.6% are measured for the barrel and end-cap modules.

  8. The design study of the JT-60SU device. No. 4. The vacuum vessel and cryostat of JT-60SU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Tobita, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The vacuum vessel and the cryostat for the JT-60 Super Upgrade (JT-60SU) have been designed. Two types of the complex materials for the vacuum vessel were chosen on the basis of the avoidance of tritium occlusion and the low irradiation, i.e. (1) SUS316 covered by tungsten plate (30mm thickness) as a {gamma}-ray shielding, (2) Ti-6Al-4V alloy covered by SUS430 plate (1mm thickness) as a tritium protector. Selecting the double skin type of vacuum vessel with toroidally continued structure gave the basic design of the vacuum vessel satisfying the design criteria of the vessel strength for the electromagnetic force, heat load and the property of radiation shielding. The characteristics of the SUS316 covered by tungsten plate type is that as the tungsten can shield the {gamma}-ray, the dose rate inside the vacuum vessel during the maintenance can reduce effectively. The advantage of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy covered by SUS430 plate type vacuum vessel is the quick reduction of the radioactive isotope because of no production of the isotopes with long half-life periods. Channel type and vertical type of the divertor were designed. The sector type of toroidally separated structure was selected for the remote handling. The material of the armor plate was not determined because no material endure the high heat load on the divertor. The cryostat composing the dome and the tank was designed. The electromagnetic force by the eddy current, generated at the plasma start up phase and at the quench of CS super-conducting coil, were small compared to the force produced by the stress limit. (author)

  9. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the data-taking period at LHC (Run-II), several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed. The results from searches by the ATLAS collaborations are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  10. ATLAS Story

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108663

    2012-01-01

    This film produced in July 2012 explains how fundamental research connects to Society and what benefits collaborative way of working can and may generate in the future, using ATLAS Collaboration as a case study. The film is intellectually inspired by the book "Collisions and Collaboration" (OUP) by Max Boisot (ed.), see: collisionsandcollaboration.com. The film is directed by Andrew Millington (OMNI Communications)

  11. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the LHC Run-II data-taking period, several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed by the ATLAS collaboration. The results from these searches are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  12. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  13. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  14. ATLAS Data Preservation Policy

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The principal intent of this document is to describe the ATLAS policy ensuring that its data are maintained reliably in a form accessible to ATLAS members. A separate document describes the ATLAS policy for making its data available, and potentially useful, to scientists who are not members of ATLAS.

  15. Regional Crustal Components of Martian Heat Flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (GRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the heat-producing element distributions in the planet’s crust and mantle, specifically the incompatible radiogenic isotopes of K, Th, and U. Normally these elements are preferentially sequestered into a planet’s crust during differentiation, and this is especially true for Mars, which possesses a thick and mostly ancient crust that is proportionally large with respect to the planet’s total volume. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument on board the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft can detect all three of these elements and has been used to map the K and Th abundances across nearly the entire Martian surface. It has been estimated that as much as 50% or more of the Martian planetary budget of heat producing elements has seen sequestered into the crust during planetary differentiation due to their incompatibility in igneous processes; a process that mostly took place very early in Martian geological history. As such, the crustal component of heat flow represents as much as half of the total planetary output of radiogenic heat. While GRS measurements can not constrain heat flow from mantle sources, previous work calculated the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.43 mW/m2 based on radiogenic elemental abundances. Orbital GRS data are of lower spatial resolution (5°x5° per pixel) than most other orbital remote sensing instruments and, accordingly, are best suited for global or large, regional-scale studies, rather than detailed, local analyses of geographically small features and landforms. Here we present detailed calculations for specific, areally-large, regions and geologic provinces on Mars, reporting the present-day crustal component of heat flow, the crustal heat flow at time of regional formation, and constraints of geothermal gradients from these measurements.

  16. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  17. Elemental Composition Variations for Large Dusty and Rocky Regions on Mars Using Gamma-Ray Data from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Reedy, R. C.; Boynton, W. V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft has been mapping the elemental composition of the surface materials since June 2002. To study elemental composition variations on the martian surface, seven large regions of Mars were selected: three very dusty ones and four mainly rocky ones. Large regions were used to get good counting statistics on as many gamma-ray peaks as possible from spectrum accumulated by the GRS experiment on Mars Odyssey, including elements with poor counting statistics. Data from TES were used to help select these regions. Gamma-ray peaks for several elements were analyzed. Some results and trends are reported.

  18. The Odyssey of Dental Anxiety: From Prehistory to the Present. A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Enrico; Zanette, Gastone

    2017-01-01

    Dental anxiety (DA) can be considered as a universal phenomenon with a high prevalence worldwide; DA and pain are also the main causes for medical emergencies in the dental office, so their prevention is an essential part of patient safety and overall quality of care. Being DA and its consequences closely related to the fight-or-flight reaction, it seems reasonable to argue that the odyssey of DA began way back in the distant past, and has since probably evolved in parallel with the development of fight-or-flight reactions, implicit memory and knowledge, and ultimately consciousness. Basic emotions are related to survival functions in an inseparable psychosomatic unity that enable an immediate response to critical situations rather than generating knowledge, which is why many anxious patients are unaware of the cause of their anxiety. Archeological findings suggest that humans have been surprisingly skillful and knowledgeable since prehistory. Neanderthals used medicinal plants; and relics of dental tools bear witness to a kind of Neolithic proto-dentistry. In the two millennia BC, Egyptian and Greek physicians used both plants (such as papaver somniferum) and incubation (a forerunner of modern hypnosis, e.g., in the sleep temples dedicated to Asclepius) in the attempt to provide some form of therapy and painless surgery, whereas modern scientific medicine strongly understated the role of subjectivity and mind-body approaches until recently. DA has a wide range of causes and its management is far from being a matter of identifying the ideal sedative drug. A patient's proper management must include assessing his/her dental anxiety, ensuring good communications, and providing information (iatrosedation), effective local anesthesia, hypnosis, and/or a wise use of sedative drugs where necessary. Any weak link in this chain can cause avoidable suffering, mistrust, and emergencies, as well as having lifelong psychological consequences. Iatrosedation and hypnosis are no

  19. Time-variable and static gravity field of Mars from MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-04-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) missions have significantly contributed to the determination of global high-resolution global gravity fields of Mars for the last 16 years. All three spacecraft were located in sun-synchronous, near-circular polar mapping orbits for their primary mission phases at different altitudes and Local Solar Time (LST). X-Band tracking data have been acquired from the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) providing information on the time-variable and static gravity field of Mars. MGS operated between 1999 and 2006 at 390 km altitude. ODY and MRO are still orbiting Mars with periapsis altitudes of 400 km and 255 km, respectively. Before entering these mapping phases, all three spacecraft collected radio tracking data at lower altitudes (˜170-200 km) that help improve the resolution of the gravity field of Mars in specific regions. We analyzed the entire MGS radio tracking data set, and ODY and MRO radio data until 2015. These observations were processed using a batch least-squares filter through the NASA GSFC GEODYN II software. We combined all 2- and 3-way range rate data to estimate the global gravity field of Mars to degree and order 120, the seasonal variations of gravity harmonic coefficients C20, C30, C40 and C50 and the Love number k2. The gravity contribution of Mars atmospheric pressures on the surface of the planet has been discerned from the time-varying and static gravity harmonic coefficients. Surface pressure grids computed using the Mars-GRAM 2010 atmospheric model, with 2.5° x2.5° spatial and 2-h resolution, are converted into gravity spherical harmonic coefficients. Consequently, the estimated gravity and tides provide direct information on the solid planet. We will present the new Goddard Mars Model (GMM-3) of Mars gravity field in spherical harmonics to degree and order 120. The solution includes the Love number k2 and the 3-frequencies (annual, semi-annual, and tri

  20. The Odyssey of Dental Anxiety: From Prehistory to the Present. A Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Enrico; Zanette, Gastone

    2017-01-01

    Dental anxiety (DA) can be considered as a universal phenomenon with a high prevalence worldwide; DA and pain are also the main causes for medical emergencies in the dental office, so their prevention is an essential part of patient safety and overall quality of care. Being DA and its consequences closely related to the fight-or-flight reaction, it seems reasonable to argue that the odyssey of DA began way back in the distant past, and has since probably evolved in parallel with the development of fight-or-flight reactions, implicit memory and knowledge, and ultimately consciousness. Basic emotions are related to survival functions in an inseparable psychosomatic unity that enable an immediate response to critical situations rather than generating knowledge, which is why many anxious patients are unaware of the cause of their anxiety. Archeological findings suggest that humans have been surprisingly skillful and knowledgeable since prehistory. Neanderthals used medicinal plants; and relics of dental tools bear witness to a kind of Neolithic proto-dentistry. In the two millennia BC, Egyptian and Greek physicians used both plants (such as papaver somniferum) and incubation (a forerunner of modern hypnosis, e.g., in the sleep temples dedicated to Asclepius) in the attempt to provide some form of therapy and painless surgery, whereas modern scientific medicine strongly understated the role of subjectivity and mind-body approaches until recently. DA has a wide range of causes and its management is far from being a matter of identifying the ideal sedative drug. A patient's proper management must include assessing his/her dental anxiety, ensuring good communications, and providing information (iatrosedation), effective local anesthesia, hypnosis, and/or a wise use of sedative drugs where necessary. Any weak link in this chain can cause avoidable suffering, mistrust, and emergencies, as well as having lifelong psychological consequences. Iatrosedation and hypnosis are no

  1. The Odyssey of Dental Anxiety: From Prehistory to the Present. A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Facco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental anxiety (DA can be considered as a universal phenomenon with a high prevalence worldwide; DA and pain are also the main causes for medical emergencies in the dental office, so their prevention is an essential part of patient safety and overall quality of care. Being DA and its consequences closely related to the fight-or-flight reaction, it seems reasonable to argue that the odyssey of DA began way back in the distant past, and has since probably evolved in parallel with the development of fight-or-flight reactions, implicit memory and knowledge, and ultimately consciousness. Basic emotions are related to survival functions in an inseparable psychosomatic unity that enable an immediate response to critical situations rather than generating knowledge, which is why many anxious patients are unaware of the cause of their anxiety. Archeological findings suggest that humans have been surprisingly skillful and knowledgeable since prehistory. Neanderthals used medicinal plants; and relics of dental tools bear witness to a kind of Neolithic proto-dentistry. In the two millennia BC, Egyptian and Greek physicians used both plants (such as papaver somniferum and incubation (a forerunner of modern hypnosis, e.g., in the sleep temples dedicated to Asclepius in the attempt to provide some form of therapy and painless surgery, whereas modern scientific medicine strongly understated the role of subjectivity and mind-body approaches until recently. DA has a wide range of causes and its management is far from being a matter of identifying the ideal sedative drug. A patient's proper management must include assessing his/her dental anxiety, ensuring good communications, and providing information (iatrosedation, effective local anesthesia, hypnosis, and/or a wise use of sedative drugs where necessary. Any weak link in this chain can cause avoidable suffering, mistrust, and emergencies, as well as having lifelong psychological consequences. Iatrosedation and

  2. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  3. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Philippe [DG unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent [TE department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  4. Proposal to Negotiate an Amendment to an Existing Contract and Several Contracts for the Supply and Assembly of the LHC Short Straight Section Cryostats

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Following the insolvency of a major contractor, CERN proposes to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract and to place several contracts for the supply of 360 LHC arc short straight section cryostats and their assembly, eight spare cryostat units and components for 64 LHC dispersion suppressor short straight section cryostats. The Finance Committee is therefore invited to approve an amendment to an existing contract with the consortium: &8721; INTERTEC (DK) - CEGELEC (FR) - SPIE TRINDEL (FR) to include assembly of the LHC arc short straight sections, for an additional amount of 4 088 470 euros (6 205 480 Swiss francs), subject to revision for inflation after 31 December 2002; the consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal : DK - 52%, FR - 48%; and to the negotiation of contracts for the supply of related major components with the firms: &8721; SES (SK) for the supply of vacuum vessels for an amount of 5 538 533 euros...

  5. EnviroAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web...

  6. Export Odyssey: An Exposition and Analytical Review of Literature Concerning an Undergraduate Student Project in International Marketing on Key Teaching-Learning Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nicholas C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes Export Odyssey (EO), a structured, Internet-intensive, team-based undergraduate student project in international marketing. Presents an analytical review of articles in the literature that relate to three key teaching-learning dimensions of student projects (experiential versus non-experiential active learning, team-based versus…

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Alirocumab 150 mg Every 4 Weeks in Patients With Hypercholesterolemia Not on Statin Therapy : The ODYSSEY CHOICE II Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroes, Erik; Guyton, John R; Lepor, Norman; Civeira, Fernando; Gaudet, Daniel; Watts, Gerald F; Baccara-Dinet, Marie T; Lecorps, Guillaume; Manvelian, Garen; Farnier, Michel; Visseren, FLJ

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The PCSK9 antibody alirocumab (75 mg every 2 weeks; Q2W) as monotherapy reduced low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels by 47%. Because the option of a monthly dosing regimen is convenient, ODYSSEY CHOICE II evaluated alirocumab 150 mg Q4W in patients with inadequately

  8. Mars' gravity field and upper atmosphere with MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO radio science data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander J.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-04-01

    The Mars exploration program conducted by NASA during the last decade has enabled continuous observations of the planet from orbit with three different missions: the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). These spacecraft were equipped with on board instrumentation dedicated to collect radio tracking data in the X-band. The analysis of these data has provided a high-resolution gravity field model of Mars. MGS and ODY were inserted into two separate frozen sun-synchronous, near-circular, polar orbits with different local times, with their periapsis altitude at ~370 km and ~390 km, respectively. MGS was in orbit around Mars between 1999 and 2006, whereas ODY has been orbiting the planet since January 2002. Using the radio science data of these two spacecraft, gravity models with a maximum resolution of degree and order 95 in spherical harmonics (spatial resolution of 112 km) have been determined. MRO has been orbiting Mars since August 2006 in a frozen sun-synchronous orbit with a periapsis at 255 km altitude. Therefore, its radio data helped significantly improve Mars' gravity field model, up to degree and order 110 (spatial resolution of 96 km). However, mismodeling of the atmospheric drag, which is the strongest non-conservative force acting on the spacecraft at MRO's low altitude, compromises the estimation of the temporal variations of the gravity field zonal harmonics that provide crucial information on the seasonal mass of carbon dioxide in the polar caps. For this reason, we implemented the Drag Temperature Model (DTM)-Mars model (Bruinsma and Lemoine 2002) into our Precise Orbit Determination (POD) program GEODYN-II. We estimated key model parameters to adequately reproduce variations in temperatures and (partial) density along the spacecraft trajectories. Our new model allows us to directly estimate the long-term periodicity of the major constituents at MGS, ODY, and MRO altitudes (~255-450 km). In this

  9. The Odyssey of the Ancestral Escherich Strain through Culture Collections: an Example of Allopatric Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, M; Royer, G; Roche, D; Mercier-Darty, M; Vallenet, D; Médigue, C; Bastard, K; Rodriguez, C; Clermont, O; Denamur, E; Decousser, J-W

    2018-01-01

    More than a century ago, Theodor Escherich isolated the bacterium that was to become Escherichia coli , one of the most studied organisms. Not long after, the strain began an odyssey and landed in many laboratories across the world. As laboratory culture conditions could be responsible for major changes in bacterial strains, we conducted a genome analysis of isolates of this emblematic strain from different culture collections (England, France, the United States, Germany). Strikingly, many discrepancies between the isolates were observed, as revealed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), the presence of virulence-associated genes, core genome MLST, and single nucleotide polymorphism/indel analyses. These differences are correlated with the phylogeographic history of the strain and were due to an unprecedented number of mutations in coding DNA repair functions such as mismatch repair (MutL) and oxidized guanine nucleotide pool cleaning (MutT), conferring a specific mutational spectrum and leading to a mutator phenotype. The mutator phenotype was probably acquired during subculturing and corresponded to second-order selection. Furthermore, all of the isolates exhibited hypersusceptibility to antibiotics due to mutations in efflux pump- and porin-encoding genes, as well as a specific mutation in the sigma factor-encoding gene rpoS . These defects reflect a self-preservation and nutritional competence tradeoff allowing survival under the starvation conditions imposed by storage. From a clinical point of view, dealing with such mutator strains can lead microbiologists to draw false conclusions about isolate relatedness and may impact therapeutic effectiveness. IMPORTANCE Mutator phenotypes have been described in laboratory-evolved bacteria, as well as in natural isolates. Several genes can be impacted, each of them being associated with a typical mutational spectrum. By studying one of the oldest strains available, the ancestral Escherich strain, we were able to

  10. ATLAS experimentet

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    Filmen innehåller mycket information om fysik och varför LHC behövs tilsammans med stora detektorer och specielt om behovet av ATLAS Experimentet. Mycket bra film för att förklara det okända- som man undersöker i CERN för att ge svar på frågor som människor har försökt förklara under flere tusen år.

  11. Long-Term Periodicity of the Mars Exospheric Density from MRO and Mars Odyssey Radio Tracking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, A.; Goossens, S. J.; Lemoine, F. G.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) missions have collected more than 11 years of continuous tracking data of spacecraft in orbit around Mars. The radio science data are generally used to determine the static and seasonal gravity field of the central body. However, these two spacecraft are in different sun-synchronous orbits that cover a wide range of altitudes (250-410 km) where investigation of the atmosphere and climate of Mars so far have not been supported by in situ and remote sensing measurements. The drag perturbation acting on the probes provides indirect measurements of the Martian atmospheric density. Therefore, we focused our work on the determination of the long-term periodicity of the atmospheric constituents in the Mars exosphere with Mars Odyssey and MRO radio tracking data. We implemented the Drag Temperature Model (DTM) -Mars model into our Precise Orbit Determination (POD) program GEODYN-II to adequately reproduce variations in temperature and (partial) density along ODY and MRO trajectories. The recovery of Mars' atmospheric dynamics using Doppler tracking data requires the accurate modeling of all forces acting on the spacecraft. The main non-conservative force, apart from drag, is solar radiation pressure. Spacecraft panel reflectivities and the radiation pressure-scaling factor are not estimated, but we adjusted empirical once-per-revolution along-track periodic accelerations (cosine and sine) over each orbital arc to mitigate solar radiation pressure mismodeling. After converging the orbital data arcs, and editing out all the data during superior conjunctions, we combined the MRO and Mars Odyssey arcs in a global solution where we estimated spacecraft initial states, time-correlated drag scale factors, and annual and semi-annual variability of the major constituents in the Mars upper atmosphere. We will show that the updated DTM-Mars model provides a better prediction of the long-term variability of the dominant species

  12. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  13. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  14. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Green Bay, WI Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  16. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Paterson, NJ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  17. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, ME Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  18. Frontier use in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; The ATLAS collaboration; DeStefano, J; Dewhurst, A; Donno, F; Dykstra, D; Front, D; Gallas, E; Hawkings, R; Luehring, F; Walker, R

    2010-01-01

    Frontier is a distributed database access system, including data caching, that was developed originally for the CMS experiment. This system has been in production for CMS for some time, providing world-wide access to the experiment's conditions data for all user jobs. The ATLAS experiment, which has had similar problems with global data distribution, investigated the use of the system for ATLAS jobs. After months of trials and verification, ATLAS put the Frontier system into production late in 2009. Frontier now supplies database access for ATLAS jobs at over 50 computing sites. This successful deployment of Frontier in ATLAS will be described, along with the scope of the system and necessary resources.

  19. ATLAS25: Facebook Live Events

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    2017-01-01

    This video is a montage of the 5 Facebook Live events that were broadcast on 2nd October 2017, to celebrate ATLAS25. For more details visit: http://atlas.cern/updates/atlas-news/celebrating-25-years-discovery

  20. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  1. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  2. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  3. On-surface integration and test of the ATLAS central solenoid and its proximity cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, Roger J M Y; Cipolla, G; Deront, L; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; Kanahara, T; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Kopeykin, N; Mizumaki, S; Metselaar, J; Park, A; Pavlov, O V; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Ravat, S; Sbrissa, E; Stepanov, V; ten Kate, H H J; Yamamoto, A

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector for the LHC at CERN requires a superconducting solenoid, which provides the magnetic field for the inner detector. The ATLAS Central Solenoid and its associated proximity cryogenics system has been designed by KEK in collaboration with CERN. Following construction and preliminary tests at Toshiba in Japan the equipment has been shipped to CERN. The system is being prepared for the integration in the common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter, whereafter a full on-surface test has to be completed before its final installation 100 m underground in the ATLAS cavern. For this purpose a provisional set-up for commissioning of the final proximity cryogenics, the connecting chimney and the solenoid has been established. A number of tests and simulations have been conducted in applying a new process control system to validate the cryogenics functionalities, the electrical powering scheme as well as the magnet control and safety systems. The present status of the solenoid project and the results of th...

  4. Probabilistic liver atlas construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Esther; Domingo, Juan; Ayala, Guillermo; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Goceri, E

    2017-01-13

    Anatomical atlases are 3D volumes or shapes representing an organ or structure of the human body. They contain either the prototypical shape of the object of interest together with other shapes representing its statistical variations (statistical atlas) or a probability map of belonging to the object (probabilistic atlas). Probabilistic atlases are mostly built with simple estimations only involving the data at each spatial location. A new method for probabilistic atlas construction that uses a generalized linear model is proposed. This method aims to improve the estimation of the probability to be covered by the liver. Furthermore, all methods to build an atlas involve previous coregistration of the sample of shapes available. The influence of the geometrical transformation adopted for registration in the quality of the final atlas has not been sufficiently investigated. The ability of an atlas to adapt to a new case is one of the most important quality criteria that should be taken into account. The presented experiments show that some methods for atlas construction are severely affected by the previous coregistration step. We show the good performance of the new approach. Furthermore, results suggest that extremely flexible registration methods are not always beneficial, since they can reduce the variability of the atlas and hence its ability to give sensible values of probability when used as an aid in segmentation of new cases.

  5. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  6. A randomized trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of alirocumab in South Korea and Taiwan (ODYSSEY KT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kwang Kon; Nam, Chang Wook; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Liu, Ming-En; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chong-Jin; Li, Ivy; Li, Jianyong; Baccara-Dinet, Marie T; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Chiang, Chern-En

    2017-10-19

    Alirocumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, has been shown to provide significant reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Data about its efficacy and safety in patients from South Korea and Taiwan are limited. ODYSSEY KT assessed the efficacy and safety of alirocumab in patients from South Korea and Taiwan. Patients with hypercholesterolemia at high cardiovascular risk who were on maximally tolerated statin were randomized (1:1) to alirocumab (75 mg every 2 weeks, with dose increase to 150 mg every 2 weeks at week 12 if LDL-C ≥70 mg/dL at week 8) or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was percentage change in LDL-C from baseline to week 24. Safety was assessed throughout. At week 24, alirocumab changed LDL-C levels by -57.1% (placebo: +6.3%). In the alirocumab group, 9 patients (9.5%) received dose increase at week 12. At week 24, 85.8% of patients in the alirocumab group reached LDL-C <70 mg/dL (placebo: 14.2%; P ≤ .0001 vs placebo). Alirocumab significantly improved non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), apolipoprotein B, total cholesterol, lipoprotein (a), and HDL-C vs placebo (P ≤ .05). Two consecutive calculated LDL-C values <25 mg/dL were recorded in 27.8% of alirocumab-treated patients. Overall, 58.8% (alirocumab) and 61.8% (placebo) of patients experienced treatment-emergent adverse events; 2.1% and 1.0% discontinued treatment due to treatment-emergent adverse events, respectively. Alirocumab significantly improved LDL-C, apolipoprotein B, non-HDL-C, lipoprotein (a), HDL-C, and total cholesterol in Asian patients. Alirocumab was generally well tolerated. These findings are consistent with ODYSSEY findings to date. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R. [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  8. Future ATLAS Higgs Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, Ben; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will prove a challenging environment to work in, with for example $=200$ expected. It will however also provide great opportunities for advancing studies of the Higgs boson. The ATLAS detector will be upgraded, and Higgs prospects analyses have been performed to assess the reach of ATLAS Higgs studies in the HL-LHC era. These analyses are presented, as are Run-2 ATLAS di-Higgs analyses for comparison.

  9. Conceptualisation of cryostat variants for cooling a superconducting coil in an offshore wind power plant; Konzeptionierung von Kryostatvariationen zur Kuehlung einer supraleitenden Spule in einer off-shore Windkraftanlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radel, Benjamin [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik

    2013-07-01

    One goal of the EU project SUPRAPOWER is to develop a rotating cryostat for a superconducting coil cooled to 20 Kelvin by means of a Gifford McMahon cooler. This superconducting coil forms part of a novel type of generator for offshore wind power plants. Use of superconducting coils in generators of a wind power plants will make it possible to reduce weight, bringing rated capacities of up to 10 MW within the realm of possibility. Development work started out from a cryostat described in a patent of the Tecnalia company. This cryostat was examined in terms of the coil's heat intake. Alternative designs were evaluated using an actively cooled shield to reduce both weight and heat intake. Research work focused on the use of thin rounded walls for the vacuum chamber and of fibreglass-reinforced materials for a coil support. Finally results were compared in terms of heat intake and weight reduction.

  10. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  11. Role of Congress in the High Level Radioactive Waste Odyssey: The Wisdom and Will of the Congress - 13096

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieth, Donald L. [DOE/NVOO Project Manager for Yucca Mountain, 1982 thru 1987, 1154 Cheltenham Place, Maineville, OH 45039 (United States); Voegele, Michael D. [Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office, 7404 Oak Grove Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89117 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Congress has had a dual role with regard to high level radioactive waste, being involved in both its creation and its disposal. A significant amount of time has passed between the creation of the nation's first high level radioactive waste and the present day. The pace of addressing its remediation has been highly irregular. Congress has had to consider the technical, regulatory, and political issues and all have had specific difficulties. It is a true odyssey framed by an imperative and accountability, by a sense of urgency, by an ability or inability to finish the job and by consequences. Congress had set a politically acceptable course by 1982. However, President Obama intervened in the process after he took office in January 2009. Through the efforts of his Administration, by the end of 2012, the US government has no program to dispose of high level radioactive waste and no reasonable prospect of a repository for high level radioactive waste. It is not obvious how the US government program will be reestablished or who will assume responsibility for leadership. The ultimate criteria for judging the consequences are 1) the outcome of the ongoing NRC's Nuclear Waste Confidence Rulemaking and 2) the concomitant permissibility of nuclear energy supplying electricity from operating reactors in the US. (authors)

  12. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  13. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    La Givrine near St Cergue Cross Country Skiing and Fondue at Basse Ruche with M Nordberg, P Jenni, M Nessi, F Gianotti and Co. ATLAS Management Fondu dinner, reviewing state of play of the experiment Many fun scenes from cross country skiing and after 41 minutes of the film starts the fondue dinner in a nice chalet with many persons working for ATLAS experiment

  14. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  15. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  16. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  17. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  18. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  19. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  20. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  1. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  2. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  3. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  4. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  5. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Shots of aircraft factory where machining for ATLAS is done Shots of aircraft Work on components for ATLAS big wheel Discussions between Tikhonov and Nordberg in workshop Sequence 2 Shots of downtown Novosibirsk, including little church which is mid-point of Russian Federation Sequence 3 Interview of Yuri Tikhonov by Andrew Millington

  6. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  7. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  8. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  9. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  10. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  11. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  12. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  13. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  14. The superconducting magnet system for the ATLAS Detector at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the ATLAS Detector for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is under construction since 1997. The magnet system is a hybrid of 4 superconducting magnets, a 2.5 m bore, 5.3 m long 2 T central solenoid servicing the inner detector and three 4 T toroids with global dimensions of 20 m diameter, 25 m long providing the magnetic field of about 1 T for the muon detectors. The operating currents of the solenoid and toroids are 8 and 20 kA respectively with a total stored energy of 1.6 GJ. The realization of the system is challenging due to its unusual size and complexity. Last year the construction of the coils and cryostats commenced in industry. The manufacture of the solenoid cold mass is already finished and the delivery of the individual toroid coils will commence in 2001. An on-surface test of all magnets will occur. After installation in a new cavern 100 m underground this will start in 2003 leading to commissioning of the entire magnet system in early 2005. In the paper vari...

  15. ATLAS magnet common cryogenic, vacuum, electrical and control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Miele, P; Delruelle, N; Geich-Gimbel, C; Haug, F; Olesen, G; Pengo, R; Sbrissa, E; Tyrvainen, H; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The superconducting Magnet System for the ATLAS detector at the LHC at CERN comprises a Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and a Central Solenoid with overall dimensions of 20 m diameter by 26 m length and a stored energy of 1.6 GJ. Common proximity cryogenic and electrical systems for the toroids are implemented. The Cryogenic System provides the cooling power for the 3 toroid magnets considered as a single cold mass (600 tons) and for the CS. The 21 kA toroid and the 8 kA solenoid electrical circuits comprise both a switch-mode power supply, two circuit breakers, water cooled bus bars, He cooled current leads and the diode resistor ramp-down unit. The Vacuum System consists of a group of primary rotary pumps and sets of high vacuum diffusion pumps connected to each individual cryostat. The Magnet Safety System guarantees the magnet protection and human safety through slow and fast dump treatment. The Magnet Control System ensures control, regulation and monitoring of the operation of the magnets. The update...

  16. Cryogenic Tests of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, C; Chalifour, M; Gonidec, A; Passardi, Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter consists of the barrel and two end-cap detectors housed in three independent cryostats filled with a total volume of 78 m3 of liquid argon. During cool-down the temperature differences in the composite structure of the detectors must be kept within strict limits to avoid excessive mechanical stresses and relative displacements. During normal operation the formation of gas bubbles, which are detrimental to the functioning of the detector, must be prevented and temperature gradients of less than 0.7 K across the argon bath are mandatory due to the temperature dependence of the energy measurements. Between April 2004 and May 2005 the barrel (120 t) and one end-cap (219 t) underwent qualification tests at the operating temperature of 87.3 K using a dedicated test facility at ground level. These tests provided a validation of the cooling methods to be adopted in the final underground configuration. In total 6.9 GJ and 15.7 GJ were extracted from the calorimeters and a temperature...

  17. Micromegas R&D for ATLAS MUON PHASE II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Edoardo Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade, a proposal to extend the detector acceptance of the muon system to high η has been put forward (namely up to | η| ~ 4). Extension of the muon coverage has been demonstrated to enhance physics performance. The proposed location for the new detector is in between the end-cap calorimeter cryostat and the JD shielding; in this region there is no magnetic field applied, the aim of the new detector is therefore to only tag muons without performing any momentum measurement. The new η tagger should cope with extremely high particle rate, that has been calculated, by means of simulations, to be 9 MHz at R = 25 cm and 0.4 MHz at R = 60 cm for μ = 200, where μ stands for the number of pp collisions per bunch crossing. The required spatial resolution at the inner edge of the detector has been estimated in few hundreds micrometres. One of the most promising candidate technology for the new detector is the MicroMegaS one, which has already been adopted for the NSW upgrad...

  18. Dutch supplier rewarded for manufacture of the two vacuum vessels for the ATLAS end-cap toroids

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has presented an award for outstanding supplier performance to Dutch firm Schelde Exotech. Based on a design by Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, Schelde Exotech manufactured under a NIKHEF contract the two 500 m3 large vacuum vessels for the cryostats of the ATLAS end-cap toroids. These 11-metre diameter castellated aluminium vessels with stainless-steel bore tube are essentially made up of 40-mm-thick plates for the shells, 75-mm-thick plates for the endplates, and 150-mm-thick bars for the flanges. Because of transport constraints, the vessels were made in halves, temporarily sealed and vacuum tested at the works, then transported to CERN for final assembly and acceptance tests. Both vessels were vacuum-tight and the meticulous and clean way of working ensured that a high vacuum was obtained within a few days of pumping. The delivery to CERN was completed in July 2002. Representatives of Schelde Exotech are seen here receiving their award in the ATLAS assembly hall. In the backgro...

  19. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  20. A compact membrane-driven diamond anvil cell and cryostat system for nuclear resonant scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. Y.; Bi, W.; Sinogeikin, S.; Hu, M. Y.; Alp, E. E.; Wang, X. C.; Jin, C. Q.; Lin, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    A new miniature panoramic diamond anvil cell (mini-pDAC) as well as a unique gas membrane-driven mechanism is developed and implemented to measure electronic, magnetic, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of materials using the nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) and the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) simultaneously at high pressure (over Mbar) and low temperature (T Advanced Photon Source, for NRIXS and SMS studies. The same instrument can easily be used for other X-ray techniques, such as X-ray radial diffraction, X-ray Raman scattering, X-ray emission spectroscopy, and X-ray inelastic scattering under high pressure and low temperature. In this paper, technical details of the mini-pDAC, membrane engaging mechanism, and the cryostat system are described, and some experimental results are discussed.

  1. How to achieve ultra-clean detectors and cryostats at astronomical instruments: measures to avoid contamination and dust on CCD detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiries, S.; Lizon, Jean Louis; Iwert, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    ESO developed in its detector laboratory a complete routine to achieve ultra-clean detectors with lasting effect with special materials and surface treatments. All components of the detector cryostats are washed in ultrasonic baths, then baked to its maximum temperature in vacuum ovens. As final step plasma cleaning is used of individual and integrated systems. All handlings and the complete integrations are done in the clean room before its integration the detectors are dust cleaned with new methods e.g.: vapor cleaning. At observatory operation the detectors can be monitored by new methods (e.g.: pseudo FF dust evaluation, UV QE test) as a long term contamination control. The always unavoidable moisture in the ready installed instrument can even be cured by UV flashing in dry synthetic air without removing anything from the telescope. Such ESO provides ultra-clean detectors and instruments, which also do not degrade even after years of operation at their telescope sites.

  2. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - EnviroAtlas Community Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  3. ATLAS Data Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Roger; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to parallel open access and analysis preservation initiatives, ATLAS is taking steps to ensure that the data taken by the experiment during run-1 remain accessible and available for future analysis by the collaboration. An evaluation of what is required to achieve this is underway, examining the ATLAS data production chain to establish the effort required and potential problems. Several alternatives are explored, but the favoured solution is to bring the run 1 data and software in line with the equivalent to that which will be used for run 2. This will result in a coherent ATLAS dataset for the data already taken and that to come in the future.

  4. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  5. 'Doctor Google' ending the diagnostic odyssey in lysosomal storage disorders: parents using internet search engines as an efficient diagnostic strategy in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Machtelt G; Teunissen, Quirine G A; Wijburg, Frits A; Linthorst, Gabor E

    2010-08-01

    The expansion of the internet has resulted in widespread availability of medical information for both patients and physicians. People increasingly spend time on the internet searching for an explanation, diagnosis or treatment for their symptoms. Regarding rare diseases, the use of the internet may be an important tool in the diagnostic process. The authors present two cases in which concerned parents made a correct diagnosis of a lysosomal storage disorder in their child by searching the internet after a long doctor's delay. These cases illustrate the utility of publicly available internet search engines in diagnosing rare disorders and in addition illustrate the lengthy diagnostic odyssey which is common in these disorders.

  6. ATLAS Event - First Splash of Particles in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2008-01-01

    A simulated event. September 10, 2008 - The ATLAS detector lit up as a flood of particles traversed the detector when the beam was occasionally directed at a target near ATLAS. This allowed ATLAS physicists to study how well the various components of the detector were functioning in preparation for the forthcoming collisions. The first ATLAS data recorded on September 10, 2008 is seen here. Running time 24 seconds

  7. Upgrade plans for ATLAS Forward Calorimetry for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Randrianarivony, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Even though data taking has just started with the LHC, plans are being developed to operate the machine and its detectors at up to 10 times the original design luminosity. This has an impact on many components of the ATLAS detector, particularly the Forward calorimeter, which is exposed to some of the highest radiation rates in ATLAS. The FCal detector and its associated components were designed for operation at the maximum LHC luminosity of 1034 cm2s-1. However at the higher luminosities (HL), which are projected for the HL-LHC, operation of the FCal will be compromised. Beam heating in the FCal which is located on a liquid argon filled cryostat could lead to the formation of argon bubbles in the detector, the ionization rate will result in space charge effects that will reduce the signal and the current draw will result in a voltage drop across the HV current limiting resistors. The space charge and ionization rates will result in the FCal becoming insensitive to particles at its inner edge and the insensit...

  8. Upgrade Plans for ATLAS Forward Calorimetry for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC Collider foresees increased instantaneous luminosity 3-7 times the original design value of 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. The increased particle flux at this high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) will have an impact on many sub-systems of the ATLAS detector. In particular, in the LAr forward calorimeter (FCal), which was designed for operation at LHC luminosities, the associated increase in the ionization load at HL-LHC luminosities poses a number of problems that can degrade its performance, related to beam heating, space charge effects in the LAr gaps and HV drop due to increased current draws over the HV current-limiting resistors. One solution to these problems, which would require the opening of both ATLAS endcap cryostats, is the construction and installation of a new FCal, with cooling loops, narrower LAr gaps, and lower value protection resistors. The signal performance of the current FCal and of a possible narrow-gap FCal has been measured in a dedicated test-beam campaign ...

  9. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  10. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN, Building 40 Interview with theorist Mr. Philip Hinchliffe (Berkeley) as well an interview with his wife Mrs. Hinchliffe who is also Physics Department head at Berkeley. They are both working in ATLAS Experiment.

  11. Lunar Sample Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sample Atlas provides pictures of the Apollo samples taken in the Lunar Sample Laboratory, full-color views of the samples in microscopic thin-sections,...

  12. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    ATLAS Physics Workshop at the University of Roma Tre held from Monday 06 June 2005 to Saturday 11 June 2005. Experts establishing workshop, poster, people milling Shots of Peter Jenni introduction Many audience shots Sequences from various talks

  13. The Latest from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Since November 2008, ATLAS has undertaken detailed maintenance, consolidation and repair work on the detector (see Bulletin of 20 July 2009). Today, the fraction of the detector that is operational has increased compared to last year: less than 1% of dead channels for most of the sub-systems. "We are going to start taking data this year with a detector which is even more efficient than it was last year," agrees ATLAS Spokesperson, Fabiola Gianotti. By mid-September the detector was fully closed again, and the cavern sealed. The magnet system has been operated at nominal current for extensive periods over recent months. Once the cavern was sealed, ATLAS began two weeks of combined running. Right now, subsystems are joining the run incrementally until the point where the whole detector is integrated and running as one. In the words of ATLAS Technical Coordinator, Marzio Nessi: "Now we really start physics." In parallel, the analysis ...

  14. Consolidated Lunar Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Consolidated Lunar Atlas is a collection of the best photographic images of the moon, including low-oblique photography, full-moon photography, and tabular and...

  15. ATLAS Cavern baseplate

    CERN Multimedia

    It-UDS-Audiovisual Services

    2002-01-01

    This video shows the incredible amounth of iron used for ATLAS cavern. Please look at the related links and also videos that are concerning the civil engineering where you can see even more detailed cavern excavation work.

  16. VT Planning Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Planning Atlas provides easy access to commonly requested land use planning data – the status of local planning and regulation, state designation boundaries and...

  17. Apollo Image Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Apollo Image Atlas is a comprehensive collection of Apollo-Saturn mission photography. Included are almost 25,000 lunar images, both from orbit and from the...

  18. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  19. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  20. ATLAS soft QCD results

    CERN Document Server

    Sykora, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Recent results of soft QCD measurements performed by the ATLAS collaboration are reported. The measurements include total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, inclusive spectra, underlying event and particle correlations in p-p and p-Pb collisions.

  1. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: June ATLAS Plenary Meeting Tutorial on Physics EDM and Tools (June) Freiburg Overview Week Ketevi Assamagan's Tutorial on Analysis Tools Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  2. ATLAS Transitional Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the transitional radiation tracker within the ATLAS detector. Subjects covered include what the tracker is used to measure, its structure, what happens when particles pass through the tracker, how it distinguishes between different types of particles within it.

  3. Budker INP in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Novosibirsk group has proposed a new design for the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter with a constant thickness of absorber plates. This design has signifi- cant advantages compared to one in the Technical Proposal and it has been accepted by the ATLAS Collaboration. The Novosibirsk group is responsible for the fabrication of the precision aluminium structure for the e.m.end-cap calorimeter.

  4. ATLAS Status and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lankford, AJ; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study a broad range of particle physics at the highest available laboratory energies, from measurements of the standard model to searches for new physics beyond the standard model. The status of ATLAS commissioning and the ATLAS physics program will be reported, and physics prospects for the 2010 LHC run will be discussed.

  5. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1999-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. The film has original working sound.

  6. Insights into the extremotolerance of Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, a gram-negative bacterium isolated from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, K B; Derecho, I; Wong, T; Tran, H M; Huynh, T D; La Duc, M T; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2012-09-01

    The microbiology of the spacecraft assembly process is of paramount importance to planetary exploration, as the biological contamination that can result from remote-enabled spacecraft carries the potential to impact both life-detection experiments and extraterrestrial evolution. Accordingly, insights into the mechanisms and range of extremotolerance of Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the surface of the preflight Mars Odyssey orbiter, were gained by using a combination of microbiological, enzymatic, and proteomic methods. In summary, A. radioresistens 50v1 displayed a remarkable range of survival against hydrogen peroxide and the sequential exposures of desiccation, vapor and plasma phase hydrogen peroxide, and ultraviolet irradiation. The survival is among the highest reported for non-spore-forming and Gram-negative bacteria and is based upon contributions from the enzyme-based degradation of H(2)O(2) (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy management (ATP synthase and alcohol dehydrogenase), and modulation of the membrane composition. Together, the biochemical and survival features of A. radioresistens 50v1 support a potential persistence on Mars (given an unintended or planned surface landing of the Mars Odyssey orbiter), which in turn may compromise the scientific integrity of future life-detection missions.

  7. Atlas Fractures and Atlas Osteosynthesis: A Comprehensive Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandziora, Frank; Chapman, Jens R; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Schroeder, Gregory D; Scholz, Matti

    2017-09-01

    Most atlas fractures are the result of compression forces. They are often combined with fractures of the axis and especially with the odontoid process. Multiple classification systems for atlas fractures have been described. For an adequate diagnosis, a computed tomography is mandatory. To distinguish between stable and unstable atlas injury, it is necessary to evaluate the integrity of the transverse atlantal ligament (TAL) by magnetic resonance imaging and to classify the TAL lesion. Studies comparing conservative and operative management of unstable atlas fractures are unfortunately not available in the literature; neither are studies comparing different operative treatment strategies. Hence all treatment recommendations are based on low level evidence. Most of atlas fractures are stable and will be successfully managed by immobilization in a soft/hard collar. Unstable atlas fractures may be treated conservatively by halo-fixation, but nowadays more and more surgeons prefer surgery because of the potential discomfort and complications of halo-traction. Atlas fractures with a midsubstance ligamentous disruption of TAL or severe bony ligamentous avulsion can be treated by a C1/2 fusion. Unstable atlas fractures with moderate bony ligamentous avulsion may be treated by atlas osteosynthesis. Although the evidence for the different treatment strategies of atlas fractures is low, atlas osteosynthesis has the potential to change treatment philosophies. The reasons for this are described in this review.

  8. Neutron-produced component of radiation background on orbit, surface and subsurface of Mars: data from HEND/Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, I.; Kozyrev, A.; Litvak, M.; Sanin, A.; Tret'yakov, V.

    The fluxes of neutrons and gamma-rays from Mars are produced by the bombardment of the surface layer by galactic cosmic rays. Subsurface layer of 1-2 meters emits the leakage flux of neutrons, which energy spectrum depends on the composition of subsurface material, mainly on the content of hydrogen in the soil. Gamma rays are produced by nuclei of the main soil elements, which are exited either by inelastic collisions or by capture reactions with neutrons. Therefore, Mars has much enhanced radiation background in comparison with the Earth both on the surface and in the surrounding space up to several thousands kilometers away. Data of neutrons measurements from HEND/Odyssey will be presented both for interplanetary flight to Mars and on the orbit around mars. These data will be transformed into the neutron-produced component of radiation dose at these conditions. The map of neutron-produced doses will be presented for orbital altitude of 400 km above Mars. Model-dependent deconvolution of orbital data will be described, which allows to estimate the leakage flux of neutrons on the surface of Mars. It will be shown that content of ground water is the main factor, which determines the local radiation background on the surface. Using the values of leakage flux of neutrons at the surface, neutron-produced doses will be estimated for different regions of Mars with different content of ground water. Neutron-produced doses will be also estimated in the shallow subsurface of different regions of Mars down to 3 meters. The data for neutron-produced doses over the Mars will be useful for creation of comprehensive engineering model of radiation environment on the planet. rom A soil with larger content of hydrogen moderates much better original neutrons from the energy range about 10-20 MeV down to the thermal energy. On Mars hydrogen is associated with water. Therefore, regions with larger and smaller content of water in the soil emit lower and higher fluxes of epithermal

  9. A Mathematician's Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodmer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    In this overview of my research, I have aimed to give the background as to how I came to be involved in my various areas of interest, with an emphasis on the early phases of my career, which largely determined my future directions. I had the enormous good fortune to have worked under two of the most outstanding scientists of the twentieth century, R.A. Fisher and Joshua Lederberg. From mathematics and statistics, I went to population genetics and the early use of computers for modeling and simulation. Molecular biology took me into the laboratory and eventually to somatic cell genetics and human gene mapping. One chance encounter led me into the HLA field and another led me into research on cancer, especially colorectal cancer. On the way, I became a champion of the Human Genome Project and of the need for scientists to help promote the public understanding of science.

  10. 2050: A Pricing Odyssey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faruqui, Ahmad

    2006-10-15

    The author uses the Rip Van Winkle approach favored by marketers to gaze, clear-eyed, into the future - say, the year 2050 - to visualize alternative demand-response possibilities. Dare we go California Dreamin' of a distant utopia - or is it inevitable that pricing myopia will keep us from attaining the fulfillment of many of our career goals? (author)

  11. Odyssey of Auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Steffen; Theologis, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    The history of plant biology is inexorably intertwined with the conception and discovery of auxin, followed by the many decades of research to comprehend its action during growth and development. Growth responses to auxin are complex and require the coordination of auxin production, transport, and perception. In this overview of past auxin research, we limit our discourse to the mechanism of auxin action. We attempt to trace the almost epic voyage from the birth of the hormonal concept in plants to the recent crystallographic studies that resolved the TIR1-auxin receptor complex, the first structural model of a plant hormone receptor. The century-long endeavor is a beautiful illustration of the power of scientific reasoning and human intuition, but it also brings to light the fact that decisive progress is made when new technologies emerge and disciplines unite. PMID:20739413

  12. A learning space Odyssey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the alignment of learning space with higher education learning and teaching. Significant changes in higher education the past decades, such as increased information and communication technology (ICT) and new learning theories have resulted in the dilemma whether higher

  13. Odyssey of the spermatozoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson D Varner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This Opinion piece is offered as a cursory overview of sperm development, function, and transport through the eyes of an equine veterinarian. My professional background is predominantly clinical in nature, but my fascination with sperm function and preservation has led to a fairly sizeable review of the scientific literature over the years in hopes of extracting laboratory findings that have application to my daily activities in the clinical arena. Spermatozoa are quite unique among cellular types with regard to both form and function, and represent the only endogenously derived cell type that exerts its action in a separate being. This paper takes the reader on a voyage with a mammalian spermatozoon, from its formative stages through its transport in the male and female reproductive tracts, and culminating with its interaction with an ovulated oocyte at the time of fertilization. Specific emphasis is placed on equine spermatozoa when notable research findings have been unveiled.

  14. A mitochondrial odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Good fortune let me be an innocent child during World War II, a hopeful adolescent with encouraging parents during the years of German recovery, and a self-determined adult in a period of peace, freedom, and wealth. My luck continued as a scientist who could entirely follow his fancy. My mind was always set on understanding how things are made. At a certain point, I found myself confronted with the question of how mitochondria and organelles, which cannot be formed de novo, are put together. Intracellular transport of proteins, their translocation across the mitochondrial membranes, and their folding and assembly were the processes that fascinated me. Now, after some 30 years, we have wonderful insights, unimagined views of a complex and at the same time simple machinery and its workings. We have glimpses of how orderly processes are established in the cell to assemble from single molecules our beautiful mitochondria that every day make some 50 kg of ATP for each of us. At the same time, we have learned amazing lessons from the tinkering of evolution that developed mitochondria from bacteria.

  15. EnviroAtlas Community Boundaries Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundaries of all EnviroAtlas Communities. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in each EnviroAtlas...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Austin, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Cleveland, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  18. ATLAS Review Office

    CERN Multimedia

    Szeless, B

    The ATLAS internal reviews, be it the mandatory Production Readiness Reviews, the now newly installed Production Advancement Reviews, or the more and more requested different Design Reviews, have become a part of our ATLAS culture over the past years. The Activity Systems Status Overviews are, for the time being, a one in time event and should be held for each system as soon as possible to have some meaning. There seems to a consensus that the reviews have become a useful project tool for the ATLAS management but even more so for the sub-systems themselves making achievements as well as possible shortcomings visible. One other recognized byproduct is the increasing cross talk between the systems, a very important ingredient to make profit all the systems from the large collective knowledge we dispose of in ATLAS. In the last two months, the first two PARs were organized for the MDT End Caps and the TRT Barrel Modules, both part of the US contribution to the ATLAS Project. Furthermore several different design...

  19. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  20. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  1. Multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Fang, A; Nguyen, B T; Raphel, J K; Jagannathan, L; Raghavan, R; Bryan, R N; Miller, G A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of developing multiple, complementary, fully labeled electronic brain atlases and an atlas-based neuroimaging system for analysis, quantification, and real-time manipulation of cerebral structures in two and three dimensions, we have digitized, enhanced, segmented, and labeled the following print brain atlases: Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain by Talairach and Tournoux, Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren, Referentially Oriented Cerebral MRI Anatomy by Talairach and Tournoux, and Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci by Ono, Kubik, and Abernathey. Three-dimensional extensions of these atlases have been developed as well. All two- and three-dimensional atlases are mutually preregistered and may be interactively registered with an actual patient's data. An atlas-based neuroimaging system has been developed that provides support for reformatting, registration, visualization, navigation, image processing, and quantification of clinical data. The anatomical index contains about 1,000 structures and over 400 sulcal patterns. Several new applications of the brain atlas database also have been developed, supported by various technologies such as virtual reality, the Internet, and electronic publishing. Fusion of information from multiple atlases assists the user in comprehensively understanding brain structures and identifying and quantifying anatomical regions in clinical data. The multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system have substantial potential impact in stereotactic neurosurgery and radiotherapy by assisting in visualization and real-time manipulation in three dimensions of anatomical structures, in quantitative neuroradiology by allowing interactive analysis of clinical data, in three-dimensional neuroeducation, and in brain function studies.

  2. ATLAS production system

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Klimentov, Alexei; Golubkov, Dmitry; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Wenaus, Torre; Padolski, Siarhei

    2016-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS production system called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager which used by thousands of physicists to analyze the data remotely, with the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, across a more than hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based on many criterias, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kind of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteering computers. Besides jobs definition Production System also includes flexible web user interface, which implements user-friendly environment for main ATLAS workflows, e.g. simple way of combining different data flows, and real-time monitoring, optimised for using with huge amount of information to present. We present an overview of the ATLAS Production System major components: job and task definition, workflow manager web user i...

  3. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Showing excellence in mechanics, electronics and cryogenics, three industries are honoured for their contributions to the ATLAS experiment. Representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony. For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Close interaction with CERN was a key factor in the selection of each rewarded company, in addition to the high-quality products they delivered to the experiment. Alu Menziken Industrie AG, of Switzerland, was honoured for the production of 380,000 aluminium tubes for the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). As Giora Mikenberg, the Muon System Project Leader stressed, the aluminium tubes were delivered on time with an extraordinary quality and precision. Between October 2000 and Jan...

  4. Event visualization in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R. M.; Boudreau, J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Moyse, E.; Thomas, J.; Waugh, B. M.; Yallup, D. P.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  5. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211497; The ATLAS collaboration; Boudreau, Joseph; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Martyniuk, Alex; Moyse, Edward; Thomas, Juergen; Waugh, Ben; Yallup, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  6. ATLAS B Physics Reach

    CERN Document Server

    Smizanska, M

    2004-01-01

    The current scope and status of ATLAS B-physics trigger and off-line performance studies are presented. With the initial low-luminosity LHC runnings the high-statistics analyses will allow to make sensitivity tests of possible New physics contributions by searching for additional CP violation effects and for increased probabilities of rare B-decay channels. In physics of Bs meson system there is sensitivity to mass and width differences and to a weak mixing phase beyond SM expectation. ATLAS will be able to access rare B decays using also high-luminosity running. In beauty production ATLAS will perform measurements sensitive to higher order QCD terms providing new data to investigate present inconsistency between theory and experiment.

  7. Analyse d’atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ouvrages de référence, de lecture, d’actualité, les atlas s’adressent à des publics très divers, de l’école à l’université.La Bibliothèque vient de recevoir des publications intéressantes à faire connaître aux lecteurs d’ EchoGéo. Les exemples choisis et analysés illustrent la variété formelle et thématique de ce type de document. L’atlas des atlas : le Monde vu d’ailleurs200 cartes proposées sous la direction de Philippe Thureau-Dangin, Christine Chameau et al. Paris : Arthaud, 2008. 191 p (...

  8. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  9. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  10. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration:

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Christopher Jon; The ATLAS collaboration; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Ballestrero, Sergio; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Voronkov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of ̃3000 servers, processing the data readout from ̃100 million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. During the data taking only critical security updates are applied and broken hardware is replaced to ensure a stable operational environment. The LS1 provided an excellent opportunity to look into new technologies and applications that would help to improve and streamline the daily tasks of not only the System Administrators, but also of the scientists who wil...

  11. Two ATLAS suppliers honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recognised the outstanding contribution of two firms to the pixel detector. Recipients of the supplier award with Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, and Maximilian Metzger, CERN Secretary-General.At a ceremony held at CERN on 28 November, the ATLAS collaboration presented awards to two of its suppliers that had produced sensor wafers for the pixel detector. The CiS Institut für Mikrosensorik of Erfurt in Germany has supplied 655 sensor wafers containing a total of 1652 sensor tiles and the firm ON Semiconductor has supplied 515 sensor wafers (1177 sensor tiles) from its foundry at Roznov in the Czech Republic. Both firms have successfully met the very demanding requirements. ATLAS’s huge pixel detector is very complicated, requiring expertise in highly specialised integrated microelectronics and precision mechanics. Pixel detector project leader Kevin Einsweiler admits that when the project was first propo...

  12. The ATLAS Computing Model

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Bee, C P; Hawkings, R; Jarp, S; Jones, R; Malon, D; Poggioli, L; Poulard, G; Quarrie, D; Wenaus, T

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Offline Computing Model is described. The main emphasis is on the steady state, when normal running is established. The data flow from the output of the ATLAS trigger system through processing and analysis stages is analysed, in order to estimate the computing resources, in terms of CPU power, disk and tape storage and network bandwidth, which will be necessary to guarantee speedy access to ATLAS data to all members of the Collaboration. Data Challenges and the commissioning runs are used to prototype the Computing Model and test the infrastructure before the start of LHC operation. The initial planning for the early stages of data-taking is also presented. In this phase, a greater degree of access to the unprocessed or partially processed raw data is envisaged.

  13. New hardware and software platform for experiments on a HUBER-5042 X-ray diffractometer with a DISPLEX DE-202 helium cryostat in the temperature range of 20-300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Antipin, A. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    Huber-5042 diffractometer with a closed-cycle Displex DE-202 helium cryostat is a unique scientific instrument for carrying out X-ray diffraction experiments when studying the single crystal structure in the temperature range of 20-300 K. To make the service life longer and develop new experimental techniques, the diffractometer control is transferred to a new hardware and software platform. To this end, a modern computer; a new detector reader unit; and new control interfaces for stepper motors, temperature controller, and cryostat vacuum pumping system are used. The system for cooling the X-ray tube, the high-voltage generator, and the helium compressor and pump for maintaining the desired vacuum in the cryostat are replaced. The system for controlling the primary beam shutter is upgraded. A biological shielding is installed. The new program tools, which use the Linux Ubuntu operating system and SPEC constructor, include a set of drivers for control units through the aforementioned interfaces. A program for searching reflections from a sample using fast continuous scanning and a priori information about crystal is written. Thus, the software package for carrying out the complete cycle of precise diffraction experiment (from determining the crystal unit cell to calculating the integral reflection intensities) is upgraded. High quality of the experimental data obtained on this equipment is confirmed in a number of studies in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K.

  14. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  15. Analysis Preservation in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Kyle; The ATLAS collaboration; Jones, Roger; South, David

    2015-01-01

    Long before data taking ATLAS established a policy that all analyses need to be preserved. In the initial data-taking period, this has been achieved by various tools and techniques. ATLAS is now reviewing the analysis preservation with the aim to bring coherence and robustness to the process and with a clearer view of the level of reproducibility that is reasonably achievable. The secondary aim is to reduce the load on the analysts. Once complete, this will serve for our internal preservation needs but also provide a basis for any subsequent sharing of analysis results with external parties.

  16. Atlas of Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam; Al-Bilbisi, Hussam; al-Muheisen, Zeydoun; al-Nahar, Maysoun; Alaime, Mathieu; Augé, Christian; Azizeh, Wael Abu; Bakhit, Adnan; De Bel-Air, Françoise; Bourke, Stephen; Courcier, Rémy; Crouzel, Isabelle; Daher, Rami; Daradkeh, Saleh Musa; Darmame, Khadija

    2014-01-01

    L’ambition de cet atlas est d’offrir au lecteur des clés d’analyse spatiale des dynamiques sociales, économiques et politiques qui animent la Jordanie, pays exemplaire de la complexité du Moyen-Orient. Produit de sept années de coopération scientifique entre l’Ifpo, le Centre Royal Jordanien de Géographie et l’Université de Jordanie, l’atlas réunit les contributions de 48 chercheurs européens, jordaniens et internationaux. La formation des territoires jordaniens sur le temps long est éclairée...

  17. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m......A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles...

  18. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M.A.B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Y.S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Navarro, J.E.; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E.N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M.H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S.M.; Gilbert, L.M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gingrich, D.M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F.M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P.F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K.W.; Glonti, G.L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L.S.; Goncalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J.J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H.A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorisek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M.I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.P.; Goussiou, A.G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H.M.; Gray, J.A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Gregor, I.M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A.A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y.V.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C.B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H.K.; Hadley, D.R.; Haefner, P.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, J.B.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G.A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R.D.; Harris, O.M.; Harrison, K; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.J.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H.S.; Haywood, S.J.; Head, S.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; 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Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  19. ATLAS forward physics program

    CERN Document Server

    HELLER, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The variety of forward detectors installed in the vicinity of the ATLAS experiment allows to look over a wide range of forward physics topics. They ensure a good information about rapidity gaps, and the installation of very forward detectors (ALFA and AFP) will allow to tag the leading proton(s) remaining from the different processes studied. Most of the studies have to be done at low luminosity to avoid pile-up, but the AFP project offers a really exiting future for the ATLAS forward physics program. We also present how these forward detectors can be used to measure the relative and absolute luminosity.

  20. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    CAMERA ON TOROID The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The video is about the slow lowering of the toroid down to the cavern of ATLAS. It is very demanding task. The camera is placed on top of the toroid.

  1. The Herschel ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  2. Improving ATLAS reprocessing software

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    For my CERN Summer Student programme I have been working with ATLAS reprocessing group. Data taken at ATLAS experiment is not only processed after being taken, but is also reprocessed multiple times afterwards. This allows applying new alignments, calibration of detector and using improved or faster algorithms. Reprocessing is usually done in campaigns for different periods of data or for different interest groups. The idea of my project was to simplify the definition of tasks and monitoring of their progress. I created a LIST configuration files generator script in Python and a monitoring webpage for tracking current reprocessing tasks.

  3. ATLAS Fast Physics Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Koeneke, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is recording data from proton-proton collisions with 7 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2010. The integrated luminosity has grown nearly exponentially since then and continues to rise fast. The ATLAS collaboration has set up a framework to automatically run over the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2-3 days after data taking). Hints of potentially interesting physics signals obtained this way are followed up by physics groups.

  4. The Cytokine Odyssey 2001, a joint meeting of the Society of Leukocyte Biology and the International Cytokine Society. 8-11 November 2001, Maui, Hawaii, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhase, Mireille; Ware, Carl

    2002-02-01

    The Cytokine Odyssey 2001 was held at the Outrigger Wailea Resort in Maui, Hawaii, USA. The meeting, jointly sponsored by the International Cytokine Society (ICS, 9th Annual Meeting) and the Society of Leukocyte Biology (SLB, 35th Annual Meeting), was organised by Carl Ware (Chair) from the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology (La Jolla, USA) and Thomas Hamilton (Co-Chair) from the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (Cleveland, USA). This international conference was designed to bring together leading investigators in molecular and cellular biology, physiology and genetics, interested in cytokines and cells of the immune system. This forum was aimed to assess the impact of this expanding science on new approaches to disease intervention [1].

  5. THE PLOT OF HUSBAND’S RETURN TO HIS WIFE’S WEDDING IN "THE ODYSSEY" BY HOMER AND IN THE SLAVIC AND RUSSIAN EPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana G. Malchukova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the plot of husband’s return to his wife’s wedding embodied both in the millenary Ancient epic literature represented by the "Odyssey" of Homer, and in the Russian and Slavic epic. The study of Homer’s epic heritage, conducted over the years, includes a huge number of works of scientists around the world. Comparative-historical, comparative-genetic and comparative-typological studies found a link between oral folk tradition and epic poetry written by an author. The current international science is developing the hypothesis that professionally individual Homeric poems, which are at least 850 years old, were created in the ancient, oral poetry improvisation in a precise format of hexameter. The study of the Russian epic has less history, but the researches in this field have revealed the presence of Late Antiquity elements in the Slavic environment. These elements along with paganism and Christianity became the source of the people’s spiritual culture. The plot "the return of her husband", which is analyzed in the article, is widely-spread in folklore of many nations, and appeared rudimentarily in "The Odyssey". The western and eastern variants of this theme are diverse in genre structure and stylistic features. In Russian tradition the plot is presented in a large thematic variety "Dobrynya and Alyosha", which evolves into the epic genre due to contamination, small inserts in the epic genre. As a result, the great volume brings together the olden time and the ancient epic, creating intermediate forms comparable with the author’s imitations.

  6. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. When passing throw the walls the succeeding can be heard and seen. The film has original working sound.

  7. Prime wires for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In an award ceremony on 3 September, ATLAS honoured the French company Axon Cable for its special coaxial cables, which were purpose-built for the Liquid Argon calorimeter modules. Working for CERN since the 1970s, Axon' Cable received the ATLAS supplier award last week for its contribution to the liquid argon calorimeter cables of ATLAS (LAL/Orsay, France and University of Victoria, Canada), started in 1996. Its two sets of minicoaxial cables, called harnesses "A" and "B", are designed to function in the harsh conditions in the liquid argon (at 90 Kelvin or -183°C) and under extreme radiation (up to several Mrads). The cables are mainly used for the readout of the calorimeters, and are connected to the outside world by 114 signal feedthroughs with 1920 channels each. The signal from the detectors is transmitted directly without any amplification, which imposes tight restrictions on the impedance and on the signal propagation time of the cables. Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, gives the award for best s...

  8. Taus at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, Sarah M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-06

    The grant "Taus at ATLAS" supported the group of Sarah Demers at Yale University over a period of 8.5 months, bridging the time between her Early Career Award and her inclusion on Yale's grant cycle within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The work supported the functioning of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and the analysis of ATLAS data. The work included searching for the Higgs Boson in a particular mode of its production (with a W or Z boson) and decay (to a pair of tau leptons.) This was part of a broad program of characterizing the Higgs boson as we try to understand this recently discovered particle, and whether or not it matches our expectations within the current standard model of particle physics. In addition, group members worked with simulation to understand the physics reach of planned upgrades to the ATLAS experiment. Supported group members include postdoctoral researcher Lotte Thomsen and graduate student Mariel Pettee.

  9. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  10. The ATLAS event filter

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, H P; Boissat, C; Davis, R; Duval, P Y; Etienne, F; Fede, E; Francis, D; Green, P; Hemmer, F; Jones, R; MacKinnon, J; Mapelli, Livio P; Meessen, C; Mommsen, R K; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Nacasch, R; Negri, A; Pinfold, James L; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rafflin, C; Scannicchio, D A; Stanescu, C; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the studies for the ATLAS Event Filter is given. The architecture and the high level design of the DAQ-1 prototype is presented. The current status if the prototypes is briefly given. Finally, future plans and milestones are given. (11 refs).

  11. A thermosiphon for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2013-01-01

    A new thermosiphon cooling system, designed for the ATLAS silicon detectors by CERN’s EN-CV team in collaboration with the experiment, will replace the current system in the next LHC run in 2015. Using the basic properties of density difference and making gravity do the hard work, the thermosiphon promises to be a very reliable solution that will ensure the long-term stability of the whole system.   Former compressor-based cooling system of the ATLAS inner detectors. The system is currently being replaced by the innovative thermosiphon. (Photo courtesy of Olivier Crespo-Lopez). Reliability is the major issue for the present cooling system of the ATLAS silicon detectors. The system was designed 13 years ago using a compressor-based cooling cycle. “The current cooling system uses oil-free compressors to avoid fluid pollution in the delicate parts of the silicon detectors,” says Michele Battistin, EN-CV-PJ section leader and project leader of the ATLAS thermosiphon....

  12. ATLAS Experiment Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00085461

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  13. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking).

  14. ATLAS PDF Results

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, Mark; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties from parton distribution functions can limit our measurements of new cross sections and searches beyond the SM. Results are presented on recent ATLAS measurements which are sensitive to parton distribution functions. These cover a wide range of cross section measurements, including those from: jets, photons, $W$/$Z$ bosons and top quarks.

  15. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1 March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day.

  16. Prototype ATLAS straw tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This is an early prototype of the straw tracking device for the ATLAS detector at CERN. This detector will be part of the LHC project, scheduled to start operation in 2008. The straw tracker will consist of thousands of gas-filled straws, each containing a wire, allowing the tracks of particles to be followed.

  17. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  18. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  19. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - French

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  20. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Serbian

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  1. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Italian

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  2. Taking ATLAS to new heights

    CERN Document Server

    Abha Eli Phoboo, ATLAS experiment

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this month, 51 members of the ATLAS collaboration trekked up to the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains, Mt. Toubkal (4,167m), in North Africa.    The physicists were in Marrakech, Morocco, attending the ATLAS Overview Week (7 - 11 October), which was held for the first time on the African continent. Around 300 members of the collaboration met to discuss the status of the LS1 upgrades and plans for the next run of the LHC. Besides the trek, 42 ATLAS members explored the Saharan sand dunes of Morocco on camels.  Photos courtesy of Patrick Jussel.

  3. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  4. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  5. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  6. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance has just been attributed to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months ago at their headquarters in Japan.

  7. ATLAS: civil engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. Nice view from the surface to the cavern from the pit side - all the big machines looked very small. The film has original working sound.

  8. Data challenges in ATLAS computing

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A

    2003-01-01

    ATLAS computing is steadily progressing towards a highly functional software suite, plus a World Wide computing model which gives all ATLAS equal and equal quality of access to ATLAS data. A key component in the period before the LHC is a series of Data Challenges of increasing scope and complexity. The goals of the ATLAS Data Challenges are the validation of the computing model, of the complete software suite, of the data model, and to ensure the correctness of the technical choices to be made. We are committed to 'common solutions' and look forward to the LHC Computing Grid being the vehicle for providing these in an effective way. In close collaboration between the Grid and Data Challenge communities ATLAS is testing large-scale testbed prototypes around the world, deploying prototype components to integrate and test Grid software in a production environment, and running DC1 production at 39 'tier' centers in 18 countries on four continents.

  9. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  10. Jet physics in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet performance and physics measurements, together with results from new physics searches using the 2011 dataset. They include studies of the underlying event and fragmentation models, measurements of the inclusive jet, dijet and multijet cross sections, parton density functions, heavy flavours, jet shape, mass and substructure. Searches for new physics in monojet, dijet and photon-jet final states are also presented.

  11. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation periods allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  12. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  13. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  14. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  15. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  16. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  17. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  18. ATLAS latest results

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Reale, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the LHC start-up and the first runs at 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV and 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy in the years 2009 and 2010, the ATLAS detector started to record its first collision events. The integrated luminosity has now reached one inverse pico barn. These data have been used to perform detailed studies on the performance of the detector, including measuring charged and neutral particle mass resonances and the study of QCD cross-sections. The data have already made it possible to commission and calibrate the various ATLAS subdetectors, and understand their performance in detail. The first observation of Standard Model electroweak processes, in particular mass resonances, is also being used as a benchmark for validating the analysis and simulation tools. The status and performance of the detector will be briefly reviewed, the latest physics results will be summarized and limits on new physics will be given.

  19. Exotics searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Renjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new physics accessible by the LHC. The ATLAS experiment all have rigorous search programs ongoing with the aim to find indications for new physics involving state of the art analysis techniques. This talk reports on new results obtained using the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  20. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bellagamba, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This report presents an overview of some of the most recent results obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration using pp and heavy-ion collisions at LHC. The review is not intended to be comprehensive and includes recent updates on the Higgs boson properties, precision Standard Model measurements, as well as searches for new physics. Most of the results exploit the data collected in the last LHC run, providing pp collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV.

  1. The ATLAS Experiment Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  2. L'esperimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  3. El experimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  4. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Torro Pastor, Emma; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  5. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb̄, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  6. Higgs results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00145153; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM) Higgs results, such as $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma,ZZ,WW,\\tau\\tau,\\mu\\mu,b\\bar{b}$, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM) results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  7. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  8. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  9. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to `transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  10. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to 'transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  11. ATLAS overview week highlights

    CERN Document Server

    D. Froidevaux

    2005-01-01

    A warm and early October afternoon saw the beginning of the 2005 ATLAS overview week, which took place Rue de La Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the heart of the Quartier Latin in Paris. All visitors had been warned many times by the ATLAS management and the organisers that the premises would be the subject of strict security clearance because of the "plan Vigipirate", which remains at some level of alert in all public buildings across France. The public building in question is now part of the Ministère de La Recherche, but used to host one of the so-called French "Grandes Ecoles", called l'Ecole Polytechnique (in France there is only one Ecole Polytechnique, whereas there are two in Switzerland) until the end of the seventies, a little while after it opened its doors also to women. In fact, the setting chosen for this ATLAS overview week by our hosts from LPNHE Paris has turned out to be ideal and the security was never an ordeal. For those seeing Paris for the first time, there we...

  12. Nova Scotia wind atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In order to stimulate growth of the wind energy sector in the province of Nova Scotia and to optimize the development of an important renewable energy source in the province, the Nova Scotia Department of Energy has launched the Nova Scotia wind atlas project. The atlas provides valuable information regarding the identification of the optimal locations to install wind farm turbines, both at the large utility scale level and at the private or small business levels. This article presented information on the wind atlas website and on wind resource maps. Background information on the project was presented. The wind resource maps were developed in partnership by the K.C, Irving Chair in Sustainable Development at Moncton University and the Applied Geomatics Research Group at the Nova Scotia Community College. The wind resource maps are available for viewing on the website where users can click on tile section to obtain enlarged versions of wind resource maps for different parts of the province of Nova Scotia. The maps were developed using computer modelling. 7 figs.

  13. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extens...

  14. ATLAS Upgrade Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000/fb by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new...

  15. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  16. US Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat. part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo)

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2000-01-01

    Photo 01 : September 2000 - Mr Bill Richardson, Secretary of Energy, United States of America (centre) at an LHC interaction region quadrupole test cryostat, part of the US contribution to LHC construction and built by the US-LHC collaboration (hence the Fermilab logo); with l. to r. Dr Mildred Dresselhaus, Dr Carlo Wyss, CERN Director General, Profesor Luciano Maiani, Professor Roger Cashmore, Ambassador George Moose, Dr Peter Rosen, Dr John Ellis. Photo 02 : Mr. Bill Richardson (right), Secretary of Energy United States of America with Prof. Luciano Maiani leaning over one of the LHC magnets produced at Fermilab during his visit to CERN on 16th September 2000.

  17. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter; Performance after 2 years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    AbouZeid, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at about 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LH...

  18. Upgrade plans for the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Although data-taking at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to continue for a number of years, plans are already being developed for operation of the LHC and associated detectors at an increased instantaneous luminosity about 5 times the original design value of 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. The increased particle flux at this high luminosity (HL) will have an impact on many sub-systems of the ATLAS detector. In particular, in the liquid argon forward calorimeter (FCal), which was designed for operation at LHC luminosities, the associated increase in the ionization load at HL-LHC luminosities creates a number of problems which can degrade its performance. These include space-charge effects in the liquid argon gaps, excessive drop in potential across the gaps due to large HV supply currents through the protection resistors, and an increase in temperature which may cause the liquid argon to boil. One solution, which would require opening both End-Cap cryostats, is the construction and installation of new FCals w...

  19. Upgrade of the Cold Electronics of the ATLAS HEC Calorimeter for sLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Oberlack, H G; Fischer, A; Hambarzumjan, A; Pospelov, G; Reimann, O; Rudert, A; Schacht, P

    2009-01-01

    The signal amplification and summation electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic End-cap Calorimeter (HEC) is operated at the circumference of the HEC calorimeters inside the cryostats in liquid argon. The present electronics is designed to operate at irradiation levels expected for the LHC. For operation at the sLHC the irradiation levels are expected to be a factor 10 higher, therefore a new electronic system might be needed. The technological possibilities are investigated. From irradiation tests of the present HEC electronics it is known that it will operate up to a dose of 55 kGy of ionizing radiation and up to a neutron fluence of 3 * 10**14 n/cm**2, where it shows some degradation of performance. This matches well the requirements of up to 1.5 * 10**13 n/cm**2 for 10 years of LHC operation, including safety factors. For a subsequent sLHC running phase with 10 times higher expected irradiation levels, a more radiation hard HEC electronics will be needed. Therefore generic studies of different technologies have ...

  20. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after three years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    De La Torre, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beam...

  1. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Lampl, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo- rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and s...

  2. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, O

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton ($pp$) collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region $|\\eta|< 3.2$, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range $1.5 < |\\eta| < 4.9$. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5~K. The 182,468 cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigger and t...

  3. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Lampl, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions pro- duced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo- rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterised by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform az- imuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as pas- sive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical elec- trodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic ra...

  4. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η|< 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5<|η|<4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed for the coverage at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5K. The approximately 200K cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigg...

  5. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  6. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  7. A Time for Atlases and Atlases for Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Yoav; Mizrahi, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism's experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases. PMID:20204142

  8. A time for atlases and atlases for time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Livneh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism’s experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases.

  9. New Geologic Map of the Argyre Region of Mars: Deciphering the Geologic History Through Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, J. M.; Banks, M.; Buczkowski, D.

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the mapping effort is to produce a geologic map of the Argyre basin and surrounding region at 1:5,000,000 scale in both digital and print formats that will detail the stratigraphic and crosscutting relations among rock materials and landforms (30 deg. S to 65 deg. S, 290 deg. E to 340 deg E). There has not been a detailed geologic map produced of the Argyre region since the Viking-era mapping investigation. The mapping tasks include stratigraphic mapping, crater counting, feature mapping, quantitative landform analysis, and spectroscopic/ stratigraphic investigation feature mapping. The regional geologic mapping investigation includes the Argyre basin floor and rim materials, the transition zone that straddles the Thaumasia plateau, which includes Argyre impactrelated modification, and the southeast margin of the Thaumasia plateau using important new data sets from the Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The geologic information unfolded by this new mapping project will be useful to the community for constraining the regional geology, paleohydrology, and paleoclimate, which includes but is not limited to the assessment of: (1) whether the Argyre basin contained lakes, (2) the extent of reported flooding and glaciation, (3) existing interpretations of the origin of the narrow ridges located in the southeast part of the basin floor, and (4) the extent of Argyre-related tectonism and its influence on the surrounding regions.

  10. Verification of a Monte-Carlo planetary surface radiation environment model using gamma-ray data from Lunar Prospector and 2001 Mars Odyssey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S., E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.u [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    Characterising a planetary radiation environment is important to: (1) assess the habitability of a planetary body for indigenous life; (2) assess the risks associated with manned exploration missions to a planetary body and (3) predict/interpret the results that remote sensing instrumentation may obtain from a planetary body (e.g. interpret the gamma-ray emissions from a planetary surface produced by radioactive decay or via the interaction of galactic cosmic rays to obtain meaningful estimates of the concentration of certain elements on the surface of a planet). The University of Leicester is developing instrumentation for geophysical applications that include gamma-ray spectroscopy, gamma-ray densitometry and radiometric dating. This paper describes the verification of a Monte-Carlo planetary radiation environment model developed using the MCNPX code. The model is designed to model the radiation environments of Mars and the Moon, but is applicable to other planetary bodies, and will be used to predict the performance of the instrumentation being developed at Leicester. This study demonstrates that the modelled gamma-ray data is in good agreement with gamma-ray data obtained by the gamma-ray spectrometers on 2001 Mars Odyssey and Lunar Prospector, and can be used to accurately model geophysical instrumentation for planetary science applications.

  11. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  12. The new European wind atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    European Wind Atlas” aiming at reducing overall uncertainties in determining wind conditions; standing on three legs: A data bank from a series of intensive measuring campaigns; a thorough examination and redesign of the model chain from global, mesoscale to microscale models and creation of the wind atlas...... database. Although the project participants will come from the 27 member states it is envisioned that the project will be opened for global participation through test benches for model development and sharing of data – climatologically as well as experimental. Experiences from national wind atlases...... will be utilized, such as the Indian, the South African, the Finnish, the German, the Canadian atlases and others....

  13. Automated Loads Analysis System (ATLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Stephen; Frere, Scot; O’Reilly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is a generalized solution that can be used for launch vehicles. ATLAS is used to produce modal transient analysis and quasi-static analysis results (i.e., accelerations, displacements, and forces) for the payload math models on a specific Shuttle Transport System (STS) flight using the shuttle math model and associated forcing functions. This innovation solves the problem of coupling of payload math models into a shuttle math model. It performs a transient loads analysis simulating liftoff, landing, and all flight events between liftoff and landing. ATLAS utilizes efficient and numerically stable algorithms available in MSC/NASTRAN.

  14. An atlas of functions: with equator, the atlas function calculator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oldham, Keith

    2008-01-01

    ... of arguments. The first edition of An Atlas of Functions, the product of collaboration between a mathematician and a chemist, appeared during an era when the programmable calculator was the workhorse for the numerical evaluation of functions. That role has now been taken over by the omnipresent computer, and therefore the second edition delegates this duty to Equator, the Atlas function calculator. This is a software program that, as well as carrying out other tasks, will calculate va...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas community. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Pittsburgh, PA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Woodbine, IA EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  19. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Austin, TX EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  20. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The ATLAS facility is a leading facility for nuclear structure research in the...

  1. Women of ATLAS - International Women's Day 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Women play key roles in the ATLAS Experiment: from young physicists at the start of their careers to analysis group leaders and spokespersons of the collaboration. Celebrate International Women's Day by meeting a few of these inspiring ATLAS researchers.

  2. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (http://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Phoenix, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Milwaukee, WI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (http://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Memphis, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Tampa, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Woodbine, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Durham, NC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas ). The layers in these web...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Paterson, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Fresno, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Portland, ME

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  12. ATLAS : civil engineering at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video.

  13. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 1 - ATLAS: ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN is one of the largest and most complex scientific endeavours ever assembled. The detector, located at collision point 1 of the LHC, is designed to explore the fundamental components of nature and to study the forces that shape our universe. The past year’s discovery of a Higgs boson is one of the most important scientific achievements of our time, yet this is only one of many key goals of ATLAS. During a brief break in their journey, some of the 3000-member ATLAS collaboration will be taking time to share the excitement of this exploration with you. On surface no restricted access  The exhibit at Point 1 will give visitors a chance to meet these modern-day explorers and to learn from them how answers to the most fundamental questions of mankind are being sought. Activities will include a visit to the ATLAS detector, located 80m below ground; watching the prize-winning ATLAS movie in the ATLAS cinema; seeing real particle tracks in a cloud chamber and discussi...

  14. Diffractive measurements in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grafstrom, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Several diffractive measurements in ATLAS are discussed. Using a diffractive enhanced event sample, the diffractive fraction of the inelastic cross section is determined to be in the range 25-30 % dependent on what model is used. Rapidity gap studies give similar percentages. The differential cross section as a function of the rapidity gap size has been determined at the hadron level. The diffractive cross section is roughly 1 mb per unit of gap size for gap sizes bigger than 3.5 units.

  15. SUSY Searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mamuzic, Judita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is considered one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. It postulates a fundamental symmetry between fermions and bosons, and introduces a set of new supersymmetric particles at the electroweak scale. It addresses the hierarchy and naturalness problem, gives a solution to the gauge coupling unification, and offers a cold dark matter candidate. Different aspects of SUSY searches, using strong, electroweak, third generation production, and R-parity violation and long lived particles are being studied at the LHC. An overview of most recent SUSY searches results using the 13 TeV ATLAS RUN2 data will be presented.

  16. Top Properties at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandbach, Ruth Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Properties of the top quark are measured with the ATLAS detector using LHC proton-proton collisions data. Measurements of the top-quark mass and polarisation, as well as of the polarization of W bosons in top quark decays to probe the Wtb-vertex are presented. In addition, measurements of the spin correlation between top and anti-top quarks as well as of the top-quark charge asymmetry, which constitute important tests of QCD and are sensitive to new physics, are discussed.

  17. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CPPM Laboratory Marseille Starting with the Workshop- adding modules to the strip 00:09:19 Exterior-entering the lab site by car, Sascha Rosanov and a PR lady walking, Lab sign on building -Physique des Particules de Marseille 00:20:00 Interviews of the ATLAS pixel work for bio-mediacal research 00:34:00 Interview of Roy Aleksov, Head of CPPM Laboratory, Working in international team, working with CERN and GRID The rest of the film inclusdes lab testingand some exterior shots.

  18. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Reception for Markus Nordberg and Andrew Millington by about 20 physicists from the Budker Nuclear Physics Institute Host: Yuri Tikhonov Various short talks and exchanges, with coffee Sequence 2 Visit to BINP Facilities Tikhonov and Nordberg walking and talking Visit to electron accelerator, old solar detector Sequence 3 Visit to BNIP workshops Work on big wheel segments shots over-exposed Work on Atlas coils LHC Magnets Men playing chess, exterior shots of Tikhonov, Nordberg arriving Sequence 4 Shots from car of journey from workshop to main BNIP building.

  19. Surveying the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The cathedral-like cavern into which the ATLAS experiment will be lowered and installed forms a vital part of the engineering work at CERN in preparation for the new LHC accelerator. This cavern, being measured by surveyors in these images, will have one of the largest spans of any man-made underground structure. The massive 46X25X25 cubic metre detector will be the largest of its type in the world when it is completed for the LHC start-up in 2008.

  20. The ATLAS IBL BOC

    CERN Document Server

    SCHROER, N; The ATLAS collaboration; BRUNI, G; BRUSCHI, M; DANTONE, I; FALCHIERI, D; DOPKE, J; FLICK, T; GABRIELLI, A; GROSSE-KNETTER, J; Heim, T; JOSEPH, J; KRIEGER, N; KUGEL, A; MORETTINI, P; Neumann, M; RIZZI, M; TRAVAGLINI, R; ZANNOLI, S; ZOCCOLI, A

    2011-01-01

    The pixel detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN will be upgraded with an additional layer (IBL) in 2013. To handle the data readout the currently used VME card pairs consisting of a back of crate card (BOC) and a read out driver (ROD) are being redesigned. We present details of the hardware design of the new BOC prototype. It takes advantage from modern FPGA technology and commercial optical modules and abandons the need for a variety of custom components used on the old card. Also the throughput is four times higher and additional features are implemented.

  1. The ATLAS Upgrade programme

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    After the ¯rst successful years of LHC running, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about ¯ve times the design-luminosity some 10-years from now. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and improve the physics capabilities of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  2. Higgs searches with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aurousseau, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    This document is an overview of the recent results from the ATLAS experiment in the search for a Standard Model Higgs boson, using an integrated luminosity of 4.8~\\ifb{} and 13~\\ifb{} of data at 7~\\TeV{} and 8~\\TeV{} in the center-of-mass, respectively. The results are presented in the \\HZZllll, \\Hgg, \\HWWlnln, \\Htautau{} and \\Hbb{} channels. An update on the combination of the various channels and on the properties measurement (spin, parity) of the observed state is given.

  3. ATLAS Style Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhandler, E F

    2008-01-01

    This is a compendium of rules, recommendations, information and advice for writing papers and notes within the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It covers what to include in the paper, and some general guidelines and specific points about writing a scientific paper. There are sections on the use of English (though it is not a guide to grammar), punctuation, and typography. Advice about the use of LATEX is given in the main text, and there is an appendix on software tools containing general comments about LATEX and information on using Microsoft Word. Currently on version 2.6, 3 March 2017, 47pp.

  4. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The heavy-ion programme in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider aims to probe and characterise hot and dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. Moreover, smaller collision systems involving nuclei and hadrons are of interest to disentangle initial- from final-state effects. This report presents new results based on lead-lead and proton-proton data collected at √sNN = 5.02 TeV in 2015, including measurements of bulk collectivity, charged-particle production, electroweak bosons, photon-jet correlations, and quarkonium suppression. First attempts to measure electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions are also discussed.

  5. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousson Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC that delivered more than 2 fb−1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  6. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  7. Two new wheels for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Juergen Zimmer (Max Planck Institute), Roy Langstaff (TRIUMF/Victoria) and Sergej Kakurin (JINR), in front of one of the completed wheels of the ATLAS Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter. A decade of careful preparation and construction by groups in three continents is nearing completion with the assembly of two of the four 4 m diameter wheels required for the ATLAS Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter. The first two wheels have successfully passed all their mechanical and electrical tests, and have been rotated on schedule into the vertical position required in the experiment. 'This is an important milestone in the completion of the ATLAS End Cap Calorimetry' explains Chris Oram, who heads the Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter group. Like most experiments at particle colliders, ATLAS consists of several layers of detectors in the form of a 'barrel' and two 'end caps'. The Hadronic Calorimeter layer, which measures the energies of particles such as protons and pions, uses two techniques. The barrel part (Tile Calorimeter) cons...

  8. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Scandinavia and other countries. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed...... by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the LHC Computing Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous...... environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF....

  9. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  10. The atlas of endangered species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mackay, R

    2009-01-01

    Vividly illustrated with full-color maps and detailed graphics, The Atlas of Endangered Species catalogs the inhabitants of a wide variety of ecosystems, including forests, mangroves, and coral reefs...

  11. Linguistic Atlas of French Polynesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charpentier, Jean-Michel; François, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    ... François, the Linguistic Atlas of French Polynesia pays tribute to the rich linguistic landscape of the country by documenting thoroughly twenty different communalects, in the form of 2250 maps...

  12. ATLAS online data quality monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Hadavand, H; Ilchenko, Y; Kolos, S; Slagle, K; Taffard, A

    2010-01-01

    Every minute the ATLAS detector is taking data, the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in providing quick feedback to the subsystems about the functioning and performance of the different parts of ATLAS by providing a configurable easy and fast visualization of all this information. The Data Quality Monitoring Display (DQMD) is a visualization tool for the automatic data quality assessment of the ATLAS experiment. It is the interface through which the shift crew and experts can validate the quality of the data being recorded or processed, be warned of problems related to data quality, an...

  13. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  14. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  15. Wheels lining up for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    On 30 October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year.

  16. Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For more than 20 years, the Dartmouth Atlas Project has documented glaring variations in how medical resources are distributed and used in the United States. The...

  17. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  18. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  19. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  20. ATLAS Overview Week 2009 Barcelona

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    From October 5th to October 9th about 400 physicists from the ATLAS Collaboration met in Barcelona (Catalonia) to discuss the status of the experiment. The event was organized by the Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), a member of the ATLAS Collaboration. Besides the Scientific program, few social events were organized, such as Reception at the Palau de Pedralbes, a visit to the Fundacio Joan Miro and a social dinner at Maremagnunm hall.

  1. Composition of the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00221668; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration consists of about 5,000 members from 178 institutes in 38 countries. About half of the members of the collaboration are scientific authors of the papers, and there are about 1,200 students in the collaboration. This note presents data showing aspects of the composition of the collaboration; in particular the relative fraction of women is described at several levels within the hierarchy of the ATLAS experiment.

  2. Searches for Supersymmetry in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cervelli, Alberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson in ATLAS first run of data taking, and due to the lack of observation of new physics, searches for new particles such as Supersymmetric states are one of the main area of interest for the general purpose detectors operating at LHC. In this talk we will present a review of the searches for Supersymmetric particles, performed by the ATLAS experiment

  3. The ATLAS Student Event Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Fassouliotis, D; Roupas, Z; Vudragovic, D

    2007-01-01

    The ASEC (ATLAS Student Event Challenge) is an educational project which allows the students to learn about the elementary particles by studying "events", the products of beam collisions at the LHC. The events are collected by the ATLAS detector and displayed graphically using the ATLANTIS package. The students are given the means to select and analyse the events on-line, and subsequently present the results and draw conclusions.

  4. Diboson Physics Study with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Simic, Lj

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS prospects for the measurements of the $WW$, $WZ$ and $Wgamma$ cross sections and the limits on the anomalous $WWZ$ and $WWgamma$ couplings at 14 TeV are summarized. Study with full simulation of ATLAS detector leads to the conclusion that with 100 pb^{-1} of accumulated data $WW$, $Wgamma$ and $WZ$ signal can be established with more than 5$sigma$ statistical significance, while with 10-30 fb^{-1} of data systematic uncertainties will dominate diboson measurements.

  5. ATLAS experiment : mapping the secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2010-01-01

    This 4 page color brochure describes ATLAS and the LHC, the ATLAS inner detector, calorimeters, muon spectrometer, magnet system, a short definition of the terms "particles," "dark matter," "mass," "antimatter." It also explains the ATLAS collaboration and provides the ATLAS website address with some images of the detector and the ATLAS collaboration at work.

  6. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  7. ATLAS Cloud R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitkin, Sergey; Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Caballero Bejar, Jose; Benjamin, Doug; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Gable, Ian; Hendrix, Val; Hover, John; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramon; Love, Peter; Ohman, Henrik; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Taylor, Ryan; Walker, Rodney; Zaytsev, Alexander; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained a significant insight into the cloud computing landscape and has identified points that still need to be addressed in order to fully utilize this technology. This contribution will explain the cloud integration models that are being evaluated and will discuss ATLAS' learning during the collaboration with leading commercial and academic cloud providers.

  8. ATLAS DBM Module Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gorisek, Andrej [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, Marko [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sokhranyi, Grygorii [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); McGoldrick, Garrin [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Cerv, Matevz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-18

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Jozef Stefan Institute, CERN, and University of Toronto who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond has a number of properties that make it attractive for high energy physics detector applications. Its large band-gap (5.5 eV) and large displacement energy (42 eV/atom) make it a material that is inherently radiation tolerant with very low leakage currents and high thermal conductivity. CVD diamond is being investigated by the RD42 Collaboration for use very close to LHC interaction regions, where the most extreme radiation conditions are found. This document builds on that work and proposes a highly spatially segmented diamond-based luminosity monitor to complement the time-segmented ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) so that, when Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MTBS) and LUCID (LUminosity measurement using a Cherenkov Integrating Detector) have difficulty functioning, the ATLAS luminosity measurement is not compromised.

  9. ATLAS Future Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00225024; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Along with maintenance and consolidation of the detector in the past few years, ATLAS has added inner b-layer to its tracking system. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requir...

  10. ATLAS muon detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Muon detectors from the outer layer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Over a million individual detectors combine to make up the outer layer of ATLAS. All of this is exclusively to track the muons, the only detectable particles to make it out so far from the collision point. How the muon’s path curves in the magnetic field depends on how fast it is travelling. A fast muon curves only a very little, a slower one curves a lot. Together with the calorimeters, the muon detectors play an essential role in deciding which collisions to store and which to ignore. Certain signals from muons are a sure sign of exciting discoveries. To make sure the data from these collisions is not lost, some of the muon detectors react very quickly and trigger the electronics to record. The other detectors take a little longer, but are much more precise. Their job is to measure exactly where the muons have passed, calculating the curvature of their tracks in the magnetic field to the nearest five hundredths of a ...

  11. ATLAS Distributed Analysis Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Liko, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS production system has been successfully used to run production of simulation data at an unprecedented scale. Up to 10000 jobs were processed in one day. The experiences obtained operating the system on several grid flavours was essential to perform a user analysis using grid resources. First tests of the distributed analysis system were then performed. In the preparation phase data was registered in the LHC File Catalog (LFC) and replicated in external sites. For the main test, few resources were used. All these tests are only a first step towards the validation of the computing model. The ATLAS management computing board decided to integrate the collaboration efforts in distributed analysis in only one project, GANGA. The goal is to test the reconstruction and analysis software in a large scale Data production using Grid flavors in several sites. GANGA allows trivial switching between running test jobs on a local batch system and running large-scale analyses on the Grid; it provides job splitting a...

  12. Jet Calibration at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The accurate measurement of jets at high transverse momentum produced in proton proton collision at a centre of mass energy at \\sqrt(s)=7 TeV is important in many physics analysis at LHC. Due to the non-compensating nature of the ATLAS calorimeter, signal losses due to noise thresholds and in dead material the jet energy needs to be calibrated. Presently, the ATLAS experiment derives the jet calibration from Monte Carlo simulation using a simple correction that relates the true and the reconstructed jet energy. The jet energy scale and its uncertainty are derived from in-situ measurements and variation in the Monte Carlo simulation. Other calibration schemes have been also developed, they use hadronic cell calibrations or the topology of the jet constituents to reduce hadronic fluctuations in the jet response, improving in that way the jet resolution. The performances of the various calibration schemes using data and simulation, the evaluation of the modelling of the properties used to derive each calibration...

  13. ATLAS construction schedule

    CERN Multimedia

    Kotamaki, M

    The goal during the last few months has been to freeze and baseline as much as possible the schedules of various ATLAS systems and activities. The main motivations for the re-baselining of the schedules have been the new LHC schedule aiming at first collisions in early 2006 and the encountered delays in civil engineering as well as in the production of some of the detectors. The process was started by first preparing a new installation schedule that takes into account all the new external constraints and the new ATLAS staging scenario. The installation schedule version 3 was approved in the March EB and it provides the Ready For Installation (RFI) milestones for each system, i.e. the date when the system should be available for the start of the installation. TCn is now interacting with the systems aiming at a more realistic and resource loaded version 4 before the end of the year. Using the new RFI milestones as driving dates a new summary schedule has been prepared, or is under preparation, for each system....

  14. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    Della Mussia, S

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1st March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day. Two road trailers each with 64 wheels, positioned side by side. This was the solution chosen to transport the lower part of the central barrel of ATLAS' tile hadronic calorimeter from Building 185 to the PX16 shaft at Point 1 (see Figure 1). The transportation, and then the installation of the component in the experimental cavern, which took place over three days were, to say the least, rather spectacular. On 25 February, the component, consisting of eight 6-metre modules, was loaded on to the trailers. The segment of the barrel was transported on a steel support so that it wouldn't move an inch during the journey. On 26 February, once all the necessary safety checks had been carried out, the convoy was able to leave Buildi...

  15. The ATLAS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Vandelli, W; Battaglia, A; Beck, H P; Blair, R; Bogaerts, A; Bosman, M; Ciobotaru, M; Cranfield, R; Crone, G; Dawson, J; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drake, G; Ermoline, Y; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Gorini, B; Green, B; Haberichter, W; Haberli, C; Hauser, R; Hinkelbein, C; Hughes-Jones, R; Joos, M; Kieft, G; Klous, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kugel, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann, G; Martin, B; Mapelli, L; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Misiejuk, A; Mornacchi, G; Müller, M; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Petersen, J; Pope, B; Schlereth, J L; Spiwoks, R; Stancu, S; Strong, J; Sushkov, S; Szymocha, T; Tremblet, L; Ünel, G; Vermeulen, J; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Yu, M; Yasu, Y; Zhang, J; Zobernig, H; 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    2008-01-01

    Event data from proton-proton collisions at the LHC will be selected by the ATLAS experiment in a three-level trigger system, which, at its first two trigger levels (LVL1+LVL2), reduces the initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz to $sim$3~kHz. At this rate, the Event Builder collects the data from the readout system PCs (ROSs) and provides fully assembled events to the Event Filter (EF). The EF is the third trigger level and its aim is to achieve a further rate reduction to $sim$200~Hz on the permanent storage. The Event Builder is based on a farm of O(100) PCs, interconnected via a Gigabit Ethernet to O(150) ROSs. These PCs run Linux and multi-threaded software applications implemented in C++. All the ROSs, and substantial fractions of the Event Builder and Event Filter PCs have been installed and commissioned. We report on performance tests on this initial system, which is capable of going beyond the required data rates and bandwidths for Event Building for the ATLAS experiment.

  16. Spring comes for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Butin, F.

    2004-01-01

    (First published in the CERN weekly bulletin 24/2004, 7 June 2004.) A short while ago the ATLAS cavern underwent a spring clean, marking the end of the installation of the detector's support structures and the cavern's general infrastructure. The list of infrastructure to be installed in the ATLAS cavern from September 2003 was long: a thousand tonnes of mechanical structures spread over 13 storeys, two lifts, two 65-tonne overhead travelling cranes 25 metres above cavern floor, with a telescopic boom and cradle to access the remaining 10 metres of the cavern, a ventilation system for the 55 000 cubic metre cavern, a drainage system, a standard sprinkler system and an innovative foam fire-extinguishing system, as well as the external cryogenic system for the superconducting magnets and the liquid argon calorimeters (comprising, amongst other things, two helium refrigeration units, a nitrogen refrigeration unit and 5 km of piping for gaseous or liquid helium and nitrogen), not to mention the handling eq...

  17. ATLAS Physicist in Space

    CERN Multimedia

    Bengt Lund-Jensen

    2007-01-01

    On December 9, the former ATLAS physicist Christer Fuglesang was launched into space onboard the STS-116 Space Shuttle flight from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Christer worked on the development of the accordion-type liquid argon calorimeter and SUSY simulations in what eventually became ATLAS until summer 1992 when he became one out of six astronaut trainees with the European Space Agency (ESA). His selection out of a very large number of applicants from all over the ESA member states involved a number of tests in order to choose the most suitable candidates. As ESA astronaut Christer trained with the Russian Soyuz programme in Star City outside of Moscow from 1993 until 1996, when he moved to Houston to train for space shuttle missions with NASA. Christer belonged to the backup crew for the Euromir95 mission. After additional training in Russia, Christer qualified as ‘Soyuz return commander’ in 1998. Christer rerouting cables during his second space walk. (Photo: courtesy NASA) During...

  18. ATLAS Christmas lunch

    CERN Multimedia

    Francois Butin; Markus Nordberg

    The end of the year ATLAS pit lunch is now a well established tradition: the 4th edition took place in the most prestigious place at CERN; the "Globe de l'innovation", or simply "the Globe". This end-of-year event is the opportunity to thank all those working so hard at Point 1. The first event took place in December 2003. At that time, there was no Globe yet, and the party took place in SX1 building, at the top of the shafts leading to the ATLAS cavern, with some 100 guests. In December 2004, we had the privilege to be the first to organize a lunch in the Globe with some 200 guests. Since then, many have followed our example! Well, almost: we were requested to refrain from serving "Tartiflette" again in there (a Savoyard specialty, using vast amounts of Reblochon, a smelly cheese...). It was said to have left a poignant odour for following events throughout 2004... Long queues formed for this special event. In December 2005, we were authorized to party in the Globe again (once we promised we would b...

  19. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition system for the ATLAS experiment has to reduce the 40 MHz of LHC bunch crossing rate to ~200 Hz of recording rate. This is achieved through a complex distributed system composed by $sim$ 1.000 CPUs, about a third of the expected final size of the system. Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  20. Catalog of hard X-ray solar flares detected with Mars Odyssey/HEND from the Mars orbit in 2001-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, M. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Nizamov, B. A.; Vybornov, V. I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.

    2017-09-01

    The study of nonstationary processes in the Sun is of great interest, and multi-wavelength observations and the registration of magnetic fields have been carried out using both ground-based telescopes and several specialized spacecraft in near-Earth orbits in recent years. However, the acquisition of new, reliable information on their hard X-ray radiation remains necessary, in particular, if the corresponding spacecraft provide additional information, e.g., in regard to flare observations from directions other than the Sun-Earth direction. This paper presents a catalog of powerful solar flares registered by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) designed at the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. HEND is mounted onboard the 2001Mars Odyssey spacecraft. It operated successfully during the flight to Mars and is currently operating in near-Mars orbit. Apart from neutrons, HEND is sensitive to hard X-ray (up to 300 keV) and gamma-ray radiation (above 300 keV). This radiation is registered by two scintillators: an outer one that is sensitive to photons above 40 keV and an inner one sensitive to photons above 200 keV. The catalog was created using a new procedure for calibration of the data. For the most powerful 60 solar flares in the visible and far sides of the Sun (for a terrestrial observer), time profiles of the flare radiation summed over all channels of the X-ray, and in some cases the gamma-ray, bands are provided, as well as spectra and characteristics of power-law fits. The results of previous studies of the Sun using HEND and the potential for further use of these data are discussed.

  1. The Origin of the Term 'Atlas'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Lapaine

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin of the term 'atlas', as a bound collection of maps, is considered. It is usually thought to derive from the name of the Titan, Atlas, who was punished by being forced to bear the entire celestial sphere or universe on his shoulders. However, on the basis of research into and translation of the original Preface of Mercator's Atlas sive cosmographicae meditationes de fabrica mvndi et fabricati figvra, it has been determined that Mercator did not refer to this legend, but named his atlas for the completely different characteristics, such as wisdom, erudition and humanity, of another Atlas.

  2. Last piece of the puzzle for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Clare Ryan

    At around 15.40 on Friday 29th February the ATLAS collaboration cracked open the champagne as the second of the small wheels was lowered into the cavern. Each of ATLAS' small wheels are 9.3 metres in diameter and weigh 100 tonnes including the massive shielding elements. They are the final parts of ATLAS' muon spectrometer. The first piece of ATLAS was installed in 2003 and since then many detector elements have journeyed down the 100 metre shaft into the ATLAS underground cavern. This last piece completes this gigantic puzzle.

  3. ATLAS Maintenance and Operation management system

    CERN Multimedia

    Copy, B

    2007-01-01

    The maintenance and operation of the ATLAS detector will involve thousands of contributors from 170 physics institutes. Planning and coordinating the action of ATLAS members, ensuring their expertise is properly leveraged and that no parts of the detector are understaffed or overstaffed will be a challenging task. The ATLAS Maintenance and Operation application (referred to as Operation Task Planner inside the ATLAS experiment) offers a fluent web based interface that combines the flexibility and comfort of a desktop application, intuitive data visualization and navigation techniques, with a lightweight service oriented architecture. We will review the application, its usage within the ATLAS experiment, its underlying design and implementation.

  4. EnviroAtlas Proximity to Parks Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). This EnviroAtlas dataset shows...

  5. EnviroAtlas Near Road Tree Buffer Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). This EnviroAtlas dataset...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Des Moines, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  8. Diffractive Measurements in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, K

    2012-01-01

    Measurements made using the ATLAS detector at the LHC at \\surd s = 7 TeV incorporating diffractive processes are presented. A first measurement of the inelastic cross-section using 20 \\mu b-1 of data is given, yielding a result of {\\sigma}inel ({\\xi} > 5 \\times 10-6) = 60.3 \\pm 2.1 mb, for single (p p \\rightarrow X p) and double (p p \\rightarrow XY) diffractive processes for a kinematic range corresponding to detector acceptance {\\xi} = M2X /s calculated from the invariant mass MX of the heavier dissociation system X. Furthermore a study is made of pseudorapidity gap distributions using 7.1 \\pm 0.2 \\mu b-1 of data collected to tune the diffractive fraction of the inelastic cross-section in Monte Carlo (MC) models, and a measurement is made of the differential cross-section for events with large gaps in pseudorapidity where diffractive processes dominate.

  9. Exotic physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Meehan, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    A number of proposed explanations to observed phenomena predict new physics that will be directly observable at the LHC. Each new theory is manifested in the experiments as an experimental signature that sets it apart from the many well understood Standard Model processes. Presented here is a summary of a selection of such searches performed using 8 TeV center of mass energy data produced by the LHC and collected with the ATLAS detector. As no significant deviations from the standard model are observed in any search channel presented here, the results are interpreted in terms of constraints on new physics in a number of scenarios including dark matter, sequential standard model extensions, and model independent interpretations depending on the given search channel.

  10. Consumer Energy Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  11. The ATLAS upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the rst successful LHC run in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about ve times the design-luminosity in about ten years. The larger luminosity will allow to perform precise measurements of the just discovered Higgs boson and to continue searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and, whenever possible, to improve the physics performance of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  12. The ATLAS upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C

    2014-01-01

    After the first successful LHC run in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about above times the design-luminosity in about ten years. The larger luminosity will allow to perform precise measurements of the just discovered Higgs boson and to continue searching for new physics beyond the Standard Model. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and, whenever possible, to improve the physics performance of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  13. Atlas of Nuclear Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashok Kumar; Maheshwari, Bhoomika; Garg, Swati; Patial, Monika; Singh, Balraj

    2015-09-01

    We present an atlas of nuclear isomers containing the experimental data for the isomers with a half-life ≥ 10 ns together with their various properties such as excitation-energy, half-life, decay mode(s), spin-parity, energies and multipolarities of emitted gamma transitions, etc. The ENSDF database complemented by the XUNDL database has been extensively used in extracting the relevant data. Recent literature from primary nuclear physics journals, and the NSR bibliographic database have been searched to ensure that the compiled data Table is as complete and current as possible. The data from NUBASE-12 have also been checked for completeness, but as far as possible original references have been cited. Many interesting systematic features of nuclear isomers emerge, some of them new; these are discussed and presented in various graphs and figures. The cutoff date for the extraction of data from the literature is August 15, 2015.

  14. Higgs in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Ouellette, E A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The search for the Higgs boson in the $H \\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow ZZ^*$ has led to the discovery of a new boson at ATLAS using 2011 and 2012 data. A further push is needed to confirm that the discovered particle is in fact the Standard Model Higgs. Thus, Higgs searches in fermionic decay channels have become very important. This talk presents the results of the search for the SM Higgs boson produced in association with a $W$ or $Z$ and decaying to $b\\bar{b}$ using 4.7 fb-1 of LHC data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$TeV and 13.0 fb-1 at 8TeV. In addition, results from the SM Higgs search in the $ttH (H\\rightarrow b\\bar{b})$ using 4.7fb-1 of $\\sqrt{s}=7$TeV data are presented.

  15. Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2011-01-01

    Four hundred years ago in Middelburg, in the Netherlands, the telescope was invented. The invention unleashed a revolution in the exploration of the universe. Galileo Galilei discovered mountains on the Moon, spots on the Sun, and moons around Jupiter. Christiaan Huygens saw details on Mars and rings around Saturn. William Herschel discovered a new planet and mapped binary stars and nebulae. Other astronomers determined the distances to stars, unraveled the structure of the Milky Way, and discovered the expansion of the universe. And, as telescopes became bigger and more powerful, astronomers delved deeper into the mysteries of the cosmos. In his Atlas of Astronomical Discoveries, astronomy journalist Govert Schilling tells the story of 400 years of telescopic astronomy. He looks at the 100 most important discoveries since the invention of the telescope. In his direct and accessible style, the author takes his readers on an exciting journey encompassing the highlights of four centuries of astronomy. Spectacul...

  16. The ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dunford, Monica Lynn

    2014-01-01

    In particle physics experiments, the discovery of increasingly more massive particles has brought deep understanding of the basic constituents of matter and of the fundamental forces among them. In order to explore Nature in its deepest elementary secrets, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was built at CERN, Geneva. The LHC provides the highest energy collisions in a laboratory, at very high rates to allow one to study very rare reactions. Two independent sophisticated huge instruments, called ATLAS and CMS detectors, are operated to explore in a most broad way the physics of these collisions. In addition to these two general-purpose detectors, smaller specialized experiments (LHCb, ALICE and some others) are collecting collision data as well.

  17. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  18. Atlas of Nuclear Isomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashok Kumar, E-mail: ajainfph@iitr.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee-247667 (India); Maheshwari, Bhoomika; Garg, Swati; Patial, Monika [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee-247667 (India); Singh, Balraj [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario-L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    We present an atlas of nuclear isomers containing the experimental data for the isomers with a half-life ≥ 10 ns together with their various properties such as excitation-energy, half-life, decay mode(s), spin-parity, energies and multipolarities of emitted gamma transitions, etc. The ENSDF database complemented by the XUNDL database has been extensively used in extracting the relevant data. Recent literature from primary nuclear physics journals, and the NSR bibliographic database have been searched to ensure that the compiled data Table is as complete and current as possible. The data from NUBASE-12 have also been checked for completeness, but as far as possible original references have been cited. Many interesting systematic features of nuclear isomers emerge, some of them new; these are discussed and presented in various graphs and figures. The cutoff date for the extraction of data from the literature is August 15, 2015.

  19. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  20. ATLAS TRT barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2005-01-01

    On 3 February 2005, members of the US-TRT team proceeded to the installation of the last TRT barrel module for the Transition Radiation Tracker, which will be used for tracking in the Atlas detector. The TRT barrel is made of 96 modules containing around 52 000 4-mm straws, each of them equipped with a 20 microns sense wire. The modules were first designed at CERN, then built in the USA between 1996 and 2003. Duke, Hampton and Indiana Universities, tested in details at CERN between 2003 and 2005 by members of the US-TRT group, and mounted on the support structure in the SR-1 building where this video was taken. During assembly of the last module, one can see Kirill Egorov (PNPI, Gatchina, Russia), Chuck Mahlong (Hampton) as well as John Callahan and Pauline Gagnon (Indiana). (Written by Pauline Gagnon)

  1. The human cell atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regev, Aviv; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Lander, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international...... collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells...... in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early...

  2. The ATLAS distributed analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legger, F.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In the LHC operations era, analysis of the multi-petabyte ATLAS data sample by globally distributed physicists is a challenging task. To attain the required scale the ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of Grid computing, realized in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), the largest distributed computational resource existing in the sciences. The ATLAS experiment currently stores over 140 PB of data and runs about 140,000 concurrent jobs continuously at WLCG sites. During the first run of the LHC, the ATLAS Distributed Analysis (DA) service has operated stably and scaled as planned. More than 1600 users submitted jobs in 2012, with 2 million or more analysis jobs per week, peaking at about a million jobs per day. The system dynamically distributes popular data to expedite processing and maximally utilize resources. The reliability of the DA service is high and steadily improving; Grid sites are continually validated against a set of standard tests, and a dedicated team of expert shifters provides user support and communicates user problems to the sites. Both the user support techniques and the direct feedback of users have been effective in improving the success rate and user experience when utilizing the distributed computing environment. In this contribution a description of the main components, activities and achievements of ATLAS distributed analysis is given. Several future improvements being undertaken will be described.

  3. First ATLAS Events Recorded Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Teuscher, R

    As reported in the CERN Bulletin, Issue No.30-31, 25 July 2005 The ATLAS barrel Tile calorimeter has recorded its first events underground using a cosmic ray trigger, as part of the detector commissioning programme. This is not a simulation! A cosmic ray muon recorded by the barrel Tile calorimeter of ATLAS on 21 June 2005 at 18:30. The calorimeter has three layers and a pointing geometry. The light trapezoids represent the energy deposited in the tiles of the calorimeter depicted as a thick disk. On the evening of June 21, the ATLAS detector, now being installed in the underground experimental hall UX15, reached an important psychological milestone: the barrel Tile calorimeter recorded the first cosmic ray events in the underground cavern. An estimated million cosmic muons enter the ATLAS cavern every 3 minutes, and the ATLAS team decided to make good use of some of them for the commissioning of the detector. Although only 8 of the 128 calorimeter slices ('superdrawers') were included in the trigg...

  4. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and mana......The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed...... and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed...... outside the worker node environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from otherGrids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data...

  5. ATLAS Cloud R&D

    CERN Document Server

    Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Love, P; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

    2014-01-01

    The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

  6. Irradiation tests and expected performance of readout electronics of the ATLAS hadronic endcap calorimeter for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cheplakov, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The readout electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter (HEC) will have to withstand a much more demanding radiation environment at the future high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) compared to LHC design values. The heart of the HEC read-out electronics is the pre-amplifier and summing (PAS) system which is realized in GaAs ASIC technology. The PAS devices are installed inside the LAr cryostat directly on the detector. They have been proven to operate reliably in LHC conditions up to luminosities of 1000 fb-1, within safety margins. However, at the HL-LHC a total luminosity of 3000 fb-1 is expected, which corresponds to radiation levels being increased by a factor 3-5. On top of that a safety factor of at least 2 needs to be accounted for to reflect our confidence in the simulations. The GaAs ASIC has therefore been exposed to neutron and proton radiation with integrated fluences in excess of 4∙10^15 n/cm2 and 2.6∙10^14 p/cm2, several factors above the levels corresponding to ten years of HL-LHC running. ...

  7. Irradiation Tests and Expected Performance of Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cheplakov, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The readout electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter (HEC) will have to withstand a much more demanding radiation environment at the future high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) compared to LHC design values. The heart of the HEC read-out electronics is the pre-amplifier and summing (PAS) system which is realized in GaAs ASIC technology. The PAS devices are installed inside the LAr cryostat directly on the detector. They have been proven to operate reliably in LHC conditions up to luminosities of 1000 fb-1, within safety margins. However, at the HL-LHC a total luminosity of 3000 fb-1 is expected, which corresponds to radiation levels being increased by a factor 3-5. On top of that a safety factor of at least 2 needs to be accounted for to reflect our confidence in the simulations. The GaAs ASIC has therefore been exposed to neutron and proton radiation with integrated fluences in excess of 4x10^15 n/cm2 and 2.6x10^14 p/cm2, several factors above the levels corresponding to ten years of HL-LHC running. In-s...

  8. The ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Level 1 Trigger Signal pre-Processing System: Installation, Commissioning and Calibration Results.

    CERN Document Server

    Boulahouache, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The Liquid Argon calorimeter is one of the main sub-detectors in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It provides precision measurements of electrons, photons, jets and missing transverse energy produced in the LHC pp collisions. The calorimeter information is a key ingredient in the first level (L1) trigger decision to reduce the 40 MHz p-p bunch crossing rate to few 100 kHz of accepted events waiting to be readout in full precision, in the system pipelines. This presentation covers the LAr calorimeter electronics used to prepare signals for the L1 trigger. After exiting the cryostat, part of the current signal, at the front end, is directly split off the main readout path and summed with neighbouring channels forming trigger towers which are transmitted in analog form over 50 to 70 meters to the counting room. There, the signals are calibrated, reordered and futher summed for fast digitization using the L1 trigger hardware. Many factors like calorimeter capacitances and pulse shapes have to be taken into accoun...

  9. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    Strizenec, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN - EnviroAtlas Community Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in...

  11. World ocean atlas 2001 [electronic resource]: World ocean atlas 2001 figures : objective analyses and statistics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    World ocean atlas 2001 (WOA01) is an update of World ocean atlas 1998. WOA01 expands on WOA98 with the addition of the monthly nutrients fields and the introduction of annual and seasonal zooplankton biomass fields...

  12. ATLAS Online Data Quality Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the delivery of the first proton-proton collisions by the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration had the opportunity to operate the detector under the environment it was designed for. These first events have been of great interest not only for the high energy physics outcome, but also as a means to perform a general commissioning of system. A highly scalable distributed monitoring framework assesses the quality of the data and the operational conditions of the detector, trigger and data acquisition system. Every minute of an ATLAS data taking session the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in ...

  13. ATLAS online data quality monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the delivery of the first proton-proton collisions by the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration had the opportunity to operate the detector under the environment it was designed for. These first events have been of great interest not only for the high energy physics outcome, but also as a means to perform a general commissioning of system. A highly scalable distributed monitoring framework assesses the quality of the data and the operational conditions of the detector, trigger and data acquisition system. Every minute of an ATLAS data taking session the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in ...

  14. The ATLAS Glasgow Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Hawkings

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Overview Weeks always provide a good opportunity to see the status and progress throughout the experiment, and the July week at Glasgow University was no exception. The setting, amidst the traditional buildings of one of the UK's oldest universities, provided a nice counterpoint to all the cutting-edge research and technology being discussed. And despite predictions to the contrary, the weather at these northern latitudes was actually a great improvement on the previous few weeks in Geneva. The meeting sessions comprehensively covered the whole ATLAS project, from the subdetector and TDAQ systems and their commissioning, through to offline computing, analysis and physics. As a long-time ATLAS member who remembers plenary meetings in 1991 with 30 people drawing detector layouts on a whiteboard, the hardware and installation sessions were particularly impressive - to see how these dreams have been translated into 7000 tons of reality (and with attendant cabling, supports and services, which certainly...

  15. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne O.; Codrea, Marius C.; Sun, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...... the veterinary proteomics domain, and this article demonstrates how the expression of isoform-unique peptides can be observed across distinct tissues and body fluids. The Pig PeptideAtlas is a unique resource for use in animal proteome research, particularly biomarker discovery and for preliminary design of SRM...... assays, which are equally important for progress in research that supports farm animal production and veterinary health, as for developing pig models with relevance to human health research....

  16. Two ATLAS trackers become one

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS inner detector barrel comes one step closer to completion as the semiconductor tracker is merged with the transition radiation tracker. ATLAS collaborators prepare for the insertion of the semiconductor tracker (SCT, behind) into the transition radiation tracker (TRT, in front). Some had hoped it would fall on Valentine's Day. But despite the slight delay, Friday 17 February was lovingly embraced as 'Conception Day,' when dozens of physicists and engineers from the international collaboration gathered to witness the insertion of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker into the transition radiation tracker, a major milestone in the assembly of the experiment's inner detector. With just millimeters of room for error, the cylindrical trackers were slid into each other as inner detector integration coordinator Heinz Pernegger issued commands and scientists held out flashlights, lay on their backs and stood on ladders to take careful measurements. Each tracker is the result of about 10 years of international ...

  17. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

  18. New ATLAS Software & Computing Organization

    CERN Multimedia

    Barberis, D

    Following the election by the ATLAS Collaboration Board of Dario Barberis (Genoa University/INFN) as Computing Coordinator and David Quarrie (LBNL) as Software Project Leader, it was considered necessary to modify the organization of the ATLAS Software & Computing ("S&C") project. The new organization is based upon the following principles: separation of the responsibilities for computing management from those of software development, with the appointment of a Computing Coordinator and a Software Project Leader who are both members of the Executive Board; hierarchical structure of responsibilities and reporting lines; coordination at all levels between TDAQ, S&C and Physics working groups; integration of the subdetector software development groups with the central S&C organization. A schematic diagram of the new organization can be seen in Fig.1. Figure 1: new ATLAS Software & Computing organization. Two Management Boards will help the Computing Coordinator and the Software Project...

  19. The ATLAS positive ion injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Bollinger, L.M.; Pardo, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the design, construction status, and beam tests to date of the positive ion injector (PII) which is replacing the tandem injector for the ATLAS heavy-ion facility. PII consists of an ECR ion source on a 350 KV platform injecting a very low velocity superconducting linac. The linac is composed of an independently-phased array of superconducting four-gap interdigital resonators which accelerate over a velocity range of .006 to .05c. In finished form, PII will be able to inject ions as heavy as uranium into the existing ATLAS linac. Although at the present time little more than 50% of the linac is operational, the indenpently-phased array is sufficiently flexible that ions in the lower half of the periodic table can be accelerated and injected into ATLAS. Results of recent operational experience will be discussed. 5 refs.

  20. The ATLAS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Schlenker, S; Kersten, S; Hirschbuehl, D; Braun, H; Poblaguev, A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Talyshev, A; Zimmermann, S; Franz, S; Gutzwiller, O; Hartert, J; Mindur, B; Tsarouchas, CA; Caforio, D; Sbarra, C; Olszowska, J; Hajduk, Z; Banas, E; Wynne, B; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Nemecek, S; Thompson, PD; Mandic, I; Deliyergiyev, M; Polini, A; Kovalenko, S; Khomutnikov, V; Filimonov, V; Bindi, M; Stanecka, E; Martin, T; Lantzsch, K; Hoffmann, D; Huber, J; Mountricha, E; Santos, HF; Ribeiro, G; Barillari, T; Habring, J; Arabidze, G; Boterenbrood, H; Hart, R; Marques Vinagre, F; Lafarguette, P; Tartarelli, GF; Nagai, K; D'Auria, S; Chekulaev, S; Phillips, P; Ertel, E; Brenner, R; Leontsinis, S; Mitrevski, J; Grassi, V; Karakostas, K; Iakovidis, G.; Marchese, F; Aielli, G

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. Twelve different sub-detectors as well as the common experimental infrastructure are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS enables equipment supervision of all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the order of 106 operational parameters. Higher level control system layers allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling, and manage the communication with external systems such as the LHC. This contribution firstly describes the status of the ATLAS DCS and the experience gained during the LHC commissioning and the first physics data taking operation period. Secondly, the future evolution and maintenance constraints for the coming years an...

  1. ATLAS Nightly Build System Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Simmons, B; Undrus, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a facility for automatic production of software releases. Being the major component of ATLAS software infrastructure, it supports more than 50 multi-platform branches of nightly releases and provides ample opportunities for testing new packages, for verifying patches to existing software, and for migrating to new platforms and compilers. The Nightly System testing framework runs several hundred integration tests of different granularity and purpose. The nightly releases are distributed and validated, and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The first LHC long shutdown (2013-2015) activities will elicit increased load on the Nightly System as additional releases and builds are needed to exploit new programming techniques, languages, and profiling tools. This paper describes the plan of the ATLAS Nightly Build System Long Shutdown upgrade. It brings modern database and web technologies into the Nightly System, improves monitoring of nigh...

  2. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius; Sun, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Biological research of Sus scrofa, the domestic pig, is of immediate relevance for food production sciences, and for developing pig as a model organism for human biomedical research. Publicly available data repositories play a fundamental role for all biological sciences, and protein data...... repositories are in particular essential for the successful development of new proteomic methods. Cumulative proteome data repositories, including the PeptideAtlas, provide the means for targeted proteomics, system-wide observations, and cross-species observational studies, but pigs have so far been...... underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...

  3. ATLAS honours two Swiss companies

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 18 June 2003, ATLAS presented awards to two Swiss companies, Cicorel SA and Isola Composites AG, the suppliers of the electrodes and the composite bars for the electromagnetic calorimeter. "Physicists' dreams could not become reality without industry's active participation and creativity", said Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman, congratulating two of the collaboration's suppliers, to which it presented awards on 18 June. Swiss quality was the order of the day, since the two companies, Cicorel SA and Isola Composites AG, which are both involved in the production of components for the electromagnetic calorimeter, are located in Switzerland's Jura region. "You have taken up and met a challenge that bordered on the impossible", added Peter Jenni. The suppliers who received the ATLAS award: Hans Wyss from Cicorel SA (left) and Constant Gentile from Isola Composites (right).Circorel SA produced enough electrodes to cover an entire football pitch. Each electrode, measuring 2 square metres, consists of three layers of...

  4. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  5. ATLAS computing on CSCS HPC

    CERN Document Server

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Weber, Michele; Walker, Rodney; Hostettler, Michael Artur

    2015-01-01

    The Piz Daint Cray XC30 HPC system at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing centre, is in 2014 the highest ranked European system on TOP500, also featuring GPU accelerators. Event generation and detector simulation for the ATLAS experiment has been enabled for this machine. We report on the technical solutions, performance, HPC policy challenges and possible future opportunities for HEP on extreme HPC systems. In particular a custom made integration to the ATLAS job submission system has been developed via the Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware. Further, some GPU acceleration of the Geant4 detector simulations were implemented to justify the allocation request for this machine.

  6. ATLAS computing on CSCS HPC

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael Artur; The ATLAS collaboration; Haug, Sigve; Walker, Rodney; Weber, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Piz Daint Cray XC30 HPC system at CSCS, the Swiss National Supercomputing centre, was in 2014 the highest ranked European system on TOP500, also featuring GPU accelerators. Event generation and detector simulation for the ATLAS experiment have been enabled for this machine. We report on the technical solutions, performance, HPC policy challenges and possible future opportunities for HEP on extreme HPC systems. In particular a custom made integration to the ATLAS job submission system has been developed via the Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware. Furthermore, some GPU acceleration of the Geant4 detector simulations has been implemented to justify the allocation request for this machine.

  7. Atlas de l’Afrique.

    OpenAIRE

    Péhaut, Yves

    2008-01-01

    La publication, en 1993, de l’Atlas de l’Afrique mettait enfin à la disposition de tous ceux qui travaillent sur le continent ou qui s’intéressent à lui, un outil d’utilité fondamentale, traitant, par cartes thématiques, de tout le continent et présentant, pour chaque pays, un document topographique et une ou plusieurs cartes économiques. L’ouvrage est un atlas exhaustif. Les notices qui accompagnent les cartes d’ensemble permettent de faire le point sur les données schématisées par celles-ci...

  8. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1998-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment After watching this film you can get the view of the civil engineering work at POINT1 where the ATLAS will be built. 03-11-1998 The video starts with the view of the POINT1 taken from the roof of the building 33. 04-11-1998 View of the installation of the entrance of the SDX1 18/19-11-1998 Installation of the rafters to the building PX15

  9. The ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Cerv, M

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor is a novel charged-particle detector. It will be used in the ATLAS experiment to measure luminosity and beam backgrounds. The monitor’s pCVD diamond sensors are instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end chips. The CVD diamond sensor material was chosen to ensure long-term durability of the sensors in a radiation-hard environment. This document describes the principles of luminosity measurements. It is then explained how the Diamond Beam Monitor will carry out this task.

  10. ATLAS computing: Technical Design Report

    OpenAIRE

    ATLAS, Collaboration; Åkesson, Torsten; Eerola, Paula; Hedberg, Vincent; Jarlskog, Göran; Lundberg, Björn; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Smirnova, Oxana; Almehed, Sverker; et, al.

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Computing Model embraces the Grid paradigm and a high degree of decentralization and sharing of computing resources. The required level of computing resources means that off-site facilities will be vital to the operation of ATLAS in a way that was not the case for previous CERN-based experiments. The primary event processing occurs at CERN in a Tier-0 facility. The RAW data is archived at CERN and copied (along with the primary processed data) to the Tier-1 facilities around ...

  11. Jet Veto Measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Hesketh, Gavin Grant; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Jet veto cross section measurements in ATLAS ATLAS has no new dedicated analyses on BFKLtype analyses. We suggest the following mixture of jet veto / exclusive jet cross sections in V+jet, VV+jet, multijets: - Z+jets 13 TeV and Jet vetoes in Z VBF, W VBF studies - WW+0,1 jets http://arxiv.org/abs/1608.03086 - Other dibosons + jets: Zgamma+jets and WZ+jets http://arxiv.org/abs/1606.04017,http://arxiv.org/abs/1604.05232 - Studies of rapidity separations etc in 4jet events http://arxiv.org/abs/1509.07335

  12. ATLAS: Big Data in a Small Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneau, Larry; Tonry, John

    2015-08-01

    For even small telescope projects, the petabyte scale is now upon us. The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS; Tonry 2011) will robotically survey the entire visible sky from Hawaii multiple times per night to search for near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) on impact trajectories. While the ATLAS optical system is modest by modern astronomical standards -- two 0.5 m F/2.0 telescopes -- each year the ATLAS system will obtain ~103 measurements of 109 astronomical sources to a photometric accuracy of space junk that ATLAS will see each night. Additional interrogation will identify interesting phenomena from beyond the solar system occurring over millions of transient sources per night. The data processing and storage requirements for ATLAS demand a ``big data'' approach typical of commercial Internet enterprises. We describe our approach to deploying a nimble, scalable and reliable data processing infrastructure, and promote ATLAS as steppingstone to eventual processing scales in the era of LSST.

  13. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    CERN Document Server

    Undrus, A

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Builds and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, test...

  14. The White Adolescent's Drug Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Douglas S.; Marel, Rozanne

    1980-01-01

    Presents a "typical" case history of a White middle-class teenager who becomes involved with marihuana and subsequently begins to abuse other drugs. Sociological findings from other research are interspersed in the anecdotal account. (GC)

  15. A refreshing odyssey / Matt Garrick

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Garrick, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Leedu Vytautas Magnuse Ülikool tahab projekti Refresh abiga välisleedulasi koju tuua. 2 nädalat kestva projekti käigus saavad välisleedulased koos üliõpilastega õppida ja ekskursioonidel käia

  16. LSTM: A Search Space Odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greff, Klaus; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Koutnik, Jan; Steunebrink, Bas R; Schmidhuber, Jurgen

    2017-10-01

    Several variants of the long short-term memory (LSTM) architecture for recurrent neural networks have been proposed since its inception in 1995. In recent years, these networks have become the state-of-the-art models for a variety of machine learning problems. This has led to a renewed interest in understanding the role and utility of various computational components of typical LSTM variants. In this paper, we present the first large-scale analysis of eight LSTM variants on three representative tasks: speech recognition, handwriting recognition, and polyphonic music modeling. The hyperparameters of all LSTM variants for each task were optimized separately using random search, and their importance was assessed using the powerful functional ANalysis Of VAriance framework. In total, we summarize the results of 5400 experimental runs ( ≈ 15 years of CPU time), which makes our study the largest of its kind on LSTM networks. Our results show that none of the variants can improve upon the standard LSTM architecture significantly, and demonstrate the forget gate and the output activation function to be its most critical components. We further observe that the studied hyperparameters are virtually independent and derive guidelines for their efficient adjustment.

  17. LSTM: A Search Space Odyssey

    OpenAIRE

    Greff, Klaus; Srivastava, Rupesh Kumar; Koutník, Jan; Steunebrink, Bas R.; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Several variants of the Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) architecture for recurrent neural networks have been proposed since its inception in 1995. In recent years, these networks have become the state-of-the-art models for a variety of machine learning problems. This has led to a renewed interest in understanding the role and utility of various computational components of typical LSTM variants. In this paper, we present the first large-scale analysis of eight LSTM variants on three representati...

  18. ATLAS Inner Detector Event Data Model

    CERN Document Server

    Akesson, F; Dobos, D; Elsing, M; Fleischmann, S; Gaponenko, A; Gnanvo, K; Keener, P T; Liebig, W; Moyse, E; Salzburger, A; Siebel, M; Wildauer, A

    2007-01-01

    The data model for event reconstruction (EDM) in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment is presented. Different data classes represent evolving stages in the reconstruction data flow, and specific derived classes exist for the sub-detectors. The Inner Detector EDM also extends the data model for common tracking in ATLAS and is integrated into the modular design of the ATLAS high-level trigger and off-line software.

  19. ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Capeans, M.

    Starting on 17th May, the ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop was organised by Ken MacFarlane and his team at Hampton University, Virginia, USA. During a welcome break in the very dense workshop programme, the group enjoyed a half-day long boat trip along the waterways, offering a first-hand look at the history and heritage of this part of America. The attendance during the six-day workshop was about 50 people representing most of the collaborating institutes, although many Russian colleagues had stayed in their institutes to pursue the start-up of end-cap wheel production at PNPI and DUBNA. The meeting clearly showed that, during the year 2002, the TRT community is focusing on final design issues and module/wheel construction, while moving at the same time towards acceptance testing and integration, including the front-end electronics. The two main topics treated at the workshop were the preparation for beginning full production of the FE electronics, and the wire-joint problem that the US barrel colleagues have been fa...

  20. News from the ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beauchemin, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The LHC has been running for over 2 years and the different experiments have accumulated enough data to find a new particle which could well be the Higgs boson, achieve Standard Model measurements with precision at the percent level, and seriously constrain a large variety of new physics scenarios, giving important hints on what the physics beyond the Standard Model can be and what it cannot be. This presentation will focus on ATLAS latest searches for new physics in events featuring signatures relevant to theories of quantum gravity. Will be presented the results on searches for large extra dimensions (direct graviton emission, virtual graviton propagation, Kaluza-Klein Randall-Sundrum resonances, etc.) and other TeV-scale gravity phenomena such as black holes (rotating and non-rotating) and string balls production and decay. Results will be reported on each of the various final states investigated for each signals. The results of some searches that are not typically interpreted into bounds on quantum gravit...