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Sample records for atlas control room

  1. Recent Development in the ATLAS Control Room

    CERN Multimedia

    Armen Vartapetian

    Only recently the name ATLAS Control Room (ACR) was more associated with the building at Point 1 (SCX1) than with the real thing. But just within the last several months, with the installation of the ACR hardware, that perception has changed significantly. The recently furnished ATLAS control room. But first of all, if you are not familiar with the ATLAS experimental site and are interested in visiting the ATLAS control room to see the place that in the near future will become the brain of the detector operations, it is quite easy to do so. You don't even need safety helmet or shoes! The ACR is located on the ground floor of a not so typical, glass-covered building in Point 1. The building number on the CERN map is 3162, or SCX1 as we call it. It is also easy to recognize that building by its shiny appearance within the cluster of Point 1 buildings if you are driving from Geneva. Final design and prototyping of the ACR hardware started at the beginning of 2006. Evaluation of the chosen hardware confi...

  2. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Genova

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Genova-2012.html

  3. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Genova-2013_1.html

  4. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Genova-2013_2.html

  5. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Bern

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    Fresher's day for potential future bachelor students Infotage für Studieninteressierte Bachelor Once a year the University of Bern organizes two information days for young potential future bachelor students. Young aspiring candidates interested in a career in physics will be shown the forefront of physics research, where a trip around the university physics laboratories, and a direct video link to the ATLAS Control room at CERN's Large Hadron Collider is part of the program. A physicist from Bern will present directly from the ATLAS control room for a direct and personal view into the physics at the LHC, the Higgs particle, the generation of mass, antimatter, the origin of the universe and the involvement of the Bern high-energy physics team in the ATLAS experiment. This also allows for fruitful discussions about their own perspectives of perhaps becoming a CERN physicist one day. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Bern-2012.html

  6. ATLAS Virtual Visits: Bringing the World into the ATLAS Control Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, S.

    2012-12-01

    The newfound ability of Social Media to transform public communication back to a conversational nature provides HEP with a powerful tool for Outreach and Communication. By far, the most effective component of nearly any visit or public event is that fact that the students, teachers, media, and members of the public have a chance to meet and converse with real scientists. While more than 30,000 visitors passed through the ATLAS Visitor Centre in 2011, nearly 7 billion did not have a chance to make the trip. Clearly this is not for lack of interest. Rather, the costs of travel, in terms of time and money, and limited parking, put that number somewhat out of reach. On the other hand, during the LHC “First Physics” event of 2010, more than 2 million visitors joined the experiment control rooms via webcast for the celebration. This document presents a project developed for the ATLAS Experiment's Outreach and Education program that complements the webcast infrastructure with video conferencing and wireless sound systems, allowing the public to interact with hosts in the control room with minimal disturbance to the shifters. These “Virtual Visits” have included high school classes, LHC Masterclasses, conferences, expositions and other events in Europe, USA, Japan and Australia, to name a few. We discuss the technology used, potential pitfalls (and ways to avoid them), and our plans for the future.

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Al-Quds University

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS virtual visit features Al-Quds University, a Palestinian university with campuses in Abu Dis and Beit Hanina-Jerusalem. As part of the "Physics Without Frontiers" project, funded by ICTP, Al-Quds is hosting a one day particle physics masterclass. During the day the students are given an introduction to particle physics, the LHC and the ATLAS Experiment, before having the chance to analyse real LHC data. This virtual visit comprises of a live tour around the ATLAS control room and the opportunity to ask questions to the ATLAS physicists.

  8. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by High schools of Argos prefecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Continuing the subatomic journey that started last year in Argos, Greece, 45 students from 14 high schools of the prefecture will take part in a dedicated ATLAS Masterclass organized by the University of Athens in the framework of the Go-Lab and Inspiring Science Education European projects. Students will learn how to analyse real events from the ATLAS experiment with the use of HYPATIA online applet. They will also have the opportunity to visit the ATLAS control room to learn what it takes for scientists to keep on pushing the boundaries of our understanding of the origins of the universe.

  9. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by QuarkNet program in Portland

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The LHC fellows of the U.S. QuarkNet program will hold a workshop "Real LHC Data for the Classroom" for teachers using elements of the ATLAS masterclass on July 13, 2013. The workshop is part of the Summer 2013 Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers. In the workshop, teachers are introduced to particle physics, the ATLAS experiment, and ways to use actual data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to help their students understand fundamental physics. One of the highlights of this one-day workshop is an ATLAS Virtual Visit, in which the teachers connect by videoconference with the ATLAS control room. In the videoconferecne, the participants will be able to to ask questions of and have discussions with an ATLAS physicist.

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Frankfurt Book Fair

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The Frankfurt book fair is the largest of its kind in Germany, attracting about 300,000 visitors during five days. CERN will be present with a large stand, incorporating a virtual LHC control centre, a table featuring books on CERN for the general public, an interactive LHC tunnel and a presentation stage. Every 2 hours, a CERN physicist will give a short presentation on CERN and LHC physics, which includes a live link to the control rooms of ATLAS or CMS, or the CERN control room. This will give visitors of the book fair the opportunity to ask questions about the LHC, the LHC experiments, Higgs particles or anything else they would like to know. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Frankfurt-2012.html

  11. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Athens College

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    Athens College, is part of HAEF (Hellenic American Educational Foundation). It is an Athens high-school with great a tradition and an important contribution to the scientific world of Greece and society. Its graduates are distinguished personalities of the scientific, artistic, economic and political life, both in Greece and internationally. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Athens-2012.html

  12. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by leading universities of Russian Federation

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    Science Festival in Russian Federation is a programme of events which take place at the leading scientific centres and museums in Russia. At the Science Festival scientists, engineers and students show to visitors the advances of modern science and technology in all scopes of life. Today the leading universities of Russia will feature a multipoint video conference with the LHC control room at CERN. This will give visitors of the Science Festival the opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the Large Hadron Collider experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Russia-2012.html

  13. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow, Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The 12 Festival of Science "Theory-knowledge-experience...". Fest will be located on the traditional Main Square, which is visited by thousands of citizens and tourists. Institute of Nuclear Physics as usual participates in this annual event. Our visitors will learn the secrets of the CERN experiments on the Large Hadron Collider - ATLAS, LHCb, ALICE, CMS, find out more about the Higgs particles, antimatter quark-gluon plasma (beeing guided by our scientists and PhD students). One of the attractions will be ATLAS Control Room Virtual Visit. Visiting people will have an opportunity to see how ATLAS is controlled and operated to collect its exciting data and ask questions to scientists and engineers involved in LHC program at CERN. Institute of Nuclear Physics has prepared also several interactive demonstrations of Atomic Force Microscopy, Magnetic Resonance, Hadron Therapy and Crystal Physics. The Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences carries out basic and applied research in physics, ...

  14. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Birzeit University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The physics department at Birzeit University is organizing a Masterclass on particle physics on Tuesday 5th March as part of the International Masterclasses run by IPPOG, where many of high school students and undergraduate students are participating to learn more about particles, the LHC and the ATLAS experiment. The activities of the day include lectures, event analysis with real data from the LHC and virtual visit to CERN via video conference.

  15. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Europe Day Symposium

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    EUROPE DAY 2013: A Symposium Examining Canada/European Scientific Collaboration On May 9 2013. Canadians in Vancouver, British Columbia, will be gathering to enrich their understanding of scientific collaboration between Canada and Europe using CERN and its recent discovery of the Higgs boson as a framework for a symposium celebrating Europe Day. Canadians have been involved in nearly every aspect of the Large Hadron Collider accelerator and the ATLAS particle-physics detector. ATLAS-Canada spokesperson Rob McPherson will be addressing the symposium participants and talking about the multi-national effort that led to the Higgs breakthrough; his presentation will include a live virtual visit to the ATLAS control room at CERN. The event is hosted by TRIUMF, Canada`s national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics. http://www.europeanfestival.ca/europe-day

  16. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by various towns in Uruguay

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Anilla Cultural Latinoamérica – Europa in Uruguay is a venture between ANEP, CES and UDELAR. In its line of action of scientific and technological culture they contact CERN for an open dialogue to divulge science, led to its teachers and students. The virtual "visit" of Uruguay at CERN is done from multiple video conferencing rooms in the country through the Uruguayan Academic Network. On 28th May six towns in Uruguay will be connected to the ATLAS Control Room: Montevideo, Maldonado, Rocha, Tacuarembó, Salto and Rivera.

  17. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Southdown Primary School in Huntington

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This ATLAS Virtual Visit is being conducted with Mrs. Triessl's 4th grade class at the Southdown Primary School in Huntington, NY. The students of Mrs. Triessl's class have been studying together in an innovative Dual-Language (Spanish/English) program since kindergarten. In spite of the extra academic effort this program requires, the curriculum has maintained a strong and increasing focus on science education. The students have begun this year learning about matter and energy and look forward to meeting a real scientist addressing these topics in a laboratory far across the ocean! The school and the district are thrilled to have this opportunity, which they hope will inspire their students toward future participation in their growing K-12 scientific programs (see http://www.hufsd.edu/academics/science/science_index.html). http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Huntington-2012.html Steven Goldfarb and Kate Shaw in the ATLAS Control Room and students of the 4th grade class a...

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Natural History Museum, London

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    Nature Live is a programme of daily events which take place at the Natural History Museum, London. Nature Live brings together scientists and visitors to explore, discover and discuss the natural world and our place within it. In each event visitors get the chance to meet our scientists, see the specimens they study and ask lots of questions. Today Nature Live will feature a live link to the LHC control room at CERN. This will give visitors the amazing opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the Large Hadron Collider experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. As well as to discover how scientists at the Museum and at CERN are all looking back through deep time to answer those big questions on the origins of life, the universe and everything. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/London_NatureLive-2012.html

  19. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by 1st and 3rd Lyceums in Chios

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    High school students from the 1st and 3rd Lyceums of Chios, Greece, will be visiting the control room of ATLAS to discuss the latest results on the Higgs search, LHC’s first long shutdown and what the future holds for the ATLAS experiment. This visit takes place in the context of a Masterclass where students will learn how to analyse real events from the LHC with the use of the HYPATIA online applet based on educational scenarios from the Discover the COSMOS portal. This full-day activity is organized by the University of Athens, the University of the Aegean, Ellinogermaniki Agogi and the Chios Physical Society in the framework of the Open Discovery Space EU project.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during the "Nuit des deux infinis", Grenoble

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    October 9, 2012 will be held the first "Night of two infinities", organized by the Laboratories of Excellence P2IO and ENIGMASS on two sites: Massy and Grenoble. This general public event will be held each year in a similar way to other "Nights" that became famous as the "Night of Museums, the "White Night "and the "Night of the Stars." During this event a short virtual visit of the ATLAS Control Room will be organized. The ACR will be briefly presented to the audience (~2000 people). A few questions will be taken from Massy and Grenoble.

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by 3rd Gymnasium in Volos

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The city of Volos, situated at the centre of the Greek mainland, will be hosting the 7th International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics this summer. In this context, and with support of PATHWAY and Discover the COSMOS projects, Volos` science education community is organising several pre-events aimed at bringing the world`s biggest experiments in science closer to students - the scientists of tomorrow. Junior high school students from the 3rd Gymnasium in Volos will have the unique opportunity to visit the ATLAS control room on 29th of March.

  2. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by 5th Lyceum in Volos

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The city of Volos, situated at the centre of the Greek mainland, will be hosting the 7th International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics this summer. In this context, and with support of PATHWAY and Discover the COSMOS projects, Volos` science education community is organising several pre-events aimed at bringing the world`s biggest experiments in science closer to students - the scientists of tomorrow. Senior high school students from the 5th Lyceum will have the unique opportunity to visit the ATLAS control room on the 28th March, about three months before their educational trip to CERN.

  3. ATLAS Virtual Visits: bringing the world into the ATLAS control room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Steven; Yacoob, Sahal; ATLAS Experiment

    2016-04-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN [1]. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world's continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  4. ATLAS Virtual Visits bringing the world into the ATLAS control room

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051192; The ATLAS collaboration; Yacoob, Sahal

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  5. Prof. Jean-Dominique Vassalli, Rector of University of Geneva visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Prof. Jean-Dominique Vassalli, Rector of University of Geneva visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

  6. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Vancouver Community Science Celebration

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    October 13th and 14th, 2012. This is the first event of its kind at TELUS World of Science, and we want you to be there. Let's celebrate the science all around us at the Vancouver Community Science Celebration at TELUS World of Science! October 14, 13:30 local (22:30 CET) Sunday's program will feature a live link to the ATLAS control room at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. This will give visitors the amazing opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the LHC experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. As well as to discover how scientists in Canada and at CERN are all looking back through deep time to answer those big questions on the origins of life, the universe and everything. Doors to the Science Theatre will open at 1:15 pm and space is limited to the first 200 through the door.. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Vancouver-2012.html

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Greek Physical Society Annual Student Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    In a continuation of last years` efforts, The Hellenic Union of Physicists organises for the 5th consecutive year its annual meeting for high-performing students across Greece. In this creative thinking meeting, students will have an excellent opportunity to acquire an in-depth understanding in contemporary physics issues and topics as well as in modern scientific knowledge and thinking in general. Moreover, they will be introduced to modern scientific methods and will practice critical thinking via live interaction with distinctive physicists. During this meeting, students will also connect live to the ATLAS control room to talk to a Greek physicist and learn about latest developments from the world`s largest physics laboratory.

  8. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by High Schools from Greece & Cyprus

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The subatomic journey to Nobel Prize experiments at CERN continues - this time in Greece and Cyprus. More than 600 high-schoolers from 12 schools in seven different locations across the two countries will have the unique opportunity to visit the control room of the ATLAS experiment to interact live with a Greek scientist involved in the search for the Higgs Boson and learn what it takes for CERN scientists to keep pushing the boundaries of our understanding of the origins of the Universe at the world`s largest particle physics laboratory. This international-level virtual visit has been supported by the Open Discovery Space and Inspiring Science Education EU projects that aim to help science teachers find innovative ways to make their teaching of physics and science more inspirational, attractive and relevant to students` lives.

  9. 11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) visiting the ATLAS experiment control room with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and ATLAS Muon Project Leader G. Mikenberg. Family photograph with CERN Japanese scientists in front of the ATLAS surface building.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) visiting the ATLAS experiment control room with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and ATLAS Muon Project Leader G. Mikenberg. Family photograph with CERN Japanese scientists in front of the ATLAS surface building.

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Niels Bohr Institute - Kulturnatten, Copenhagen

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This ATLAS Virtual Visit will be part of outreach and education programme of the Niels Bohr Institute during a Copenhagen wide night of culture and science, Kulturnatten. Visitors of all ages and background will have the chance to get an introduction to the ATLAS Experiment, the LHC, and basic particle physics. The Virtual Visit will supplement an exhibition and give the opportunity to ask questions about anything related to ATLAS to a Danish physicist at CERN. The Niels Bohr Institute is a long time member of the ATLAS Collaboration and has contributed to Kulturnatten for many years now. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Copenhagen-2012.html

  11. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On June 27th, 2013, a Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Experiment at CERN will take place. This Virtual Visit will be presented by Professor Amadeu Albino Jr (IFRN), Anderson Guedes (SEEC/RN) and Denis Damazio (researcher at the ATLAS experiment/CERN). The event will take place in LAPEFA - the Laboratory for Research in Physics and Astronomy Teaching - located in the Department of theoretical and experimental physics of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN). The event will start at 9 a.m. local time. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Natal-2013.html

  12. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during Researchers Night by Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    We invite our "6-th Ma?opolska Researchers Night" guests for Virtual Visits in ATLAS Control Room. They could ask Polish scientists and experts during a lecture "How a mass is created - the Higgs boson discovery" to be given by dr Anna Kaczmarska. "Ma?opolska Researchers Night" is a part of European Researchers Night events to be held in more than 200 cities. Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences invites Cracow citizens and tourists visiting our town to its laboratories and to the "Science Garden" formed, especially for this event, in front of the main building. Visitors will have an unique opportunity to discuss science problems with researches and students. Wide range of demonstrations of interesting activities performed in our institute will be presented, these include among others: - AIC 144 Cyclotron with hadrons' therapy facility for eye treatment - Dosimetry and environmental pollution monitoring - Large Hadron Collider experiments - Van de Graff linear accelerator with proton micro b...

  13. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by High Schools in Chalkida and Chania

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    On the 24th of January, students from High Schools in Chalkida and from the Junior High School of Platanias in Chania, Crete will meet together to take part in a dedicated ATLAS Masterclass organized by physicists of the University of Athens. Using the HYPATIA online applet, students will learn how to analyze real events from the ATLAS experiment at CERN.

  14. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by CEFET in Rio de Janeiro

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CEFET/RJ is the Center for Tecnological Education grouping 3000 students from High-School level, 2000 Engineering and 200 post-graduation students. To keep the students always up to date with recent advances in the field of Experimental Physics, we invite researchers in the field that can contribute to the learning process of these students. In this direction, a conference is being organized with teachers José de Seixas (UFRJ/ATLAS BRASIL) and Denis Damazio (CERN/BNL/ATLAS). The conference will be enriched by a Virtual Visit to the ATLAS detector in Switzerland. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/RioDeJaneiro-2013.html

  15. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by William Floyd High School, New York

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This ATLAS Virtual Visit features high school students from Mrs. Brazzelli's and Mrs. Meyer's Physics classes of William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach, NY. This experience will further student involvement in STEM disciplines. Students will be introduced to the Standard Model of particles, the ATLAS Experiment, and the Large Hadron Collider. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze and compare data from the ATLAS experiment and summarize the fundamental facts around the Higgs boson discovery. At the end of this activity students will interact with scientists by asking questions about the experiment. William Floyd High School is also involved in the International Physics Masterclass organized by the European Particle Physics Outreach Group. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/WilliamFloyd-NY-2012.html

  16. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the McGill University in Montreal

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This will be the fourth year that McGill University in Montreal, Canada, has run a physics masterclass. Students from colleges across Quebec province have been invited to participate in a day of events. The students will have lectures about black holes, dark matter as well as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The students will also have the opportunity to pose questions to two post-docs working for McGill, but based at CERN, thanks to ATLAS virtual visits. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Montreal-2012.html

  17. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Filothei Lyceum, Athens

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    For us, to connect with the ATLAS experiment is a great opportunity to inspire our students towards physics. Our students are thrilled in the prospective of talking with one of the members of the experiment, that also was a student of our school, and connect with the place that the data are recorded and the search of new physics is taking place. Already they have a lot of questions that they want to ask. They want to discover how scientists at CERN are all looking back through deep time to answer those big questions on the origins of life, the universe and everything and in what way the ATLAS experiment is involved in. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Athens_filothei-2012.html

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Birmingham

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The particle physics research group in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Birmingham is holding a Masterclass to highlight the exciting results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN: the existence of a new particle which may be the long sought Higgs boson. The particle physics group is involved strongly in the ATLAS, ATLAS and LHCb experiments at the LHC.

  19. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Salento in Lecce

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The Scientific Culture Week is a traditional early-spring event for the University of Salento in Lecce, Italy. Every year, during the entire Week, about a thousand students visit our University and our laboratories, interested in knowing more about our research and teaching activities. We plan to include a seminar on ATLAS research activities and recent results, together with a dedicated ATLAS Virtual Visit for the morning (between 10am and 11am) on Wednesday April 9, 2014.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Science Fest in Chicago

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    Particle physics allows us to understand the elementary constituents of all matter in the universe. Colliding particles at very high energy to a speed close to the speed of light, demonstrates that all matter on earth is made up of electrons and quarks and gluons, the substructure of protons and neutrons. Short films will present two of the main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, the European Center for Nuclear Research, ATLAS and CMS, where protons collide at energies up to 7 tev, simulating a situation very close to the big bang. Discussions about the potential discoveries of the Higgs boson will be performed. Posters displayed will show the detectors at the LHC and at the Tevatron Fermilab in Chicago. A live video link with the CERN will be provided at 12:00 PM. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Chicago-2012.html

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Lyceum of Komotini

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Located in northeastern Greece, the 3rd Lyceum of Komotini is a public school that numbers around 500 students from diverse ethnical backgrounds. The school is actively involved in many national and international educational projects. Our vision is to continually introduce our students into innovative initiatives that spark their curiosity, imagination and interest in Science. Taking part in this ATLAS Virtual Visit will be of great benefit to the students, who will also participate in a dedicated Masterclass given by researchers from the University of Athens on how to analyse real data from the ATLAS experiment. This ATLAS Virtual Visit, we believe, will also have an impact on the diverse community of Komotini, a crossroads of different cultures and religions, which in some ways resembles the multicultural character of the CERN community.

  2. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of São Paulo

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 03/07/2013, we will have a conference to students from the University of São Paulo (USP), part of the Post Graduation Program in Interdisciplinary Science Education. This program comprises the following areas: Teaching of Physics, Teaching of Chemistry and Teaching of Biology. The event will be enriched by a Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Detector at CERN/Switzerland. The attendees to the virtual tour are enrolled on the course "Complements of Electromagnetism", from the Teaching of Physics area. A total of 21 students are expected, most of them are high school teachers in public and private schools in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/SaoPaulo2013.html

  3. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Manuel Peleteiro is an outstanding school in Galicia and in Spain. We form our approximately 1600 students from the ages of 3-18 in educational excellence, in which the level we achieve in science subjects is high. At present, due to the growth of cutting-edge technology, we can fly from our new campus inaugurated in 2009 to the ATLAS detector and CERN facilities to have our students take part in the latest achievements in modern physics research accomplished by CERN and to be exposed to their enthusiasm, boldness and talent which has taken them to advance in the knowledge of the structure of matter and the origin of the universe. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/SantiagoComp-2013.html

  4. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by IFRN in Parnamirim

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On March 14th, the Club of Sciences of the Federal Institute for Education, Science and Technology (IFRN in portuguese) will promote a video conference in the Parnamirim Campus. An introductory talk "The Universe of the Particles : Discovering the LHC and the ATLAS detector" will be presented in collaboration with the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), with professors Amadeu Albino Júnior (IFRN), Anderson Guimarães Guedes (PIBID/UFRN - Natal) and Denis Damazio (ATLAS Detector - LHC/CERN). The Videoconference will take place in the main Auditorium of IFRN.

  5. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Irish Science Teachers` Association in Gorey

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Centre for e-Innovation and Workplace Learning (CEWL) will facilitate a Pathway to Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE) workshop and a CERN ATLAS virtual visit at the 51st Irish Science Teachers` Association (ISTA) Annual Conference in Gorey, Co. Wexford on Saturday 13th April, 2013. The ISTA is the Subject Association for teachers of Science in the Republic of Ireland. It has over 1200 members. Mick Storr from CERN will be the virtual host for this ATLAS virtual visit. As part of this session, Dr. Sofoklis Sotiriou (Ellinogermaniki Agogi) will present the PATHWAY approach to IBSE.

  6. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The University of Birmingham

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The particle physics research group in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Birmingham is holding a Masterclass to highlight the exciting results from the LHC at CERN. The particle physics group is involved strongly in the ATLAS and LHCb experiments at the LHC.

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Agrupamento de Escolas de Amarante

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Students of the third grade school at the Agrupamento de Escolas de Amarante will virtually visit ATLAS at CERN as a part of an integrated unit on Physics that introduces them to how scientists learn about and explore Physics. The students will learn about how:

  8. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Rio Grande do Sul Federal University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The first State Encounter for the Physics Teaching of Rio Grande do Sul, EEEFis-RS, was organized in 2005 by the Physics Institute of the Rio Grande do Sul Federal University (UFRGS), via the Post-graduation in Physics Teaching, as one more initiative to promote the learning of Physics. Produced in the Center for Reference for Physics Teaching of UFRGS (CREF-UFGRS), in the Vale Campus, the event had support from CAPES. It counted 134 registered people for 3 days of very intense activity, visible here. New editions were produced since then, each time with more people. The V EEEFis-RS will happen between October 17th and 19th, 2013. More information is available here. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/PortoAlegre-2013.html

  9. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Technical University of Dresden

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The German programme "Netzwerk Teilchenwelt" is a network of 24 particle physics institutes in Germany and CERN which offers students and teachers the unique opportunity to get to know particle physics in hands-on exercises. With real data from CERN the participants of our workshops are able to do experiments and work like a particle physicists! Today, the participants of a particle physics camp held at the Technical University of Dresden where "Netzwerk Teilchenwelt" is coordinated are invited to virtually visit CERN and its experiments and ask questions about work and life at the world's greatest collider. Scientists from the Dresden Institute of Particle Physics currently working at CERN will answer questions about the experiments, their research and report about their exciting time in Geneva. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Dresden-2012.html

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Yannopoulos School in Glyfada

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Located in Glyfada, a suburb at the south of Athens (Greece), Yannopoulos School is a private educational institution covering all levels of K-12 education. The school employs innovative instruction methods coupled with advanced ICT designed to ensure a rich learning experience for its 200 students. Followed by a school trip to CERN this spring, this virtual visit will offer a unique opportunity to all students and staff to get a first concrete idea of the huge scientific effort at the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The virtual visit will be combined with a hands-on Masterclass organized by physicists from the University of Athens, in which students will learn how to use the HYPATIA online applet to search for Higgs-like events in real data from the ATLAS experiment.

  11. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by three High Schools in Athens

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Forty-eight students/members of physics groups from three high schools in Athens (Doukas Lyceum, Gennadios Experimental Lyceum of Athens, Lyceum of Kaisariani) have recently joined forces in a series of collaborative educational activities on particle physics, initiated by teachers participating in last year`s Greek Teachers Programme at CERN, and supported by the LHC-ATLAS Group of the University of Athens and CERN Education Group in the framework of the Discover the COSMOS project. Hosted in the premises of Doukas Lyceum, this virtual visit will be combined with a dedicated Masterclass during which students will learn how to analyse collision events from the ATLAS experiment with the use of the HYPATIA online applet.

  12. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The State School Santo Dias da Silva

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The State School Santo Dias da Silva receives students from the Fundamental and High-School cycles of the city of São Paulo, in the Interlagos Region, South Zone of the city. It counts with 500 students of the High-School cycle and 800 of the Fundamental cycle. The Virtual Visit to the ATLAS/CERN experiment is an excelent opportunity to motivate the students in the learning of science.

  13. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Pontificia Universidad Catolica in Santiago

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Here at Pontificia Universidad Catolica we are an active member of the ATLAS collaboration. We are working on various aspects related to this experiment, reaching from theory & phenomenology to tau trigger. This year 2014 we will for the first time participate in the "LHC masterclass" program, where students get the chance to live the experience of being a particle physicist. As preparation for this event we will have a data workshop with teachers on the Saturday 08 of March 2014.

  14. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Pedagogical University of Mozambique

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Pedagogical University (PU) of Mozambique main office is in Maputo and it will make a virtual visit to the ATLAS experiment, at CERN. This university is the largest of the country with 40 thousand students. It has delegations in all 10 provinces of Mozambique under the management of the dean Doctor Rogério José Uthui. UP is a reference institution focused in forming education professionals.

  15. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of Kwazulu-Natal

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) was formed on 1st January 2004 as a result of the merger between the University of Durban-Westville and the University of Natal. During the "Be a Scientist for a Week" program high school learners in their final two years of school will have the opportunity to spend a week at either the Westville, or Pietermaritzburg campus of the University of Kwazulu-Natal. The Westville campus will host approximately 30 students who were the top achievers in mathematics and science from the 20 feeder schools to the university. Within the physics department students will follow the masterclasses progam where they will be given an introduction to particle physics, the LHC and the ATLAS Experiment, before having the chance to analyse real LHC data. Their session will end with the virtual visit to the ACR. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Kwazulu-Natal-2013.html

  16. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The Higgs in Tour, Forlì, Italy

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    "HIGGS IN TOUR: A discovery in the making" - Three science shows touring Emilia Romagna (Italy), organized by INFN, the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Bologna and by the University of Bologna. Three legs are scheduled in the cities of: - Forlì : 13 Oct. - Reggio Emilia : 10 Nov. - Bologna : 17 Nov. The announcement of the discovery of a new particle compatible with the Higgs boson at CERN last July hit the headlines worldwide. The general public and students in these cities are ready and greedy to know more and meet the scientists behind the discovery. Within the 2 hour programmes, particle physicists from Bologna will take the floor at the venues in Italy and from the LHC experiments' control rooms at CERN through videoconferencing. Videos and animations will make the LHC experiments and the physics discoveries tangible for the audience, who will be able to interact with the scientists in town and at CERN. The event will be moderated by local host Patrizio Roversi (a tv star in Italy) and remote h...

  17. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The Higgs in Tour, Bologna

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    "HIGGS IN TOUR: A discovery in the making" - Three science shows touring Emilia Romagna (Italy), organized by INFN, the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Bologna and by the University of Bologna. Three legs are scheduled in the cities of: - Forlì : 13 Oct. - Reggio Emilia : 10 Nov. - Bologna : 17 Nov. The announcement of the discovery of a new particle compatible with the Higgs boson at CERN last July hit the headlines worldwide. The general public and students in these cities are ready and greedy to know more and meet the scientists behind the discovery. Within the 2 hour programmes, particle physicists from Bologna will take the floor at the venues in Italy and from the LHC experiments' control rooms at CERN through videoconferencing. Videos and animations will make the LHC experiments and the physics discoveries tangible for the audience, who will be able to interact with the scientists in town and at CERN. The event will be moderated by local host Patrizio Roversi (a tv star in Italy) and remote h...

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during Researchers Night by Natural History Museum, London

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    This event is part of EU Researchers Night, when institutions in more than 200 cities across Europe reveal the exciting science research taking place behind their doors and how science research is exciting, fun and vital to our daily lives. Following the success of Science Uncovered in 2010 and 2011, the Natural History Museum, London throws open its doors once again this September. There will be hundreds of inspiring scientific activities happening throughout the Museum's iconic galleries and behind the scenes. One big part of the night is a series of Nature Live events, where visitors get the chance to meet our scientists, see the specimens they study and join in the discussion. Throughout the night these events will feature live links to other scientific institutions across the world, including to the LHC control room at CERN. This will give visitors the amazing opportunity to ask questions to the physicists involved about the Large Hadron Collider experiments, Higgs particles and antimatter. As well as to...

  19. 8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of Valencia

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Open Days at Park Scientific of the University of Valencia hosts Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC). The annual open house day and the ScienceExpo (Expociencia) have a large turnout and create a playful environment where thousands of citizens can explore the Park`s facilities, both academic and business. Each year, more than 3.000 people came to learn about science and have fun also, gathering scientists and public together. IFIC is the only research institute on Particle Physics placed at Park Scientific of the University of Valencia, so virtual visit to ATLAS is a great oportunity to reach general public.

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Primary Schools in Magnesia perfecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    “Good morning Mr. Higgs” is a novel educational programme for 6th grade students from all primary schools in Magnesia prefecture in Greece. Supported by the Open Discovery Space EU project, the objective of this programme is to sensitize primary school students towards appreciating and understanding key ideas and scientific discoveries in particle physics by offering them unique opportunities to learn “how big science” goes at CERN, the world’s largest physics laboratory, through real and virtual visits. This ATLAS virtual visit will help prepare the ground for students’ real visit to CERN later this year.

  2. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Universidad de Antioquia in Medellin

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The Physics institute of the Universidad de Antioquia has long experience in research on particle physics done by the Phenomenology of Fundamental Interactions Group (GFIF). The insitute offers a masters and a doctoral programme in the field. Additionally, since 2009 the same group has created opportunities for the dissemination of particle physics such as courses, a congress and talks and participation in International Masterclasses. Teachers from the Medellín area will gather at UA on 27th February to get ready for Masterclasses 2014. The ATLAS Virtual Visit will be an important part of this workshop.

  3. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The Federal University of Santa Catarina

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Associated School of the Federal University of Santa Catarina is a public federal institution located in Florianópolis receiving students from 6 to 18 years old. Physics is taught in the last three school years by 3 teachers, 2 of them were in the CERN teachers Portuguese Language School program in 2009 and 2013. In the year 2013, the program for teaching Modern Physics was implemented consisting in a series of seminars to the students by the school teachers or researchers at the University. In this context, the virtual visit to ATLAS is an excellent opportunity for the students to know more about the universe of the Particle Physics research.

  4. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room during The National Week of Science and Technology, Salvador

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The Polytechnic School of the Federal University of Bahia (EPUFBA) was founded in 1897 in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Currently there are in EPUFBA 10 undergraduate and six graduate programs in engineering, The EPUFBA is one of the largest Brazilian centers of education and research in engineering and technology. The National Week of Science and Technology (SNCT) is an annual event organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MCT) and in 2012 will take place in the period between October 15th and 21st. The SNCT is held since 2004 and its aim is to mobilize the population, especially children and youth around science and technology themes and activities. In SNCT activities are carried out in all regions of the country, involving several partners, such as universities, research institutions, schools, public and private companies, government entities and civil society. In 2011, there were approximately 16,000 activities in 654 cities. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtua...

  5. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the ASTC Conference in Columbus, Ohio

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) is a global nonprofit organization of science centers and museums committed to raising public understanding of science's role in solving critical societal issues, and its value in igniting and nurturing the innovative spirit that people of all ages need for success in today's world. For more information about ASTC, or to find a science center near you, visit www.astc.org ATLAS Live will be part of a featured showcase session being organized by MAGPI, Internet2 and ASTC to be held at the annual ASTC 2012 Conference being held in Columbus OH. This showcase session entitled "Enabling Science Centers to Connect with Frontier Science Over Advanced Networks Worldwide" to be held Monday Oct. 15th from 1:30 - 2:45pm EDT aims to show science center educators, administrators, and staff how to bring cutting-edge research and resources at advanced network enabled institutions around the world live to the science center floor. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch...

  6. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Bonn

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Bonn will host a five day camp for high school students on July 22 - 26. The camp is organized by the school lab of the University of Bonn "Physics Workshop Rhineland" and supported by the Foundation for Physics and Astronomy in Bonn. The topics of the camp include also particle physics, in particular current research at the Large Hadron Collider. Students will be introduced to experimental techniques at the LHC and will have the opportunity to analyze current data of the ATLAS experiment and to search even for the Higgs-particle. During the virtual visit of CERN students will talk to young scientists currently working in Geneva and ask them questions about their work, the experiments and the life at the world largest high energy research center.

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of Montréal

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The particle physics research group in the University of Montréal is holding a Masterclass to highlight the exciting results from the LHC at CERN. The particle physics group is involved into experimental and theoretical physics. The experimentalists are involved in the ATLAS experiment, direct dark matter detection (PICASSO experiment), B-meson factories (BELLE-II) and an experiment in TRIUMF, Vancouver, studying nuclear reaction creating stars (TIGRESS). On the theory side of things, two approaches are represented: phenomenology and field theory. The University of Montréal (UdeM) has Quebec`s largest sponsored research income and the third largest in Canada and is the second largest university in Canada in terms of student enrolment.

  8. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Hellenic Physical Society in Eretria

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Hellenic Physical Society (EEF) is a non-profit Scientific Society representing the Greek scientists of Physics, Physics Technologies and Physics of Communication. As part of its Education and Outreach activities, EEF organizes summer training courses for high school students from all over Greece. This year, thirty students will take part in EEF`s summer school "Advanced Concepts in Physics", which will take place in Eretria, from 23 to 28 of June. The ultimate aim of the school is to help students develop and sustain their curiosity about the natural world, enjoyment of scientific activity and understanding of how natural phenomena can be explained. Under the guidance of university professors, researchers and science educators, students are expected to enhance their scientific capabilities concerned with gathering and using evidence and to develop further scientific attitudes. This ATLAS Virtual Visit will be a perfect complement to a session dedicated to the LHC and the mysteries of the Universe. - See ...

  9. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Sofia Science Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Have you ever imagined that you could have access to CERN, one of the word’s largest and most respected centres for scientific research? Have you ever imagined that you could have access to science educational material with just one click? The Discover the COSMOS project goes to this year’s Sofia Science Festival and organises a dedicated Open Science workshop on innovative ways of engaging teachers and students in e-Science through the use of existing e-infrastructures in order to spark young people’s interest in science and in following scientific careers. Participants of this workshop will learn about e-science apps in particle physics and astronomy that can be used in the classroom. They will also have the unique opportunity to take a virtual tour at the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. 9 July 2008 - Microsoft Co-Founder P. Allen visiting ATLAS control room and underground experimental area with Adviser J. Ellis and IT Department Head W. von Rüden.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    9 July 2008 - Microsoft Co-Founder P. Allen visiting ATLAS control room and underground experimental area with Adviser J. Ellis and IT Department Head W. von Rüden and guided by ATLAS Collaboration Users S. Goldfarb, P. Nevski and L. Price.

  11. 6 June 2008 - Chancellor F. Tomàs Vert, University of Valencia, visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    6 June 2008 - Chancellor F. Tomàs Vert, University of Valencia, visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni. Other participants: Prof. Francisco José Botella, Director, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, University of València and CSIC Prof. José Peñarrocha, Dean, Faculty of Physics Prof. Antonio Ferrer, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, University of València and CSIC Prof. Antonio Pich, University of València, Member of IFIC (CSIC - Univ. València), Coordinator of CPAN, Spanish National Centre for Particle, Astroparticle and Nuclear Physics.

  12. Mr Lars Leijonborg, Minister for Higher Education and Research of Sweden visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Mr Lars Leijonborg, Minister for Higher Education and Research of Sweden visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

  13. 2nd September 2010 - Japanese Senior Vice-Minister of the Environment I. Tajima signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the ATLAS control room with physicists T. Kondo and H. Fukuda, Members of the ATLAS Collaboration and KEK.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    2nd September 2010 - Japanese Senior Vice-Minister of the Environment I. Tajima signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the ATLAS control room with physicists T. Kondo and H. Fukuda, Members of the ATLAS Collaboration and KEK.

  14. 17 April 2013 - UK Queen Mary University London Principal S. Gaskell in the ATLAS control room at LHC Point 1, LHC tunnel and ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    17 April 2013 - UK Queen Mary University London Principal S. Gaskell in the ATLAS control room at LHC Point 1, LHC tunnel and ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  15. 8 February 2010: University College London President & Provost M. Grant signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R.Heuer and Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss; visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Adviser for Non-Member States J. Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Caption for photograph 1002015 01: 8 February 2010: University College London President & Provost M. Grant (6th from left) visiting ATLAS control room with, from left to right, ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson and University of Birmingham D. Charlton; UCL Head of the HEP group M. Lancaster; UCL Vice Provost for research D. Price; ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti; UCL Department of Physics and Astronomy N. Konstantinidis; UCL Head of Physics Department J. Tennyson; Head of the UCL-ATLAS group and Vice-Dean for Research in the faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences J. Butterworth, visiting the ATLAS control room.

  16. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Federal Institute of Rio Grande do Norte (IFRN), Natal

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    In the next October 18th, the Science Club of the Federal Institute of Rio Grande do Norte (IFRN) will host the video-conference "The Particle's Universe : Discovering the LHC and the ATLAS Detector" in partnership with CERN and with the participation of the teachers Amadeu Albino Júnior (IFRN), Anderson Guimarães Guedes (PIBID/UFRN - Natal), and Denis Damazio (ATLAS Detector - LHC/CERN). The Event will take place in the Auditorium of the IFRN Campus Natal-Central at 1:00 pm, Natal local time. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Natal-2012.html

  17. PS Control Room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1963-01-01

    The good old PS Control Room, all manual. For each parameter, a knob or a button to control it; for each, a light or meter or oscilloscope to monitor it; carefully written pages serve as the data bank; phones and intercom for communication. D.Dekkers is at the microphone, M.Valvini sits in front.

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The State University of Londrina in Paraná

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The State University of Londrina in Paraná will organize the XVIII Physics Week. During the meeting, there will be a lecture by professor Pedro Abreu from the Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics Laboratory of Portugal about particle physics in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The lecture will be followed by a virtual visit to the ATLAS experiment at CERN, Switzerland with teachers Denis Damazio (BNL/CERN) and Yara Coutinho (UFRJ/CERN). - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Londrina-2013.html

  19. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Federal Institute of Bahia in Simões Filho

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The students and teachers of the Federal Institute of Bahia - Campus Simões Filho - will watch a lecture by professor Eduardo Simas of the Fedetal University of Bahia starting at 13:00 of March 31st, 2014. The lecture will be followed by a virtual visit to the ATLAS experiment, at CERN, Switzerland for a short presentation of the detector by professor Denis Damazio followed by a Q&A session.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by INS Montserrat Miró High School in Barcelona

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We are a group of Physics students in our last course before university. Our High School, INS Montserrat Miró, is in Montcada in the outskirts of Barcelona. Nuclear Physics is a part of our syllabus and being engaged in this visit will allow us to understand more and more what research at CERN is really like. So we`re thrilled preparing our visit, and even more, we are lucky to get this videoconference to see more details about ATLAS experiment. All of us have entered in CERNLAND Contest. Several assignments have been done for that purpose. The atmosphere created is very engaqging due to this goal.

  1. 21 June 2010 - TUBITAK Vice President A. Adli signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer, visiting the ATLAS control room at Point 1 with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and CMS Control Centre, building 354, with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli. Throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    21 June 2010 - TUBITAK Vice President A. Adli signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer, visiting the ATLAS control room at Point 1 with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and CMS Control Centre, building 354, with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli. Throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis.

  2. An ATLAS Virtual Visit connects physicists at the Town Square of Cracow and physicists of the LHC Experiment in the ATLAS control room; special participation of CERN's General Director, Rolf Heuer and the Director for Research and Scientific Computing, Sergio Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    he 12 Festival of Science "Theory-knowledge-experience...". Fest will be located on the traditional Main Square, which is visited by thousands of citizens and tourists. The Institute of Nuclear Physics as usual participates in this annual event. Our visitors will learn the secrets of the CERN experiments on the Large Hadron Collider - ATLAS, LHCb, ALICE, CMS, find out more about the Higgs particles, antimatter quark-gluon plasma (beeing guided by our scientists and PhD students). One of the attractions will be ATLAS Control Room Virtual Visit. Visiting people will have an opportunity to see how ATLAS is controlled and operated to collect its exciting data and ask questions to scientists and engineers involved in LHC program at CERN. Institute of Nuclear Physics has prepared also several interactive demonstrations of Atomic Force Microscopy, Magnetic Resonance, Hadron Therapy and Crystal Physics.

  3. In the LEAR control room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    View into the control room of the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). Edgar Asseo (sitting) and Dieter Möhl and Georges Carron reflecting upon some beam dynamics (or hardware?) problem. Vassilis Agoritsas, in the background, leaning over a plan or a keyboard. LEAR in its early years (1982 to about 1990) was run from this local control room in building 363 close to the end of the PS South Hall, where the ring was installed. Later-on the operation was surveyed from the PS main control room.

  4. ISOLDE target zone control room

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Operating the ISOLDE target handling robots from the dedicated control room in building 197. Monitors showing the movements of the robots (GPS in this case) in the target zone. The footage shows the actual operation by the operator as well as the different equipment such as camera electronics, camera motor controls, camera monitors and Kuka robot controls touch panel.

  5. 28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  6. 23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  7. 23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  8. Controls and data acquisition on Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scudder, D.W.; Hosack, K.W.; Parsons, W.M.; Reass, W.A.; Thompson, M.C.; Wysocki, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Creager, J. [Allied Signal, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The control and data acquisition systems for Atlas will use a large degree of decentralization. By distributing control points close to the systems being controlled, the authors expect to simplify the task of isolating electronic systems from the large expected EMI pulses, allow connection of the various parts of the system by high-level fiber-optic networks, allow a simple configuration of the control and data acquisition screen rooms, and simplify the software efforts through the resulting modularization. The Atlas control system must control capacitor charging, machine and diagnostic timing and triggering, marx module diagnostics, vacuum systems, gas handling for railgaps, safety interlocks, and oil handling. Many of these tasks will be performed by industrial-style programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Each of 38 Marx bank maintenance units will have a control and diagnostic package which will monitor both charging and discharging current and railgap trigger timing. An unusual feature of digitizers to record each Marx module`s output waveform, plus nanosecond resolution time interval meters to record the firing time of each railgap. The machine data acquisition system for Atlas will be built around an SQL database, use National Instruments LabVIEW software to control data acquisition instruments and provide links for a variety of experimentalists` data analysis packages. World Wide Web access will provide an interface through which users can monitor experimental data and machine status.

  9. The ATLAS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Schlenker, S; Kersten, S; Hirschbuehl, D; Braun, H; Poblaguev, A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Talyshev, A; Zimmermann, S; Franz, S; Gutzwiller, O; Hartert, J; Mindur, B; Tsarouchas, CA; Caforio, D; Sbarra, C; Olszowska, J; Hajduk, Z; Banas, E; Wynne, B; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Nemecek, S; Thompson, PD; Mandic, I; Deliyergiyev, M; Polini, A; Kovalenko, S; Khomutnikov, V; Filimonov, V; Bindi, M; Stanecka, E; Martin, T; Lantzsch, K; Hoffmann, D; Huber, J; Mountricha, E; Santos, HF; Ribeiro, G; Barillari, T; Habring, J; Arabidze, G; Boterenbrood, H; Hart, R; Marques Vinagre, F; Lafarguette, P; Tartarelli, GF; Nagai, K; D'Auria, S; Chekulaev, S; Phillips, P; Ertel, E; Brenner, R; Leontsinis, S; Mitrevski, J; Grassi, V; Karakostas, K; Iakovidis, G.; Marchese, F; Aielli, G

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. Twelve different sub-detectors as well as the common experimental infrastructure are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS enables equipment supervision of all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the order of 106 operational parameters. Higher level control system layers allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling, and manage the communication with external systems such as the LHC. This contribution firstly describes the status of the ATLAS DCS and the experience gained during the LHC commissioning and the first physics data taking operation period. Secondly, the future evolution and maintenance constraints for the coming years an...

  10. 9th May 2008 - Members of Saudi government visiting ATLAS control room and cavern with Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and Adviser to the Director-General D. Blechschmidt.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    CERN-HI-0804043 05: from left to right 1st row Mrs. Ibtesam Badhrees, ATLAS Collaboration user Mr. Nadhmi Al-Nassr, Interim President, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, KAUST H.E. Dr. Khaled S. Al-Sultan, Rector, King Fahd University for Petroleum and Minerals Mr. Abdallah S. Jum’ah, President and Chief Executive Officer, Saudi Aramco H.E. Dr. Ibrahim A. Al-Assaf, Minister of Finance H.E. Dr. Abdul Rahman Al-Tuwaijri, Chairman of Capital Markets Authority H.E. Dr. Mohammed I. Al-Suwaiyel, President, King Abdul Aziz City for Science & Technology KACST; 2nd row Mr. Salim S. Al-Aydh, Senior Vice President – Engineering & Project Management, Saudi Aramco Mr. Khalid A. Al-Falih, Executive Vice President – Operations, Saudi Aramco Mr. A. Othman, Saudi Aramco Mr. Peter Woicke, Member of the Saudi Aramco Board of Directors Mr. Abdulaziz F. Al-Khayyal, Senior Vice President – Industrial Relations, Saudi Aramco Mr. James W. Kinnear, Retired President & Chief Executive Office...

  11. Control room philosophy: Principles of control room design and control room work; Kontrollrumsfilosofi: Principer foer kontrollrumsutformning och kontrollrumsarbete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skriver, Jan; Ramberg, Jasmine; Allwin, Pernilla [Scandpower Risk Management AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    In order to provide insights for improvement of work in control rooms several factors have to be considered. Knowledge of principles including control room philosophies will guide the recommended improvements. In addition to knowledge about specific principles an advantage for an organization can be an understanding of similarities and policies used in other high risk industry. The report has been developed on the basis of a document analysis of international standards and other guiding documents. (NUREG 0711, ISO 11064, ISO 6385, IEC 60964). In addition to the document analysis which has strived to compare the documents to see similarities in important principals, experience from working with control room design, modifications and evaluations in other high risk industries has pervaded the report. Important principles have been identified which are recommended to be included in a control room philosophy. Many of these are similar to the principles identified in the international standards. An additional principal which is regarded as important is the utilization of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) which can be used as a measure to target preventative means. Further more it is critical that the control room philosophy is easy to access and comprehend for all users. One of the challenges that remain after having developed a control room philosophy is how to utilize it in the daily work situation. It is vital that the document remains as a living document, guiding the continual improvement of the control room in the various life cycle stages.

  12. Evaporation Controlled Emission in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    -scale ventilated room when the emission is fully or partly evaporation controlled. The objective of the present research work has been to investigate the change of emission rates from small-scale experiments to full-scale ventilated rooms and to investigate the influence of the local air velocity field near...

  13. Virtual Training of Compressor Control Room Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MYMIC will analyze, design, develop and evaluate the Virtual Control Room – Compressor Station (VCoR-CS) training system. VCoR-CS will provide procedural...

  14. The Advanced Photon Source main control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasky, S.

    1998-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation light source built in the 1990s. Like the machine itself, the Main Control Room (MCR) employs design concepts based on today`s requirements. The discussion will center on ideas used in the design of the MCR, the comfort of personnel using the design, and safety concerns integrated into the control room layout.

  15. CERN opens up its control rooms to youngsters

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    CERN is inviting 13 to 18 year-olds to come and spend a couple of hours in the control rooms of the LHC and its experiments. Registration is now open.   Is your neighbour's kid eager to come and see what's going on in the CERN control rooms for himself? Is your niece from Germany fascinated by the famous accelerator near Geneva that she's heard about and asking to know more? Then Researchers Night is for them! From 6.00 p.m. on Friday 23 September until 1.00 a.m. the following morning, the LHC and its experiments will open their doors to 13 to 18 year-olds. They are invited to come and spend a couple of hours in the control rooms watching the physicists and taking part in various activities. ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, TOTEM, and the CERN Control Centre (CCC) will all be welcoming visitors. For this second year of CERN's involvement in European Researchers Night, the CERN exhibitions will be open late and special activities will be organised in Microcosm....

  16. ISOLDE target zone control room HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Operating the ISOLDE target handling robots from the dedicated control room in building 197. Monitors showing the movements of the robots (GPS in this case) in the target zone. The footage shows the actual operation by the operator as well as the different equipment such as camera electronics, camera motor controls, camera monitors and Kuka robot controls touch panel.

  17. Guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.; Bocast, A. K.; Stewart, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The anthropometry, workstation design, and environmental design of control rooms are outlined. The automated interface and VDTs and displays and various modes of communication between the system and the human operator using VDTs are discussed. The man in the loop is examined, the single controller single task framework and multiple controller multiple tasks issues are considered.

  18. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  19. Enhancing training in the main control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuigan, K.; O' Leary, K.; Canavan, K. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    In 2003 Pickering B Nuclear of Ontario Power Generation installed a Desktop Simulator (DTS) in the Main Control Room (MCR) for training purposes. This paper will outline why this training enhancement was undertaken and the approach taken to secure its use in an active MCR environment while minimizing distractions to plant operations. (author)

  20. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo(2)Ti(2)Fe(8)O(19), large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them.

  1. White Paper for Virtual Control Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, William; Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The Virtual Control Room (VCR) Proof of Concept (PoC) project is the result of an award given by the Fourth Annual NASA T&I Labs Challenge Project Call. This paper will outline the work done over the award period to build and enhance the capabilities of the Augmented/Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to create the VCR.

  2. Detector Control System for the ATLAS Forward Proton detector

    CERN Document Server

    Czekierda, Sabina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) is a forward detector using a Roman Pot technique, recently installed in the LHC tunnel. It is aiming at registering protons that were diffractively or electromagnetically scattered in soft and hard processes. Infrastructure of the detector consists of hardware placed both in the tunnel and in the control room USA15 (about 330 meters from the Roman Pots). AFP detector, like the other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, uses the Detector Control System (DCS) to supervise the detector and to ensure its safe and coherent operation, since the incorrect detector performance may influence the physics results. The DCS continuously monitors the detector parameters, subset of which is stored in data bases. Crucial parameters are guarded by alarm system. A detector representation as a hierarchical tree-like structure of well-defined subsystems built with the use of the Finite State Machine (FSM) toolkit allows for overall detector operation and visualization. Every node in the hierarchy is...

  3. 49 CFR 192.631 - Control room management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control room management. 192.631 Section 192.631... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 192.631 Control room management. (a... operator must have and follow written control room management procedures that implement the requirements of...

  4. 49 CFR 195.446 - Control room management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control room management. 195.446 Section 195.446... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.446 Control room management. (a) General. This section applies to... written control room management procedures that implement the requirements of this section. The procedures...

  5. [Controlling systems for operating room managers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüpfer, G; Bauer, M; Scherzinger, B; Schleppers, A

    2005-08-01

    Management means developing, shaping and controlling of complex, productive and social systems. Therefore, operating room managers also need to develop basic skills in financial and managerial accounting as a basis for operative and strategic controlling which is an essential part of their work. A good measurement system should include financial and strategic concepts for market position, innovation performance, productivity, attractiveness, liquidity/cash flow and profitability. Since hospitals need to implement a strategy to reach their business objectives, the performance measurement system has to be individually adapted to the strategy of the hospital. In this respect the navigation system developed by Gälweiler is compared to the "balanced score card" system of Kaplan and Norton.

  6. Designing an Alternate Mission Operations Control Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Patty; Reeves, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is a multi-project facility that is responsible for 24x7 real-time International Space Station (ISS) payload operations management, integration, and control and has the capability to support small satellite projects and will provide real-time support for SLS launches. The HOSC is a service-oriented/ highly available operations center for ISS payloads-directly supporting science teams across the world responsible for the payloads. The HOSC is required to endure an annual 2-day power outage event for facility preventive maintenance and safety inspection of the core electro-mechanical systems. While complete system shut-downs are against the grain of a highly available sub-system, the entire facility must be powered down for a weekend for environmental and safety purposes. The consequence of this ground system outage is far reaching: any science performed on ISS during this outage weekend is lost. Engineering efforts were focused to maximize the ISS investment by engineering a suitable solution capable of continuing HOSC services while supporting safety requirements. The HOSC Power Outage Contingency (HPOC) System is a physically diversified compliment of systems capable of providing identified real-time services for the duration of a planned power outage condition from an alternate control room. HPOC was designed to maintain ISS payload operations for approximately three continuous days during planned HOSC power outages and support a local Payload Operations Team, International Partners, as well as remote users from the alternate control room located in another building.

  7. Requirements for Control Room Computer-Based Procedures for use in Hybrid Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna Helene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Many plants in the U.S. are currently undergoing control room modernization. The main drivers for modernization are the aging and obsolescence of existing equipment, which typically results in a like-for-like replacement of analogue equipment with digital systems. However, the modernization efforts present an opportunity to employ advanced technology that would not only extend the life, but enhance the efficiency and cost competitiveness of nuclear power. Computer-based procedures (CBPs) are one example of near-term advanced technology that may provide enhanced efficiencies above and beyond like for like replacements of analog systems. Researchers in the LWRS program are investigating the benefits of advanced technologies such as CBPs, with the goal of assisting utilities in decision making during modernization projects. This report will describe the existing research on CBPs, discuss the unique issues related to using CBPs in hybrid control rooms (i.e., partially modernized analog control rooms), and define the requirements of CBPs for hybrid control rooms.

  8. Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

    2007-01-01

    Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

  9. 26th February 2009 - US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf signing the guest book with Director for research and Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    HI-0902038 05: IT Department Head, F. Hemmer; US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf; Computing Security Officer and Colloquium Convenor D. R. Myers; Member of the Internet Society Advisory Council F. Flückiger; Director for Research and Scientific Computing, S. Bertolucci ; Honorary Staff Member, B. Segal. HI-0902038 16: Computing Security Officer and Colloquium Convenor D. R. Myers; UC Irvine, ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson elect A. J. Lankford; US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf; ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; IT Department Head, F. Hemmer.

  10. Human reliability analysis of control room operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A.L.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Grecco, Claudio H.S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Human reliability is the probability that a person correctly performs some system required action in a required time period and performs no extraneous action that can degrade the system Human reliability analysis (HRA) is the analysis, prediction and evaluation of work-oriented human performance using some indices as human error likelihood and probability of task accomplishment. Significant progress has been made in the HRA field during the last years, mainly in nuclear area. Some first-generation HRA methods were developed, as THERP (Technique for human error rate prediction). Now, an array of called second-generation methods are emerging as alternatives, for instance ATHEANA (A Technique for human event analysis). The ergonomics approach has as tool the ergonomic work analysis. It focus on the study of operator's activities in physical and mental form, considering at the same time the observed characteristics of operator and the elements of the work environment as they are presented to and perceived by the operators. The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to analyze the human reliability of the operators of industrial plant control room, using a framework that includes the approach used by ATHEANA, THERP and the work ergonomics analysis. (author)

  11. Control And Configuration Of The ATLAS Trigger And Data Acquisition System During Data Taking Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, R M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN relies on a complex and highly distributed Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system to gather and select particle collision data at unprecedented energy and rates. The control and configuration (CC) system is responsible for all the software required to configure and control the ATLAS data taking. This ranges from high level applications, such as the graphical user interfaces and the desktops used within the ATLAS control room, to low level packages, such as access, process and resource management. Currently the CC system is required to supervise more than 15000 processes running on more than 1500 computers. At these scales, issues such as access, process and resource management, distribution of configuration data and access to them, run control, diagnostic and especially error recovery become predominant to guarantee a high availability of the TDAQ system and minimize the dead time of the experiment. And it is indeed during the data taking activitie...

  12. Overview of the LHD central control room data monitoring environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M., E-mail: emoto.masahiko@nifs.ac.jp; Yoshinuma, M.; Yoshida, M.; Nakanishi, H.; Iwata, C.; Ohsuna, M.; Nonomura, M.; Imazu, S.; Yokota, M.; Aoyagi, M.; Ogawa, H.; Ida, K.; Watanabe, K.; Kaneko, O.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In this paper, the data monitoring environments in the LHD central control room, for example, summary data graph and video monitoring tools are introduced. Also, the environments for the remote participants are introduced. - Abstract: During the Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments, many scientists and technical staff are working in the central control room to operate the experiment. They must manage the diagnostics and controlling devices referring to the results of the last plasma shot. Also, the experiment coordinator must decide the conditions for the subsequent experiments using the results. Furthermore, many scientists are participating in the experiment from remote sites. Therefore, it is important to share the information in the control room quickly, such as the results of the last plasma discharge, with the remote user as well as with the staff in the room. In this paper, the data monitoring environment in the LHD central control room is introduced.

  13. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furtherm...

  14. ATLAS Virtual Visit Nepal-19.12.2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    19 December 2014 - 9:00 CET (13:45 local) ATLAS Physicists Barbara Alvarez Gonzalez and Steven Goldfarb welcome students from Kathmandu University and from Tribhuvan University, for the second consecutive year, to the ATLAS Control Room.

  15. Design of a multisystem remote maintenance control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Kring, C.T.; Kawatsuma, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Remote Systems Development Section of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Japan's Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) recently collaborated in the development of a control room concept for remote operations. This report describes design methods and the resulting control room concept. The design project included five stages. The first was compilation of a complete function list; functions are tasks performed by operators in the control room while operating equipment located in the remote area. The second step was organization of the function list into ''function groups;'' function groups are sets of functions that operate one piece of equipment. The third stage was determination of crew size and requirements for supervision. The fourth stage was development of conceptual designs of displays and controls. The fifth stage was development of plans for placement of crew stations within the control room. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Using a Research Simulator for Validating Control Room Modernization Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Julius J. Persensky; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2012-05-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is a research, development, and deployment program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The program is operated in close collaboration with industry research and development programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants that are currently in operation. Advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the continued safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear control rooms. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe life extension of current reactors. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Current analog control rooms are growing obsolete, and it is difficult for utilities to maintain them. Using its reconfigurable control room simulator adapted from a training simulator, INL serves as a neutral test bed for implementing new control room system technologies and assisting in control room modernization efforts across.

  17. Control room concept for remote maintenance in high radiation areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design of a control room concept for an operator interface with remote maintenance equipment consisting of force-reflecting manipulators, tools, hoists, cranes, cameras, and lights. The design development involved two major activities. First, detailed requirements were defined for foreseeable functions that will be performed by the control room operators. Second, concepts were developed, tested, and refined to meet these requirements. Each of these activities is summarized below. 6 references, 3 figures.

  18. Key requirements for future control room functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    This internal report provides the key requirements for the future control centres. R8.1 represents the starting point of WP8 activities and wants to achieve a double objective. On the one hand it collects general requirements on future control centres emerging from the general trends in power...

  19. Team of the Technical Control Room, TCR, at work

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    0202037_06 transmit of the instruction from a team TCR to the changing .0202037_01 Kenneth Olesen brings a solution to a user of the CERN, while Mark Harvey checks its monitors .0202037_02 Laurent Randot and Eric Lienard (with the phone) work in the control room .0202037_08 Mr Jean-Pierre Hernández, shift leader TCR , stay near the order console for the electric wire of the CERN .0202037_09 The order console with all the diode on .0202037_10 View of the control room .

  20. Active low frequency sound field control in a listening room using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce the sound transmitted to neighbour rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    is possible at modal frequencies. For that reason the modal frequencies in the source room will also have big impact on the transmission to neighbour rooms. These low frequency resonance frequencies are very audible in the source room but also in neighbour rooms as a booming bass. CABS (Controlled Acoustic......Sound in rooms and transmission of sound between rooms gives the biggest problems at low frequencies. Rooms with rectangular boundaries have strong resonance frequencies and will give big spatial variations in sound pressure level (SPL) in the source room, and an increase in SPL of 20 dB at a wall...... Bass System) is a time based room correction system for reproduced sound using loudspeakers. The system can remove room modes at low frequencies, by active cancelling the reflection from at the rear wall to a normal stereo setup. Measurements in a source room using CABS and in two neighbour rooms have...

  1. ATLAS Detector Control System Data Viewer

    CERN Document Server

    Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Roe, S; Bitenc, U; Fehling-Kaschek, ML; Winkelmann, S; D’Auria, S; Hoffmann, D; Pisano, O

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is one of the four Large Hadron Collider experiments. DCS Data Viewer (DDV) is a web interface application that provides access to historical data of ATLAS Detector Control System [1] (DCS) parameters written to the database (DB). It has a modular andflexible design and is structured using a clientserver architecture. The server can be operated stand alone with a command-line interface to the data while the client offers a user friendly, browser independent interface. The selection of the metadata of DCS parameters is done via a column-tree view or with a powerful search engine. The final visualisation of the data is done using various plugins such as “value over time” charts, data tables, raw ASCII or structured export to ROOT. Excessive access or malicious use of the database is prevented by dedicated protection mechanisms, allowing the exposure of the tool to hundreds of inexperienced users. The metadata selection and data output features can be used separately by XML con...

  2. The Tilecal/ATLAS detector control system

    CERN Document Server

    Tomasio Pina, João Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Tilecal is the barrel hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector that is presently being built at CERN to operate at the LHC accelerator. The main task of the Tilecal detector control system (DCS) is to enable the coherent and safe operation of the detector. All actions initiated by the operator and all errors, warnings, and alarms concerning the hardware of the detector are handled by DCS. The DCS has to continuously monitor all operational parameters, give warnings and alarms concerning the hardware of the detector. The DCS architecture consists of a distributed back-end (BE) system running on PC's and different front-end (FE) systems. The implementation of the BE will he achieved with a commercial supervisory control and data acquisition system (SCADA) and the FE instrumentation will consist on a wide variety of equipment. The connection between the FE and BE is provided by fieldbus or L

  3. Advanced interaction media in nuclear power plant control rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    The shift from analog to digital Instruments (related mainly to information visualization) and Controls in Nuclear Power Plant Main Control Rooms (NPP MCR) is a central current topic of investigation. In NPP MCR, digitalization was implemented gradually, analog and digital systems still coexisting for the two main systems related to safety--Safety Instruments and Control System (SICS) and Process Instruments and Controls System (PICS). My ongoing research focuses on the introduction of Advanced Interaction Media (AIM) such as stereoscopic 3D visualization and multi-touch surfaces in control rooms. This paper proposes a Safety-Centric approach for gathering the Design Rationale needed in the specification of such novel AIM concepts as well as their evaluation through user tests. Beyond methodological research, the final output of the current research is to build an experimental simulator aiming to enhance improvements in Human-Systems Integration (HSI). This paper provides an overview of the topics under consideration.

  4. Inside the LEP control room at start-up

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    Physicists grouped around a screen in the LEP control room at the strat-up of LEP on 14 July 1989. The emotion of the moment is clear. Carlo Rubbia, Director-General of CERN at the time, is in the centre and on his left, Herwig Schopper, former Director-General of the Organization.

  5. 75 FR 67450 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management Implementation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Implementation Workshop AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of workshop. SUMMARY: PHMSA is conducting a workshop in conjunction with the National Association.... The workshop is intended to foster an understanding of the Control Room Management Rule issued by...

  6. Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Boring

    2011-09-01

    nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

  7. Control room envelope unfiltered air inleakage test protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagus, P.L. [Lagus Applied Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Grot, R.A. [Lagus Applied Technology, Olney, MD (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In 1983, the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) recommended that the US NRC develop a control room HVAC performance testing protocol. To date no such protocol has been forthcoming. Beginning in mid-1994, an effort was funded by NRC under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to develop several simplified test protocols based on the principles of tracer gas testing in order to measure the total unfiltered inleakage entering a CRE during emergency mode operation of the control room ventilation system. These would allow accurate assessment of unfiltered air inleakage as required in SRP 6.4. The continuing lack of a standard protocol is unfortunate since one of the significant parameters required to calculate operator dose is the amount of unfiltered air inleakage into the control room. Often it is assumed that, if the Control Room Envelope (CRE) is maintained at +1/8 in. w.g. differential pressure relative to the surroundings, no significant unfiltered inleakage can occur it is further assumed that inleakage due to door openings is the only source of unfiltered air. 23 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Computer codes for evaluation of control room habitability (HABIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stage, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Computer Codes for Evaluation of Control Room Habitability (HABIT). HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic chemicals or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel. HABIT is an integrated package of several programs that previously needed to be run separately and required considerable user intervention. This report discusses the theoretical basis and physical assumptions made by each of the modules in HABIT and gives detailed information about the data entry windows. Sample runs are given for each of the modules. A brief section of programming notes is included. A set of computer disks will accompany this report if the report is ordered from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center. The disks contain the files needed to run HABIT on a personal computer running DOS. Source codes for the various HABIT routines are on the disks. Also included are input and output files for three demonstration runs.

  9. Analytic control law for a food storage room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, S.; Zwart, Heiko J.; Keesman, K.J.

    A storage room contains a bulk of potatoes that produce heat due to respiration. A ventilator blows cooled air around to keep the potatoes cool and prevent spoilage. The aim is to design a control law such that the product temperature is kept at a constant, desired level. This physical system is

  10. Switching input controller for a food storage room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, S.; Zwart, Heiko J.; Keesman, K.J.

    The temperature dynamics inside a bulk storage room for food products is modeled by a set of partial differential equations, and validated against experimental data. The product temperature is controlled by a cooling installation that is switched on and off on a regular basis. An approximate model

  11. Response Times of Operators in a Control Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platz, O.; Rasmussen, Jens; Skanborg, Preben Zacho

    A statistical analysis was made of operator response times recorded in the control room of a research reactor during the years 1972-1974. A homogeneity test revealed that the data consist of a mixture of populations. A small but statistically significant difference is found between day and night...

  12. Climate control of a bulk storage room for foodstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, S.; Zwart, Heiko J.; Keesman, K.J.; Troch, Inge; Breitenecker, Felix

    2006-01-01

    A storage room contains a bulk of potatoes that produce heat due to respiration. A ventilator blows cooled air around to keep the potatoes cool and prevent spoilage. The aim is to design a control law such that the product temperature is kept at a constant, desired level. This physical system is

  13. Controlling allergens in animal rooms by using curtains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Thomas Cæcius; Itter, Gabi; Fosse, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The reduction and control of allergens in the animal facility is important for staff working with laboratory animals. This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of perforated Makrolon curtains in front of racks as a method to reduce the amount of allergen in the animal room. The experimen...... the curtains and prevents its spread from the cages into the aisle. The present study shows that the use of curtains in front of the cage racks is an efficient way to prevent spread of allergens from rodent cages to the entire animal room....

  14. Control System for ATLAS TileCal HVRemote boards

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro Martins, Filipe Manuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    One of the proposed solutions for upgrading the high voltage (HV) system of TileCal, the ATLAS central hadron calorimeter, consists in removing the HV regulation boards from the detector and deploying them in a low-radiation room where there is permanent access for maintenance. This option requires many ∼100 m long HV cables but removes the requirement of radiation hard boards. This solution simplifies the control system of the HV regulation cards (called HVRemote). It consists of a Detector Control System (DCS) node linked to 256 HVRemote boards through a tree of Ethernet connections. Each HVRemote includes a smart Ethernet transceiver for converting data and commands from the DCS into serial peripheral interface (SPI) signals routed to SPI-capable devices in the HVRemote. The DCS connection to the transceiver and the control of some SPI-capable devices via Ethernet has been tested successfully. A test board (HVRemote-Ctrl) with the interfacing sub-system of the HVRemote was fabricated. It is being tested ...

  15. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ATLAS TileCal HVRemote BOARDS

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro Martins, Filipe Manuel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    One of the proposed solutions for upgrading the high voltage (HV) system of Tilecal, the ATLAS hadron calorimeter, consists in removing the HV regulation boards from the detector and deploying them in a low-radiation room where there is permanent access for maintenance. This option requires many ~100 m long HV cables but removes the requirement of radiation hard boards. That solution simplifies the control system of the HV regulation cards (called HVRemote). It consists of a Detector Control System (DCS) node linked to 256 HVRemote boards through a tree of Ethernet connections. Each HVRemote includes a smart Ethernet transceiver for converting data and commands from the DCS into serial peripheral interface (SPI) signals routed to SPI-capable devices in the HVRemote. The DCS connection to the transceiver and the control of some SPI-capable devices via Ethernet has been tested successfully. A test board (HVRemote-ctrl) with the interfacing sub-system of the HVRemote was fabricated. It is being tested through SP...

  16. Feasibility of touch-less control of operating room lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Florian; Schlaefer, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Today's highly technical operating rooms lead to fairly complex surgical workflows where the surgeon has to interact with a number of devices, including the operating room light. Hence, ideally, the surgeon could direct the light without major disruption of his work. We studied whether a gesture tracking-based control of an automated operating room light is feasible. So far, there has been little research on control approaches for operating lights. We have implemented an exemplary setup to mimic an automated light controlled by a gesture tracking system. The setup includes a articulated arm to position the light source and an off-the-shelf RGBD camera to detect the user interaction. We assessed the tracking performance using a robot-mounted hand phantom and ran a number of tests with 18 volunteers to evaluate the potential of touch-less light control. All test persons were comfortable with using the gesture-based system and quickly learned how to move a light spot on flat surface. The hand tracking error is direction-dependent and in the range of several centimeters, with a standard deviation of less than 1 mm and up to 3.5 mm orthogonal and parallel to the finger orientation, respectively. However, the subjects had no problems following even more complex paths with a width of less than 10 cm. The average speed was 0.15 m/s, and even initially slow subjects improved over time. Gestures to initiate control can be performed in approximately 2 s. Two-thirds of the subjects considered gesture control to be simple, and a majority considered it to be rather efficient. Implementation of an automated operating room light and touch-less control using an RGBD camera for gesture tracking is feasible. The remaining tracking error does not affect smooth control, and the use of the system is intuitive even for inexperienced users.

  17. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  18. Evaluation of an advanced control room prototype, ISACS-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstroem, C.B.O.; Endestad, T.; Follesoe, K.; Foerdestroemmen, N.T.; Volden, F.S. (OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway))

    1993-01-01

    The concept of an integrated surveillance and control system (ISACS) has been developed into a first prototype, ISACS-1, which is now in operation at the pressurized water reactor simulator-based experimental control room HAMM-LAB of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Halden Reactor Project, Halden, Norway. Characteristics of ISACS is that it covers the whole interface between the process and the operator, and this interface is fully computerized using tools like CRTs and dynamic keyboards. In addition, a large number of computerized operator support systems (COSSs) are included in ISACS. ISACS-1 is currently subject to extensive evaluation. The test and evaluation program is designed to provide design feedback and to address general human-machine topics in advanced control rooms. The program is separated into three stages.

  19. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by London Academy

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    London Academy is a multicultural academy in Edgware, outer London. Within an extremely caring and supportive environment, students, including those in the sixth form, many pupils, flourish and achieve well. The Principal`s clear vision of a learning community that develops in its students the skills and values that will enable them to live their lives as respectful, caring and responsible citizens is both shared and realised. The event was organised from London Academy by the Physics Teacher, Ms Pamela Chabba; the older science students, especially those who are studying pure physics, are very excited about the event linking them to CERN. They range between 14-18 years old and many plan to go on to study sciences at university.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Kathmandu University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Kathmandu University is a not-for-profit, non-governmental institution located in Dhulikhel, Nepal. In the 20+ years of its operation, it has established itself as one of the frontrunners of higher education in the country.

  1. Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Modifications in Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Clefton, Gordon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This report describes the basic aspects of control room modernization projects in the U.S. nuclear industry and the need for supplementary guidance on the integration of human factors considerations into the licensing and regulatory aspects of digital upgrades. The report pays specific attention to the integration of principles described in NUREG-0711 (Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model) and how supplementary guidance can help to raise general awareness in the industry regarding the complexities of control room modernization projects created by many interdependent regulations, standards and guidelines. The report also describes how human factors engineering principles and methods provided by various resources and international standards can help in navigating through the process of licensing digital upgrades. In particular, the integration of human factors engineering guidance and requirements into the process of licensing digital upgrades can help reduce uncertainty related to development of technical bases for digital upgrades that will avoid the introduction of new failure modes.

  2. The Prevessin Control Room during LEP's start up in 1989.

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    The Prévessin Control Room saw its first momentous event when the 400 GeV beam for the SPS was commissioned in the presence of Project Leader John Adams. It was also here that the first proton-antiproton collisions were observed, in 1981. Eight years later, in 1989, operators and directors alike jumped for joy at the announcement of the first electron-positron collisions at the start up of LEP, the biggest accelerator in the world.

  3. The Halden Reactor Project workshop meeting on control room development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miberg, Ann Britt; Green, Marie; Haukenes, Hanne; Larsen, Marit; Seim, Lars Aage; Veland, Oeystein

    1999-03-15

    The 'Control Room Development' workshop was organised in. Halden, November 5-6, 1998. The purpose of the workshop was to bring forward recommendations for the future use of HAMMLAB with respect to control room development. The workshop comprised thirteen presentations summarising current issues and status in control room development projects and related projects. Following the presentations, five working groups were formed. The purpose of the working groups was to establish a set of recommendations for the future use of HAMMLAB. Each working group developed a set of recommendations. The outcomes of the working groups' discussions were summarised in plenum by the working group chairs. During the workshop, all participants excluding the Halden Project staff were asked to fill in a questionnaire indicating which research topics they found most interesting to pursue in future HAMMLAB research. The purpose of this report is to summarise the workshop participants' presentations, the working groups' discussions, and the recommendations given by the workshop participants concerning the future use of HAMMLAB (author) (ml)

  4. First-of-A-Kind Control Room Modernization Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This project plan describes a comprehensive approach to the design of an end-state concept for a modernized control room for Palo Verde. It describes the collaboration arrangement between the DOE LWRS Program Control Room Modernization Project and the APS Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. It further describes the role of other collaborators, including the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It combines advanced tools, methodologies, and facilities to enable a science-based approach to the validation of applicable engineering and human factors principles for nuclear plant control rooms. It addresses the required project results and documentation to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. It describes the project tasks that will be conducted in the project, and the deliverable reports that will be developed through these tasks. This project plan will be updated as new tasks are added and as project milestones are completed. It will serve as an ongoing description on the project both for project participants and for industry stakeholders.

  5. The ATLAS/TILECAL Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Tilecal, the barrel hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS, is a sampling calorimeter where scintillating tiles are embedded in an iron matrix. The tiles are optically coupled to wavelength shifting fibers that carry the optical signal to photo-multipliers. It has a cylindrical shape and is made out of 3 cylinders, the Long Barrel with the LBA and LBC partitions, and the two Extended Barrel with the EBA and EBC partitions. The main task of the Tile calorimeter Detector Control System (DCS) is to enable the coherent and safe operation of the calorimeter. All actions initiated by the operator, as well as all errors, warnings and alarms concerning the hardware of the detector are handled by DCS. The Tile calorimeter DCS controls and monitors mainly the low voltage and high voltage power supply systems, but it is also interfaced with the infrastructure (cooling system and racks), the laser and cesium calibration systems, the data acquisition system, configuration and conditions databases and the detector safety system. In...

  6. Verification and Validation of Digitally Upgraded Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lau, Nathan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    As nuclear power plants undertake main control room modernization, a challenge is the lack of a clearly defined human factors process to follow. Verification and validation (V&V) as applied in the nuclear power community has tended to involve efforts such as integrated system validation, which comes at the tail end of the design stage. To fill in guidance gaps and create a step-by-step process for control room modernization, we have developed the Guideline for Operational Nuclear Usability and Knowledge Elicitation (GONUKE). This approach builds on best practices in the software industry, which prescribe an iterative user-centered approach featuring multiple cycles of design and evaluation. Nuclear regulatory guidance for control room design emphasizes summative evaluation—which occurs after the design is complete. In the GONUKE approach, evaluation is also performed at the formative stage of design—early in the design cycle using mockups and prototypes for evaluation. The evaluation may involve expert review (e.g., software heuristic evaluation at the formative stage and design verification against human factors standards like NUREG-0700 at the summative stage). The evaluation may also involve user testing (e.g., usability testing at the formative stage and integrated system validation at the summative stage). An additional, often overlooked component of evaluation is knowledge elicitation, which captures operator insights into the system. In this report we outline these evaluation types across design phases that support the overall modernization process. The objective is to provide industry-suitable guidance for steps to be taken in support of the design and evaluation of a new human-machine interface (HMI) in the control room. We suggest the value of early-stage V&V and highlight how this early-stage V&V can help improve the design process for control room modernization. We argue that there is a need to overcome two shortcomings of V&V in current practice

  7. An expert display system and nuclear power plant control rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltracchi, L.

    1988-04-01

    General topics for consideration when designing expert display systems and nuclear power plant control room displays are summarized. A system is proposed in which the display of segments (a combined series of graphic primitives or a reusable collection of graphic primitives and primitives attributes stored in memory) controls a cathode-ray-tube's screen to form an image of plant operations. The image consists of an icon of: (1) the process (heat engine cycle), (2) plant control systems, and (3) safety systems. A set of data-driven, forward-chaining computer-stored rules control the display segments. As plant operation changes, measured plant data are processed through the rules, and the results control the deletion and addition of segments to the display format. The icon contains information needed by control rooms operators to monitor plant operations. One example of an expert display is illustrated for the operator's task of monitoring leakage from a safety valve in a steam line of a boiling water reactor (BWR). In another example, the use of an expert display to monitor plant operations during pre-trip, trip, and post-trip operations is discussed as a universal display.

  8. Low frequency sound field control for loudspeakers in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Rectangular rooms are the most common shape for sound reproduction, but at low frequencies the reflections from the boundaries of the room cause large spatial variations in the sound pressure level.  Variations up to 30 dB are normal, not only at the room modes, but basically at all frequencies....... As sound propagates in time, it seems natural that the problems can best be analyzed and solved in the time domain. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) has been developed for sound reproduction in rectangular listening rooms. It can control the sound...... distribution in the room at low frequencies by using multiple loudspeakers together with an optimal placement of the loudspeakers.  At low frequencies CABS will create a plane wave from the front wall loudspeakers which will be absorbed by additional loudspeakers at the rear wall giving an almost homogeneous...

  9. Simon van der Meer in the AA Control Room

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1984-01-01

    Simon van der Meer, spiritus rector of the Antiproton Accumulator, in the AA Control Room. Inventor of stochastic cooling, on which the AA was based, and of the magnetic horn, with which the antiprotons were focused, he also wrote most of the software with which the AA was controlled, and spent uncountable numbers of hours in this chair to tickle the AA to top performance. 8 months after this picture was taken, he received, in October 1984, the Nobel prize, together with Carlo Rubbia, the moving force behind the whole Proton-Antiproton Collider project that led to the discovery, in 1983, of the W and Z intermediate bosons.

  10. Human Computer Interaction in the ALMA Control Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, M.; Primet, R.; Pietriga, E.; Schwarz, J.

    2012-09-01

    The article describes the ALMA Operations Monitoring and Control (OMC) software and its next generation user interfaces, used by operators and astronomers to monitor and control the observing facility. These user interfaces bring state-of-the-art Human Computer Interaction (HCI) techniques to the ALMA Control Room: map visualisation, semantic zooming, navigation gestures, multiple coordinated views, and decrease of time-to-point. They enable users to stay in control of dozens of antennas, hundreds of devices, and thousands of baselines. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international radio-astronomy facility, is a partnership of North America, Europe and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. It is located at the Altiplano de Chajnantor and is being operated from the Operations Support Facilities (OSF) near San Pedro de Atacama.

  11. Capturing Control Room Simulator Data with the HERA Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; April Whaley; Bruce Hallbert; Karin Laumann; Per Oivind Braarud; Andreas Bye; Erasmia Lois; Yung Hsien James Chang

    2007-08-01

    The Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA) system has been developed as a tool for classifying and recording human performance data extracted from primary data sources. This paper reviews the process of extracting data from simulator studies for use in HERA. Simulator studies pose unique data collection challenges, both in types and quality of data measures, but such studies are ideally suited to gather operator performance data, including the full spectrum of performance shaping factors used in a HERA analysis. This paper provides suggestions for obtaining relevant human performance data for a HERA analysis from a control room simulator study and for inputting those data in a format suitable for HERA.

  12. Baseline Study Methodology for Future Phases of Research on Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bower, Gordon Ross [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, Rachael Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide a basis for industry adoption of advanced technologies, the Control Room Upgrades Benefits Research Project will investigate the benefits of including advanced technologies as part of control room modernization This report describes the background, methodology, and research plan for the first in a series of full-scale studies to test the effects of advanced technology in NPP control rooms. This study will test the effect of Advanced Overview Displays in the partner Utility’s control room simulator

  13. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz

    2002-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate CERN equipment services or contractors. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity covers the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, and buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaur...

  14. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz / TCR Responsible

    2000-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number 72201. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the tec...

  15. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz

    2002-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  16. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRALSERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz / TCR Responsible

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  17. CERN's Technical Control Room (TCR) A Central Service for Everyone

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  18. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz (TCR Responsible)

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  19. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz (TCR Responsible)

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number 72201. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the tec...

  20. Diffusion and Evaporation-Controlled Emission in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus

    and sources. This work provides an investigation based on fundamental fluid dynamics and mass transfer theory to obtain a general understanding of the mechanisms involved in the emission from building materials in ventilated rooms. In addition, a generally applicable model for prediction of surface emission...... change rate, local air velocity and local turbulence intensity as the mass transfer coefficient increases in proportion to these parameters. The experimental results moreover exhibit the behaviour of a diffusion-controlled emission process at the end of the experiments. A simplified version of the model...... proposed was applied to investigate the influence of source diffusion coefficient and air velocity on the concentration distribution. The findings show that the mass transfer coefficient increases in proportion to the velocity when the emission is controlled by evaporation from the surface. As to diffusion-controlled...

  1. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Phillips, L C; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Garcia, V; Fusil, S; Briddon, P R; Guiblin, N; Mougin, A; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Valencia, S; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  2. A Business Case for Nuclear Plant Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Niedermuller, Josef M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a generic business case for implementation of technology that supports Control Room Modernization (CRM). The analysis presented in two forms; 1) a standalone technology upgrade, and 2) a technology upgrade that is built upon and incremental to a prior business case created for Mobile Work Packages (MWP). The business case contends that advanced communication and networking and analytical technologies will allow NPP to conduct control room operations with improved focus by reducing human factors and redundant manpower, and therefore operate with fewer errors. While some labor savings can be harvested in terms of overtime, the majority of savings are demonstrated as reduced time to take the plant off line and bring back on line in support of outages. The benefits are quantified to a rough order of magnitude that provides directional guidance to NPPs that are interested in developing a similar business case. This business case focuses on modernization of the operator control room and does not consider a complete overhaul and modernization of a plants instrument and control systems. While operators may be considering such an investment at their plants, the sizable capital investment required is not likely supported by a cost/benefit analysis alone. More likely, it is driven by obsolescence and reliability issues, and requires consideration of mechanical condition of plant systems, capital depreciation, financing, relicensing and overall viability of the plant asset over a 20-year horizon in a competitive market. Prior studies [REF] have indicated that such a modernization of plant I&C systems, alone or as part of a larger modernization effort, can yield very significant reductions in O&M costs. However, the depth of research and analysis required to develop a meaningful business case for a plant modernization effort is well beyond the scope of this study. While CRM as considered in this study can be easily integrated as part of grander plant

  3. Controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yingpu; Lu, Gongxuan

    2008-07-01

    Large quantities of pentagonal gold nanotubes have been synthesized by reducing chloroauric acid with silver nanowires in an aqueous solution of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at room temperature. These gold nanotubes possess perfect structures, smooth surfaces, highly crystalline walls, and similar cross-sections to that of the silver template. In this process, the CTAB participation was found to be crucial for shape-controlled synthesis of pentagonal gold nanotubes. In the absence of CTAB, loose and hollow gold structures were routinely generated, while bundled gold nanotubes with rough surfaces were obtained by replacing the CTAB with poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The possible formation mechanism of pentagonal gold nanotubes has also been discussed on the basis of various growth stages studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images. In addition, the catalytic properties of these hollow nanostructures for hydrogen generation reaction from HCHO solution have also been investigated. They showed higher activity than that of spherical gold nanoparticles.

  4. Low frequency sound reproduction in irregular rooms using CABS (Control Acoustic Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    loudspeakers well positioned at the end of the room a virtual array is formed propagating plane waves along the length of the room in one direction. This will correct the sound field distribution in the room. When plane wave arrives to the end wall two more loudspeakers have to be placed connected......Early investigations on low frequency sound reproduction in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) have shown good results on simulations and measurements in real rooms. CABS takes the advantage of having a rectangular room with parallel walls. By using two low frequency...... with the same signal in counter phase and with a delay corresponding to approximately the length of the room. This is to cancel the reflection and maintain the plane wave propagating along the room. Real life rooms are not necessary rectangular and can be of different shapes. In this paper simulations...

  5. Control and Data Acquisition System of the ATLAS Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ki-Yong; Kwon, Tae-Soon; Cho, Seok; Park, Hyun-Sik; Baek, Won-Pil; Kim, Jung-Taek

    2007-02-15

    This report describes the control and data acquisition system of an integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) facility, which recently has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The control and data acquisition system of the ATLAS is established with the hybrid distributed control system (DCS) by RTP corp. The ARIDES system on a LINUX platform which is provided by BNF Technology Inc. is used for a control software. The IO signals consists of 1995 channels and they are processed at 10Hz. The Human-Machine-Interface (HMI) consists of 43 processing windows and they are classified according to fluid system. All control devices can be controlled by manual, auto, sequence, group, and table control methods. The monitoring system can display the real time trend or historical data of the selected IO signals on LCD monitors in a graphical form. The data logging system can be started or stopped by operator and the logging frequency can be selected among 0.5, 1, 2, 10Hz. The fluid system of the ATLAS facility consists of several systems including a primary system to auxiliary system. Each fluid system has a control similarity to the prototype plant, APR1400/OPR1000.

  6. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  7. STS-30 JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Flight Control Room (FCR) activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    During STS-30, Flight Director Ronald D. Dittemore (standing) looks over the Spacecraft Communicator (CAPCOM) console manned by astronauts Michael A. Baker (right) and G. David Low in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Flight Control Room (FCR). Low reviews checklist as Baker prepares to engage switch.

  8. Exploring Bridge-Engine Control Room Collaborative Team Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Kataria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The EC funded CyClaDes research project is designed to promote the increased impact of the human element in shipping across the design and operational lifecycle. It addresses the design and operation of ships and ship systems. One of the CyClaDes’ tasks is to create a crew-centered design case-study examination of the information that is shared between the Bridge and Engine Control Room that helps the crew co-ordinate to ensure understanding and complete interconnected tasks. This information can be provided in various ways, including communication devices or obtained from a common database, display, or even the ship environment (e.g., the roll of the ship. A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with seafarers of diverse ranks to get a better idea of what communication does, or should, take place and any problems or challenges existing in current operations, as seen from both the bridge and ECR operators’ perspectives. Included in the interview were both the standard communications and information shared during planning and executing a voyage, as well as special situations such as safety/casualty tasks or heavy weather. The results were analyzed in terms of the goals of the communication, the primary situations of interest for communication and collaboration, the communication media used, the information that is shared, and the problems experienced. The results of seafarer interviews are presented in the paper to explore on-board inter-departmental communication.

  9. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  10. The detector control system of the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poy, A Barriuso; Burckhart, H J; Cook, J; Franz, S; Gutzwiller, O; Hallgren, B; Schlenker, S; Varela, F [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Boterenbrood, H [NIKHEF, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Filimonov, V; Khomutnikov, V [PNPI, Gatchina, Leningrad reg., 188300 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: stefan.schlenker@cern.ch

    2008-05-15

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. The individual detector components as well as the common experimental infrastructure are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS enables equipment supervision using operator commands, reads, processes and archives the operational parameters of the detector, allows for error recognition and handling, manages the communication with external control systems, and provides a synchronization mechanism with the physics data acquisition system. Given the enormous size and complexity of ATLAS, special emphasis was put on the use of standardized hardware and software components enabling efficient development and long-term maintainability of the DCS over the lifetime of the experiment. Currently, the DCS is being used successfully during the experiment commissioning phase.

  11. The detector control system of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso Poy, A; Burckhart, H J; Cook, J; Filimonov, V; Franz, S; Gutzwiller, O; Hallgren, B; Khomutnikov, V; Schlenker, S; Varela, F

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. The individual detector components as well as the common experimental infrastructure are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS enables equipment supervision using operator commands, reads, processes and archives the operational parameters of the detector, allows for error recognition and handling, manages the communication with external control systems, and provides a synchronization mechanism with the physics data acquisition system. Given the enormous size and complexity of ATLAS, special emphasis was put on the use of standardized hardware and software components enabling efficient development and long-term maintainability of the DCS over the lifetime of the experiment. Currently, the DCS is being used successfully during the experiment commissioning phase.

  12. A Research Framework for Demonstrating Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research presented here is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report serves as an outline for planned research on the benefits of greater modernization in the main control rooms of nuclear power plants.

  13. Low frequency sound field control in rectangular listening rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce sound transmission to neighbor rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    from the rear wall, and thereby leaving only the plane wave in the room. With a room size of (7.8 x 4.1 x 2.8) m. it is possible to prevent modal frequencies up to 100 Hz. An investigation has shown that the sound transmitted to a neighbour room also will be reduced if CABS is used. The principle......Sound reproduction is often taking place in small and medium sized rectangular rooms. As rectangular rooms have 3 pairs of parallel walls the reflections at especially low frequencies will cause up to 30 dB spatial variations of the sound pressure level in the room. This will take place not only...... at resonance frequencies, but more or less at all frequencies. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) has been developed and is able to create a homogeneous sound field in the whole room at low frequencies by proper placement of multiple loudspeakers. A normal setup...

  14. Low frequency sound field control in rectangular listening rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce sound transmission to neighbor rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    at resonance frequencies, but more or less at all frequencies. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) has been developed and is able to create a homogeneous sound field in the whole room at low frequencies by proper placement of multiple loudspeakers. A normal setup......Sound reproduction is often taking place in small and medium sized rectangular rooms. As rectangular rooms have 3 pairs of parallel walls the reflections at especially low frequencies will cause up to 30 dB spatial variations of the sound pressure level in the room. This will take place not only...... from the rear wall, and thereby leaving only the plane wave in the room. With a room size of (7.8 x 4.1 x 2.8) m. it is possible to prevent modal frequencies up to 100 Hz. An investigation has shown that the sound transmitted to a neighbour room also will be reduced if CABS is used. The principle...

  15. Control of the Environment in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jonathan D

    2017-10-01

    There is a direct relationship between the quality of the environment of a workplace and the productivity and efficiency of the work accomplished. Components such as temperature, humidity, ventilation, drafts, lighting, and noise each contribute to the quality of the overall environment and the sense of well-being of those who work there.The modern operating room is a unique workplace with specific, and frequently conflicting, environmental requirements for each of the inhabitants. Even minor disturbances in the internal environment of the operating room can have serious ramifications on the comfort, effectiveness, and safety of each of the inhabitants. A cool, well-ventilated, and dry climate is optimal for many members of the surgical team. Any significant deviation from these objectives raises the risk of decreased efficiency and productivity and adverse surgical outcomes. A warmer, more humid, and quieter environment is necessary for the patient. If these requirements are not met, the risk of surgical morbidity and mortality is increased. An important task for the surgical team is to find the correct balance between these 2 opposed requirements. Several of the components of the operating room environment, especially room temperature and airflow patterns, are easily manipulated by the members of the surgical team. In the following discussion, we will examine these elements to better understand the clinical ramifications of adjustments and accommodations that are frequently made to meet the requirements of both the surgical staff and the patient.

  16. OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  17. The version control service for ATLAS data acquisition configuration files

    CERN Document Server

    Soloviev, Igor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    To configure data taking session the ATLAS systems and detectors store more than 160 MBytes of data acquisition related configuration information in OKS XML files [1]. The total number of the files exceeds 1300 and they are updated by many system experts. In the past from time to time after such updates we had experienced problems caused by XML syntax errors or inconsistent state of files from a point of view of the overall ATLAS configuration. It was not always possible to know who made a modification causing problems or how to go back to a previous version of the modified file. Few years ago a special service addressing these issues has been implemented and deployed on ATLAS Point-1. It excludes direct write access to XML files stored in a central database repository. Instead, for an update the files are copied into a user repository, validated after modifications and committed using a version control system. The system's callback updates the central repository. Also, it keeps track of all modifications pro...

  18. ATLAS DAQ/HLT rack DCS

    CERN Document Server

    Ermoline, Y; Francis, D; Wickens, F

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS Detector Control System (DCS) group provides a set of standard tools, used by subsystems to implement their local control systems. The ATLAS Data Acquisition and High Level Trigger (DAQ/HLT) rack DCS provides monitoring of the environmental parameters (air temperatures, humidity, etc.). The DAQ/HLT racks are located in the underground counting room (20 racks) and in the surface building (100 racks). The rack DCS is based on standard ATLAS tools and integrated into overall operation of the experiment. The implementation is based on the commercial control package and additional components, developed by CERN Joint Controls Project Framework. The prototype implementation and measurements are presented.

  19. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  20. Temperature distribution in Risø Flexhouse Room 3 with different heating control principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    in winter and spring 2009 to study the distribution of local temperatures in the room – particularly with the purpose to compare with the temperature measured and logged by the heating control sensor which was already installed in the room. The measured data shall be used together with mathematical models......This report presents the measurements of local thermal conditions in one room (“Room 3”) of the so-called “Flexouse” located at Risø DTU. The house is part of Risø DTU’s SYSLAB facility used to study the interaction of different facilities that supply and use energy. The facility has been used...

  1. Role Based Access Control system in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valsan, M L; The ATLAS collaboration; Lehmann Miotto, G; Scannicchio, D A; Schlenker, S; Filimonov, V; Khomoutnikov, V; Dumitru, I; Zaytsev, A S; Korol, A A; Bogdantchikov, A; Caramarcu, C; Ballestrero, S; Darlea, G L; Twomey, M; Bujor, F; Avolio, G

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the ATLAS experiment motivated the deployment of an integrated Access Control System in order to guarantee safe and optimal access for a large number of users to the various software and hardware resources. Such an integrated system was foreseen since the design of the infrastructure and is now central to the operations model. In order to cope with the ever growing needs of restricting access to all resources used within the experiment, the Roles Based Access Control (RBAC) previously developed has been extended and improved. The paper starts with a short presentation of the RBAC design, implementation and the changes made to the system to allow the management and usage of roles to control access to the vast and diverse set of resources. The paper continues with a detailed description of the integration across all areas of the system: local Linux and Windows nodes in the ATLAS Control Network (ATCN), the Linux application gateways offering remote access inside ATCN, the Windows Terminal Serv...

  2. Role Based Access Control System in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valsan, M L; The ATLAS collaboration; Lehmann Miotto, G; Scannicchio, D A; Schlenker, S; Filimonov, V; Khomoutnikov, V; Dumitru, I; Zaytsev, A S; Korol, A A; Bogdantchikov, A; Avolio, G; Caramarcu, C; Ballestrero, S; Darlea, G L; Twomey, M; Bujor, F

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of the ATLAS experiment motivated the deployment of an integrated Access Control System in order to guarantee safe and optimal access for a large number of users to the various software and hardware resources. Such an integrated system was foreseen since the design of the infrastructure and is now central to the operations model. In order to cope with the ever growing needs of restricting access to all resources used within the experiment, the Roles Based Access Control (RBAC) previously developed has been extended and improved. The paper starts with a short presentation of the RBAC design, implementation and the changes made to the system to allow the management and usage of roles to control access to the vast and diverse set of resources. The paper continues with a detailed description of the integration across all areas of the system: local Linux and Windows nodes in the ATLAS Control Network (ATCN), the Linux application gateways offering remote access inside ATCN, the Windows Terminal Serv...

  3. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bower, Gordon Ross [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, Rachael Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); LeBlanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  4. Control and monitoring system for TRT detector in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hajduk, Z

    2002-01-01

    In this article we present methods and tools for design and construction of the control and monitoring system for a big particle physics experiment taking as an example one of the ATLAS subdetectors. Several requirements has been enumerated which such a system have to meet both by hardware and software. Harsh environmental conditions, difficult if not impossible access and very long exploitation time create conditions where only application of industrial standards allow for serviceability, possibility of fast and easy upgrades and intuitive running of the system by relatively non-experienced staff. (6 refs).

  5. Detector Control System of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kersten, S; Lantzsch, K; Zeitnitz, C; Verlaat, B; Meroni, C; Citterio, M; Gensolen, F; Mättig, P; Kind, P

    2011-01-01

    To improve tracking robustness and precision of the ATLAS inner tracker, an additional, fourth pixel layer is foreseen, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). It will be installed between the innermost present Pixel layer and a new, smaller beam pipe and is presently under construction. As, once installed into the experiment, no access is possible, a highly reliable control system is required. It has to supply the detector with all entities required for operation and protect it at all times. Design constraints are the high power density inside the detector volume, the sensitivity of the sensors against heat-ups, and the protection of the front end electronics against transients. We present the architecture of the control system with an emphasis on the CO2 cooling system, the power supply system, and protection strategies. As we aim for a common operation of Pixel and IBL detector, the integration of the IBL control system into the Pixel control system will also be discussed.

  6. Effects of Shift Work on Cognitive Performance, Sleep Quality, and Sleepiness among Petrochemical Control Room Operators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazemi, Reza; Haidarimoghadam, Rashid; Motamedzadeh, Majid; Golmohamadi, Rostam; Soltanian, Alireza; Zoghipaydar, Mohamad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive performance, sleepiness, and sleep quality among petrochemical control room shift workers...

  7. Near-term improvements for nuclear power plant control room annunciator systems. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, W.L.; Duvernoy, E.G.; Ames, K.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Eckenrode, R.J.

    1983-04-01

    This report sets forth a basic design philosophy with its associated functional criteria and design principles for present-day, hard-wired annunciator systems in the control rooms of nuclear power plants. It also presents a variety of annunciator design features that are either necessary for or useful to the implementation of the design philosophy. The information contained in this report is synthesized from an extensive literature review, from inspection and analysis of control room annunciator systems in the nuclear industry and in related industries, and from discussions with a variety of individuals who are knowledgeable about annunciator systems, nuclear plant control rooms, or both. This information should help licensees and license applicants in improving their hard-wired, control room annunciator systems as outlined by NUREG-0700.

  8. Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

    2001-11-01

    With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

  9. OPC Unified Architecture within the Control System of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiel, P P; Franz, S; Schlenker, S; Boterenbrood, H; Filimonov, V

    2014-01-01

    The Detector Control System (DCS) of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC has been using the OPC DA standard as an interface for controlling various standard and custom hardware components and their integration into the SCADA layer.

  10. Psychological factors of professional success of nuclear power plant main control room operators

    OpenAIRE

    Kosenkov A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to conduct a comparative analysis of the psychological characteristics of the most and least successful main control room operators. Material and Methods. Two NPP staff groups: the most and least successful main control room operators, who worked in routine operating conditions, were surveyed. Expert evaluation method has been applied to identify the groups. The subjects were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), Cattell's Sixteen Personality Factor Questio...

  11. Integrated open loop control and design of a food storage room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van S.; Zwart, H.J.; Keesman, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    Usually, control design in a food storage room takes place after the plant has been designed. However, the performance of the plant connected to the controller might be improved by simultaneous design of the plant and the controller. In the case of open loop control, expressions that describe the

  12. Software Development for Remote Control and Firing Room Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano Pena, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The Launch Control System (LCS) developed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) will be used to launch future spacecraft. Two of the many components of this system are the Application Control Language (ACL) and remote displays. ACL is a high level domain specific language that is used to write remote control applications for LCS. Remote displays are graphical user interfaces (GUIs) developed to display vehicle and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) data, they also provide the ability to send commands to control GSE and the vehicle. The remote displays and the control applications have many facets and this internship experience dealt with several of them.

  13. Evaluation program of the integrated surveillance and control ISACS -- An advanced control room prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstroem, C.B.O.; Endestad, T.; Follesoe, K.; Foerdestroemmen, N.T.; Haugset, K.; Volden, F.S. (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway). Inst. for Energiteknikk)

    1994-07-01

    The concept of an integrated surveillance and control system (ISACS) has been developed into a first prototype, ISACS-1, which is now in operation at the pressurized water reactor simulator-based experimental control room HAMMLAB of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development's Halden Reactor Project, Halden, Norway. It is characteristic of ISACS that it covers the whole interface between the process and the operator, and this interface is fully computerized using tools like cathode ray tubes and dynamic keyboards. In addition, a large number of computerized operator support systems are included in ISACS. The ISACS-1 is presently subject to extensive evaluation. The test and evaluation program aims at both providing design feedback and addressing general human-machine topics in advanced control rooms. The program is separated into three stages, starting with basic human factors work concerning layout and coding remedies. The next stage focuses on the qualitative aspects of the ISACS interface. In the final stage, the evaluation addresses higher level human factors issues, including experiments to evaluate ISAC's impact on the operator's overview and understanding of the current status of the process. The goal is to investigate how modern computer technology can be used to improve operational safety and efficiency of nuclear power plants and other complex processes.

  14. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

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Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; 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Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  15. Design of a Control Room for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Jun; Suh, Sang Moon; Lee, Hyun Chul; Park, Je Yun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Since the main role of JRTR(Jordan Research and Training Reactor) operating personnel is safe and reliable operation of the reactor, MCR(Main Control Room) and SCR(Supplementary Control Room) must provide them with sufficient information and controls needed to optimize their performance. Before the TMI accident, control room were generally designed just with intuitive common sense, without using any proper HFE(human factors engineering) practices. Many results derived from the analysis of TMI accident showed that a more comprehensive and systematic approaches to develop MCR design requirements were needed. Moreover changes of operators' role as a decision maker from a physical controller in rapid improvement of control system which resulted in higher automation clearly needed more featured regulatory requirements and guidelines. So many regulatory and industrial guidance for control room design have been developed by relevant institution and regulatory bodies. In this paper, a conceptual design of the JRTR control room in the effort of satisfying current regulatory requirements and guidelines are presented. And some information display design is also presented

  16. Model predictive control of room temperature with disturbance compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilla, Jozef; Hubinský, Peter

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with temperature control of multivariable system of office building. The system is simplified to several single input-single output systems by decoupling their mutual linkages, which are separately controlled by regulator based on generalized model predictive control. Main part of this paper focuses on the accuracy of the office temperature with respect to occupancy profile and effect of disturbance. Shifting of desired temperature and changing of weighting coefficients are used to achieve the desired accuracy of regulation. The final structure of regulation joins advantages of distributed computing power and possibility to use network communication between individual controllers to consider the constraints. The advantage of using decoupled MPC controllers compared to conventional PID regulators is demonstrated in a simulation study.

  17. AIR CONDITIONING IN OPERATING ROOMS AND INFECTION CONTROL – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Socorro Martinez Afonso

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This bibliographic survey in data banks such as MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO, Ministry of Health, among others aims at identifying what makes air conditioners a source of environmental contamination. The air is contaminated by particles which transport microorganisms. The sources of particles include patients and surgical staff. The control of the temperature, relative humidity, pressure, number of changes of air accomplished per hour, clothes, traffic, number of people in the rooms, maintenance and cleaning of the system of conditioned air of surgical centers are major factors for the reduction of the number of microorganisms in the environment of operating rooms. KEY WORDS: Operating room; Hospital infection; Air conditioning.

  18. Scenario-based approach adopted in the ELECTRA project for deriving innovative control room functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinelli, Mattia; Heussen, Kai; Prostejovsky, Alexander Maria

    2017-01-01

    . The study outlines the methodology adopted, which is based on the cognitive work analysis framework, to provide an overview of the most interesting scenarios and to summarise the requirements analysis results. In order to derive required control room functionality, a set of relevant control room scenarios...... have been identified based on the Web-of-Cells control concept. The authors considered scenarios that challenge traditional control schemes, scenarios that caused major failures (i.e. blackouts), and scenarios that can be expected to appear in the future. For each scenario, information concerning...

  19. Development of the detector control system for the ATLAS Level-1 trigger and measurement of the single top production cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Christopher J

    This thesis discusses the development of the Detector Control System (DCS) for the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger. Microcontroller code has been developed to read out slow controls data from the Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger modules into the wider DCS. Back-end software has been developed for archiving this data. A Finite State Machine (FSM) has also been developed to offer remote access to the L1 Trigger hardware from the ATLAS Control Room. This Thesis also discusses the discovery potential for electroweak single top production during early running. Using Monte Carlo data some of the major systematics are discussed. A potential upper limit on the production cross section is calculated to be 45.2 pb. If the Standard Model prediction is assumed, a measured signal could potentially have a significance of up to 2.23¾ using 200 pb−1 of data.

  20. Influence of room heating on ambulatory blood pressure in winter: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Iwamoto, Junko; Tanaka, Yuu; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Takata, Shota; Kubo, Hiroko; Okamoto, Nozomi; Tomioka, Kimiko; Nezu, Satoko; Kurumatani, Norio

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have proposed that higher blood pressure (BP) in winter is an important cause of increased mortality from cardiovascular disease during the winter. Some observational and physiological studies have shown that cold exposure increases BP, but evidence from a randomised controlled study assessing the effectiveness of intensive room heating for lowering BP was lacking. The present study aimed to determine whether intensive room heating in winter decreases ambulatory BP as compared with weak room heating resulting in a 10°C lower target room temperature when sufficient clothing and bedclothes are available. We conducted a parallel group, assessor blinded, simple randomised controlled study with 1:1 allocation among 146 healthy participants in Japan from November 2009 to March 2010. Ambulatory BP was measured while the participants stayed in single experimental rooms from 21:00 to 8:00. During the session, participants could adjust the amount of clothing and bedclothes as required. Compared with the weak room heating group (mean temperature ± SD: 13.9 ± 3.3°C), systolic morning BP (mean BP 2 h after getting out of bed) of the intensive room heating group (24.2 ± 1.7°C) was significantly lower by 5.8 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4 to 9.3). Sleep-trough morning BP surges (morning BP minus lowest night-time BP) in the intensive room heating group were significantly suppressed to about two thirds of the values in the weak room heating group (14.3 vs 21.9 mm Hg; pheating decreased morning BP and the morning BP surge in winter.

  1. Coherent control of single molecules at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, Daan; Hildner, Richard; Stefani, Fernando D; van Hulst, Niek F

    2011-01-01

    The detection of individual molecules allows to unwrap the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble and reveal the spatial disorder and temporal dynamics of single entities. During 20 years of increasing sophistication this approach has provided valuable insights into biomolecular interactions, cellular processes, polymer dynamics, etc. Unfortunately the detection of fluorescence, i.e. incoherent spontaneous emission, has essentially kept the time resolution of the single molecule approach out of the range of ultrafast coherent processes. In parallel coherent control of quantum interferences has developed as a powerful method to study and actively steer ultrafast molecular interactions and energy conversion processes. However the degree of coherent control that can be reached in ensembles is restricted, due to the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the synchronized subset. Clearly the only way to overcome spatio-temporal disorder and achieve key control is by addressing individual units: coherent control of single molecules. Here we report the observation and manipulation of vibrational wave-packet interference in individual molecules at ambient conditions. We show that adapting the time and phase distribution of the optical excitation field to the dynamics of each molecule results in a superior degree of control compared to the ensemble approach. Phase reversal does invert the molecular response, confirming the control of quantum coherence. Time-phase maps show a rich diversity in excited state dynamics between different, yet chemically identical, molecules. The presented approach is promising for single-unit coherent control in multichromophoric systems. Especially the role of coherence in the energy transfer of single antenna complexes under physiological conditions is subject of great attention. Now the role of energy disorder and variation in coupling strength can be explored, beyond the inhomogeneously broadened ensemble.

  2. Visualization of historical data for the ATLAS detector controls - DDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, J.; Schlenker, S.

    2017-10-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of four detectors located on the Large Hardon Collider (LHC) based at CERN. Its detector control system (DCS) stores the slow control data acquired within the back-end of distributed WinCC OA applications, which enables the data to be retrieved for future analysis, debugging and detector development in an Oracle relational database. The ATLAS DCS Data Viewer (DDV) is a client-server application providing access to the historical data outside of the experiment network. The server builds optimized SQL queries, retrieves the data from the database and serves it to the clients via HTTP connections. The server also implements protection methods to prevent malicious use of the database. The client is an AJAX-type web application based on the Vaadin (framework build around the Google Web Toolkit (GWT)) which gives users the possibility to access the data with ease. The DCS metadata can be selected using a column-tree navigation or a search engine supporting regular expressions. The data is visualized by a selection of output modules such as a java script value-over time plots or a lazy loading table widget. Additional plugins give the users the possibility to retrieve the data in ROOT format or as an ASCII file. Control system alarms can also be visualized in a dedicated table if necessary. Python mock-up scripts can be generated by the client, allowing the user to query the pythonic DDV server directly, such that the users can embed the scripts into more complex analysis programs. Users are also able to store searches and output configurations as XML on the server to share with others via URL or to embed in HTML.

  3. Migration of Older to New Digital Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plant Main Control Rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has the primary mission to advance nuclear power by resolving socio-technical issues through research and development (R&D). One DOE-NE activity supporting this mission is the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. LWRS has the overall objective to sustain the operation of existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through conducting R&D across multiple “pathways,” or R&D focus areas. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and related information systems in operating U.S. NPPs. This work involves (1) ensuring that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) implementing digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the NPP operating model. Under the LWRS Advanced II&C pathway, Human Factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been conducting R&D in support of NPP main control room (MCR) modernization activities. Work in prior years has focused on migrating analog I&C systems to new digital I&C systems (). In fiscal year 2016 (FY16), one new focus area for this research is migrating older digital I&C systems to new and advanced digital I&C systems. This report summarizes a plan for conducting a digital-to-digital migration of a legacy digital I&C system to a new digital I&C system in support of control room modernization activities.

  4. Uncertainty analysis for parameters of CFAST in the main control room fire scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wanhong; Guo, Yun; Peng, Changhong [Univ. of Science and Technology of China No. 96, Anhui (China). School of Nuclear Science and Technology

    2017-07-15

    The fire accident is one of important initial events in the nuclear power plant. Moreover, the fire development process is extremely difficult and complex to predict accurately. As a result, the plant internal fire accidents have become one of the most realistic threat on the safety of the nuclear power plants. The main control room contains all the control and monitoring equipment that operators need. Once it is on fire, hostile environments would greatly impact on the safety of human operations. Therefore, fire probability safety analysis on the main control room has become a significant task. By using CFAST and Monte Carlo sampling method as a tool for fire modeling to simulate main control room on fire, we can examine uncertainty analysis for the important parameters of CFAST.

  5. HYBRID ALARM SYSTEMS: COMBINING SPATIAL ALARMS AND ALARM LISTS FOR OPTIMIZED CONTROL ROOM OPERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; J.J. Persensky

    2012-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current nuclear power plants. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Within control room modernization, alarm system upgrades present opportunities to meet the broader goals of the LWRS project in demonstrating the use and safety of the advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies and the short-term and longer term objectives of the plant. In this paper, we review approaches for and human factors issues behind upgrading alarms in the main control room of nuclear power plants.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program A Reference Plan for Control Room Modernization: Planning and Analysis Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; Ronald Boring; Lew Hanes; Kenneth Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is collaborating with a U.S. nuclear utility to bring about a systematic fleet-wide control room modernization. To facilitate this upgrade, a new distributed control system (DCS) is being introduced into the control rooms of these plants. The DCS will upgrade the legacy plant process computer and emergency response facility information system. In addition, the DCS will replace an existing analog turbine control system with a display-based system. With technology upgrades comes the opportunity to improve the overall human-system interaction between the operators and the control room. To optimize operator performance, the LWRS Control Room Modernization research team followed a human-centered approach published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-0711, Rev. 3, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (O’Hara et al., 2012), prescribes four phases for human factors engineering. This report provides examples of the first phase, Planning and Analysis. The three elements of Planning and Analysis in NUREG-0711 that are most crucial to initiating control room upgrades are: • Operating Experience Review: Identifies opportunities for improvement in the existing system and provides lessons learned from implemented systems. • Function Analysis and Allocation: Identifies which functions at the plant may be optimally handled by the DCS vs. the operators. • Task Analysis: Identifies how tasks might be optimized for the operators. Each of these elements is covered in a separate chapter. Examples are drawn from workshops with reactor operators that were conducted at the LWRS Human System Simulation Laboratory HSSL and at the respective plants. The findings in this report represent generalized accounts of more detailed proprietary reports produced for the utility for each plant. The goal of this LWRS report is to disseminate the technique and provide examples sufficient to

  7. Temperature controlled airflow ventilation in operating rooms compared with laminar airflow and turbulent mixed airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsved, Malin; Civilis, Anette; Ekolind, Peter

    2017-01-01

    , vertical laminar airflow (LAF) and turbulent mixed airflow (TMA), were compared with a newly developed ventilation technique: temperature controlled airflow (TcAF). CFU concentrations were measured at three locations in an operating room during 45 orthopaedic surgeries: close to the wound (...), at the instrument table, and peripherally in the room. The operating team evaluated the working environment comfort by answering a questionnaire. FINDINGS: We showed that LAF and TcAF, but not TMA, resulted in less than 10 CFU/m(3) at all measurement locations in the room during ongoing surgery. Median values...... of CFU/m(3) close to the wound (250 samples) were 0 for LAF, 1 for TcAF and 10 for TMA. Peripherally in the room, the CFU concentrations were lowest for TcAF. The CFU concentrations did not scale proportionally with airflow rates. Compared to LAF, TcAF's power consumption was 28% lower...

  8. ATLAS online data quality monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Hadavand, H; Ilchenko, Y; Kolos, S; Slagle, K; Taffard, A

    2010-01-01

    Every minute the ATLAS detector is taking data, the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in providing quick feedback to the subsystems about the functioning and performance of the different parts of ATLAS by providing a configurable easy and fast visualization of all this information. The Data Quality Monitoring Display (DQMD) is a visualization tool for the automatic data quality assessment of the ATLAS experiment. It is the interface through which the shift crew and experts can validate the quality of the data being recorded or processed, be warned of problems related to data quality, an...

  9. Demonstration of visualization techniques for the control room engineer in 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinelli, Mattia; Heussen, Kai; Strasser, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Deliverable 8.1 reports results on analytics and visualizations of real time flexibility in support of voltage and frequency control in 2030+ power system. The investigation is carried out by means of relevant control room scenarios in order to derive the appropriate analytics needed for each spe...

  10. Bridging the gap: adapting advanced display technologies for use in hybrid control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Inst. for Energy Technology, Halden (Norway); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE), runs the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP), featuring a state-of-the-art research simulator facility in Halden, Norway, called HAMMLAB. HAMMLAB serves two main purposes: the study of human behaviour in interaction with complex process systems; and the development, test and evaluation of prototype control centres and their individual systems. By studying operator performance in HAMMLAB and integrating the knowledge gained into new designs, the HRP contributes to improving operational safety, reliability, efficiency and productivity. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program has contracted IFE to assist DOE national laboratory staff at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in adapting HAMMLAB design concepts for the purpose of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. In support of this effort, the DOE has built a simulator research facility at INL called the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is centered on control room modernization, in which industry provided plant instrumentation and controls are modified for upgrade opportunities. The HSSL houses the LWRS simulator, which is a reconfigurable full-scale and full-scope control room simulator. Consisting of 45 large touchscreens on 15 panels, the LWRS simulator is currently using this glass top technology to digitally represent and replicate the functionality of the analog I&C systems in existing control rooms. The LWRS simulator is reconfigurable in that different plant training simulator models obtained from the utilities can be run on the panels, and the panels can be physically moved and arranged to mimic the layout of those control rooms. The glass top technology and reconfigurability capabilities allow the LWRS simulator to be the research platform that is necessary to design, prototype, and validate human-system interface (HSI) technologies that can replace existing analog I&C. IFE has

  11. EARLY-STAGE DESIGN AND EVALUATION FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; Jeffrey C. Joe; Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger T. Lew

    2015-03-01

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate operator performance with these systems as part of a verification and validation process. While there is regulatory and industry guidance for some modernization activities, there are no well defined standard processes or predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages. This paper proposes a framework defining the design process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The process and metrics are generalizable to other applications and serve as a guiding template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  12. Evaluation of information display at advanced main control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Dae Hwan; Yu, Seon Jae; Choi, Eui Sun [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    This year we plan to survey information in order to have basic understanding of digital information display and control at the advanced MCR. At first we collect different ways of presenting information at the advanced MCR. Secondly, we conduct literature survey on studies that have investigated information representation techniques and their effects. Then, we need compare differences between conventional NPPs and advanced NPPs. Thirdly, we need to check HMI styles and evaluation techniques that are used currently at foreign NPPs. Indeed, HMI at the advanced MCR is quite different from that at a conventional MCR. It is not desirable to apply the same evaluation technique that has veen used at the conventional MCR. We need to develop an evaluation technique that is valid in theory and applicable in practice. Finally, we identify the requirements for a support system for an HMI evaluator, since it is not easy to carry out an evaluation task even though one has firm background on cognitive engineering theories and practical experiences.

  13. Main Control Room Upgrade for Kori Unit 1 in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jae Taeg; Choi, Moon Jae [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Kori Unit 1 is a 30 years old nuclear power plant and its MCR and MCB was upgraded based on the latest Human Factors Engineering (HFE) principles. The objectives of applying the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) principles are to minimize the human errors and to enhance the safe operation of the plant. In order to systematically incorporate the HFE design principles into the Human System Interface (HSI) design, HFE Program Plan (HFEPP) for Kori Unit 1 was developed and the plan provided an overview of the HSI design process along with detailed methods and results. The upgrade includes addition of Bypassed and Inoperable Status Indication System (BISI) and the replacement of the conventional MMI devices such as hardwired hand switches, recorders and indicators with new advanced control and display devices using VDUs (Video Display Units). The VDUs significantly improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the monitoring function. Plant Monitoring System (PMS) and Plant Annunciator System (PAS) were upgraded also by replacing the outdated systems with advanced digital systems with future expansion capability. In addition, the MCR related equipment and/or facilities were replaced or improved. Some of these include the enhancement of MCR interior designs for better working environment, dimmable ceiling lighting, aesthetically pleasing decor of ceiling, wall and floor as well as ergonomically improved operator consoles.

  14. Baseline Evaluations to Support Control Room Modernization at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald L.; Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2015-02-01

    For any major control room modernization activity at a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the U.S., a utility should carefully follow the four phases prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG-0711, Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model. These four phases include Planning and Analysis, Design, Verification and Validation, and Implementation and Operation. While NUREG-0711 is a useful guideline, it is written primarily from the perspective of regulatory review, and it therefore does not provide a nuanced account of many of the steps the utility might undertake as part of control room modernization. The guideline is largely summative—intended to catalog final products—rather than formative—intended to guide the overall modernization process. In this paper, we highlight two crucial formative sub-elements of the Planning and Analysis phase specific to control room modernization that are not covered in NUREG-0711. These two sub-elements are the usability and ergonomics baseline evaluations. A baseline evaluation entails evaluating the system as-built and currently in use. The usability baseline evaluation provides key insights into operator performance using the control system currently in place. The ergonomics baseline evaluation identifies possible deficiencies in the physical configuration of the control system. Both baseline evaluations feed into the design of the replacement system and subsequent summative benchmarking activities that help ensure that control room modernization represents a successful evolution of the control system.

  15. A uniform, quality controlled Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pfeil

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A well-documented, publicly available, global data set of surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2 parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC. Many additional CO2 data, not yet made public via the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC, were retrieved from data originators, public websites and other data centres. All data were put in a uniform format following a strict protocol. Quality control was carried out according to clearly defined criteria. Regional specialists performed the quality control, using state-of-the-art web-based tools, specially developed for accomplishing this global team effort. SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data points from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968–2007. Three types of data products are available: individual cruise files, a merged complete data set and gridded products. With the rapid expansion of marine CO2 data collection and the importance of quantifying net global oceanic CO2 uptake and its changes, sustained data synthesis and data access are priorities.

  16. Calling all LEGO lovers! Add a mini control room to your collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The mini LHC Lego project launched in March (see here) now has almost 6,000 supporters - well on its way to the 10,000 votes needed for it to (hopefully!) hit store shelves. This week, the project added a new feature to its line: a mini control centre! The new LEGO Control centre, featuring operators "Kerstin" and "Marco".   The mini LHC project is the brainchild of ATLAS PhD student Nathan Readioff, who designed Lego replicas of the LHC and the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments on a micro scale. Each detector model is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand but crammed with detailed internal systems revealed by cutaway walls. Every major detector component is represented by a Lego piece. Now, Nathan has created a control centre to complement the mini LHC project. This would be an add-on feature for Lego’s consideration, should they decide to develop the accelerator into a box set. “The control centre is ...

  17. Who wants control in the hospital room? Environmental control, desirability of control and stress

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, C.; Devlin, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Perceived control is a desirable quality in the healthcare environment to increase patients’ well-being. However, recent research has demonstrated that perceived control did not predict stress. Based on the hypothesis that control does not always lead to better adjustment, and that it may depend on whether people want to have control, the aim of the current research was to examine the moderating role of individual differences in terms of desire for control. In an experiment, 150 participants ...

  18. 75 FR 5536 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management/Human Factors, Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ...PHMSA is correcting a Final Rule that appeared in the Federal Register on December 3, 2009. That final rule amended the Federal Pipeline Safety Regulations to address human factors and other aspects of control room management for pipelines where controllers use supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, but contained errors regarding certain dates, both in the preamble and the amendments. This document corrects those errors.

  19. Evaluation for the habitability of the main control room and the performance of the smoke control system at NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, M. H.; Hong, S. R.; Sung, C. K. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    In addition to the indoor air conditioning, the habitability of the main control room for the operators at Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) has to be ensured with a strict design requirements to protect the workers from the radiation exposure, hazardous chemicals, and the smoke with toxic combustion products. With this context, the internal pressure of the control room envelope shall be sustained at slightly higher pressure than the atmospheric pressure. At this paper, the internal pressure of the control room envelope was analyzed by use of the evaluation program, CONTANW that was developed by the NIST. On the basis of design values, the performance status of the smoke control system was also checked by the program, CFAST that was released by the NIST to confirm the dynamic smoke behaviors.

  20. Control console for the X-ray room; Consola de control para la sala de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia H, J.M.; Aguilar B, M.A.; Torres B, M.A

    1998-07-01

    It is presented the design and construction of Control console for the X-ray room of Metrology Center for ionizing radiations at National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). This system controls the positioning of 6 different filters for an X-ray beam. Also it controls a shutter which blockades the beam during periods established by user, these periods can be fixed from hours until tenth of second. The shutter opening periods, as well as the X-ray beam filter are establish and monitoring from a Personal computer outside of room. (Author)

  1. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  2. Gargamelle in the West Area - control room for the external electronic detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    Four electronic detectors complementing Gargamelle were installed in 1977, among them the external muon identifier (EMI), consisting of two arrays of multiwire proportional chambers separated by an iron wall (see Annual Report 1977 p. 84). The photo shows the control room close to the West Gargamelle Hall (Bld. 185).

  3. Psychological factors of professional success of nuclear power plant main control room operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosenkov A.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to conduct a comparative analysis of the psychological characteristics of the most and least successful main control room operators. Material and Methods. Two NPP staff groups: the most and least successful main control room operators, who worked in routine operating conditions, were surveyed. Expert evaluation method has been applied to identify the groups. The subjects were administered the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI, Cattell's Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF form A and Raven's Progressive Matrices test. Results. Numerous significant psychological differences between the groups of most and least successful control room operators were obtained: the best operators were significantly more introverted and correctly solved more logical tasks with smaller percentage of mistakes under time pressure than worst ones. Conclusions: 1. The psychodiagnostic methods used in the study were adequate to meet research objective 2. Tendency to introversion, as well as developed the ability to solve logic problems undertime pressure, apparently, are important professional qualities for control room operators. These indicators should be considered in the process of psychological selection and professional guidance of nuclear power plant operators.

  4. From human factors to HSI and beyond: operation centers and control rooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.W.; Post, W.M.; Brake, G.M. te

    2014-01-01

    Currently, Human Factors does not just cover human performance and human centred design but also the evaluation and influencing of human behaviour in complex environments. In particular in the design of operations centres and control rooms, the functioning of humans and systems must be considered in

  5. Advanced control rooms and crew performance issues: Implications for human reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.; Hall, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Recent trends in advanced control room (ACR) design are considered with respect to their impact on human performance. It is concluded that potentially negative influences exist, however, a variety of factors make it difficult to model, analyze, and quantify these effects for human reliability analyses (HRAs).

  6. ATLAS magnet common cryogenic, vacuum, electrical and control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Miele, P; Delruelle, N; Geich-Gimbel, C; Haug, F; Olesen, G; Pengo, R; Sbrissa, E; Tyrvainen, H; ten Kate, H H J

    2004-01-01

    The superconducting Magnet System for the ATLAS detector at the LHC at CERN comprises a Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and a Central Solenoid with overall dimensions of 20 m diameter by 26 m length and a stored energy of 1.6 GJ. Common proximity cryogenic and electrical systems for the toroids are implemented. The Cryogenic System provides the cooling power for the 3 toroid magnets considered as a single cold mass (600 tons) and for the CS. The 21 kA toroid and the 8 kA solenoid electrical circuits comprise both a switch-mode power supply, two circuit breakers, water cooled bus bars, He cooled current leads and the diode resistor ramp-down unit. The Vacuum System consists of a group of primary rotary pumps and sets of high vacuum diffusion pumps connected to each individual cryostat. The Magnet Safety System guarantees the magnet protection and human safety through slow and fast dump treatment. The Magnet Control System ensures control, regulation and monitoring of the operation of the magnets. The update...

  7. Ceiling baffles and reflectors for controlling lecture-room sound for speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2007-06-01

    Reinforcing speech levels and controlling noise and reverberation are the ultimate acoustical goals of lecture-room design to achieve high speech intelligibility. The effects of sound absorption on these factors have opposite consequences for speech intelligibility. Here, novel ceiling baffles and reflectors were evaluated as a sound-control measure, using computer and 1/8-scale models of a lecture room with hard surfaces and excessive reverberation. Parallel ceiling baffles running front to back were investigated. They were expected to absorb reverberation incident on the ceiling from many angles, while leaving speech signals, reflecting from the ceiling to the back of the room, unaffected. Various baffle spacings and absorptions, central and side speaker positions, and receiver positions throughout the room, were considered. Reflective baffles controlled reverberation, with a minimum decrease of sound levels. Absorptive baffles reduced reverberation, but reduced speech levels significantly. Ceiling reflectors, in the form of obstacles of semicircular cross section, suspended below the ceiling, were also tested. These were either 7 m long and in parallel, front-to-back lines, or 0.8 m long and randomly distributed, with flat side up or down, and reflective or absorptive top surfaces. The long reflectors with flat side down and no absorption were somewhat effective; the other configurations were not.

  8. The Read Out Controller for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)781403; The ATLAS collaboration; Popa, Stefan; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Ivanovici, Mihail; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Levinson, Lorne; Vermeulen, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In the upgrade process of the ATLAS detector, the innermost stations of the endcaps (Small Wheels, SW) will be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have two chamber technologies, one for the Level-1 trigger function (small-strip Thin Gap Chambers, sTGC) and one primarily dedicated to precision tracking (Micromegas detectors, MM). Custom front-end Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) will be used to read and filter information from both the sTGC and MM detectors. In the context of the New Small Wheel data path, we designed the Read Out Controller (ROC) ASIC for handling, preprocessing and formatting the data generated by the NSW VMM upstream chips. The ROC will concentrate the data streams from 8 VMMs, filter data based on the BCID and transmit the data to FELIX via the L1DDC. ROC is composed of 8 VMM Capture modules, a cross-bar and 4 SubROC modules. The output data is sent via 4 high-speed e-links.

  9. Light room therapy effective in mild forms of seasonal affective disorder--a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastad, C; Ulfberg, J; Lindberg, P

    2008-06-01

    The most common way to provide bright light therapy to Swedish patients with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), is treatment in a light therapy room. Since few studies have evaluated treatment provided in this setting and few have evaluated the effect of bright light in sub-clinical SAD (S-SAD), such a study including a one-month follow-up was designed. Fifty adults recruited from a previous prevalence study and clinically assessed as having SAD or S-SAD, were randomised to treatment in a light room or to a three-week waiting-list control group. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorders Self-rating 29-items Version (SIGH-SAD/SR) was used to measure depressive mood at baseline, directly following treatment and at the one-month follow-up. ANCOVA with adjustment for baseline depression score, showed a significant main effect for the light room therapy group (p or = 50% while no such improvement was seen in the control condition (n=0/24). After merging the two groups, repeated measures ANOVA confirmed the experimental analysis (p or = 50% and 63.8% (n=30/47) had normal depression scores, i.e. < or = 8. Light room therapy was effective in reducing depressive symptoms in subjects with winter depressive mood. Results were maintained over a period of one month.

  10. Analysis results for the stereotypes regarding colors applied to the nuclear power plant control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Hyun Chul [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dhong Ha [Suwon Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-01

    The general public not engaged in the nuclear power plant industry have no idea of the color usage in the nuclear control room. So we converted the specific color usage situation into similar but general situations. In questionnaire, we gave subjects the general situation where color coding is applied and alternative colors which were applied to the HF010 guidelines. And we asked the subjects to choose the colors proper to the situation and to rank the colors according to the degree of suitability. Two hundred fifty college students participated in the experiment. The results suggest that we can use any color coding system in the conventional control room and the CRT in the control deck because most people have no special previous color-meaning association but red-emergency relation.

  11. Multichannel active control of random noise in a small reverberant room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Søren; Elliott, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm for multichannel adaptive IIR (infinite impulse response) filtering is presented and applied to the active control of broadband random noise in a small reverberant room. Assuming complete knowledge of the primary noise, the theoretically optimal reductions of acoustic energy...... with the primary noise field generated by a panel excited by a loudspeaker in an adjoining room. These results show that far better performances are provided by IIR and FIR filters when the primary source has a lightly damped dynamic behavior which the active controller must model...... multichannel FIR (finite impulse response) and IIR filters are then compared for a four-secondary-source, eight-error microphone active control system, and it is found that for the present application FIR filters are sufficient when the primary noise source is a loudspeaker. Some experiments are then presented...

  12. Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies: Phase One Upgrades to the HSSL, Research Plan, and Performance Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ulrich, Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control room. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report describes the initial upgrades to the HSSL and outlines the methodology for a pilot test of the HSSL configuration.

  13. Room acoustic analysis of blower unit and noise control plan in the typical steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the steel industry,air blowers used to supply compressed air are considered as sources of annoying noise. This study aims to acoustics analysis of theairblower workroomand sound source characteristics in order to present noise controlmeasuresinthe steel industry. .Material and Method: Measurement of noiselevel and its frequency analysis was performed usingsound levelmetermodelof CASELLA-Cell.450. Distribution of noise level in the investigated workroom in form of noise map was provided using Surfer software. In addition, acoustic analysis of workroom and control room was performed in view point of soundabsorption andinsulation. Redesignofdoor and window of controlroom and installation of soundabsorbing materialson theceiling of the workroom were proposed and the efficiency of these interventionswasestimated. .Result: The totalsound pressurelevelin the blower workroom was 95.4 dB(L and the dominant frequency was 2000Hz. Sound pressure level inside the room control was 80.1dB(A. The average absorption coefficient and reverberation time in the blower workroom was estimated equal to 0.082 Sab.m2 and 3.9 seconds respectively. These value in control room was 0.04 Sab.m2 and 3/4 seconds respectively. In control room, sound transmission loss between the two parts of the wall dividing was 13.7 dB(A. The average of noise dose in blower operators was 230%. With the installation of sound absorber on ceiling of workroom, average of absorption coefficient can increase to 0.33 Sab.m2 and sound transmission loss of the new designed door and window was estimated equal to 20dB. . Conclusion: The main cause of noise leakage in the control room was insufficient insulation properties of door and windows. By replacing the door and window and installation of sound absorbing on ceiling of workroom, the noise dose can reduce to 49.6%. New Improved door and window of control room can reduce noise dose to 69.65% solely.

  14. Design And Implementation Of Smart Living Room Wireless Control For Safety Purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeindra Myint Lwin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research presents the microcontroller controlled smart living room system using Bluetooth wireless technology from mobile phone.An android apk is created in mobile for controlling the living room system. A 16F877A microcontroller is interfaced serially to a bluetooth module transceiver. It is used for controlling fan speed control dim light control lighting ONOFF and window angle control. An arduino controller is used for keypad control door security. It is connected to DC motor control circuit and switching circuit for opening and closing of the door keypad for entering password and serial LCD for displaying the update status of the door.User can control the home appliances by using bluetooth connection from mobile phone in its range. User can adjust the dim light fan speed window angle and light bulbs from android apk. An internal EEPROM is built in 16F877A microcontroller and it stores the last requested data of the appliances. If userwants to recover the former conditions of the appliances he can recall them from android apk.

  15. Climate control based on temperature measurement in the animal-occupied zone of a pig room with ground channel ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van A.V.; Aerts, J.M.; Brecht, van A.; Vranken, E.; Leroy, T.; Berckmans, D.

    2005-01-01

    It is known that there can be a significant temperature difference between the position of the climate controller sensor (room temperature) and the animal-occupied zone (AOZ) in a pig room. This study explores the advantages of using AOZ temperature in climate control. The objectives were: (1) to

  16. Detector Control System for the AFP detector in ATLAS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211068; The ATLAS collaboration; Caforio, Davide; Czekierda, Sabina; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Olszowska, Jolanta; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Sicho, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector consists of two forward detectors located at 205 m and 217 m on either side of the ATLAS experiment. The aim is to measure the momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. In 2016, two detector stations on one side of the ATLAS interaction point were installed and commissioned. The detector infrastructure and necessary services were installed and are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS), which is responsible for the coherent and safe operation of the detector. A large variety of used equipment represents a considerable challenge for the AFP DCS design. Industrial Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) product Siemens WinCCOA, together with the CERN Joint Control Project (JCOP) framework and standard industrial and custom developed server applications and protocols are used for reading, processing, monitoring and archiving of the detector parameters. Graphical user interfaces allow for overall detector operation and visualization of the det...

  17. Development of fluorocarbon evaporative cooling recirculators and controls for the ATLAS inner silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, C; Bonneau, P; Bosteels, Michel; Burckhart, H J; Cragg, D; English, R; Hallewell, G D; Hallgren, Björn I; Ilie, S; Kersten, S; Kind, P; Langedrag, K; Lindsay, S; Merkel, M; Stapnes, Steinar; Thadome, J; Vacek, V

    2000-01-01

    We report on the development of evaporative fluorocarbon cooling recirculators and their control systems for the ATLAS inner silicon tracker. We have developed a prototype circulator using a dry, hermetic compressor with C/sub 3/F/sup 8/ refrigerant, and have prototyped the remote-control analog pneumatic links for the regulation of coolant mass flows and operating temperatures that will be necessary in the magnetic field and radiation environment around ATLAS. pressure and flow measurement and control use 150+ channels of standard ATLAS LMB ("Local Monitor Board") DAQ and DACs on a multi-drop CAN network administered through a BridgeVIEW user interface. A hardwired thermal interlock system has been developed to cut power to individual silicon modules should their temperatures exceed safe values. Highly satisfactory performance of the circulator under steady state, partial-load and transient conditions was seen, with proportional fluid flow tuned to varying circuit power. Future developments, including a 6 kW...

  18. BEYOND INTEGRATED SYSTEM VALIDATION: USE OF A CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATOR FOR PROOF-OF-CONCEPT INTERFACE DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; Vivek Agarwal

    2012-07-01

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plants in the US. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  19. Ergonomics in the licensing and evaluation of nuclear reactors control room; A ergonomia no licenciamento e na avaliacao de salas de controle de reatores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac Jose Antonio Luquetti dos [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Vidal, Mario Cesar Rodriguez [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia de Producao

    2002-07-01

    A nuclear control room is a complex system that controls a thermodynamic process used to produce electrical energy. The operators interact with the control room through interfaces that have significant implications to nuclear plant safety and influence the operator activity. The TMI (Three Mile Island) accident demonstrated that only the anthropometric aspects were not enough for an adequate nuclear control room design. The studies showed that the accident was aggravated because the designers had not considered adequately human factor aspects. After TMI accident, the designers introduce in the nuclear control room development only human factors standards and human factors guidelines. The ergonomics approaches was not considered. Our objective is introduce in nuclear control room design and nuclear control room evaluation, a methodology that. includes human factors standards, human factors guidelines and ergonomic approaches, the operator activity analysis. (author)

  20. Control architecture of the ATLAS 2020 lower-limb active orthosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz-Merodio, D.; Sancho, J.; Pérez, M.; García, E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the control details implemented in the wearable gait exoskeleton ATLAS 2020 for improving the therapy of SMA children. This paper discusses the control challenges of a gait-training wearable exoskeleton for SMA children. Such device would also increase these children's quality of life, achieving a reduction of disability and increased functional independence.

  1. Effects of Shift Work on Cognitive Performance, Sleep Quality, and Sleepiness among Petrochemical Control Room Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Reza; Haidarimoghadam, Rashid; Motamedzadeh, Majid; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Soltanian, Alireza; Zoghipaydar, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive performance, sleepiness, and sleep quality among petrochemical control room shift workers. Method: Sixty shift workers participated in this study. Cognitive performance was evaluated using the objective test such as continuous performance test, n-back test, and simple reaction time test; sleepiness scale was measured using the subjective Karolinska Sleepiness Scale...

  2. AIR CONDITIONING IN OPERATING ROOMS AND INFECTION CONTROL – A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    May Socorro Martinez Afonso; Adenicia Custodia Silva e Souza; Anaclara Ferreira Veiga Tipple; Eliene Aparecida Machado; Eliane Alves Lucas

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This bibliographic survey in data banks such as MEDLINE, LILACS, SCIELO, Ministry of Health, among others aims at identifying what makes air conditioners a source of environmental contamination. The air is contaminated by particles which transport microorganisms. The sources of particles include patients and surgical staff. The control of the temperature, relative humidity, pressure, number of changes of air accomplished per hour, clothes, traffic, number of people in the rooms, mai...

  3. A HUMAN FACTORS META MODEL FOR U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Jeffrey C.

    2017-03-01

    Over the last several years, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored human factors research and development (R&D) and human factors engineering (HFE) activities through its Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to modernize the main control rooms (MCR) of commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in partnership with numerous commercial nuclear utilities, has conducted some of this R&D to enable the life extension of NPPs (i.e., provide the technical basis for the long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security of U.S. NPPs). From these activities performed to date, a human factors meta model for U.S. NPP control room modernization can now be formulated. This paper discusses this emergent HFE meta model for NPP control room modernization, with the goal of providing an integrated high level roadmap and guidance on how to perform human factors R&D and HFE for those in the U.S. nuclear industry that are engaging in the process of upgrading their MCRs.

  4. Report: EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory Should Improve Its Computer Room Security Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0847, September 21, 2012.Our review of the security posture and in-place environmental controls of EPA’s Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory computer room disclosed an array of security and environmental control deficiencies.

  5. Human factor engineering based design and modernization of control rooms with new I and C systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz, J.; Rejas, L. [New Control Room Design Dept., Av. Montes de Oca, 1, 28703 San Sebastian de los Reyes-Madrid (Spain); Ortega, F. [Control Room and Simulation Dept., Av. Montes de Oca, 1, 28703 San Sebastian de los Reyes-Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems of the latest nuclear power plants are based on the use of digital technology, distributed control systems and the integration of information in data networks (Distributed Control and Instrumentation Systems). This has a repercussion on Control Rooms (CRs), where the operations and monitoring interfaces correspond to these systems. These technologies are also used in modernizing I and C systems in currently operative nuclear power plants. The new interfaces provide additional capabilities for operation and supervision, as well as a high degree of flexibility, versatility and reliability. An example of this is the implementation of solutions such as compact stations, high level supervision screens, overview displays, computerized procedures, new operational support systems or intelligent alarms processing systems in the modernized Man-Machine Interface (MMI). These changes in the MMI are accompanied by newly added Software (SW) controls and new solutions in automation. Tecnatom has been leading various projects in this area for several years, both in Asian countries and in the United States, using in all cases international standards from which Tecnatom own methodologies have been developed and optimized. The experience acquired in applying this methodology to the design of new control rooms is to a large extent applicable also to the modernization of current control rooms. An adequate design of the interface between the operator and the systems will facilitate safe operation, contribute to the prompt identification of problems and help in the distribution of tasks and communications between the different members of the operating shift. Based on Tecnatom experience in the field, this article presents the methodological approach used as well as the most relevant aspects of this kind of project. (authors)

  6. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  7. ATLAS Online Data Quality Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the delivery of the first proton-proton collisions by the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration had the opportunity to operate the detector under the environment it was designed for. These first events have been of great interest not only for the high energy physics outcome, but also as a means to perform a general commissioning of system. A highly scalable distributed monitoring framework assesses the quality of the data and the operational conditions of the detector, trigger and data acquisition system. Every minute of an ATLAS data taking session the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in ...

  8. ATLAS online data quality monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the delivery of the first proton-proton collisions by the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration had the opportunity to operate the detector under the environment it was designed for. These first events have been of great interest not only for the high energy physics outcome, but also as a means to perform a general commissioning of system. A highly scalable distributed monitoring framework assesses the quality of the data and the operational conditions of the detector, trigger and data acquisition system. Every minute of an ATLAS data taking session the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in ...

  9. Control console of the gamma calibration room; Consola de control de la Sala de Calibracion Gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilchis P, A.E.; Romero G, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Ingenieria Electronica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The Nuclear Centre of Mexico has a Ionizing Radiation Metrology Center (CMRI). This is in charge of the calibration in Mexico and Latin America of equipment dedicated to radiation measurement as industrial, medical as other fields. The importance to ensure that the equipment stay justly calibrated, it is imposed the necessity of automating the different rooms which the CMRI has. in this case it will be exposed the Calibration room for gamma radiation type. The operation of this application was carried out with the LabVIEW development platform and also in C language. The hardware associated is: personal computer with two cards using the 8255 device, 16 channels with optical isolation to manage input/output TTL type, 16 channels with optical isolation to management of charges to 127 V a.c., and 2 channels for 90V d.c. motors. (Author)

  10. Quality control and quality assurance of micromegas readout boards for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Nanda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The resistive anode boards of the Micromegas detectors for ATLAS NSW upgrade, will be produced in industries. The anode boards will be thoroughly evaluated at CERN following a detailed quality control and quality assurance (QA/QC) procedure. The report describes thoroughly the procedures and the design of a small QC tool for easier measurements of electrical properties of the readout boards.

  11. Evaluation of IPbus for Control Communication in the ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Uriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The future upgrade of the ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger will require a new method of control communication to the MUCTPI. IPbus is suggested as a possible solution to this problem and setup instructions are provided. The functionality of IPbus was tested and its performance was measured for different operations and for different parameters. The Hardware Compiler was modified to support IPbus.

  12. Design and implementation of new control room system in Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, H.; Zamanian, H.; Gheidi, M.; Kheiri-Fard, M.; Kouhi, A.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is design and implementation of an up-to-date control room. The previous control room had a lot of constraints and it was not apposite to the sophisticated diagnostic systems as well as to the modern control and multivariable systems. Although it provided the best output for the considered experiments and implementing offline algorithms among all similar plants, it needed to be developed to provide more capability for complex algorithm mechanisms and this work introduces our efforts in this area. Accordingly, four leading systems were designed and implemented, including real-time control system, online Data Acquisition System (DAS), offline DAS, monitoring and data transmission system. In the control system, three real-time control modules were established based on Digital Signal Processor (DSP). Thanks to them, implementation of the classic and linear and nonlinear intelligent controllers was possible to control the plasma position and its elongation. Also, online DAS was constructed in two modules. Using them, voltages and currents of charge for the capacitor banks and pressure of different parts in vacuum vessel were measured and monitored. Likewise, by real-time processing of the online data, the safety protocol of plant performance was accomplished. In addition, the offline DAS was organized in 13 modules based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). This system can be used for gathering all diagnostic, control, and performance data in 156 channels. Data transmission system and storing mechanism in the server was provided by data transmitting network and MDSplus standard protocol. Moreover, monitoring software was designed so that it could display the required plots for physical analyses. Taking everything into account, this new platform can improve the quality and quantity of research activities in plasma physics for Damavand tokamak.

  13. Demand control on room level of the supply air temperature in an air heating and ventilation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polak, Joanna; Afshari, Alireza; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a new strategy for control of supply air temperature in an integrated air heating and ventilation system. The new strategy enables demand control of supply air temperature in individual rooms. The study is based on detailed dynamic simulations of a combined...... air heating and ventilation system in a high performance single family house using BSim simulation software. The provision of the desired thermal conditions in different rooms was examined. Results show that the new control strategy can facilitate maintaining of desired temperatures in various rooms....... Moreover, this control strategy enables controlled temperature differentiation between rooms within the house and therefore provides flexibility and better balance in heat delivery. Consequently, the thermal conditions in the building can be improved....

  14. Airborne Contamination Control through Directed Airflow in the Exam Room: A Pilot Study Using a Membrane Diffuser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajyoti Pati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne infections have been documented as a major source of hospital acquired infection - one of the major concerns in healthcare delivery. An important factor contributing to airborne infection is cross contamination through air particulate dispersion as affected by the ventilation system design. Clean room technology (with membrane ceiling has been successfully used in technology and pharmaceutical industries to control airborne contamination. This study examined the performance of membrane ceiling technology in controlling air particulate dispersion in a mock-up exam room. It included both performance tests in a mock-up room and a simulation study of six different ventilation system designs using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analysis. Findings suggest that a membrane diffuser directed airflow ventilation strategy occupying approximately 20% to 30% of the ceiling surface and placed over the patient in a contemporary sized exam room provides a less turbulent airflow pattern and less mixing of the air between the patient and others in the room.

  15. Low frequency sound reproduction in irregular rooms using CABS (Control Acoustic Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    of an irregular room model using the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method has been presented. CABS has been simulated in the irregular room model. Measurements of CABS in a real irregular room have been performed. The performance of CABS was affected by the irregular shape of the room due to the corner...

  16. Control Technologies for Room Air-conditioner and Packaged Air-conditioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuhisa

    Trends of control technologies about air-conditioning machineries, especially room or packaged air conditioners, are presented in this paper. Multiple air conditioning systems for office buildings are mainly described as one application of the refrigeration cycle control technologies including sensors for thermal comfort and heating/ cooling loads are also described as one of the system control technologies. Inverter systems and related technologies for driving variable speed compressors are described in both case of including induction motors and brushless DC motors. Technologies for more accurate control to meet various kind of regulations such as ozone layer destruction, energy saving and global warming, and for eliminating harmonic distortion of power source current, as a typical EMC problem, will be urgently desired.

  17. Demonstration of Intelligent Control and Fan Improvements in Computer Room Air Handlers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Greenberg, Steve [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Vita, Corinne [Vigilent, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2012-11-30

    This report documents a demonstration of the energy-efficiency improvement provided by a new control system for computer room air handling devices. It also analyzes measured and reported air handling device fan power associated with changing the fan type. A 135,000 square foot commercial data center was used for the demonstration. All air handling units were upgraded with improved efficiency fans, and a control system that automatically adjusts the fan speed for the air handling units was added. Power measurements were collected for a baseline and for a period with the fan speed control system active. Changing the fan type resulted in a savings of 47 percent of energy used by the air handling equipment and associated chiller plant energy needed to cool the air handlers themselves. The addition of the fan speed control resulted in an additional 37 percent savings in the same two categories. The combined savings for the two improvements for the same categories was 66 percent compared to the data center fitted with the original fans without a control system. The energy use reduction provided by the complete air handling device improvement program for the whole data center site is estimated to be 2.9 million kilowatt hours per year—an overall data center site savings of 8.0 percent. The reduced electrical energy use at the site provides a 1.9 million pound yearly reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. This demonstration showed that fan upgrades and a control system addition provide cost-effective improvements for data centers, with a payback reported to be under two years without utility incentives. In addition to the control system providing energy savings, the data collection and visual analysis capabilities provided immediate and long-term benefits. It is recommended that data center operators consider investing in fan upgrades and/or adding fan speed control for computer room air handlers.

  18. Coherent control in room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers using shaped pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Karni, Ouri; Eisenstein, Gadi; Ivanov, Vitalii; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to control quantum coherent Rabi-oscillations in a room-temperature quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) by shaping the light pulses that trigger them. The experiments described here show that when the excitation is resonant with the short wavelength slope of the SOA gain spectrum, a linear frequency chirp affects its ability to trigger Rabi-oscillations within the SOA: A negative chirp inhibits Rabi-oscillations whereas a positive chirp can enhance them, relative to the interaction of a transform limited pulse. The experiments are confirmed by a numerical calculation that models the propagation of the experimentally shaped pulses through the SOA.

  19. Report for Task 8.4: Development of Control Room Layout Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has contracted Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) to support in the development of an end state vision for the US Nuclear industry and in particular for a utility that is currently moving forward with a control room modernization project. This support includes the development of an Overview display and technical support in conducting an operational study. Development of operational scenarios to be conducted using a full scope simulator at the INL HSSL. Additionally IFE will use the CREATE modelling tool to provide 3-D views of the potential and possible end state view after the completion of digital upgrade project.

  20. Controllable effects of quantum fluctuations on spin free-induction decay at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang-Qin; Pan, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations of local fields cause decoherence of quantum objects. Usually at high temperatures, thermal noises are much stronger than quantum fluctuations unless the thermal effects are suppressed by certain techniques such as spin echo. Here we report the discovery of strong quantum-fluctuation effects of nuclear spin baths on free-induction decay of single electron spins in solids at room temperature. We find that the competition between the quantum and thermal fluctuations is controllable by an external magnetic field. These findings are based on Ramsey interference measurement of single nitrogen-vacancy center spins in diamond and numerical simulation of the decoherence, which are in excellent agreement. PMID:22666535

  1. 75 FR 56972 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management/Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ...PHMSA published the Control Room Management/Human Factors final rule in the Federal Register on December 3, 2009, which became effective on February 1, 2010. The final rule established an 18-month program development deadline of August 1, 2011, and a subsequent 18- month program implementation deadline of February 1, 2013. This proposed rule proposes to expedite the program implementation deadline to August 1, 2011, for most of the requirements, except for certain provisions regarding adequate information and alarm management, which would have a program implementation deadline of August 1, 2012.

  2. 75 FR 69912 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management/Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ...On September 17, 2010, PHMSA published a Control Room Management/Human Factors notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) proposing to expedite the program implementation deadlines to August 1, 2011, for most of the requirements, except for certain provisions regarding adequate information and alarm management, which would have a program implementation deadline of August 1, 2012. PHMSA has received a request to extend the comment period in order to have more time to evaluate the NPRM. PHMSA has concurred in part with this request and has extended the comment period from November 16, 2010, to December 3, 2010.

  3. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O' Hara

    2004-11-30

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  4. Mental workload measurement in operator control room using NASA-TLX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarindra, M.; Suryoputro, M. R.; Permana, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    The workload, encountered a combination of physical workload and mental workload, is a consequence of the activities for workers. Central control room is one department in the oil processing company, employees tasked with monitoring the processing unit for 24 hours nonstop with a combination of 3 shifts in 8 hours. NASA-TLX (NASA Task Load Index) is one of the subjective mental workload measurement using six factors, namely the Mental demand (MD), Physical demand (PD), Temporal demand (TD), Performance (OP), Effort (EF), frustration levels (FR). Measurement of a subjective mental workload most widely used because it has a high degree of validity. Based on the calculation of the mental workload, there at 5 units (DTU, NPU, HTU, DIST and OPS) at the control chamber (94; 83.33; 94.67; 81, 33 and 94.67 respectively) that categorize as very high mental workload. The high level of mental workload on the operator in the Central Control Room is a requirement to have high accuracy, alertness and can make decisions quickly

  5. A Pilot Study Investigating the Effects of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Technologies: Methods and Qualitative Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLanc, Katya Le [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Powers, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fitzgerald, Kirk [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Control room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. Nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Upgrades in the U.S. do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The goal of the control room upgrade benefits research is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report describes a pilot study to test upgrades to the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL.

  6. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Indian Institute of Technology in Kharagpur

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, the oldest and the largest among the I.I.T`s, is ranked among the best engineering institutions in the world. Over the years, this celebrated abode of knowledge has produced brilliant engineers who have made invaluable contributions in the field of science, technology and management.

  7. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Changpyeong Elementary School

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Changpyeong Elementary School is the school that has 100 years history, which has 100 students and 30 teaching staffs in the small town of South Korea. The students in Chagpyung try to contribute something to the world at the time that world is getting be one.

  8. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) was formed on 1st January 2004 as a result of the merger between the University of Durban-Westville and the University of Natal. The new University brought together the rich histories of both former universities which encompass disadvantage and advantage respectively. During the "Be a Scientist for a Week" program high school learners in their final two years of school will have the opportunity to spend a week at either the Westville, or Pietermaritzburg campus of the University of Kwazulu-Natal. The Westville campus will host approximately 30 students who were the top achievers in mathematics and science from the 20 feeder schools to the university. In order to foster their appreciation for science and assist the students to explore the wide variety of scientific endeavors available to them they will spend blocks of 3 hours hosted by research groups in physics, chemistry, environmental science, mathematics, geology, biological sciences, and computer science. Within the ...

  9. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of Milano

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Universita` degli Studi di Milano is the largest of the universities in Milano and one of the largest in Italy. It is a public teaching and research university with 10 faculties, 31 departements, 22 doctoral schools, a teaching staff of 2,178 professors and approximately 65,000 students. During the "Open Day", organized every year, the university presents its programs for undergraduate education. All day long potential students can meet professors and other students and learn about the university programs, researches, activities and services.

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Barcelona

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Future Learning is an initiative at the University of Barcelona - Faculty of Pedagogy and Education - aimed at developing research on the educational, cultural and socio-economic aspects of the use of ICT in learning settings, with special emphasis on virtual learning and eLearning. In the framework of the PATHWAY EU project, Future Learning is leading a series of teacher training activities around the CERN mini-exhibition that is touring Spain this year.

  11. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The Higgs in Tour in Bologna

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    CONFERENZA SPETTACOLO PER LE SCUOLE per presentare una delle scoperte più importanti degli ultimi 30 anni nel campo della Fisica delle Particelle Elementari. Dopo anni segnati dall`impegno e dalla determinazione di migliaia di ricercatori di tutto il mondo, il 4 luglio 2012, durante una conferenza trasmessa in diretta dal CERN, viene annunciata al mondo la scoperta di una nuova particella: il bosone di HIGGS. L`anno successivo viene attribuito il Premio Nobel per la Fisica 2013 ai fisici teorici François Englert e Peter Higgs che la ipotizzarono nel Modello Standard per dare massa alle altre particelle.

  12. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The Federal University of Campina Grande

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The XXXI EFNNE will be produced with the suport from the Federal University of Campina Grande (UFCG), the State University of Paraíba and the Federal Institute for Education, Science and Technology of Paraíba. The event, already part of the Brazilian scientific calendar, is an important opportunity for exchange of ideas about physics or the teaching of physics in the regions North and Northeast of the country.

  13. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Every year in April technical enterprises, universities and research centres are invited to organise an open day for girls: Girl`s Day - `Future Prospects for Girls`. The Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz offers about 20 workshops covering a wide spectrum of activities.

  14. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by 5th General Lyceum of Katerini

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Located in the city of Katerini, in northern Greece, the 5th General Lyceum of Katerini is a public high school with about 500 students. Although it is a new school (founded in school year 2007-2008), it is very actively involved in many educational projects. Our school visited CERN in April of 2009, guided in the facilities and the students were amazed. The new students now are even more eager to learn about CERN and the undergoing experiments!

  15. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Liverpool Hope University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Centre for Science and Mathematics Education (CSME), directed by Prof. Sarantos Psycharis, is a centre of excellence at the Education Faculty of Liverpool Hope University. With the aim to support informed-by-research activities that enhance teaching and learning of science and mathematics, CSME develops pedagogical resources for primary and secondary schools and in-service teacher programs inspired by research in Inquiry Based Science Education, whereby it acts as an interface between School Science, Mathematics and STEM, immersing students in a learning environment conducive to understanding how scientists solve problems and develop scientific paradigms and take a note of evidence.

  16. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by University of M`sila

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The University of M`sila is one of the largest universities in Algeria. It includes seven faculties, 30 departments and two institutes, it offers courses at undergraduate and postgraduate levels to around 30,000 students, graduating of them more than 4000 students each year.

  17. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Open Discovery Space webinar in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Open Discovery Space (ODS) is a socially-powered and multilingual open learning infrastructure to boost the adoption of eLearning resources. ODS brings millions of educational resources directly into school classrooms. A key part of planning engaging lessons is access to high-quality, trustworthy teaching content. The platform empowers teachers by helping them build their schools` digital libraries, join lively communities of peers to share best practices, and connect their schools virtually with the world`s best research centres, museums and libraries.

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The House of Science, São Paulo

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The House of Science is a program of the Hemocenter of Ribeirão Preto (HC/FMRP/USP) that develops activities promoting the teaching of science to approach scientific research and teachers/students from the basic educational network. The House of Science was founded in 2001 as part of the educational program of the Center for Cellular Therapy (CTC) of the Centers of Research, Innovation and Outreach (CEPID), financed by FAPESP (Foundation of Support to Research by the State of São Paulo). Coordinated by the Doctor Marisa Ramos Barbieri, the program was proposed using similar methodology to the LEC-FFCLRP/USP (between 1981-2000), which worked directly with teachers and students of the basic instruction level. Located in the Hemocenter of Ribeirão Preto, inside USP (São Paulo University), the House of Science coordinates since 2005 the series "Adopt a Scientist", a program that promotes the interaction between students from Ribeirão Preto and the Região and postgraduates of the University, who coordinate t...

  19. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Manuel Peleteiro School in Santiago de Compostela

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this training is to prepare secondary school teachers for a visit with their students to the CERN exhibition that will arrive in Santiago de Compostela on May 2nd, 2013 and stay until May 20th.

  20. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Samos and Leros High Schools

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Samos, the birthplace of Pythagoras, is a Greek island located very close to the Asia Minor coast. Karlovasi, the island`s second biggest town, has two high schools: the General High School and the 1st Vocational High School, both numbering about 300 students. Leros is also a frontier island located in the southeast Aegean Sea. The 2nd Junior High School of Leros in the Lakki town has 140 students.

  1. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by The University of Delaware

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The University of Delaware along with MAGPI (Metropolitan Area GigaPoP in Philadelphia for Internet2) and Internet2 are excited to host "Network Delaware Day: Advancing Research and Education Initiatives Across the First State." Discover the power of advanced networking opportunities in research and education throughout the First State.

  2. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by High Schools in Samos

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Samos, the birthplace of Pythagoras, is a Greek island just a few hundred meters away from the Asia Minor coast, with a population of 35,000 inhabitants. Vathi is the island`s capital town of about 6,000 inhabitants. Vathi has two high schools, the Pythagorio General High School and the Mavrogenio Vocational High School, both numbering around 600 students.

  3. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by XIII Festival of Science in Cracow

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    "Aspects of Water" is the title of the 13-th Festival of Science in Cracow. The Festival is traditionally located on the Main Square, which is the biggest medieval market square in Europe. This annual event is visited by thousands of citizens and tourists each year. Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ) is one of almost 20 universities and institutes organising the Science Village during the Festival.

  4. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Dublin City University Business School

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DCU Business School is one of Ireland`s foremost research active Business Schools. Offering cutting edge education at undergraduate, masters and doctoral level, DCU Business School has earned a reputation for working closely with science and industry producing graduates who have experienced work life and are ready to collaborate with others in pursuit of innovation and technical advancement.

  5. Studies for the detector control system of the ATLAS pixel at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Püllen, L; Boek, J; Kersten, S; Kind, P; Mättig, P; Zeitnitz, C

    2012-01-01

    experiment will be replaced completely. As part of this redesign there will also be a new pixel detector. This new pixel detector requires a control system which meets the strict space requirements for electronics in the ATLAS experiment. To accomplish this goal we propose a DCS (Detector Control System) network with the smallest form factor currently available. This network consists of a DCS chip located in close proximity to the interaction point and a DCS controller located in the outer regions of the ATLAS detector. These two types of chips form a star shaped network with several DCS chips being controlled by one DCS controller. Both chips are manufactured in deep sub-micron technology. We present prototypes with emphasis on studies concerning single event upsets.

  6. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  7. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-04-26

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  8. A HUMAN AUTOMATION INTERACTION CONCEPT FOR A SMALL MODULAR REACTOR CONTROL ROOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya; Spielman, Zach; Hill, Rachael

    2017-06-01

    Many advanced nuclear power plant (NPP) designs incorporate higher degrees of automation than the existing fleet of NPPs. Automation is being introduced or proposed in NPPs through a wide variety of systems and technologies, such as advanced displays, computer-based procedures, advanced alarm systems, and computerized operator support systems. Additionally, many new reactor concepts, both full scale and small modular reactors, are proposing increased automation and reduced staffing as part of their concept of operations. However, research consistently finds that there is a fundamental tradeoff between system performance with increased automation and reduced human performance. There is a need to address the question of how to achieve high performance and efficiency of high levels of automation without degrading human performance. One example of a new NPP concept that will utilize greater degrees of automation is the SMR concept from NuScale Power. The NuScale Power design requires 12 modular units to be operated in one single control room, which leads to a need for higher degrees of automation in the control room. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) researchers and NuScale Power human factors and operations staff are working on a collaborative project to address the human performance challenges of increased automation and to determine the principles that lead to optimal performance in highly automated systems. This paper will describe this concept in detail and will describe an experimental test of the concept. The benefits and challenges of the approach will be discussed.

  9. Advantages and Disadvantages of Physiological Assessment For Next Generation Control Room Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan Q. Tran; Ronald L. Boring; Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Bruce P Hallbert; M. David Keller; Tessa M. Anderson

    2007-08-01

    Abstract - We propose using non-obtrusive physiological assessment (e.g., eye tracking,) to assess human information processing errors (e.g., loss of vigilance) and limitations (e.g., workload) for advanced energy systems early in the design process. This physiological approach for assessing risk will circumvent many limitations of current risk methodologies such as subjective rating (e.g., rater’s biases) and performance modeling (e.g., risk assessment is scripted and is based upon the individual modeler’s judgment). Key uses will be to evaluate (early in the design process) novel control room equipment and configurations as well as newly developed automated systems that will inevitably place a high information load on operators. The physiological risk assessment tool will allow better precision in pinpointing problematic design issues and will provide a “real-time” assessment of risk. Furthermore, this physiological approach would extend the state-of-the-art of human reliability methods from a “static” measure to more “dynamic.” This paper will discuss a broad range of the current popular online performance gauges as well as its advantages and disadvantages for use in next generation control room.

  10. Requirements for future control room and visualisation features in the Web-of-Cells framework defined in the ELECTRA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinell, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    This study outlines an overview of the general requirements for the control rooms of the future power systems (2030+). The roles and activities in the future control centres will evolve with respect to the switching, dispatching and restoration functions currently active. The control centre...... operators will supervise on the power system and intervene - when necessary - thanks to the maturation and wide scale deployment of flexible controls. For the identification of control room requirements, general trends in power system evolution are considered and mainly the outcomes of the ELECTRA IRP...... project, that proposes a new Web-of-Cell (WoC) power system control architecture. Dedicated visualisation features are proposed, aimed to support the control room operators activities in a WoC-oriented approach. Furthermore, the work takes into account the point of view of network operators about future...

  11. ATLAS Point-1 System Administration Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Marc Dobson

    2007-01-01

    Hello, my name is Joe Blog and I am about to go on shift at ATLAS. When I enter the control room shown below with my CERN ID card, I go to the subsystem desk for which I am responsible. This is the first shift of the run period and there is a login window displayed on the screens. I just need to hit return and the control room desktop is started. Before I can do anything I must give my credentials in the shifter window which is then synchronised with the shift plan. After that I have access to all the allowed commands and can start preparing for the run. In order not to forget any steps I consult the documentation on how to prepare for a run on the Point-1 web. I can also check what the general status is for the ATLAS online computing farm, the sub-detectors and the LHC by using the utilities provided. ATLAS Control Room. The situation described is made up but the conditions are real. But the control room that the shifters and general public see is only the tip of the iceberg. Behind these tools lie the...

  12. THE DEVELOPMENT OF DETAILED HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING GUIDELINES FOR DIGITAL CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,W.; O' HARA,J.M.

    2004-09-19

    As part of the Department of Energy and Electric Power Research Institute's hybrid control room project, detailed human factors engineering guidance was developed for designing human-system interfaces that may be affected by introduction of additional digital technology during modernization of nuclear power plants. The guidance addresses several aspects of human-system interaction: information display, interface management, soft controls, alarms, computer-based procedures, computerized operator support systems, communications, and workstation/workplace design. In this paper, the ways in which digital upgrades might affect users' interaction with systems in each of these contexts are briefly described, and the contents of the guidance developed for each of the topics is also described.

  13. Light Control of Ferromagnetism in ZnO Films on Pt Substrate at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jihao; Qin, Hongwei; Hao, Yanming; Cheng, Bin; Liu, Weikang; Liu, Liang; Ren, Shaoqing; Zhou, Guangjun; Ji, Ziwu; Hu, Jifan

    2017-04-10

    The control of ferromagnetism by light at room temperature is essential for the development of some optical-magnetic coupling devices, data storage and quantum computation techniques. In the present work, we demonstrate that the ferromagnetism of a semiconducting ZnO film on Pt substrate can be controlled by nonpolarized ultraviolet or violet light. The illumination of light with sufficiently high frequency photons could excite photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the semiconducting ZnO film. The amount of oxygen vacancies in the ZnO film and the appearance of built-in electric field due to the heterostructured ZnO/Pt may play important roles in the light-induced changes in the ferromagnetism of the ZnO film.

  14. Psychiatric emergency room decision-making, social control and the 'undeserving sick'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Alisa

    2006-01-01

    The influence of social factors on involuntary hospitalisation has been an important and controversial area of sociological focus for many years. Traditionally, social control theory has been used to understand disproportionate rates of involuntary hospitalisation among marginalised and powerless groups. However, dramatic changes in the social context of mental healthcare have necessitated a re-examination of the role of social factors in involuntary hospitalisation. In this study 287 psychiatric emergency room visits were examined in order to test hypotheses for understanding social influences on disposition. Little support for the traditional social control hypothesis was found. People from marginalised groups were not disproportionately involuntarily hospitalised, but instead were disproportionately treated and released from the hospital as people's social resources were used to access care rather than to prevent hospitalisation. This study highlights the importance of the historical relevance of our theoretical understanding of the relationship between social factors and involuntary commitment.

  15. A HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING PROCESS TO SUPPORT HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE DESIGN IN CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, C.; Joe, J.; Boring, R.

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to sustain operation of the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through a multi-pathway approach in conducting research and development (R&D). The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) System Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and other information systems in existing U.S. NPPs. Control room modernization is an important part following this pathway, and human factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been involved in conducting R&D to support migration of new digital main control room (MCR) technologies from legacy analog and legacy digital I&C. This paper describes a human factors engineering (HFE) process that supports human-system interface (HSI) design in MCR modernization activities, particularly with migration of old digital to new digital I&C. The process described in this work is an expansion from the LWRS Report INL/EXT-16-38576, and is a requirements-driven approach that aligns with NUREG-0711 requirements. The work described builds upon the existing literature by adding more detail around key tasks and decisions to make when transitioning from HSI Design into Verification and Validation (V&V). The overall objective of this process is to inform HSI design and elicit specific, measurable, and achievable human factors criteria for new digital technologies. Upon following this process, utilities should have greater confidence with transitioning from HSI design into V&V.

  16. Association of Airborne Microorganisms in the Operating Room With Implant Infections: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouiche, Rabih O; Green, David M; Harrington, Melvyn A; Ehni, Bruce L; Kougias, Panagiotis; Bechara, Carlos F; O'Connor, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of airborne colony-forming units (CFU) at incision sites during implantation of prostheses with the incidence of either incisional or prosthesis-related surgical site infections. DESIGN Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING Primary, public institution. PATIENTS Three hundred patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty, instrumented spinal procedures, or vascular bypass graft implantation. METHODS Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either the intervention group or the control group. A novel device (Air Barrier System), previously shown to reduce airborne CFU at incision sites, was utilized in the intervention group. Procedures assigned to the control group were performed without the device, under routine operating room atmospheric conditions. Patients were followed up for 12 months to determine whether airborne CFU levels at the incision sites predicted the incidence of incisional or prosthesis-related infection. RESULTS Data were available for 294 patients, 148 in the intervention group and 146 in the control group. CFU density at the incision site was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group (Poperations may be an effective strategy to reduce prosthesis-related infections. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01610271 Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-8.

  17. Controlled Acoustic Bass System (CABS) A Method to Achieve Uniform Sound Field Distribution at Low Frequencies in Rectangular Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    ), is introduced. The system utilizes front loudspeakers and extra loudspeakers on the opposite wall of the room processed to cancel out the rear-wall reflections, which effectively conveys a more uniform sound field. The system works in the time domain and presents good performance over the loudspeaker low......The sound field produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies in small- and medium-size rectangular listening rooms is highly nonuniform due to the multiple reflections and diffractions of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A new method, called controlled acoustic bass system (CABS...

  18. Single molecule dynamics at a mechanically controllable break junction in solution at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Tatsuya; Kiguchi, Manabu; Takase, Mai; Nagasawa, Fumika; Nabika, Hideki; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Uosaki, Kohei; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki; Murakoshi, Kei

    2013-01-23

    The in situ observation of geometrical and electronic structural dynamics of a single molecule junction is critically important in order to further progress in molecular electronics. Observations of single molecular junctions are difficult, however, because of sensitivity limits. Here, we report surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a single 4,4'-bipyridine molecule under conditions of in situ current flow in a nanogap, by using nano-fabricated, mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrodes. When adsorbed at room temperature on metal nanoelectrodes in solution to form a single molecule junction, statistical analysis showed that nontotally symmetric b(1) and b(2) modes of 4,4'-bipyridine were strongly enhanced relative to observations of the same modes in solid or aqueous solutions. Significant changes in SERS intensity, energy (wavenumber), and selectivity of Raman vibrational bands that are coincident with current fluctuations provide information on distinct states of electronic and geometrical structure of the single molecule junction, even under large thermal fluctuations occurring at room temperature. We observed the dynamics of 4,4'-bipyridine motion between vertical and tilting configurations in the Au nanogap via b(1) and b(2) mode switching. A slight increase in the tilting angle of the molecule was also observed by noting the increase in the energies of Raman modes and the decrease in conductance of the molecular junction.

  19. Requirements for future control room and visualisation features in the Web-of-Cells framework defined in the ELECTRA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinell, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    This study outlines an overview of the general requirements for the control rooms of the future power systems (2030+). The roles and activities in the future control centres will evolve with respect to the switching, dispatching and restoration functions currently active. The control centre opera...

  20. Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) Mission Control Gold Room During X-29 Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The mission control Gold room is seen here during a research flight of the X-29 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. All aspects of a research mission are monitored from one of two of these control rooms at Dryden. Dryden and its control rooms are part of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). The WATR consists of a highly automated complex of computer controlled tracking, telemetry, and communications systems and control room complexes that are capable of supporting any type of mission ranging from system and component testing, to sub-scale and full-scale flight tests of new aircraft and reentry systems. Designated areas are assigned for spin/dive tests; corridors are provided for low, medium, and high-altitude supersonic flight; and special STOL/VSTOL facilities are available at Ames Moffett and Crows Landing. Special use airspace, available at Edwards, covers approximately twelve thousand square miles of mostly desert area. The southern boundary lies to the south of Rogers Dry Lake, the western boundary lies midway between Mojave and Bakersfield, the northern boundary passes just south of Bishop, and the eastern boundary follows about 25 miles west of the Nevada border except in the northern areas where it crosses into Nevada. Two X-29 aircraft, featuring one of the most unusual designs in aviation history, flew at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) from 1984 to 1992. The fighter-sized X-29 technology demonstrators explored several concepts and technologies including: the use of advanced composites in aircraft construction; variable-camber wing surfaces; a unique forward- swept wing and its thin supercritical airfoil; strakes; close-coupled canards; and a computerized fly-by-wire flight control system used to maintain control of the otherwise unstable aircraft. Research results showed that the configuration of forward-swept wings, coupled with movable canards, gave

  1. ATLAS in Collision Mode : 13TeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    With the success of first stable beams, we look back to June 3rd 2015 as the final preparations for stable beam collisions were made for Run 2's start and take a look into the ATLAS Control Room on that exciting day.

  2. Modeling Human Error Mechanism for Soft Control in Advanced Control Rooms (ACRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljneibi, Hanan Salah Ali [Khalifa Univ., Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ha, Jun Su; Kang, Seongkeun; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To achieve the switch from conventional analog-based design to digital design in ACRs, a large number of manual operating controls and switches have to be replaced by a few common multi-function devices which is called soft control system. The soft controls in APR-1400 ACRs are classified into safety-grade and non-safety-grade soft controls; each was designed using different and independent input devices in ACRs. The operations using soft controls require operators to perform new tasks which were not necessary in conventional controls such as navigating computerized displays to monitor plant information and control devices. These kinds of computerized displays and soft controls may make operations more convenient but they might cause new types of human error. In this study the human error mechanism during the soft controls is studied and modeled to be used for analysis and enhancement of human performance (or human errors) during NPP operation. The developed model would contribute to a lot of applications to improve human performance (or reduce human errors), HMI designs, and operators' training program in ACRs. The developed model of human error mechanism for the soft control is based on assumptions that a human operator has certain amount of capacity in cognitive resources and if resources required by operating tasks are greater than resources invested by the operator, human error (or poor human performance) is likely to occur (especially in 'slip'); good HMI (Human-machine Interface) design decreases the required resources; operator's skillfulness decreases the required resources; and high vigilance increases the invested resources. In this study the human error mechanism during the soft controls is studied and modeled to be used for analysis and enhancement of human performance (or reduction of human errors) during NPP operation.

  3. Štetni faktori u radnim i kontrolnim prostorijama pogona na ratnim brodovima / Harmful factors in engine-rooms and machinery control-rooms on warships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živomir Radojković

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Na devet ratnih brodova (sedam borbenih i dva pomoćna RM VJ ispitivani su štetni faktori u motorskim i turbinskim prostorima kao i kontrolnim kabinama motorskog prostora. Utvrđeno je da zaposleni u navedenim prostorima rade u uslovima nedovoljne osvetljenosti, da su izloženi visokoj temperaturi, bud vibracijama, a potencijalno i izduvnim gasovima. Izmereni nivoi buke u motorskim i turbinskim prostorima iznosili su 104-124 dB(A, i bili su znatno iznad dopuštenog nivoa od 85 dB(A, dok je u kontrolnim kabinama većine brodova buka bila ispod nivoa od 80 dB(A. U kontrolnim kabinama dva ratna broda buka je bila iznad dozvoljenog nivoa i iznosila je 83 dB(A i 95 dB(A. Buka kojoj su izloženi zaposleni u motorskim i turbinskim prostorima može da dovede do oštećenja čula sluha, ukoliko se ne koriste predviđena zaštitna sredstva. / Harmful factors in engine and machinery control rooms on 9 warships (7 combat and 2 auxiliary ships were examined. The results show that crews on thee sea ships work in conditions of insufficient luminance, elevated air temperature noise, vibration, and possibly are exposed to exhaust gases. The entire noise levels in engine and turbine rooms were between 104 dB(A and 124 dB(A, and they were significantly above the permissible levels of 85 dB(A and 80 dB(A. On two ships, in machinery control-rooms, the entire noise was above the permissible level (83 dB(A and 95 dB(A. These mentioned noise levels could lead to hearing damage if the self protecting devices for hearing protection are not used.

  4. Copper Selenide Nanosnakes: Bovine Serum Albumin-Assisted Room Temperature Controllable Synthesis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Peng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herein we firstly reported a simple, environment-friendly, controllable synthetic method of CuSe nanosnakes at room temperature using copper salts and sodium selenosulfate as the reactants, and bovine serum albumin (BSA as foaming agent. As the amounts of selenide ions (Se2− released from Na2SeSO3 in the solution increased, the cubic and snake-like CuSe nanostructures were formed gradually, the cubic nanostructures were captured by the CuSe nanosnakes, the CuSe nanosnakes grew wider and longer as the reaction time increased. Finally, the cubic CuSe nanostructures were completely replaced by BSA–CuSe nanosnakes. The prepared BSA–CuSe nanosnakes exhibited enhanced biocompatibility than the CuSe nanocrystals, which highly suggest that as-prepared BSA–CuSe nanosnakes have great potentials in applications such as biomedical engineering.

  5. Intelligent software system for the advanced control room of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Kyun; Heo, Gyung Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Gon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The intelligent software system for nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been conceptually designed in this study. Its design goals are to operate NPPs in an improved manner and to support operators` cognitive takes. It consists of six major modules such as {sup I}nformation Processing,{sup {sup A}}larm Processing,{sup {sup P}}rocedure Tracking,{sup {sup P}}erformance Diagnosis,{sup a}nd {sup E}vent Diagnosis{sup m}odules for operators and {sup M}alfunction Diagnosis{sup m}odule for maintenance personnel. Most of the modules have been developed for several years and the others are under development. After the completion of development, they will be combined into one system that would be main parts of advanced control rooms in NPPs. 5 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  6. Using micro saint to predict performance in a nuclear power plant control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawless, M.T.; Laughery, K.R. [Micro Analysis and Design, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Persenky, J.J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires a technical basis for regulatory actions. In the area of human factors, one possible technical basis is human performance modeling technology including task network modeling. This study assessed the feasibility and validity of task network modeling to predict the performance of control room crews. Task network models were built that matched the experimental conditions of a study on computerized procedures that was conducted at North Carolina State University. The data from the {open_quotes}paper procedures{close_quotes} conditions were used to calibrate the task network models. Then, the models were manipulated to reflect expected changes when computerized procedures were used. These models` predictions were then compared to the experimental data from the {open_quotes}computerized conditions{close_quotes} of the North Carolina State University study. Analyses indicated that the models predicted some subsets of the data well, but not all. Implications for the use of task network modeling are discussed.

  7. Verification and validation of human factors issues in control room design and upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.; Collier, S. [Inst. for Energiteknikk, Halden (Norway). OECD Halden Reactor Project

    1999-12-01

    Systems, facilities and equipment are periodically updated during a power plant's lifetime. This has human factors implications, especially if the central control room is involved. Human factors work may therefore be required. There is an extensive literature on human factors itself, but not so much on how it is verified and validated. Therefore, HRP and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate commissioned a study. The objective was to review the literature and establish a knowledge base on verification and validation (V and V) of human factors issues. The report first discusses verification and validation as applied to human factors work. It describes a design process and the typical human factors topics involved. It then presents a generic method for V and V of human factors. This is built on a review of standards, guidelines and other references given in an annotated bibliography. The method is illustrated by application to some human factors topics.

  8. Team interaction skills evaluation criteria for nuclear power plant control room operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Toquam, J. [Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Gaddy, C. [General Physics Corp., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Previous research has shown the value of good team interaction skills to group performance, yet little progress has been made on in terms of how such skills can be measured. In this study rating scales developed previously (Montgomery, et al., 1990) were extensively revised and cast into a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) and a Behavioral Frequency format. Rating data were collected using 13 training instructors at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Plant, who rated three videotapes of simulator scenario performance during a day-long training session and later evaluated control room crews during requalification training. High levels of interrater agreement on both rating scales were found. However, the factor structure of the ratings was generally inconsistent with that hypothesized. Analysis of training ratings using Cronbach`s components of accuracy (Cronbach, 1955) indicated that BARS ratings generally exhibited less error than did the Behavioral Frequency ratings. The results are discussed in terms of both field and research implications.

  9. Implementation of Software Tools for Hybrid Control Rooms in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Berntsson, Olof [Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); McDonald, Robert [Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fitzgerald, Kirk [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) and Idaho National Laboratory have designed, implemented, tested and installed a functioning prototype of a set of large screen overview and procedure support displays for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (GPWR) simulator in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Human Systems Simulation Laboratory. The overview display is based on IFE’s extensive experiences with large screen overview displays in the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLAB), and presents the main control room indicators on a combined three-screen display. The procedure support displays are designed and implemented to provide a compact but still comprehensive overview of the relevant process measurements and indicators to support operators' good situational awareness during the performance of various types of procedures and plant conditions.

  10. Verbal Communication Quality Analysis of Human Operators in Main Control Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hwan; Park, Jin kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Verbal communication problems have been one of the major human factors causing serious problems in many industries. The results of existing researches have revealed that keeping good communication quality is essential to ensure the safety of a large-sized and highly advanced industrial process system. Communication Quality is ensured only when both parties involved in a communication process understand and comprehend each other correctly, and it can be decided based on the correctness of the messages communicated between them. In this paper, we suggested a method to measure the quality of communication during off-normal situation in main control room of nuclear power plants. It evaluates the cosine similarity that is a measure of sentence similarity between two operators by finding the cosine of the angle between them

  11. 76 FR 35130 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management/Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ...This rule expedites the program implementation deadlines in the Control Room Management/Human Factors regulations in order to realize the safety benefits sooner than established in the original rule. The deadline for pipeline operators to implement the procedures for roles and responsibilities, shift change, change management, and operating experience, fatigue mitigation education and training is now October 1, 2011, 16 months sooner than the original regulation. The deadline for pipeline operators to implement the other procedures for adequate information, shift lengths, maximum hours-of-service, and alarm management is now August 1, 2012, six months sooner than the original regulation. In general, training procedures must also be implemented by August 1, 2012, with certain exceptions.

  12. Single-Use Energy Sources and Operating Room Time for Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloran-Schwartz, M Brigid; Gavard, Jeffrey A; Martin, Jared C; Blaskiewicz, Robert J; Yeung, Patrick P

    2016-01-01

    To compare the intraoperative direct costs of a single-use energy device with reusable energy devices during laparoscopic hysterectomy. A randomized controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). An academic hospital. Forty-six women who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy from March 2013 to September 2013. Each patient served as her own control. One side of the uterine attachments was desiccated and transected with the single-use device (Ligasure 5-mm Blunt Tip LF1537 with the Force Triad generator). The other side was desiccated and transected with reusable bipolar forceps (RoBi 5 mm), and transected with monopolar scissors using the same Covidien Force Triad generator. The instrument approach used was randomized to the attending physician who was always on the patient's left side. Resident physicians always operated on the patient's right side and used the converse instruments of the attending physician. Start time was recorded at the utero-ovarian pedicle and end time was recorded after transection of the uterine artery on the same side. Costs included the single-use device; amortized costs of the generator, reusable instruments, and cords; cleaning and packaging of reusable instruments; and disposal of the single-use device. Operating room time was $94.14/min. We estimated that our single use-device cost $630.14 and had a total time savings of 6.7 min per case, or 3.35 min per side, which could justify the expense of the device. The single-use energy device had significant median time savings (-4.7 min per side, p energy device that both desiccates and cuts significantly reduced operating room time to justify its own cost, and it also reduced total intraoperative direct costs during laparoscopic hysterectomy in our institution. Operating room cost per minute varies between institutions and must be considered before generalizing our results. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Automation inflicted differences on operator performance in nuclear power plant control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Osvalder, A.L. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Product and Producton Development (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    Today it is possible to automate almost any function in a human-machine system. Therefore it is important to find a balance between automation level and the prerequisites for the operator to maintain safe operation. Different human factors evaluation methods can be used to find differences between automatic and manual operations that have an effect on operator performance; e.g. Predictive Human Error Analysis (PHEA), NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), Halden Questionnaire, and Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART). Results from an empirical study concerning automation levels, made at Ringhals power plant, showed that factors as time pressure and criticality of the work situation influenced the operator's performance and mental workload more than differences in level of automation. The results indicate that the operator's attention strategies differ between the manual and automatic sequences. Independently of level of automation, it is essential that the operator retains control and situational understanding. When performing a manual task, the operator is 'closer' to the process and in control with sufficient situational understanding. When the level of automation increases, the demands on information presentation increase to ensure safe plant operation. The need for control can be met by introducing 'control gates' where the operator has to accept that the automatic procedures are continuing as expected. Situational understanding can be established by clear information about process status and by continuous feedback. A conclusion of the study was that a collaborative control room environment is important. Rather than allocating functions to either the operator or the system, a complementary strategy should be used. Key parameters to consider when planning the work in the control room are time constraints and task criticality and how they affect the performance of the joint cognitive system.However, the examined working

  14. Interim results of the study of control room crew staffing for advanced passive reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Sebok, A.; Haugset, K. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    Differences in the ways in which vendors expect the operations staff to interact with advanced passive plants by vendors have led to a need for reconsideration of the minimum shift staffing requirements of licensed Reactor Operators and Senior Reactor Operators contained in current federal regulations (i.e., 10 CFR 50.54(m)). A research project is being carried out to evaluate the impact(s) of advanced passive plant design and staffing of control room crews on operator and team performance. The purpose of the project is to contribute to the understanding of potential safety issues and provide data to support the development of design review guidance. Two factors are being evaluated across a range of plant operating conditions: control room crew staffing; and characteristics of the operating facility itself, whether it employs conventional or advanced, passive features. This paper presents the results of the first phase of the study conducted at the Loviisa nuclear power station earlier this year. Loviisa served as the conventional plant in this study. Data collection from four crews were collected from a series of design basis scenarios, each crew serving in either a normal or minimum staffing configuration. Results of data analyses show that crews participating in the minimum shift staffing configuration experienced significantly higher workload, had lower situation awareness, demonstrated significantly less effective team performance, and performed more poorly as a crew than the crews participating in the normal shift staffing configuration. The baseline data on crew configurations from the conventional plant setting will be compared with similar data to be collected from the advanced plant setting, and a report prepared providing the results of the entire study.

  15. Relation Between Job Stress Dimensions and Job Satisfaction in Workers of a Refinery Control Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behjati Ardakani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job stress can result from an imbalance between job demands and the abilities to cope them. Stress can affect individuals and lead to job dissatisfaction. This study was conducted to assess the influence of different job stress dimensions on job satisfaction in workers of a refinery control room located at the south of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study all 100 workers of an oil refinery control room were studied. Job stress and job satisfaction was measured using standard questionnaires provided by national institute of mental health (NIMH and Robbins respectively. After collecting, data were analyzed using SPSS ver.16 software. A general linear model was used to estimate the effect of different job stress dimensions on the job satisfaction. Results: In this study 62.08 percent of workers were categorized as having high level of stress. In job satisfaction case, 9.2, 27.6, 28.7, 16.1 and 18.4 of workers were classified as totally dissatisfied, dissatisfied, not satisfied nor dissatisfied, satisfied and totally satisfied, respectively. A Pearson correlation test revealed a significant negative correlation between job satisfaction and all studied dimensions of job stress (p= 0.01. In the general regression model, partial Eta squared was 0.03, 0.3 and 0.23 for respectively interpersonal relationships, physical conditions of work and job interest. Conclusion: This study showed that job satisfaction is mostly influenced by physical conditions and job interest dimensions of job stress. Therefore, for improvement of job satisfaction in workers, different parameters of these two dimensions of job stress should be considered.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  17. Detector Control System for the AFP detector in ATLAS experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaś, E.; Caforio, D.; Czekierda, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Olszowska, J.; Seabra, L.; Šícho, P.

    2017-10-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector consists of two forward detectors located at 205 m and 217 m on either side of the ATLAS experiment. The aim is to measure the momenta and angles of diffractively scattered protons. In 2016, two detector stations on one side of the ATLAS interaction point were installed and commissioned. The detector infrastructure and necessary services were installed and are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS), which is responsible for the coherent and safe operation of the detector. A large variety of used equipment represents a considerable challenge for the AFP DCS design. Industrial Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) product Siemens WinCCOA, together with the CERN Joint Control Project (JCOP) framework and standard industrial and custom developed server applications and protocols are used for reading, processing, monitoring and archiving of the detector parameters. Graphical user interfaces allow for overall detector operation and visualization of the detector status. Parameters, important for the detector safety, are used for alert generation and interlock mechanisms.

  18. Requirements for future control room and visualization features in the Web-of-Cells framework defined in the ELECTRA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornelli, Carlo; Zuelli, Roberto; Marinelli, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    operators will supervise on the power system and intervene - when necessary - thanks to the maturation and wide scale deployment of flexible controls. For the identification of control room requirements, general trends in power system evolution are considered and mainly the outcomes of the ELECTRA IRP...

  19. Device- and system-independent personal touchless user interface for operating rooms : One personal UI to control all displays in an operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Habert, Séverine; Weidert, Simon; Navab, Nassir

    2016-06-01

    In the modern day operating room, the surgeon performs surgeries with the support of different medical systems that showcase patient information, physiological data, and medical images. It is generally accepted that numerous interactions must be performed by the surgical team to control the corresponding medical system to retrieve the desired information. Joysticks and physical keys are still present in the operating room due to the disadvantages of mouses, and surgeons often communicate instructions to the surgical team when requiring information from a specific medical system. In this paper, a novel user interface is developed that allows the surgeon to personally perform touchless interaction with the various medical systems, switch effortlessly among them, all of this without modifying the systems' software and hardware. To achieve this, a wearable RGB-D sensor is mounted on the surgeon's head for inside-out tracking of his/her finger with any of the medical systems' displays. Android devices with a special application are connected to the computers on which the medical systems are running, simulating a normal USB mouse and keyboard. When the surgeon performs interaction using pointing gestures, the desired cursor position in the targeted medical system display, and gestures, are transformed into general events and then sent to the corresponding Android device. Finally, the application running on the Android devices generates the corresponding mouse or keyboard events according to the targeted medical system. To simulate an operating room setting, our unique user interface was tested by seven medical participants who performed several interactions with the visualization of CT, MRI, and fluoroscopy images at varying distances from them. Results from the system usability scale and NASA-TLX workload index indicated a strong acceptance of our proposed user interface.

  20. Measuring Situation Awareness of Operating Team in Different Main Control Room Environments of Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Woo Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Environments in nuclear power plants (NPPs are changing as the design of instrumentation and control systems for NPPs is rapidly moving toward fully digital instrumentation and control, and modern computer techniques are gradually introduced into main control rooms (MCRs. Within the context of these environmental changes, the level of performance of operators in a digital MCR is a major concern. Situation awareness (SA, which is used within human factors research to explain to what extent operators of safety-critical systems know what is transpiring in the system and the environment, is considered a prerequisite factor to guarantee the safe operation of NPPs. However, the safe operation of NPPs can be guaranteed through a team effort. In this regard, the operating team's SA in a conventional and digital MCR should be measured in order to assess whether the new design features implemented in a digital MCR affect this parameter. This paper explains the team SA measurement method used in this study and the results of applying this measurement method to operating teams in different MCR environments. The paper also discusses several empirical lessons learned from the results.

  1. A Distributed Control System Prototyping Environment to Support Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Roger Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ulrich, Thomas Anthony [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, however the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose a rapid prototyping approach for integrating proposed HMIs into their native environments before a design is finalized. This approach allows researchers and developers to test design ideas and eliminate design flaws prior to fully developing the new system. We illustrate this approach with four prototype designs developed using Microsoft’s Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). One example is integrated into a microworld environment to test the functionality of the design and identify the optimal level of automation for a new system in a nuclear power plant. The other three examples are integrated into a full-scale, glasstop digital simulator of a nuclear power plant. One example demonstrates the capabilities of next generation control concepts; another aims to expand the current state of the art; lastly, an HMI prototype was developed as a test platform for a new control system currently in development at U.S. nuclear power plants. WPF possesses several characteristics that make it well suited to HMI design. It provides a tremendous amount of flexibility, agility, robustness, and extensibility. Distributed control system (DCS) specific environments tend to focus on the safety and reliability requirements for real-world interfaces and consequently have less emphasis on providing functionality to support novel interaction paradigms. Because of WPF’s large user-base, Microsoft can provide an extremely mature tool. Within process control applications,WPF is

  2. Quality control results of the drift tubes for the ATLAS MDT-BIS chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Alexopoulos, T; Dris, M; Filippas, T; Gazis, E; Katsoufis, E; Maltezos, S; Savva, Panagiota S; Tsipolitis, G; Tzamariudaki, E; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) is a general purpose experiment, which will start its operation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in 2007. The ATLAS detector is designed to study the products of proton-proton collisions at c.m.s. energies of up to 14 TeV. Three Greek Universities have taken the responsibility to construct 112 BIS-MDT (Barrel Inner Small) chambers using 29 000 drift tubes of 170 cm length and 3 cm diameter that have been quality tested before assembly. This work describes the Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA_QC) procedures for the drift tubes, followed at the High Energy Physics Laboratory of the National Technical University of Athens, while emphasis is given on the obtained results for the above mentioned number of tubes.

  3. The TDAQ Analytics Dashboard: a real-time web application for the ATLAS TDAQ control infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Magnoni, L; The ATLAS collaboration; Sloper, J E

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) infrastructure is responsible for filtering and transferring ATLAS experimental data from detectors to mass storage systems. It relies on a large, distributed computing environment composed by thousands of software applications running concurrently. In such a complex environment, information sharing is fundamental for controlling applications behavior, error reporting and operational monitoring. During data taking runs, the streams of messages sent by applications and data published via information services are constantly monitored by experts to verify correctness of running operations and to understand problematic situations. To simplify and improve system analysis and errors detection tasks, we developed the TDAQ Analytics Dashboard, a web application that aims to collect, correlate and visualize effectively this real time flow of information. The TDAQ Analytics Dashboard is composed by two main entities, that reflect the twofold scope of the application. The fi...

  4. The TDAQ Analytics Dashboard: a real-time web application for the ATLAS TDAQ control infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Magnoni, L; Sloper, J E

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) infrastructure is responsible for filtering and transferring ATLAS experimental data from detectors to mass storage systems. It relies on a large, distributed computing environment composed by thousands of software applications running concurrently. In such a complex environment, information sharing is fundamental for controlling applications behavior, error reporting and operational monitoring. During data taking runs, the streams of messages sent by applications and data published via information services are constantly monitored by experts to verify correctness of running operations and to understand problematic situations. To simplify and improve system analysis and errors detection tasks, we developed the TDAQ Analytics Dashboard, a web application that aims to collect, correlate and visualize effectively this real time flow of information. The TDAQ Analytics Dashboard is composed by two main entities, that reflect the twofold scope of the application. The fi...

  5. Design and modernization of control rooms according to new I and C systems based on HFE principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejas, Luis; Larraz, Javier, E-mail: lrejas@tecnatom.e, E-mail: jlarraz@tecnatom.e [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain). New Control Room Design Dept.; Ortega, Fernando, E-mail: fortega@tecnatom.e [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain). Control Room and Simulation Dept.

    2011-07-01

    The use of new digital I and C systems in the design of new nuclear power plants, as well as the modernization of existing facilities, implies relevant changes in the control room design. New I and C systems provide new features that affect the control room operating concept. Therefore, a detailed analysis is required to take into consideration all the operating and human factors aspects. Based on Tecnatom experience in the field, this article presents the methodological approach used as well as the most relevant aspects of this kind of project. (author)

  6. Operating Room Time Savings with the Use of Splint Packs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most expensive variable in the operating room (OR is time. Lean Process Management is being used in the medical field to improve efficiency in the OR. Streamlining individual processes within the OR is crucial to a comprehensive time saving and cost-cutting health care strategy. At our institution, one hour of OR time costs approximately $500, exclusive of supply and personnel costs. Commercially prepared splint packs (SP contain all components necessary for plaster-of-Paris short-leg splint application and have the potential to decrease splint application time and overall costs by making it a more lean process. We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing OR time savings between SP use and bulk supply (BS splint application. Methods: Fifty consecutive adult operative patients on whom post-operative short-leg splint immobilization was indicated were randomized to either a control group using BS or an experimental group using SP. One orthopaedic surgeon (EMB prepared and applied all of the splints in a standardized fashion. Retrieval time, preparation time, splint application time, and total splinting time for both groups were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: The retrieval time, preparation time and total splinting time were significantly less (p

  7. Measurement, evaluation and control of the microclimate in rooms for weaned piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van A.V.

    2005-01-01

    The Animal Occupied Zone (AOZ), or the microclimate, in a room for weaned piglets is roughly the zone between 0 and 50 cm above the floor of the pen. It is distinguished from the macroclimate, which is the average climate of a pig room. The ability to create and maintain an optimal climate in the

  8. Access Control in the ATLAS TDAQ Online Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Leahu, Marius Constantin; Stoichescu, D A; Lehmann Miotto, G

    ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) is a general-purpose detector for studying high-energy particle interactions: it is the largest particle detector experiment at CERN and it is built around one of the interaction points of the proton beams accelerated by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The detector generates an impressive amount of raw data: 64 TB per second as a result of 40 MHz proton-proton collision rate with 1.6 MB data for each such event. The handling of such data rate is managed by a three levels Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system, which filters out the events not relevant from physics research point of view and selects in the end in the order of 1000 events per second to be stored for offline analyses. This system comprises a significant number of hardware devices, software applications and human personnel to supervise the experiment operation. Their protection against damages as a result of misuse and their optimized exploitation by avoiding the conflicting accesses to resources are key requ...

  9. An empirical study on the basic human error probabilities for NPP advanced main control room operation using soft control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Inseok, E-mail: nuclear82@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ar Ryum, E-mail: arryum@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Harbi, Mohamed Ali Salem Al, E-mail: 100035556@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Lee, Seung Jun, E-mail: sjlee@kaeri.re.kr [Integrated Safety Assessment Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150-1, Dukjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook, E-mail: hyungook@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Poong Hyun, E-mail: phseong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The operation environment of MCRs in NPPs has changed by adopting new HSIs. ► The operation action in NPP Advanced MCRs is performed by soft control. ► Different basic human error probabilities (BHEPs) should be considered. ► BHEPs in a soft control operation environment are investigated empirically. ► This work will be helpful to verify if soft control has positive or negative effects. -- Abstract: By adopting new human–system interfaces that are based on computer-based technologies, the operation environment of main control rooms (MCRs) in nuclear power plants (NPPs) has changed. The MCRs that include these digital and computer technologies, such as large display panels, computerized procedures, soft controls, and so on, are called Advanced MCRs. Among the many features in Advanced MCRs, soft controls are an important feature because the operation action in NPP Advanced MCRs is performed by soft control. Using soft controls such as mouse control, touch screens, and so on, operators can select a specific screen, then choose the controller, and finally manipulate the devices. However, because of the different interfaces between soft control and hardwired conventional type control, different basic human error probabilities (BHEPs) should be considered in the Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) for advanced MCRs. Although there are many HRA methods to assess human reliabilities, such as Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP), Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP), Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART), Human Event Repository and Analysis (HERA), Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR), Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM), and so on, these methods have been applied to conventional MCRs, and they do not consider the new features of advance MCRs such as soft controls. As a result, there is an insufficient database for assessing human reliabilities in advanced

  10. A Cognitive Human Error Analysis with CREAM in Control Room of Petrochemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Shokria

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The cognitive human error analysis technique is one of the second-generation techniques used to evaluate human reliability; it has a strong, detailed theoretical background that focuses on the important cognitive features of human behavior. Objectives The aim of this study was to assign task and jobs crisis using analysis of cognitive human error with CREAM. Finally, based on the results, the major causes of error were detected. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 53 people working in an olefin unit. It is one of the most important control rooms located in a special economic zone in Assaluyeh petrochemical industry. In this study, first a job analysis was conducted and the sub-tasks and conditions affecting the performance of the staff were determined. Then, the control mode coefficient and control mode type, as well as the possibility of total error were determined. Finally, the cognitive functions and type of cognitive error related to each sub-task were identified. Results Among the six evaluated occupational tasks, the tasks performed by board-man and site-man had the highest values of total human error in terms of transitory overall error coefficient (0.056 and 0.031, respectively. In addition, the following results were obtained on the basis of the extended CREAM: execution failure (31.72%, interpretation failure (29.20%, planning failure (14.63%, and observation failure (24.39%. Conclusions Common Performance Conditions (CPCs, empowerment, and the time available for work were among the most important factors that reduced occupational performance. To optimize a communication system, it is necessary to arrange the priority of tasks, hold joint meetings, inform the staff about the termination of work permits, hold training sessions, and measure the pollutants.

  11. The version control service for ATLAS data acquisition configuration filesDAQ ; configuration ; OKS ; XML

    CERN Document Server

    Soloviev, Igor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    To configure data taking session the ATLAS systems and detectors store more than 160 MBytes of data acquisition related configuration information in OKS XML files. The total number of the files exceeds 1300 and they are updated by many system experts. In the past from time to time after such updates we had experienced problems caused by XML syntax errors or inconsistent state of files from a point of view of the overall ATLAS configuration. It was not always possible to know who made a modification causing problems or how to go back to a previous version of the modified file. Few years ago a special service addressing these issues has been implemented and deployed on ATLAS Point-1. It excludes direct write access to XML files stored in a central database repository. Instead, for an update the files are copied into a user repository, validated after modifications and committed using a version control system. The system's callback updates the central repository. Also, it keeps track of all modifications providi...

  12. Low voltage control for the liquid argon hadronic end-cap calorimeter of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brettel, H; Habring, J; Oberlack, H; Schacht, P

    2002-01-01

    At the ATLAS detector a SCADA system surveys and controls the sub- detectors. The link is realized by PVSS2 software and a CanBus hardware system. The low voltages for the Hadronic Endcaps of the liquid argon calorimeter are produced by DC/DC-converters in the power boxes and split into 320 channels corresponding to the pre- amplifier and summing boards in the cryostat. Six units of a prototype distribution board are currently under test. Each of it contains 2 ELMBs as CanBus interface, a FPGA of type QL3012 for digital control and 30 low voltage regulators for the individual fine adjustments of the outputs.

  13. Prototypes for components of a control system for the ATLAS pixel detector at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Boek, J; Kind, P; Mättig, P; Püllen, L; Zeitnitz, C

    2013-01-01

    inner detector of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced entirely including the pixel detector. This new pixel detector requires a specific control system which complies with the strict requirements in terms of radiation hardness, material budget and space for the electronics in the ATLAS experiment. The University ofWuppertal is developing a concept for a DCS (Detector Control System) network consisting of two kinds of ASICs. The first ASIC is the DCS Chip which is located on the pixel detector, very close to the interaction point. The second ASIC is the DCS Controller which is controlling 4x4 DCS Chips from the outer regions of ATLAS via differential data lines. Both ASICs are manufactured in 130 nm deep sub micron technology. We present results from measurements from new prototypes of components for the DCS network.

  14. Effects of Shift Work on Cognitive Performance, Sleep Quality, and Sleepiness among Petrochemical Control Room Operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Reza; Haidarimoghadam, Rashid; Motamedzadeh, Majid; Golmohamadi, Rostam; Soltanian, Alireza; Zoghipaydar, Mohamad Reza

    2016-02-03

    Shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive performance, sleepiness, and sleep quality among petrochemical control room shift workers. Sixty shift workers participated in this study. Cognitive performance was evaluated using a number of objective tests, including continuous performance test, n-back test, and simple reaction time test; sleepiness was measured using the subjective Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS); and sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. ANCOVA, t-test, and repeated-measures ANOVA were applied for statistical analyses, and the significance level was set at p cognitive performance, except for omission error, significantly decreased at the end of both day and night shifts (p sleep quality on both day and night shifts, and there were significant differences between the day and night shifts in terms of subjective sleep quality and quantity (p sleep, induced cognitive performance decline at the end of both day and night shifts, and increased sleepiness in night shift. It, thus, seems necessary to take ergonomic measures such as planning for more appropriate shift work and reducing working hours.

  15. Applying CPM-GOMS to Analyze Mental Tasks of the Advanced Main Control Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Tsung Ling; Yang, Chih Wei [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Tao-Yuan (China); Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe [Chung-Yuan Christian University, Chung- Li (China)

    2011-08-15

    GOMS techniques produce quantitative and qualitative predictions of how people will use a proposed system, though the different versions have different emphases. All of the techniques can speak to the coverage of the functionality of a system and all provide estimates of task performance time. This study aimed for analyze the tasks that operators deal with in the main control room of advanced nuclear power plant, and most of the tasks need high mental activity. The mental tasks would overlap and be dealt with at the same time, namely, most of them can be assumed highly parallel in nature. Therefore, this study would prefer the CPM-GOMS to be the basic pattern for developing the mental task analysis for digital work environment. A within-subjects experiment design has been conducted to examine the validity of the modified CPM-GOM. Thirty subjects participated in two task types included high and low compatible type. The results indicated the performance criteria of high compatible task type was significantly higher than that of low compatible task type, that is, the modified CPM-GOMS could distinguish the difference between high and low compatible mental tasks definitely.

  16. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.leopold@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2014-12-15

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  17. Development of Alarm System link Drawing for Operation Support for APR1400 Digital Main Control Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Digitalized MMI(Man-Machine Interface) including Digital Main Control Room(MCR) and digital I and C system was being applied for SKN 3 and 4 Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) and subsequent APR1400 NPP type. But, operators can not easily find instrument for alarm immediately. Therefore, Alarm system is required to easily find instrument for Alarm. For this implementation, we will plan system design considering design feature without affecting network load and CPU load. We have developed Alarm system link drawing for digital MCR. Operators of the digitalized MCR navigates from their consoles to the drawings related to the plant alarms and their instruments or the operation status. Such method gives cognitive load to the operators having to travel to different locations in finding the related information. Screen Sharing System, which is the fundamental technique for Drawing Interconnection Alarm System is close to completion, and it should be functionally tested and verified by the human factor engineering. For the actual application to the operating plants, the drawings to be interconnected to the alarms and the opinions from the operators/maintenance departments for designating alarm number should be surveyed, Also, another function that allows the access to the alarm related drawings not only from the MCR but also from the other offices.

  18. The Measurement of Spectral Characteristics and Composition of Radiation in ATLAS with MEDIPIX2-USB Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, M.; Greiffenberg, D.; Heijne, E.; Holy, T.; Idárraga, J.; Jakubek, J.; Král, V.; Králík, M.; Lebel, C.; Leroy, C.; Llopart, X.; Lord, G.; Maneuski, D.; Ouellette, O.; Sochor, V.; Prospísil, S.; Suk, M; Tlustos, L.; Vykydal, Z.; Wilhelm, I.

    2008-01-01

    A network of devices to perform real-time measurements of the spectral characteristics and composition of radiation in the ATLAS detector and cavern during its operation is being built. This system of detectors will be a stand alone system fully capable of delivering real-time images of fluxes and spectral composition of different particle species including slow and fast neutrons. The devices are based on MEDIPIX2 pixel silicon detectors that will be operated via active USB cables and USB-Ethernet extenders through an Ethernet network by a PC located in the USA15 ATLAS control room. The installation of 14 devices inside ATLAS (detector and cavern) is in progress.

  19. Demonstrator Flood Control Room : Inventarisatie van de wensen van de verschillende Deltares onderdelen en een hierop gebaseerd ontwerp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boertjens, G.J.; Attema-van Waas, A.R.; Guikema, M.; Schilder, C.M.C.; Veen, M.J. van der

    2009-01-01

    Op basis van het uitgevoerde onderzoek trekt TNO de volgende conclusies: • De bestaande ruimte die Deltares op het oog heeft voor de realisatie van de trainingsruimte is klein. Een eerste fase van de gewenste Flood Control Room is realiseerbaar in deze ruimte, met inachtneming dat niet alle

  20. Potential of Snoezelen room multisensory stimulation to improve balance in individuals with dementia: a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klages, Kelsey; Zecevic, Aleksandra; Orange, Joseph B; Hobson, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the influence of multisensory stimulations in a Snoezelen room on the balance of individuals with dementia. Randomized controlled trial. Canadian long-term care home. Twenty-four residents (average age 86 years), in a long-term care home diagnosed with dementia, were assigned randomly to intervention and control groups. Nineteen participants completed the study. Nine intervention group participants completed 30-minute Snoezelen room sessions twice a week for six weeks. Sessions were guided by participants' preferences for stimulation. Interactions with tactile, visual and proprioceptive sensations were encouraged. Ten control group participants received an equal amount of volunteer visits. The Functional Reach Test, the eyes-open Sharpened Romberg and the Timed Up and Go Test with and without dual task, assessed static and dynamic balance at baseline and after the intervention. Falls frequencies were recorded six weeks before, during and after intervention. A journal was kept of observations in Snoezelen room. Split-plot MANOVA analyses revealed no significant effects of unstructured Snoezelen room sessions on participants' balance. There were no multivariate effects of time (F(4,14) = 1.13, P = 0.38) or group (F(4,14) = 0.63, P = 0.65). Group membership did not alter falls frequency. However, observations of participants' interactions with elements of the Snoezelen room, such as imagery-induced head and eye movements, vibrating sensations and kicking activities, captured events that can be used to create specific multisensory balance-enhancing stimulations. Although the null hypothesis was not rejected, further investigation of a potential to influence balance in individuals with dementia through Snoezelen room intervention in long-term care homes is warranted.

  1. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Control Centre for LHC operations, located in Prevessin.

    CERN Multimedia

    Husi C.

    2007-01-01

    The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Control Centre for LHC operations, located in Prevessin.

  2. APPLICATION OF EYE TRACKING FOR MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN HUMAN FACTORS STUDIES IN CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, C.; Spielman, Z.; LeBlanc, K.; Rice, B.

    2017-05-01

    An important element of human factors engineering (HFE) pertains to measurement and evaluation (M&E). The role of HFE-M&E should be integrated throughout the entire control room modernization (CRM) process and be used for human-system performance evaluation and diagnostic purposes with resolving potential human engineering deficiencies (HEDs) and other human machine interface (HMI) design issues. NUREG-0711 describes how HFE in CRM should employ a hierarchical set of measures, particularly during integrated system validation (ISV), including plant performance, personnel task performance, situation awareness, cognitive workload, and anthropometric/ physiological factors. Historically, subjective measures have been primarily used since they are easier to collect and do not require specialized equipment. However, there are pitfalls with relying solely on subjective measures in M&E such that negatively impact reliability, sensitivity, and objectivity. As part of comprehensively capturing a diverse set of measures that strengthen findings and inferences made of the benefits from emerging technologies like advanced displays, this paper discusses the value of using eye tracking as an objective method that can be used in M&E. A brief description of eye tracking technology and relevant eye tracking measures is provided. Additionally, technical considerations and the unique challenges with using eye tracking in full-scaled simulations are addressed. Finally, this paper shares preliminary findings regarding the use of a wearable eye tracking system in a full-scale simulator study. These findings should help guide future full-scale simulator studies using eye tracking as a methodology to evaluate human-system performance.

  3. Production and Quality Control of Micromegas Anode PCBs for the ATLAS NSW Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Kuger, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For the 2019-20 New Small Wheel upgrade of the ATLAS detector, Micromegas detectors of 1280m2 active area will be build. On this scale industrialization of anode board production is an essential precondition for detector construction. Design and construction methods of these boards have been optimized towards mass production. In parallel quality control procedures have been developed and established. The first pre-series of large size Micromegas anode boards has been produced in industries during 2015 and demonstrates the feasibility of the project. Full scale production is currently launching and will last 16 months.

  4. An automatic system for controlling the quality of straws installed in the ATLAS TRT detector

    CERN Document Server

    Golunov, A O; Gousakov, Yu V; Kekelidze, G D; Livinski, V V; Mouraviev, S V; Parzycki, S S; Peshekhonov, V D; Price, M J; Savenkov, A A

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an automatic system to control the quality of straws installed in the wheels of the end-cap Transition Radiation Tracker of the ATLAS experiment. The system tests both the straightness and the electrical insulation of the straws during installation. The testing time per straw is 9s; consequently it takes about 2h to measure one layer of straws. The off-line analysis takes 20s per straw. With this system defects can be immediately detected and corrected. This clearly influences the future performance of the detector.

  5. ATLAS ITk Short-Strip Stave Prototype Module with Integrated DCDC Powering and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Greenall, Ashley; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the Phase II upgrade, the ATLAS detector at the LHC will be upgraded with a new Inner Tracker (ITk) detector. The ITk prototype barrel module design has adopted an integrated low mass assembly featuring single-sided flexible circuits, with readout ASICs, glued to the silicon strip sensor. Further integration has been achieved by the attachment of module DCDC powering, a HV sensor biasing switch and autonomous monitoring and control to the sensor. This low mass integrated module approach benefits further in a reduced width stave structure to which the modules are attached. The results of preliminary electrical tests of such an integrated module are presented.

  6. Human factors design, verification, and validation for two types of control room upgrades at a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Laurids Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the NUREG-0711 based human factors engineering (HFE) phases and associated elements required to support design, verification and validation (V&V), and implementation of a new plant process computer (PPC) and turbine control system (TCS) at a representative nuclear power plant. This paper reviews ways to take a human-system interface (HSI) specification and use it when migrating legacy PPC displays or designing displays with new functionality. These displays undergo iterative usability testing during the design phase and then undergo an integrated system validation (ISV) in a full scope control room training simulator. Following the successful demonstration of operator performance with the systems during the ISV, the new system is implemented at the plant, first in the training simulator and then in the main control room.

  7. Room-temperature electric-field controlled ferromagnetism in Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Faxian; Wang, Yong; Kim, Jiyoung; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Zhou, Yi; Kou, Xufeng; Han, Wei; Kawakami, R K; Zou, Jin; Wang, Kang L

    2010-08-24

    Room-temperature control of ferromagnetism by electric fields in magnetic semiconductors has been actively pursued as one of important approaches to realize practical spintronic and nonvolatile logic devices. While Mn-doped III-V semiconductors were considered as potential candidates for achieving this controllability, the search for an ideal material with high Curie temperature (T(c) > 300 K) and controllable ferromagnetism at room temperature has continued for nearly a decade. Recently, Mn(0.05)Ge(0.95) quantum dots (QDs) were demonstrated to have a T(c) above 300 K. However, the field control of ferromagnetism based on hole-mediated effect remained at low temperatures and thus prohibited spintronic devices operable at ambient environment. Here, we report a successful demonstration of electric-field control of ferromagnetism in the Mn(0.05)Ge(0.95) quantum dots up to 300 K. We show that, by using quantum structure, high-quality material can be obtained and effective hole mediation due to quantum confinement effect can be achieved. Upon the application of gate bias to a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the ferromagnetism of the channel layer, that is, the Mn(0.05)Ge(0.95) quantum dots, was manipulated through the change of hole concentration. Our results are fundamentally and technologically important toward the realization of room-temperature spin field-effect transistors and nonvolatile spin logic devices.

  8. A Novel Grid-Wide Transient Stability Assessment and Visualization Method for Increasing Situation Awareness of Control Room Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertl, Michael; Rezkalla, Michel M.N.; Marinelli, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    is derived. Moreover, it is shown that the method facilitates the visual examination of transient stability. It provides control room operators with essential information about the state of the system and enables them to take appropriate preventive actions if insufficient transient stability margins......The aim of the paper is to introduce a grid-wide assessment method to determine the transient stability margin and visualize it effectively to increase the situation awareness of control room operators. Critical area(s) with insufficient transient stability margin have to be identified in order...... to be able to take appropriate preventive actions. The introduced method evaluates the transient stability margin with a time-domain approach by using the voltage angle of several buses across the power system. Information about the severity of a contingency and the location of the most critical buses...

  9. Control Logic for the Interlock system of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Riegel, Christian

    Part of the first upgrade program of the ATLAS detector is the installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) as a fourth and innermost detector layer of the ATLAS pixel detector to prepare the tracking system for the expected increase of pile-up events. As with every sub-detector, the IBL and its components have to be monitored and controlled via a Detector Control System (DCS). A hardware-based interlock system is installed on-site to prevent detector and people working at the detector from serious harm and damage. For the IBL, the logical processing of interlock signals is realised in Interlock Matrix Crates (IMCs) using Complex Programmable Logic Devices (CPLD). One part of this master thesis is the automatic implementation of the logical assignments from database information. A script was developed to generate the needed file to program the CPLD. The second part of this thesis is the design of a test setup to verify the functionality of the electrical components of each IMC and to confirm the correct proce...

  10. The TDAQ Analytics Dashboard: a real-time web application for the ATLAS TDAQ control infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Magnoni, Luca; Sloper, John Erik

    2011-12-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) infrastructure is responsible for filtering and transferring ATLAS experimental data from detectors to mass storage systems. It relies on a large, distributed computing system composed of thousands of software applications running concurrently. In such a complex environment, information sharing is fundamental for controlling applications behavior, error reporting and operational monitoring. During data taking, the streams of messages sent by applications and data published via information services are constantly monitored by experts to verify the correctness of running operations and to understand problematic situations. To simplify and improve system analysis and errors detection tasks, we developed the TDAQ Analytics Dashboard, a web application that aims to collect, correlate and visualize effectively this real time flow of information. The TDAQ Analytics Dashboard is composed of two main entities that reflect the twofold scope of the application. The first is the engine, a Java service that performs aggregation, processing and filtering of real time data stream and computes statistical correlation on sliding windows of time. The results are made available to clients via a simple web interface supporting SQL-like query syntax. The second is the visualization, provided by an Ajax-based web application that runs on client's browser. The dashboard approach allows to present information in a clear and customizable structure. Several types of interactive graphs are proposed as widgets that can be dynamically added and removed from visualization panels. Each widget acts as a client for the engine, querying the web interface to retrieve data with desired criteria. In this paper we present the design, development and evolution of the TDAQ Analytics Dashboard. We also present the statistical analysis computed by the application in this first period of high energy data taking operations for the ATLAS experiment.

  11. The Power System Detector Control System of the Monitored Drift Tubes of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alexopoulos, T; Bachtis, M; Argyropoulos, T; Gazis, E; Lliopoulos, A; Mountricha, E; Tsipolitis, G; Vlachos, S

    2008-01-01

    In this note the Detector Control System (DCS) for the power supply (PS) of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS experiment is presented. The principal task of DCS is to enable and ensure the coherent and safe operation of the detector. The interaction of the detector experts users or shifters with the detector hardware is also performed via DCS. This system monitors the operational parameters and the overall state of the detector, the alarm generation and handling, the connection of hardware values to databases and the interaction with the Data Acquisition system (DAQ). In this note the Power System (PS) system as a Detector Control Subsystem is presented. Furthermore, it is outlined in detail what is the front-end to be controlled and how the architecture of the back-end is established.

  12. Front-end I/O of the ATLAS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Burckhart, Helfried J

    1999-01-01

    The importance of using a powerful Detector Control System (DCS) has much increased with the size and complexity of High-Energy Physics detectors. The generation of detectors for the LHC experiments puts further requirements onto the front-end I/O system due to the inaccessibility of the equipment and the hostile environment concerning radiation and magnetic field. Novel techniques such as fieldbuses for distributed input/output and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) for closed loop control have to be employed. These represent the layer closest to the detector of a hierarchically organized multi-layer DCS. After an introduction of the organization of the ATLAS detector and of the concept and the architecture of DCS the paper will concentrate on the usage of fieldbuses as front-end I/O bus with special emphasis on industrial standards of hardware and software.

  13. Development of staffing evaluation principle for advanced main control room and the effect on situation awareness and mental workload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe, E-mail: cjoelin@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Management, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tsung-Ling, E-mail: bm1129@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Chiaan Village, Lungtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shiau-Feng, E-mail: g9602411@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Engineering, Chung-Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Road, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A staffing evaluation principle was developed for the advanced main control room. • The principle proposed to improve situation awareness and mental workload. • The principle has good validity that was examined by experimental design. - Abstract: Situation awareness and mental workload, both of which influence operator performance in the advanced main control room of a nuclear power plant, can be affected by staffing level. The key goal of staffing is to ensure the proper number of personnel to support plant operations and events. If the staffing level is not adaptive, the operators may have low situation awareness and an excessive mental workload, which lead to human error. Accordingly, this study developed a staffing evaluation principle based on CPM-GOMS modeling for operations in the advanced main control room. A within-subject experiment was designed to examine the validity of the staffing evaluation principle. The results indicated that the situation awareness, mental workload, and operating performance of the staffing level determined by the staffing evaluation principle was significantly better than that of the non-evaluated staffing level; thus, the validity of the staffing evaluation technique is acceptable. The implications of the findings of this study on managerial practice are discussed.

  14. Control of Single-room Ventilation with Regenerative Heat Recovery for Indoor Climate and Energy Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Kevin Michael; Svendsen, Svend

    2016-01-01

    The Danish government will seek energy-efficiency improvements to meet their targeted aims. Single-room ventilation with heat recovery allows simple installation through the façade and may be broadly deployed in apartments. Danish building regulations require greater than 80% heat recovery in new...... constructions and will soon require 85%. The development of single-room ventilation units may aim for these requirements as a result. The exhaust temperatures in highly efficient heat exchangers may approach outdoor levels. The cold exhaust cannot contain ample moisture, so vapour will condense on the heat...... exchanger. Available literature suggests that uncoated rotary heat exchangers transfer this condensate to the supply air, so the drying capacity of the ventilation system may be severely limited. This could raise indoor relative humidities to unsafe levels, which could promote the growth of dust...

  15. VOC level control by ventilation improvement of Flexography printing room using CFD modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Hadad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD technique, the dispersion contours and the exposure rate of Flexographic printing workers to VOCs in a printing department is evaluated. Firstly, VOCs distribution is determined in the printing room due to the existing ventilation system. Through next steps, 4 scenarios for lowering VOCs concentration and its exposure rate to workers are analyzed. Concentration distributions of ethylene glycol (MEG as a representative of VOCs are determined for 4 scenarios. The results show that, regarding the existing ventilation, the concentration of MEG at the breathing height is 1×10-5 mg/m3 and it is higher than the standard permissible level. Finally, the findings of this study lead to lowered VOCs concentrations to 13.87×10-9 mg/m3 via changing the ventilation system for the Flexography Printing Room.

  16. An Methodology for Quality Control and Draught Assessment of Room Ventilation Supply Using Laser Light Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Petersen, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    A common technique to investigate draught problems in a room is to make spot measurements of air velocity. This might identify where the draught problem is located but it does not necessarily identify the distribution and source of the problem. Usually visual inspections of the location of ventil......A common technique to investigate draught problems in a room is to make spot measurements of air velocity. This might identify where the draught problem is located but it does not necessarily identify the distribution and source of the problem. Usually visual inspections of the location...... image velocimetry software to gain overall flow pattern visualization, if not accurate readings. The latter result indicates that there could be a potential for real-time velocimetry processing by smartphones but the method in general needs further investigation and documentation....

  17. Instituting a filtration/pressurization system to reduce dust concentrations in a control room at a mineral processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, J; Cecala, A; Hummer, J

    2015-12-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has observed that many control rooms and operator compartments in the U.S. mining industry do not have filtration systems capable of maintaining low dust concentrations in these areas. In this study at a mineral processing plant, to reduce respirable dust concentrations in a control room that had no cleaning system for intake air, a filtration and pressurization system originally designed for enclosed cabs was modified and installed. This system was composed of two filtering units: one to filter outside air and one to filter and recirculate the air inside the control room. Eighty-seven percent of submicrometer particles were reduced by the system under static conditions. This means that greater than 87 percent of respirable dust particles should be reduced as the particle-size distribution of respirable dust particles is greater than that of submicrometer particles, and filtration systems usually are more efficient in capturing the larger particles. A positive pressure near 0.02 inches of water gauge was produced, which is an important component of an effective system and minimizes the entry of particles, such as dust, into the room. The intake airflow was around 118 cfm, greater than the airflow suggested by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for acceptable indoor air quality. After one year, the loading of the filter caused the airflow to decrease to 80 cfm, which still produces acceptable indoor air quality. Due to the loading of the filters, the reduction efficiency for submicrometer particles under static conditions increased to 94 percent from 87 percent.

  18. The Read Out Controller for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Coliban, Radu Mihai; The ATLAS collaboration; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Levinson, Lorne; Vermeulen, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the New Small Wheel data path, we designed the Read Out Controller (ROC) ASIC for handling, preprocessing and formatting the data generated by the NSW VMM upstream chips. The ROC will concentrate the data streams from 8VMMs, filter data based on the BCID and transmit the data to FELIX via the L1DDC. ROC is composed of 8 VMM Capture modules, a cross-bar and 4 SubROC modules. The output data is sent via 4 high-speed e-links.

  19. Cold working room temperature increased moderate/severe qualitative work stressor risk in Air Traffic Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Astuti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Pemandu lalu lintas udara (PLLU kemungkinan lebih besar terkena stresor kerja kualitatif. Tujuan penelitian untuk mengidentifikasi beberapa faktor yang berkaitan dengan stresor kerja kualitatif moderat (SBKL sedang di antara PLLU di Bandar Udara Internasional Soekarno-Hatta.Metode:  Studi  potong  lintang  dilakukan  pada  bulan  November 2008  dengan  subjek  PLLU  aktif  bekerja minimal  6  bulan. Penelitian  menggunakan  kuesioner  standar  survei  diagnostik stres  dan  kuesioner  stresor rumah tangga. Kuesioner diisi oleh subjek.Hasil: Subjek berumur 27-55 tahun terdiri dari 122 PLLU dengan SBKL sedang/berat dan serta 13 (9,6% PLLU dengan SBKL rendah. Model menunjukkan bahwa mereka yang merasa dibandingkan dengan yang tidak merasa suhu ruangan terlalu dingin mempunyai 11-lipat risiko SBKL sedang/berat [rasio odds suaian (ORa = 10,63: 95% interval kepercayaan (CI = 1,79-65,59]. Dibandingkan dengan subjek tanpa stresor ketaksaan peran, mereka yang mempunyai stresor ketaksaan peran sedang/berat berisiko 8,2-lipat SBKL sedang/berat (ORa = 8,23: 95% CI = 1,13-59,90. Di samping itu, mereka yang mempunyai stresor tanggung jawab sedang/berat mendapatkan dibandingkan dengan tanpa stesor ini 6,6-kali berisiko SBKL sedang/berat (ORa = 6,64: 95% CI = 1.13-38.85, Selanjutntya mereka yang mempunyai dibandingkan dengan yang tanpa stresor pengembangan karir sedang/berat mempunyai 3,7-kali risiko SBKL sedang/berat  (ORa = 3,67: 95% CI = 0.88-15.35; P = 0,075.Kesimpulan: Subjek LLU yang merasa suhu ruangan terlalu dingin, stresor ketaksaan peran, tanggung jawab personal dan pengembangan karir sedang/berat mengalami peningkatan risiko SBKL sedang/berat. (Health Science Indones 2011;2:58-65.AbstractBack ground: Air traffic controllers (ATCs have a high level of responsibility which may lead to qualitative work load stressor (QLWS. This study identified several risk factors related to moderate qualitative

  20. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  1. Upgrade of the ATLAS Control and Configuration Software for Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Avolio, Giuseppe; The ATLAS collaboration; Anders, Gabriel; Caprini, Mihai; Corso-Radu, Alina; D'ascanio, Matteo; De Castro Vargas Fernandes, Julio; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Kazarov, Andrei; Klopov, Nikolai; Kolobara, Bernard; Kotov, Vladislav; Lankford, Andrew; Laurent, Florian; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Magnoni, Luca; Olechko, Serguei; Papaevgeniou, Lykourgos; Ryabov, Yury; Santos, Alejandro; Scannicchio, Diana; Seixas, Jose; Soloviev, Igor; Unel, Gokhan; Yasu, Yoshiji

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS data acquisition (DAQ) system is controlled and configured via a software infrastructure that takes care of coherently orchestrating the data taking. While the overall architecture, established at the end of the 90’s, has proven to be solid and flexible, many software components have undergone a complete redesign or re-implementation in 2013/2014 in order to fold-in the additional requirements that appeared in the course of LHC’s Run 1, to profit from new technologies and to re-factorise and cleanup software. This paper describes the approach that was taken to plan, organise and carry out this software upgrade project. It highlights the main technical choices that have guided the overall work, describes the major achievements and outlines how the control and configuration software may be further improved or re-shaped in the future.

  2. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Vigne, Ralph; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained...

  3. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Serfon, Cedric; Vigne, Ralph; Garonne, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for user-generated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained frontends like ...

  4. Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor

  5. Room transfers and the risk of delirium incidence amongst hospitalized elderly medical patients: a case-control study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldberg, Amanda; Straus, Sharon E; Hamid, Jemila S; Wong, Camilla L

    2015-01-01

    Room transfers are suspected to promote the development of delirium in hospitalized elderly patients, but no studies have systematically examined the relationship between room transfers and delirium incidence...

  6. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  7. 某高层住宅消防电梯间前室的防烟设计%Design of Smoke Control in the Room before Anti-fire Elevator Room of One High-rise Residential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻利华

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on introducing the design steps of smoke control system in the room before elevator room, including ways to determine the smoke control, calculating the air rate of pressurized air supply system and air supply outlet and verifying residual pressure fan.%本文重点介绍消防电梯问前室防烟系统的设计步骤,包括防烟方式的判断,加压送风系统的风量及送风口尺寸的计算以及风机余压的验证.

  8. Production and quality control of Micromegas anode PCBs for the ATLAS NSW upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuger, F.

    2016-11-01

    To exploit the full discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider an upgrade towards high luminosity (HL-LHC) is scheduled for 2024-25. Simultaneously to the accelerator, the experiments have to adapt to the expected higher particle rates and detector occupancy. Within the next long shutdown in 2019-20 the innermost end-cap regions of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer will be replaced by the New Small Wheels (NSW) including Micromegas detector modules of several m2 size. The Micromegas readout anode boards, representing the core components of the detector, are manufactured in industry, making the NSW Micromegas the first Micro Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) for a major LHC experiment with a crucial industrial contribution. Production of the up to 2.2 m long boards is a serious challenge for industrialization technology and quality control methods.

  9. Production and Quality Control of Micromegas Anode PCBs for the ATLAS NSW Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00387450

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the full discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider an upgrade towards high luminosity (HL-LHC) is scheduled until 2024-25. In parallel to the accelerator the experiments have to adopt to the expected higher particle rates and detector occupancy. Within the next long shutdown in 2019-20 the innermost end-cap regions of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer will be replaced by the New Small Wheels (NSW) including Micromegas detector modules of several m$^2$ size. The Micromegas Readout Anode boards, representing the core components of the detector, are manufactured in industry, making the NSW Micromegas the first Micro Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) for a major LHC experiment with a crucial industrial contribution. Production of the up to 2.2\\,m long boards is a serious challenge on industrialization technology and quality control methods.

  10. Design of the Front-End Detector Control System of the ATLAS New Small Wheels

    CERN Document Server

    Koulouris, Aimilianos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will be upgraded during the next LHC Long Shutdown (LS2). The flagship upgrade is the New Small Wheel (NSW), which consists of 2 disks of Muon Gas detectors. The detector technologies used are Micromegas (MM) and sTGC, providing a total of 16 layers of tracking and trigger. The Slow Control Adapter (SCA) is part of the GigaBit Transceiver (GBT) - “Radiation Hard Optical Link Project” family of chips designed at CERN, EP-ESE department, which will be used at the NSW upgrade. The SCA offers several interfaces to read analog and digital inputs, and configure front-end Readout ASICs, FPGAs, or other chips. This poster gives an overview of the system, data flow, and software developed for communicating with the SCA.

  11. Slim edge studies, design and quality control of planar ATLAS IBL pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Tobias

    2013-05-08

    One of the four large experiments at the LHC at CERN is the ATLAS detector, a multi purpose detector. Its pixel detector, composed of three layers, is the innermost part of the tracker. As it is closest to the interaction point, it represents a basic part of the track reconstruction. Besides the requested high resolution one main requirement is the radiation hardness. In the coming years the radiation damage will cause deteriorations of the detector performance. With the planned increase of the luminosity, especially after the upgrade to the High Luminosity LHC, this radiation damage will be even intensified. This circumstance necessitates a new pixel detector featuring improved radiation hard sensors and read-out chips. The present shutdown of the LHC is already utilized to insert an additional b-layer (IBL) into the existing ATLAS pixel detector. The current n-in-n pixel sensor design had to be adapted to the new read-out chip and the module specifications. The new stave geometry requests a reduction of the inactive sensor edge. In a prototype wafer production all modifications have been implemented. The sensor quality control was supervised which led to the decision of the final sensor thickness. In order to evaluate the performance of the sensor chip assemblies with an innovative slim edge design, they have been operated in test beam setups before and after irradiation. Furthermore, the quality control of the planar IBL sensor wafer production was supervised from the stage of wafer delivery to that before the flip chip process to ensure a sufficient amount of functional sensors for the module production.

  12. Numerical simulation of a quantum controlled-not gate implemented on four-spin molecules at room temperature

    CERN Document Server

    López, G V; Berman, G P; Doolen, G D; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We study numerically the non-resonant effects on four-spin molecules at room temperature with the implemented quantum controlled-not gate and using the 2 pi k method. The four nuclear spins in each molecule represent a four-qubit register. The qubits interact with each other through Ising-type interaction which is characterized by the coupling constant J sub a sub , sub b. We study the errors on the reduced density matrix as a function of the Rabi frequency, OMEGA, using the 2 pi k method and when all the coupling constants are equal or when one of them is different from the others.

  13. Coexistence of electric field controlled ferromagnetism and resistive switching for TiO{sub 2} film at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Shaoqing; Qin, Hongwei; Bu, Jianpei; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Hu, Jifan, E-mail: hujf@sdu.edu.cn, E-mail: hu-jf@vip.163.com [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory for Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-08-10

    The Ag/TiO{sub 2}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}/Ag device exhibits the coexistence of electric field controlled ferromagnetism and resistive switching at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching in Ag/TiO{sub 2}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}/Ag device may be dominated by the modulation of Schottky-like barrier with the electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of TiO{sub 2}/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3}. We suggest that the electric field-induced magnetization modulation originates mainly from the creation/annihilation of lots of oxygen vacancies in TiO{sub 2}.

  14. Mesoporous Structure Control of Silica in Room-Temperature Synthesis under Basic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Wook Seo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of mesoporous silica, such as continuous cubic-phase MCM-48, hexagonal-phase MCM-41, and layer-phase spherical silica particles, have been synthesized at room temperature using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a surfactant, ethanol as a cosurfactant, tetraethyl orthosilicate as a silica precursor, and ammonia as a condensation agent. Special care must be taken both in the filtering of the resultant solid products and in the drying process. In the drying process, further condensation of the silica after filtering was induced. As the surfactant and cosurfactant concentrations in the reaction mixture increased and the NH3 concentration decreased, under given conditions, continuous cubic MCM-48 and layered silica became the dominant phases. A cooperative synthesis mechanism, in which both the surfactant and silica were involved in the formation of mesoporous structures, provided a good explanation of the experimental results.

  15. Analysis of hospital infection control awareness of ultrasound room office personnel in Busan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, JJung Hoon; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    146 people working in the ultrasound room in Busan were surveyed, and their perception of hospital infection was analyzed. According to the results of the survey, academic background showed the highest number in terms of awareness and performance of personal hygiene management and hand washing management, and the group with experience of infection education showed the highest number in terms of awareness of ultrasound equipment hygiene, and the group with less than college education showed the highest number in terms of performance of ultrasound equipment hygiene. The difference was statistically significant. Based on the results of this study, performance was lower than awareness in general. This result indicates that the degree of performance is inadequate. Therefore, it can be concluded that individuals need to change their perception of personal hygiene and take interest in it through infection education.

  16. Thermal room modelling adapted to the test of HVAC control systems; Modele de zone adapte aux essais de regulateurs de systemes de chauffage et de climatisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riederer, P.

    2002-01-15

    Room models, currently used for controller tests, assume the room air to be perfectly mixed. A new room model is developed, assuming non-homogeneous room conditions and distinguishing between different sensor positions. From measurement in real test rooms and detailed CFD simulations, a list of convective phenomena is obtained that has to be considered in the development of a model for a room equipped with different HVAC systems. The zonal modelling approach that divides the room air into several sub-volumes is chosen, since it is able to represent the important convective phenomena imposed on the HVAC system. The convective room model is divided into two parts: a zonal model, representing the air at the occupant zone and a second model, providing the conditions at typical sensor positions. Using this approach, the comfort conditions at the occupant zone can be evaluated as well as the impact of different sensor positions. The model is validated for a test room equipped with different HVAC systems. Sensitivity analysis is carried out on the main parameters of the model. Performance assessment and energy consumption are then compared for different sensor positions in a room equipped with different HVAC systems. The results are also compared with those obtained when a well-mixed model is used. A main conclusion of these tests is, that the differences obtained, when changing the position of the controller's sensor, is a function of the HVAC system and controller type. The differences are generally small in terms of thermal comfort but significant in terms of overall energy consumption. For different HVAC systems the cases are listed, in which the use of a simplified model is not recommended. (author)

  17. IT Infrastructure Design and Implementation Considerations for the ATLAS TDAQ System

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Caramarcu, C; Dumitru, I; Valsan, L; Darlea, G L; Bujor, F; Bogdanchikov, A G; Korol, A A; Zaytsev, A S; Ballestrero, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a thorough overview of the ATLAS TDAQ SysAdmin group activities which deals with administration of the TDAQ computing environment supporting Front End detector hardware, Data Flow, Event Filter and other subsystems of the ATLAS detector operating on the LHC accelerator at CERN. The current installation consists of approximately 1500 netbooted nodes managed by more than 60 dedicated servers, a high performance centralized storage system, about 50 multi-screen user interface systems installed in the control rooms and various hardware and critical service monitoring machines. In the final configuration, the online computer farm will be capable of hosting tens of thousands applications running simultaneously. The ATLAS TDAQ computing environment is now serving more than 3000 users subdivided into approximately 300 categories in correspondence with their roles in the system. The access and role management system is custom built on top of an LDAP schema. The engineering infrastructure of the ATLAS ...

  18. IT infrastructure design and implementation considerations for the ATLAS TDAQ system

    CERN Document Server

    Dobson, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Caramarcu, C; Dumitru, I; Valsan, L; Darlea, G L; Bujor, F; Bogdanchikov, A G; Korol, A A; Zaytsev, A S; Ballestrero, S

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a thorough overview of the ATLAS TDAQ SysAdmin group activities which deals with administration of the TDAQ computing environment supporting Front End detector hardware, Data Flow, Event Filter and other subsystems of the ATLAS detector operating on the LHC accelerator at CERN. The current installation consists of approximately 1500 netbooted nodes managed by more than 60 dedicated servers, a high performance centralized storage system, about 50 multi-screen user interface systems installed in the control rooms and various hardware and critical service monitoring machines. In the final configuration, the online computer farm will be capable of hosting tens of thousands applications running simultaneously. The ATLAS TDAQ computing environment is now serving more than 3000 users subdivided into approximately 300 categories in correspondence with their roles in the system. The access and role management system is custom built on top of an LDAP schema. The engineering infrastructure of the ATLAS ...

  19. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  20. arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipčič, Andrej; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses a specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControlTower load parameters, the jobs can be controlled by ARC client tools. The system could be extended to other submission systems using central distribution.

  1. Room-temperature electronically-controlled ferromagnetism at the LaAlO₃/SrTiO₃ interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Feng; Huang, Mengchen; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Bark, Chung-Wung; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    2014-09-25

    Reports of emergent conductivity, superconductivity and magnetism have helped to fuel intense interest in the rich physics and technological potential of complex-oxide interfaces. Here we employ magnetic force microscopy to search for room-temperature magnetism in the well-studied LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system. Using electrical top gating to control the electron density at the oxide interface, we directly observe the emergence of an in-plane ferromagnetic phase as electrons are depleted from the interface. Itinerant electrons that are reintroduced into the interface align antiferromagnetically with the magnetization at first screening and then destabilizing it as the conductive regime is approached. Repeated cycling of the gate voltage results in new, uncorrelated magnetic patterns. This newfound control over emergent magnetism at the interface between two non-magnetic oxides portends a number of important technological applications.

  2. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2024. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in middle 2014 during the Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB) alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The MainBoard will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the DaughterBoard will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the sROD will perform processing tasks on them.

  3. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F

    2013-01-01

    This work summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in middle 2014 during the Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB) alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The MainBoard will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the DaughterBoard will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the sROD will perform processing tasks on them.

  4. Upgrading the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrió Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work summarizes the status of the on-detector and off-detector electronics developments for the Phase 2 Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter at the LHC scheduled around 2022. A demonstrator prototype for a slice of the calorimeter including most of the new electronics is planned to be installed in ATLAS in the middle of 2014 during the first Long Shutdown. For the on-detector readout, three different front-end boards (FEB alternatives are being studied: a new version of the 3-in-1 card, the QIE chip and a dedicated ASIC called FATALIC. The Main Board will provide communication and control to the FEBs and the Daughter Board will transmit the digitized data to the off-detector electronics in the counting room, where the super Read-Out Driver (sROD will perform processing tasks on them and will be the interface to the trigger levels 0, 1 and 2.

  5. The Control and Configuration Software of the ATLAS Data Acquisition System: Upgrades for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, Igor; The ATLAS collaboration; Avolio, Giuseppe; Caprini, Mihai; Corso-Radu, Alina; D'ascanio, Matteo; De Castro Vargas Fernandes, Julio; Kazarov, Andrei; Kolobara, Bernard; Lankford, Andrew; Laurent, Florian; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Magnoni, Luca; Papaevgeniou, Lykourgos; Ryabov, Yury; Santos, Alejandro; Seixas, Jose; Soloviev, Igor; Unel, Gokhan; Yasu, Yoshiji

    2016-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is composed of a large number of distributed hardware and software components which in a coordinated manner provide the data-taking functionality of the overall system. The Controls and Configuration (CC) software offers services to configure, control and monitor the TDAQ system. It is a framework which provides essentially the glue that holds the various sub-systems together. While the overall architecture, established at the end of the 90’s, has proven to be solid and flexible, many software components (from core services, like the Run Control and the error management system, to end- user tools) have undergone a complete redesign or re-implementation during the LHC’s Long Shutdown I period. The upgrades were driven by the need to fold-in the additional requirements that appeared in the course of LHC’s Run 1, to profit from new technologies and to re-factorize and cleanup the code. This paper...

  6. The Controlled Electric Drive of the Automatic Cooling System of the Engine Room on a Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevz Dennis V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of an automatic cooling system control by the Zelio Logic controller. Development of the simulation model of the open-loop system “frequency inverter – asynchronous motor with IR-compensation” in Matlab Simulink. Analysis of the transient characteristics ω = f(t, M = f(t at the start of the asynchronous motor.

  7. The high-precision x-ray tomograph for quality control of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Drakoulakos, D G; Maugain, J M; Rohrbach, F; Sedykh, Yu

    1997-01-01

    For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the next millennium, a large general-purpose high-energy physics experiment, the ATLAS project, is being designed by a world-wide collaboration. One of its detectors, the ATLAS muon tracking detector, the MDT project, is on the scale of a very large industrial project: the design, the construction and assembly of twelve hundred large muon drift chambers are aimed at producing an exceptional quality in terms of accuracy, material reliability, assembly, and monitoring. This detector, based on the concept of very high mechanical precision required by the physics goals, will use tomography as a quality control platform. An X-ray tomograph prototype, monitored by a set of interferometers, has been developed at CERN to provide high-quality control of the MDT chambers which will be built in the collaborating institutes of the ATLAS project. First results have been obtained on MDT prototypes showing the validity of the X-ray tomograph approach for mechanical control of the detec...

  8. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Piauí

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The week of physics and Mathematics Semafis is an science event promoted by the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Piauí – IFPI, together with the Central Academia of Mathematics Professor Ezequias (CAMPE) e Central Academia of Physics (CAFIS), to promote the integration between the courses on Mathematics and Physics.

  9. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by 2nd High School of Eleftherio–Kordelio in Thessaloniki

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Our school is the 2nd High School of Eleftherio – Kordelio. It is located at the west suburbs of Thessaloniki in Greece and our students are between 15-17 years old. Thessaloniki is the second largest city in Greece with a port of a major role in trading at the area of South Balkans. During this period of time our students have heard so much about CERN and the great discoveries which have taken place there and they are really keen on visiting and learning many things about it.

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by St George`s School for Girls in Edinburgh

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    St George`s School for Girls is in the heart of Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland and home to Peter Higgs. It is an all-through school, with students as young as two and as old as eighteen. St George`s is a flexible and open learning community where students grow and develop at their own pace and in their own direction.

  11. Monitoring and controlling ATLAS data management: The Rucio web user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, M.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.; Barisits, M.; Garonne, V.; Serfon, C.

    2015-12-01

    The monitoring and controlling interfaces of the previous data management system DQ2 followed the evolutionary requirements and needs of the ATLAS collaboration. The new data management system, Rucio, has put in place a redesigned web-based interface based upon the lessons learnt from DQ2, and the increased volume of managed information. This interface encompasses both a monitoring and controlling component, and allows easy integration for usergenerated views. The interface follows three design principles. First, the collection and storage of data from internal and external systems is asynchronous to reduce latency. This includes the use of technologies like ActiveMQ or Nagios. Second, analysis of the data into information is done massively parallel due to its volume, using a combined approach with an Oracle database and Hadoop MapReduce. Third, sharing of the information does not distinguish between human or programmatic access, making it easy to access selective parts of the information both in constrained frontends like web-browsers as well as remote services. This contribution will detail the reasons for these principles and the design choices taken. Additionally, the implementation, the interactions with external systems, and an evaluation of the system in production, both from a technological and user perspective, conclude this contribution.

  12. ATLAS data preparation in run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00037318; The ATLAS collaboration; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Guenther, Jaroslav; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Strandberg, Jonas; Taffard, Anyes; Wang, Song-Ming

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, the data preparation workflows for Run 2 are presented. The challenges posed by the excellent performance and high live time fraction of the LHC are discussed, and the solutions implemented by ATLAS are described. The prompt calibration loop procedures are described and examples are given. Several levels of data quality assessment are used to quickly spot problems in the control room and prevent data loss, and to provide the final selection used for physics analysis. Finally the data quality efficiency for physics analysis is shown.

  13. The affective bases of team performance during nonroutine events: The case of nuclear power plant control room crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Seth A.

    By conceiving of teams' nonroutine performance as a series of coping responses, this paper examines how crewmembers' positive and negative affectivity (PA, NA) impact individual behaviors and team processes. A theoretical model is developed in which trait affect's influence is predicted to vary depending on the nature of the task, the level of analysis, and the timing of behaviors. The model is empirically tested using coded behaviors of 75 nuclear power plant control room operators, composing 17 crews, who engage in a high-fidelity training simulation. Results using random coefficient modeling were mixed, but generally failed to support the study hypotheses. Discussion focuses on the potential benefits of NA in organizations and on the limitations of the current study context.

  14. Investigation of the impact of main control room digitalization on operators cognitive reliability in nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Mu, Haiying; Jiang, Jianjun; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is a trend in nuclear power plants (NPPs) toward introducing digital and computer technologies into main control rooms (MCRs). Safe generation of electric power in NPPs requires reliable performance of cognitive tasks such as fault detection, diagnosis, and response planning. The digitalization of MCRs has dramatically changed the whole operating environment, and the ways operators interact with the plant systems. If the design and implementation of the digital technology is incompatible with operators' cognitive characteristics, it may have negative effects on operators' cognitive reliability. Firstly, on the basis of three essential prerequisites for successful cognitive tasks, a causal model is constructed to reveal the typical human performance issues arising from digitalization. The cognitive mechanisms which they impact cognitive reliability are analyzed in detail. Then, Bayesian inference is used to quantify and prioritize the influences of these factors. It suggests that interface management and unbalanced workload distribution have more significant impacts on operators' cognitive reliability.

  15. Using Face Recognition in the Automatic Door Access Control in a Secured Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Gilca

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to help users improve the door security of sensitive locations by using face detection and recognition. This paper is comprised mainly of three subsystems: face detection, face recognition and automatic door access control. The door will open automatically for the known person due to the command of the microcontroller.

  16. Controlled damaging and repair of self-organized nanostructures by atom manipulation at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurlu, O.; van Houselt, Arie; Thijssen, W.H.A.; van Ruitenbeek, J.M.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of controlled local demolition and repair of the recently discovered self-organized Pt nanowires on Ge(001) surfaces has been explored. These nanowires are composed of Pt dimers, which are found to be rather weakly bound to the underlying substrate. Using this property, we

  17. Communications dashboard (control rooms, take a cue from Facebook® !) Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David W.

    Papers published via IEEE and AIAA conferences have presented an overview of how social media could benefit NASA working environments in general [1] and proposed three specific social applications to benefit space flight control operations [2]. One of them, Communications Dashboard, would help a real time flight controller keep up with both the “ big picture” and significant details of operations via a cohesive interface similar to those of social networking services (SNS). Instead of recreational social features, “ CommDash” would support functions like console logging, categorized and threaded text chat streams with enhanced accountability and graphics display features, high-level status displays driven by telemetry or other events, and an on-screen hailing function for requesting voice or text stream conversation. Moving certain voice conversations to text streams would reduce confusion and stress in two ways. Within text conversations, there would be far less repetition of content since text conversations have visual persistence and are reviewable instantly, e.g., there's no need to brief new participants to a discussion - they just read what's already there. Remaining voice traffic would stand out more clearly, and quieter voice loops means fewer “ say again” calls and less distraction from visual and mental tasks, thus less stress. (Most flight controllers monitor 4 or 5 voice loops at once.) Links could be created from console log entries to chat selections so that underlying details are readily available yet unobtrusive. This would reduce the confusion that rises from having multiple and sometimes divergent copies of the same information due to cut/copy and paste operations, attachments, and asynchronous editing. This concept could apply to a plethora of real time control environments and to other settings with lots of information juggling. This paper explores the dashboard concept in further detail and chronic- es the first phase of a NASA IT

  18. Communications Dashboard (Control Rooms Take a Cue from Facebook), Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David w.

    2013-01-01

    Papers published via IEEE and AIAA conferences have presented an overview of how social media could benefit NASA working environments in general and proposed three specific social applications to benefit space flight control operations. One of them, Communications Dashboard, would help a real time flight controller keep up with both the "big picture" and significant details of operations via a cohesive interface similar to those of social networking services (SNS). Instead of recreational social features, "CommDash" would support functions like console logging, categorized and threaded text chat streams with enhanced accountability and graphics display features, high-level status displays driven by telemetry or other events, and an on-screen hailing function for requesting voice or text stream conversation. Moving certain voice conversations to text streams would reduce confusion and stress in two ways. Within text conversations, there would be far less repetition of content since text conversations have visual persistence and are reviewable instantly, e.g., there s no need to brief new participants to a discussion -- they just read what s already there. Remaining voice traffic would stand out more clearly, and quieter voice loops means fewer "say again" calls and less distraction from visual and mental tasks, thus less stress. (Most flight controllers monitor 4 or 5 voice loops at once.) Links could be created from console log entries to chat selections so that underlying details are readily available yet unobtrusive. This would reduce the confusion that rises from having multiple and sometimes divergent copies of the same information due to cut/copy and paste operations, attachments, and asynchronous editing. This concept could apply to a plethora of real time control environments and to other settings with lots of information juggling. This paper explores the dashboard concept in further detail and chronicles the first phase of a NASA IT Labs (Information

  19. An efficient on-board metal-free nanocatalyst for controlled room temperature hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Saswati; Das, Debanjan; Das, Nirmalya Sankar; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2017-04-01

    Positively charged functionalized carbon nanodots (CNDs) with a variety of different effective surface areas (ESAs) are synthesized via a cheap and time effective microwave method and applied for the generation of hydrogen via hydrolysis of sodium borohydride. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of metal-free controlled hydrogen generation. Our observation is that a positively charged functional group is essential for the hydrolysis for hydrogen production, but the overall activity is found to be enhanced with the ESA. A maximum value of 1066 ml g(-1) min(-1) as the turnover frequency is obtained which is moderate in comparison to other catalysts. However, the optimum activation energy is found to be 22.01 kJ mol(-1) which is comparable to well-known high cost materials like Pt and Ru. All of the samples showed good reusability and 100% conversion even after the 10th cycle. The effect of H(+) and OH(-) is also studied to control the on-board and on-demand hydrogen production ("on-off switching"). It is observed that H2 production decreases inversely with NaOH concentration and ceases completely when 10(-1) M NaOH is added. With the addition of HCl, H2 production can be initiated again, which confirms the on/off control over production.

  20. Occupational hazards control of hazardous substances in clean room of semiconductor manufacturing plant using CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Zhou, Ya-Fei

    2015-02-01

    The manufacturing processes in chip industries are complex, and many kinds of raw materials and solvents of different nature are used, most of which are highly toxic and dangerous. During the machine preventive maintenance period, these toxic and harmful substances will escape from the sealed reaction chamber to the clean workshop environment and endanger the health of the workers on-site, resulting in occupational diseases. From the perspective of prevention, the spread and prediction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) that escaped from the metal-etching chamber during maintenance were studied in this article. The computational fluid dynamics technology was used for a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the indoor air velocity field and the HCl concentration field, and the simulation results were then compared with the on-site monitoring data to verify the correctness and feasibility. The occupational hazards and control measures were analyzed based on the numerical simulation, and the optimal control measure was obtained. In this article, using the method of ambient air to analyze the occupational exposure can provide a new idea to the field of occupational health research in the integrated circuit industry and had theoretical and practical significance. © The Author(s) 2012.

  1. Developing a taxonomy of coordination behaviours in nuclear power plant control rooms during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunxing; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhizhong; Song, Fei; Ma, Liang

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to develop a taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants (NPPs). We summarised basic coordination behaviours from literature in aviation, health care and nuclear field and identified coordination behaviours specific to the nuclear domain by interviewing and surveying control crew operators. The established taxonomy includes 7 workflow stages and 24 basic coordination behaviours. To evaluate the reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy, we analysed 12 videos of operators' training sessions by coding coordination behaviours with the taxonomy and the inter-rater reliability was acceptable. Further analysis of the frequency, the duration and the direction of the coordination behaviours revealed four coordination problems. This taxonomy provides a foundation of systematic observation of coordination behaviours among NPP crews, advances researchers' understanding of the coordination mechanism during emergencies in NPPs and facilitate the possibility to deepen the understanding of the relationships between coordination behaviours and team performance. Practitioner Summary: A taxonomy of coordination behaviours during emergencies in nuclear power plants was developed. Reliability and feasibility of the taxonomy was verified through the analysis of 12 training sessions. The taxonomy can serve as an observation system for analysis of coordination behaviours and help to identify coordination problems of control crews.

  2. Tectonically controlled facies changes in the Jurassic of the northern border of the central High Atlas east of midelt (Morocco)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauptmann, M.K.; Heinetz, W.

    1988-08-01

    Jurassic carbonate sedimentation and facies changes at the northern border of the Central High Atlas mountain range east of Midelt are mainly controlled by synsedimentary tectonics which took place during the development of the Central High Atlas rift. There is no evidence of the influence of global eustatic sea level changes. During early Liassic time the carbonate facies documents an extended platform with numerous isolated mud mounds surrounded by biodetritic limestone fans. From middle Liassic to early Dogger (Aalenian) time, different kinds of mass-flow deposits coincide with the maximum extension of the Central High Atlas trough. Large-scale slide blocks, conglomerates, mud-flow and debris-flow sediments, etc, show the existence of a platform-basin border formed by a preexisting fault system acting as downthrusts during Jurassic time. A sudden diminution of the subsidence at the Aalenian-Bajocian border is indicated by nearshore carbonates (tidal flats, tidal channels). Already at middle Bajocian time red beds were deposited. From the Oligocene onward during a compressive phase most likely due to the Rif orogenesis, these faults were reactivated. As a result, the east-northeast-striking faults which oriented at right angles toward the direction of compression were transformed to inverse faults and the north-northeast-striking faults became sinistral strike-slip faults. At the fault junction, areas of higher compression were created, inducing a cleavage of the Mesozoic sediments. Whereas upfolds predominantly occur over preexisting fault zones, wide flat downfolds developed above the basement blocks.

  3. Ultrafast optical control of terahertz surface plasmons in subwavelength hole-arrays at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Abul Kalam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Hou - Tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    Extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength metallic hole-arrays has been an active research area since its first demonstration. The frequency selective resonance properties of subwavelength metallic hole arrays, generally known as surface plasmon polaritons, have potential use in functional plasmonic devices such as filters, modulators, switches, etc. Such plasmonic devices are also very promising for future terahertz applications. Ultrafast switching or modulation of the resonant behavior of the 2-D metallic arrays in terahertz frequencies is of particular interest for high speed communication and sensing applications. In this paper, we demonstrate optical control of surface plasmon enhanced resonant terahertz transmission in two-dimensional subwavelength metallic hole arrays fabricated on gallium arsenide based substrates. Optically pumping the arrays creates a conductive layer in the substrate reducing the terahertz transmission amplitude of both the resonant mode and the direct transmission. Under low optical fluence, the terahertz transmission is more greatly affected by resonance damping than by propagation loss in the substrate. An ErAs:GaAs nanoisland superlattice substrate is shown to allow ultrafast control with a switching recovery time of {approx}10 ps. We also present resonant terahertz transmission in a hybrid plasmonic film comprised of an integrated array of subwavelength metallic islands and semiconductor holes. A large dynamic transition between a dipolar localized surface plasmon mode and a surface plasmon resonance near 0.8 THz is observed under near infrared optical excitation. The reversal in transmission amplitude from a stopband to a passband and up to {pi}/2 phase shift achieved in the hybrid plasmonic film make it promising in large dynamic phase modulation, optical changeover switching, and active terahertz plasmonics.

  4. Reversible strain control of magnetic anisotropy in magnetoelectric heterostructures at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruch, Margo; Gopman, Daniel B; Iunin, Yury L; Shull, Robert D; Cheng, Shu Fan; Bussmann, Konrad; Finkel, Peter

    2016-11-21

    The ability to tune both magnetic and electric properties in magnetoelectric (ME) composite heterostructures is crucial for multiple transduction applications including energy harvesting or magnetic field sensing, or other transduction devices. While large ME coupling achieved through interfacial strain-induced rotation of magnetic anisotropy in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric multiferroic heterostructures has been demonstrated, there are presently certain restrictions for achieving a full control of magnetism in an extensive operational dynamic range, limiting practical realization of this effect. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of generating substantial reversible anisotropy changes through induced interfacial strains driven by applied electric fields in magnetostrictive thin films deposited on (0 1 1)-oriented domain-engineered ternary relaxor ferroelectric single crystals with extended temperature and voltage ranges as compared to binary relaxors. We show, through a combination of angular magnetization and magneto-optical domain imaging measurements, that a 90° in-plane rotation of the magnetic anisotropy and propagation of magnetic domains with low applied electric fields under zero electric field bias are realized. To our knowledge, the present value attained for converse magnetoelectric coupling coefficient is the highest achieved in the linear piezoelectric regime and expected to be stable for a wide temperature range, thus representing a step towards practical ME transduction devices.

  5. The Value of Audio Devices in the Endoscopy Room (VADER) study: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Zaid Sm; Vasudevan, Abhinav; Hew, Simon; Schulberg, Julien; Lontos, Steve

    2015-12-14

    To evaluate the effect of Star Wars music (SWM) compared with endoscopist-selected popular music (PM) on quality outcomes in colonoscopy. A single-centre, prospective, randomised controlled trial conducted in an endoscopy suite within a quaternary-centre gastroenterology unit, Melbourne, Australia. The primary outcome measures were procedure time, polyp detection rate (PDR) and adenoma detection rate (ADR). The secondary outcome measure was adenomas per colonoscopy (APC). 103 colonoscopies were analysed: 58 in the SWM group and 45 in the PM group. Bowel preparation was assessed as good or excellent in 57% of the SWM group compared with 69% of the PM group (P < 0.01). The PDR was significantly higher in the SWM group than in the PM group (60% v 35%; P = 0.006). Similarly, the ADR was significantly higher in the SWM group than in the PM group (48% v 27%; P = 0.01). The APC in the SWM group was 84% compared with 35% in the PM group (P = 0.01). SWM compared with PM improves key quality outcomes in colonoscopy, despite poorer bowel preparation.

  6. System administration of ATLAS TDAQ computing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeel-Ur-Rehman, A [National Centre for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Bujor, F; Dumitrescu, A; Dumitru, I; Leahu, M; Valsan, L [Politehnica University of Bucharest (Romania); Benes, J [Zapadoceska Univerzita v Plzni (Czech Republic); Caramarcu, C [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (Romania); Dobson, M; Unel, G [University of California at Irvine (United States); Oreshkin, A [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Popov, D [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Zaytsev, A, E-mail: Alexandr.Zaytsev@cern.c [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-01

    This contribution gives a thorough overview of the ATLAS TDAQ SysAdmin group activities which deals with administration of the TDAQ computing environment supporting High Level Trigger, Event Filter and other subsystems of the ATLAS detector operating on LHC collider at CERN. The current installation consists of approximately 1500 netbooted nodes managed by more than 60 dedicated servers, about 40 multi-screen user interface machines installed in the control rooms and various hardware and service monitoring machines as well. In the final configuration, the online computer farm will be capable of hosting tens of thousands applications running simultaneously. The software distribution requirements are matched by the two level NFS based solution. Hardware and network monitoring systems of ATLAS TDAQ are based on NAGIOS and MySQL cluster behind it for accounting and storing the monitoring data collected, IPMI tools, CERN LANDB and the dedicated tools developed by the group, e.g. ConfdbUI. The user management schema deployed in TDAQ environment is founded on the authentication and role management system based on LDAP. External access to the ATLAS online computing facilities is provided by means of the gateways supplied with an accounting system as well. Current activities of the group include deployment of the centralized storage system, testing and validating hardware solutions for future use within the ATLAS TDAQ environment including new multi-core blade servers, developing GUI tools for user authentication and roles management, testing and validating 64-bit OS, and upgrading the existing TDAQ hardware components, authentication servers and the gateways.

  7. Human Factors and Modeling Methods in the Development of Control Room Modernization Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques V.; Slay III, Lorenzo

    2017-06-01

    nuclear power plants. Although the nuclear industry has made steady improvement in outage optimization, each day of a refueling outage still represents an opportunity to save millions of dollars and each day an outage extends past its planned end date represents millions of dollars that may have been spent unnecessarily. Reducing planned outage duration or preventing outage extensions requires careful management of the outage schedule as well as constant oversight and monitoring of work completion during the outage execution. During a typical outage, there are typically more than 10,000 activities on the schedule that, if not managed efficiently, may cause expensive outage delays. Management of outages currently relies largely on paper-based resources and general-purpose office software. A typical tool currently used to monitor work performance is a burn-down curve, where total remaining activities are plotted against the baseline schedule to track bulk work completion progress. While these tools are useful, there is still considerable uncertainty during a typical outage that bulk work progress is adequate and therefore a lot of management time is spent analyzing the situation on a daily basis. This paper describes recent advances made in developing a framework for the design of visual outage information presentation, as well as an overview of the scientific principles that informed the development of the visualizations. To test the utility of advanced visual outage information presentation, an outage management dashboard software application was created as part of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Outage Control Center project. This dashboard is intended to present all the critical information an outage manager would need to understand the current status of a refueling outage. The dashboard presents the critical path, bulk work performance, key performance indicators, outage milestones and metrics relating current performance to historical performance

  8. A room with a view and a polarizing cue: individual differences in the stimulus control of place navigation and passive latent learning in the water maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Bryan D; Petri, Herbert L; Mishkin, Mortimer; Stouffer, Eric M; Bowker, Jonna L; Yin, Ping-Bo; Buffalari, Deanne M; Olds, James L

    2002-07-01

    We investigated individual differences in the stimulus control of navigational behavior in the water maze by comparing measures of place learning in one environment to measures of latent learning (via passive placement on the goal platform) in a novel environment. In the first experiment, 12 rats were trained to find a slightly submerged hidden platform at a fixed location in room A for 10 days (4 trials/day). Fast and slow place learners were identified by their mean escape latency and cumulative distance to the goal during acquisition. The same animals were then given a 2-min passive placement on the submerged platform in room B. Latent learning was assessed by the animal's escape latency on a single swim trial immediately following the placement in room B. The results showed that the good latent learners in room B were not necessarily the fast place learners in room A. This weak correlation may be related to the fact that some rats swam near the area in room B that corresponded to the former goal location in room A relative to a common polarizing cue (i.e., the door/entrance to both rooms). When the view of the door was blocked in a second experiment a significant positive correlation between place acquisition and the latent learning test was obtained, although escape performance following passive placement was not improved. These findings suggest that while place navigation and latent learning via passive placement may involve some common cognitive-spatial function, other associative (S-S and/or S-R) processes that occur during place navigation/active movement may be required for animals to exhibit truly accurate navigational behavior characteristic of asymptotic escape performance in the water maze. Additional implications for neurobiological studies using a procedural pretraining design are discussed. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  9. Sound field control in a rectangular room at low frequencies to simulate the sound radiated by a virtual source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco, Arturo; Uchiyama, Michiaki; Tohyama, Mikio

    1999-01-01

    The sound reproduced in a room by a conventional audio system is modified because of the acoustic response of the room. In this paper a theoreticalstudy based on computer simulations for the synthesis of a desired sound field in a room is presented. The optimal solution in a continuous region...... that covers almost the entire volume of the room has been obtained with the least-square approximation. It is shown that the synthesis of travelling waves in a certain direction is possible at frequencies up to 320 Hz in a room with dimensions 2.9x3.6x2.5 m using 32 loudspeakers. If waves travelling in any...

  10. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before 1950's, patients were usually cared for in an ill-defined postoperative unit or on the hospital ward. Patients were frequently transferred from the operating room directly to the ward where they were placed close to the nursing station. In 1947 the. Anesthesia Study Commission of the Philadelphia. Country Medical ...

  11. Recovery Room

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Journal of Zambia, Volume 36 Number 3 (2009). 132. Department of Anaesthesia, University Teaching Hospital ... nursing shortage, stimulated widespread development of recovery rooms. This article summarizes .... Singapore Med J.1997; 38(5): 200-204. 11. Feeley TW, Macario A. Chapter 71: The postanesthesia ...

  12. Radiative control of dark excitons at room temperature by nano-optical antenna-tip Purcell effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Jiang, Tao; Clark, Genevieve; Xu, Xiaodong; Raschke, Markus B.

    2018-01-01

    Excitons, Coulomb-bound electron-hole pairs, are elementary photo-excitations in semiconductors that can couple to light through radiative relaxation. In contrast, dark excitons (XD) show anti-parallel spin configuration with generally forbidden radiative emission. Because of their long lifetimes, these dark excitons are appealing candidates for quantum computing and optoelectronics. However, optical read-out and control of XD states has remained challenging due to their decoupling from light. Here, we present a tip-enhanced nano-optical approach to induce, switch and programmably modulate the XD emission at room temperature. Using a monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) WSe2 on a gold substrate, we demonstrate 6 × 105-fold enhancement in dark exciton photoluminescence quantum yield achieved through coupling of the antenna-tip to the dark exciton out-of-plane optical dipole moment, with a large Purcell factor of ≥2 × 103 of the tip-sample nano-cavity. Our approach provides a facile way to harness excitonic properties in low-dimensional semiconductors offering new strategies for quantum optoelectronics.

  13. Development of Thermal Stress Test Profile for Class 1E Equipment in Main Control Room of a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seung Ki; Park, Je Yun; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hee Jun [Daewoo Engineering and Construction Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The primary objective of an equipment qualification (EQ) is to demonstrate with reasonable assurance that Class 1E equipment for which a qualified life or condition has been established can perform its safety function without experiencing common-cause failures before, during, and after applicable design basis events (DBEs). For the environmental test of Class 1E equipment installed in the main control room (MCR) of a research reactor, the thermal stress test profile should be developed based on normal and abnormal environmental conditions of the MCR. A thermal stress test profile for Class 1E equipment located in the MCR of a research reactor is developed based on an engineering justification. A set of thermal stress test conditions including temperature, test duration, and number of test cycles is defined considering the specific characteristics of the targeted research reactor. The method used in this study can be applied to develop a thermal stress test profile used for the EQ test to qualify Class 1E equipment installed in the MCR of various research reactors.

  14. Controllable Growth of Perovskite Films by Room-Temperature Air Exposure for Efficient Planar Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Keum, Jong; Das, Sanjib; Puretzky, Alexander; Aytug, Tolga; Joshi, Pooran C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-12-01

    A two-step solution processing approach has been established to grow void-free perovskite films for low-cost high-performance planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices. A high-temperature thermal annealing treatment was applied to drive the diffusion of CH3NH3I precursor molecules into a compact PbI2 layer to form perovskite films. However, thermal annealing for extended periods led to degraded device performance owing to the defects generated by decomposition of perovskite into PbI2. A controllable layer-by-layer spin-coating method was used to grow "bilayer" CH3NH3I/PbI2 films, and then drive the interdiffusion between PbI2 and CH3NH3I layers by a simple air exposure at room temperature for making well-oriented, highly crystalline perovskite films without thermal annealing. This high degree of crystallinity resulted in a carrier diffusion length of ca. 800 nm and a high device efficiency of 15.6%, which is comparable to values reported for thermally annealed perovskite films. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Tension in the LEP/SPS Control Room as the first beams circulate in LEP after the fire in BA3 on 13 May 1997

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    There is an atmosphre of calm in the LEP control room, monitors signalling stable beams at 45.625 GeV and the quantity of Z0 data requested by the experiments to calibrate their detectors steadily building up. It is all too easy to forget the difficulties which have been overcome since the fire in BA3 on 13 May 1997.

  16. Evaluating well-mixed room and near-field-far-field model performance under highly controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Susan F; Shao, Yuan; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2017-06-01

    Exposure judgments made without personal exposure data and based instead on subjective inputs tend to underestimate exposure, with exposure judgment accuracy not significantly more accurate than random chance. Therefore, objective inputs that contribute to more accurate decision making are needed. Models have been shown anecdotally to be useful in accurately predicting exposure but their use in occupational hygiene has been limited. This may be attributable to a general lack of guidance on model selection and use and scant model input data. The lack of systematic evaluation of the models is also an important factor. This research addresses the need to systematically evaluate two widely applicable models, the Well-Mixed Room (WMR) and Near-Field-Far-Field (NF-FF) models. The evaluation, conducted under highly controlled conditions in an exposure chamber, allowed for model inputs to be accurately measured and controlled, generating over 800 pairs of high quality measured and modeled exposure estimates. By varying conditions in the chamber one at a time, model performance across a range of conditions was evaluated using two sets of criteria: the ASTM Standard 5157 and the AIHA Exposure Assessment categorical criteria. Model performance for the WMR model was excellent, with ASTM performance criteria met for 88-97% of the pairs across the three chemicals used in the study, and 96% categorical agreement observed. Model performance for the NF-FF model, impacted somewhat by the size of the chamber was nevertheless good to excellent. NF modeled estimates met modified ASTM criteria for 67-84% of the pairs while 69-91% of FF modeled estimates met these criteria. Categorical agreement was observed for 72% and 96% of NF and FF pairs, respectively. These results support the use of the WMR and NF-FF models in guiding decision making towards improving exposure judgment accuracy.

  17. An Investigation for Arranging the Video Display Unit Information in a Main Control Room of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chong Cheng; Yang, Chih Wei [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Current digital instrumentation and control and main control room (MCR) technology has extended the capability of integrating information from numerous plant systems and transmitting needed information to operations personnel in a timely manner that could not be envisioned when previous generation plants were designed and built. A MCR operator can complete all necessary operating actions on the video display unit (VDU). It is extremely flexible and convenient for operators to select and to control the system display on the screen. However, a high degree of digitalization has some risks. For example, in nuclear power plants, failures in the instrumentation and control devices could stop the operation of the plant. Human factors engineering (HFE) approaches would be a manner to solve this problem. Under HFE considerations, there exists 'population stereotype' for operation. That is, the operator is used to operating a specific display on the specific VDU for operation. Under emergency conditions, there is possibility that the operator will response with this habit population stereotype, and not be aware that the current situation has already changed. Accordingly, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the MCR VDU configuration plan to meet the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. On the other hand, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the human factors verification and validation plan of the MCR VDU configuration to verify and validate the configuration of the MCR VDUs, and to ensure that the MCR VDU configuration allows the operator shift to meet the HFE consideration and the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. This paper is one of the HF V V plans of the MCR VDU configuration of the advanced nuclear power plant. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether the VDU configuration meets the human factors principles and the consistent

  18. Clean Industrial Room for Drift Tube Assembling

    CERN Document Server

    Glonti, GL; Evtoukhovitch, P G; Kroa, G; Manz, A; Potrap, I N; Rihter, P; Stoletov, G D; Tskhadadze, E G; Chepurnov, V F; Chirkov, A V; Shelkov, G A

    2001-01-01

    Description of a clean industrial room for assembly of drift tubes for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment is presented. High quality specifications on the detectors to be produced demanded creation of a workplace with stable temperature and humidity, as well as minimum quantity of dust in the room. Checking of parameters of intra-room air during long period of continuous work has been confirmed correctness of the designed characteristics of the climatic system installed in the clean room. The room large volum (\\sim 190 m^3), the powerful and flexible climatic system, and simplicity of service allow assembling of detectors with length up to 5 m. Subsequent checking of functionality of the assembled detectors has shown high quality of assembling (the amount of rejected tubes does not exceed 2 %). It demonstrates conformity to the assembling quality requirements for mass production of drift chambers for the muon spectrometer.

  19. Designing of Simulation for Engine Room Km. Sinabung with Control Monitoring Web Server Based by Wireless Network and Power Line Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi, Eko Sasmito; Adietya, Berlian Arswendo; S.P, Firdaus

    2013-01-01

    Engine room monitoring control system is monitoring and controlling main engine and auxiliary engine from long distance by powerline communication network and wireless network to ease the operator in operating the ship and save operational cost. To prevent error in programming the main engine and auxiliary engine, a simulation using instrument software is needed to know the machine characteristic. After simulation result fulfills the requirement which is approached the value of test record, i...

  20. DESIGNING OF SIMULATION FOR ENGINE ROOM KM. SINABUNG WITH CONTROL MONITORING WEB SERVER BASED BY WIRELESS NETWORK AND POWER LINE COMMUNICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Eko Sasmito Hadi; Berlian Arswendo Adietya; Firdaus S.P

    2013-01-01

    Engine room monitoring control system is monitoring and controlling main engine and auxiliary engine from long distance by powerline communication network and wireless network to ease the operator in operating the ship and save operational cost. To prevent error in programming the main engine and auxiliary engine, a simulation using instrument software is needed to know the machine characteristic. After simulation result fulfills the requirement which is approached the value of test record, i...

  1. Association between birth order and emergency room visits and acute hospital admissions following pediatric vaccination: a self-controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Hawken

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between a child's birth order and emergency room (ER visits and hospital admissions following 2-,4-,6- and 12-month pediatric vaccinations. METHODS: We included all children born in Ontario between April 1(st, 2006 and March 31(st, 2009 who received a qualifying vaccination. We identified vaccinations, ER visits and admissions using health administrative data housed at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We used the self-controlled case series design to compare the relative incidence (RI of events among 1(st-born and later-born children using relative incidence ratios (RIR. RESULTS: For the 2-month vaccination, the RIR for 1(st-borns versus later-born children was 1.37 (95% CI: 1.19-1.57, which translates to 112 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. For the 4-month vaccination, the RIR for 1(st-borns vs. later-borns was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.45-1.99, representing 157 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. At 6 months, the RIR for 1(st vs. later-borns was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.09-1.48, or 77 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. At the 12-month vaccination, the RIR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02-1.21, or 249 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: Birth order is associated with increased incidence of ER visits and hospitalizations following vaccination in infancy. 1(st-born children had significantly higher relative incidence of events compared to later-born children.

  2. ATLAS virtual visit features Birzeit University, first university in Palestine and a member of the International Association of Universities since 1977.

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia marcelloni

    2012-01-01

    This ATLAS virtual visit features Birzeit University, first university in Palestine and a member of the International Association of Universities since 1977. As part of the "Physics Without Frontiers" project, funded by the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Birzeit is hosting a one day particle physics masterclass. During the day the physics major students are given an introduction to experimental particle physics, the LHC and the ATLAS Experiment, before having the chance to analyze real LHC data. This virtual visit comprises of a live tour around the ATLAS control room and the opportunity to ask questions to the ATLAS physicists. The Department of Physics at Birzeit University provides an exciting environment for the training of both graduate and undergraduate students. Some of the Physics department graduates participated in the CERN Summer Program over the past few years.

  3. Strong Facet-Induced and Light-Controlled Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Semiconducting β-FeSi2 Nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiqiang; Xiong, Shijie; Wu, Shuyi; Zhu, Xiaobin; Meng, Ming; Wu, Xinglong

    2015-09-09

    Crystalline β-FeSi2 nanocubes with two {100} facets and four {011} lateral facets synthesized by spontaneous one-step chemical vapor deposition exhibit strong room-temperature ferromagnetism with saturation magnetization of 15 emu/g. The room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed from the β-FeSi2 nanocubes larger than 150 nm with both the {100} and {011} facets. The ferromagnetism is tentatively explained with a simplified model including both the itinerant electrons in surface states and the local moments on Fe atoms near the surfaces. The work demonstrates the transformation from a nonmagnetic semiconductor to a magnetic one by exposing specific facets and the room-temperature ferromagnetism can be manipulated under light irradiation. The semiconducting β-FeSi2 nanocubes may have large potential in silicon-based spintronic applications.

  4. Resource control in ATLAS distributed data management: Rucio Accounting and Quotas

    CERN Document Server

    Barisits, Martin-Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system stores more than 160PB of physics data across more than 130 sites globally. Rucio, the next-generation data management system of ATLAS has been introduced to cope with the anticipated workload of the coming decade. The previous data management system DQ2 pursued a rather simplistic approach for resource management, but with the increased data volume and more dynamic handling of data workflows required by the experiment, a more elaborate approach to this issue is needed. This document describes how resources, like storage, accounts and replication requests, are accounted in Rucio. Especially the measurement of used logical storage space is fundamentally different in Rucio than it’s predecessor DQ2. We introduce a new concept of declaring quota policies (limits) for accounts in Rucio. This new quota concept is based on accounts and RSE (Rucio storage element) expressions, which allows the definition of account limits in a dynamic way. This concept enables the opera...

  5. Resource control in ATLAS distributed data management: Rucio Accounting and Quotas

    CERN Document Server

    Barisits, Martin-Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, Vincent; Lassnig, Mario; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Vigne, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system manages more than 160PB of physics data across more than 130 sites globally. Rucio, the next generation Distributed Data Management system of the ATLAS experiment, replaced DQ2 in December 2014 and will manage the experiments data throughout Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. The previous data management system pursued a rather simplistic approach for resource management, but with the increased data volume and more dynamic handling of data workflows required by the experiment, a more elaborate approach to this issue is needed. Rucio was delivered with an initial quota system, but during the first months of operation it turned out to not fully satisfy the collaborations resource management needs. We consequently introduce a new concept of declaring quota policies (limits) for accounts in Rucio. This new quota concept is based on accounts and RSE (Rucio storage element) expressions, which allows the definition of hierarchical quotas in a dynamic way. This concept enables t...

  6. An IMPI-compliant control system for the ATLAS TileCal Phase II Upgrade PreProcessor module

    CERN Document Server

    Zuccarello, Pedro Diego; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    TileCal is the Tile hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The LHC upgrade program, currently under development, will culminate in the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), which is expected to increase about five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. The readout electronics of the Tile calorimenter being redesigned introducing a new read-out strategy in order to accommodate the detector to the new HL-LHC parameters. The data generated inside the detector at every bunch crossing will be transmitted to the PreProcessor (PPR) boards before any event selection is applied. The PPRs will be located at off-detector sites. The PPR will be responsible of providing preprocessed trigger information to the ATLAS first level of trigger (L1). In overall it will represent the interface between the data acquisition, trigger and control systems and the on-detector electronics. The PPR, being an important part of the readout system, needs to be remotely accessed and monitored to prevent failures or, in cas...

  7. JACoW Design of the front-end detector control system of the ATLAS New Small Wheels

    CERN Document Server

    Moschovakos, Paris

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will be upgraded during the next LHC Long Shutdown (LS2). The flagship upgrade is the New Small Wheel (NSW) [1], which consists of 2 disks of Muon Gas detectors. The detector technologies used are Micromegas (MM) and sTGC, providing a total of 16 layers of tracking and trigger. The Slow Control Adapter (SCA) is part of the Gigabit Transceiver (GBT) - “Radiation Hard Optical Link Project” family of chips designed at CERN, EP-ESE department [2,3], which will be used at the NSW upgrade. The SCA offers several interfaces to read analogue and digital inputs, and configure front-end Readout ASICs, FPGAs, or other chips. The design of the NSW Detector Control System (DCS) takes advantage of this functionality, as described in this paper.

  8. Control of Human Error and comparison Level risk after correction action With the SHERPA Method in a control Room of petrochemical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zakerian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims Today in many jobs like nuclear, military and chemical industries, human errors may result in a disaster. Accident in different places of the world emphasizes this subject and we indicate for example, Chernobyl disaster in (1986, tree Mile accident in (1974 and Flixborough explosion in (1974.So human errors identification especially in important and intricate systems is necessary and unavoidable for predicting control methods.   Methods Recent research is a case study and performed in Zagross Methanol Company in Asalouye (South pars.   Walking –Talking through method with process expert and control room operators, inspecting technical documents are used for collecting required information and completing Systematic Human Error Reductive and Predictive Approach (SHERPA worksheets.   Results analyzing SHERPA worksheet indicated that, were accepting capable invertebrate errors % 71.25, % 26.75 undesirable errors, % 2 accepting capable(with change errors, % 0 accepting capable errors, and after correction action forecast Level risk to this arrangement, accepting capable invertebrate errors % 0, % 4.35 undesirable errors , % 58.55 accepting capable(with change errors, % 37.1 accepting capable errors .   ConclusionFinally this result is comprehension that this method in different industries especially in chemical industries is enforceable and useful for human errors identification that may lead to accident and adventures.

  9. Turning the Waiting Room into a Classroom: Weekly Classes Using a Vegan or a Portion-Controlled Eating Plan Improve Diabetes Control in a Randomized Translational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Neal D; Levin, Susan M; Gloede, Lise; Flores, Rosendo

    2018-02-01

    In research settings, plant-based (vegan) eating plans improve diabetes management, typically reducing weight, glycemia, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations to a greater extent than has been shown with portion-controlled eating plans. The study aimed to test whether similar benefits could be found using weekly nutrition classes in a typical endocrinology practice, hypothesizing that a vegan eating plan would improve glycemic control, weight, lipid concentrations, blood pressure, and renal function and would do so more effectively than a portion-controlled eating plan. In a 20-week trial, participants were randomly assigned to a low-fat vegan or portion-controlled eating plan. Individuals with type 2 diabetes treated in a single endocrinology practice in Washington, DC, participated (45 starters, 40 completers). Participants attended weekly after-hours classes in the office waiting room. The vegan plan excluded animal products and added oils and favored low-glycemic index foods. The portion-controlled plan included energy intake limits for weight loss (typically a deficit of 500 calories/day) and provided guidance on portion sizes. Body weight, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), plasma lipids, urinary albumin, and blood pressure were measured. For normally distributed data, t tests were used; for skewed outcomes, rank-based approaches were implemented (Wilcoxon signed-rank test for within-group changes, Wilcoxon two-sample test for between-group comparisons, and exact Hodges-Lehmann estimation to estimate effect sizes). Although participants were in generally good metabolic control at baseline, body weight, HbA1c, and LDL cholesterol improved significantly within each group, with no significant differences between the two eating plans (weight: -6.3 kg vegan, -4.4 kg portion-controlled, between-group P=0.10; HbA1c, -0.40 percentage point in both groups, P=0.68; LDL cholesterol -11.9 mg/dL vegan, -12.7 mg/dL portion-controlled, P=0.89). Mean urinary

  10. Effectiveness of the custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator on hallux valgus: A prospective, randomized single-blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadchavalpanichaya, Navaporn; Prakotmongkol, Voraluck; Polhan, Nattapong; Rayothee, Pitchaya; Seng-Iad, Sirirat

    2017-03-01

    Silicone toe separator is considered as a conservative treatment for hallux valgus. The prefabricated toe separator does not fit all. However, effectiveness in prescription of the custom-mold toe separator is still unknown. To investigate the effect of using a custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator to decrease hallux valgus angle and hallux pain. The compliances, complications, and satisfactions of toe separator were also explored. A prospective, randomized single-blinded controlled trial. A total of 90 patients with a moderate degree of hallux valgus were enrolled in a study at the Foot Clinic, Siriraj Hospital, Thailand. Patients were randomized into two groups; the study group was prescribed a custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator for 6 h per night for 12 months. Patients in both groups received proper foot care and shoes and were permitted to continue drug treatment. In total, 40 patients in the study group and 39 patients in the control group completed the study. The hallux valgus angle was obtained through radiographic measurement. At month 12, both groups had significant differences in mean hallux valgus angle with a decrease of 3.3° ± 2.4° for the study group and increase of 1.9° ± 1.9° for the control group. There were statistically significant differences of hallux valgus angle between the two groups ( p Hallux pain was decreased in the study group. A custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator can decrease hallux valgus angle and pain with no serious complications. Clinical relevance The custom-mold room temperature vulcanizing silicone toe separator for treatment of hallux valgus reduces deformity and hallux pain.

  11. A high-precision X-ray tomograph for quality control of the ATLAS Muon Monitored Drift Tube Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, S; Banhidi, Z; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Lampl, W; Marchesotti, M; Rangod, Stephane; Sbrissa, E; Smirnov, Y; Voss, Rüdiger; Woudstra, M; Zhuravlov, V

    2004-01-01

    A dedicated X-ray tomograph has been developed at CERN to control the required wire placement accuracy of better than 20mum of the 1200 Monitored Drift Tube Chambers which make up most of the precision chamber part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The tomograph allows the chamber wire positions to be measured with a 2mum statistical and 2mum systematic uncertainty over the full chamber cross-section of 2.2 multiplied by 0.6m**2. Consistent chamber production quality over the 4-year construction phase is ensured with a similar to 15% sampling rate. Measurements of about 70 of the 650 MDT chambers so far produced have been essential in assessing the validity and consistency of the various construction procedures.

  12. Average Air Temperature Inside a Room With a Semitransparent Wall With a Solar Control Film: Effect of The Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xamán

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a theoretical study on conjugated heat transfer (natural convection, radiation and conduction in a squareroom (cavity with turbulent flow is presented, taking into account variation on the opaque wall emissivity. The room isformed by an isothermal vertical wall, two adiabatic horizontal walls and a semitransparent wall with and without acontrol solar radiation film. The governing equations for turbulent flow in 2D were solved using a finite volumeformulation and k- turbulent model. Results for an isothermal wall at 21°C and an external temperature of 35°C arepresented. The size of the room is 4.0 m length and height and the solar radiation falling directly on thesemitransparent wall was 750 W/m2 (AM2. The emissivity of the opaque walls was varied between 0.1 ≤ * ≤ 1.0.Results show that, based on the air average temperature and the effective heat flux inside the room, the solar controlfilm under study was advantageous for energy saving purposes, for emissivity values of * ≤ 0.46. A correlation onthis system for the heat transfer as a function of the emissivities was determined.

  13. Qualification measurements of the voltage supply system as well as conceptionation of a state machine for the detector control of the ATLAS pixel detector; Qualifizierungsmessungen des Spannungsversorgungssystems sowie Konzeptionierung einer Zustandsmaschine fuer die Detektorkontrolle des ATLAS-Pixeldetektors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultes, Joachim

    2007-02-15

    The supply system and the control system of the ATLAS pixel detector represent important building blocks of the pixel detector. Corresponding studies of the supply system, which were performed within a comprehensive test system, the so-called system test, with nearly all final components and the effects on the pixel detector are object of this thesis. A further point of this thesis is the coordination and further development of the detector-control-system software under regardment of the different partial systems. A main topic represents thereby the conceptionation of the required state machine as interface for the users and the connection to the data acquisition system.

  14. A Comparison between Temperature-Controlled Laminar Airflow Device and a Room Air-Cleaner in Reducing Exposure to Particles While Asleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spilak, Michal; Sigsgaard, Torben; Takai, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    environment might be a feasible method to alleviate these health symptoms. We performed full-scale laboratory measurements using a thermal manikin positioned on an experimental bed. Three ventilation settings were tested: with no filtration system operated, use of portable air cleaner and use of a temperature-controlled...... laminar airflow (TLA) device. The first part of the experiment investigated the air-flow characteristics in the breathing zone. In the second part, particle removal efficiency was estimated. Measured in the breathing zone, the room air cleaner demonstrated high turbulence intensity, high velocity...... was significantly lower with the TLA device compared to the room air cleaner. The TLA device provided a barrier which significantly reduced the introduction of airborne particles into the breathing zone. Further studies should be conducted for the understanding of the transport of resuspended particles between...

  15. Work on the ATLAS semiconductor tracker barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Precision work is performed on the semiconductor tracker barrel of the ATLAS experiment. All work on these delicate components must be performed in a clean room so that impurities in the air, such as dust, do not contaminate the detector. The semiconductor tracker will be mounted in the barrel close to the heart of the ATLAS experiment to detect the path of particles produced in proton-proton collisions.

  16. Resource control in ATLAS distributed data management: Rucio Accounting and Quotas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisits, M.; Serfon, C.; Garonne, V.; Lassnig, M.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system manages more than 160PB of physics data across more than 130 sites globally. Rucio, the next generation Distributed Data Management system of the ATLAS experiment, replaced DQ2 in December 2014 and will manage the experiment's data throughout Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. The previous data management system pursued a rather simplistic approach for resource management, but with the increased data volume and more dynamic handling of data workflows required by the experiment, a more elaborate approach is needed. Rucio was delivered with an initial quota system, but during the first months of operation it turned out to not fully satisfy the collaboration's resource management needs. We consequently introduce a new concept of declaring quota policies (limits) for accounts in Rucio. This new quota concept is based on accounts and RSE (Rucio storage element) expressions, which allows the definition of hierarchical quotas in a dynamic way. This concept enables the operators of the data management system to implement very specific policies for users, physics groups and production systems while, at the same time, lowering the operational burden. This contribution describes the concept, architecture and workflow of the system and includes an evaluation measuring the performance of the system.

  17. Framework for data intercommunication and control of ATLAS High Level Trigger algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Ospanov, Rustem; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is equipped with a sophisticated trigger system capable of reducing the 40 MHz LHC collision rate to the 70 kHz rate at the Level 1 hardware trigger and to the average 400 Hz rate at the High Level Trigger (HLT) during the Run 1 data taking in 2010-2012. In the HLT, the Steering Framework manages a few hundred of trigger algorithms: it evaluates every collision event and makes an accept/reject decision using as few resources as possible. Communication among algorithms is facilitated by a data navigation structure, implemented as a directed acyclic graph structure, that allows HLT algorithms fast discovery of detector regions containing interesting physics objects, as well as selecting an optimal way to build and traverse the event graph structure. For ATLAS running after the 2013-2014 shutdown (Run 2), more detailed trigger information is given to physics analysis users thus improving capabilities of trigger aware analyses. To reduce size of event data stored for physics analys...

  18. Design of the control room of the N4-type PWR: main features and feedback operating experience; La salle de commande du palier N4: principales caracteristiques et retour d'experience d'exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouton, J.M.; Guillas, J.; Nougaret, Ch. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN/CAPE), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    This article presents the design, specificities and innovating features of the control room of the N4-type PWR. A brief description of control rooms of previous 900 MW and 1300 MW -type PWR allows us to assess the change. The design of the first control room dates back to 1972, at that time 2 considerations were taken into account: first the design has to be similar to that of control rooms for thermal plants because plant operators were satisfied with it and secondly the normal operating situation has to be privileged to the prejudice of accidental situations just as it was in a thermal plant. The turning point was the TMI accident that showed the weight of human factor in accidental situations in terms of pilot team, training, procedures and the ergonomics of the work station. The impact of TMI can be seen in the design of 1300 MW-type PWR. In the beginning of the eighties EDF decided to launch a study for a complete overhaul of the control room concept, the aim was to continue reducing the human factor risk and to provide a better quality of piloting the plant in any situation. The result is the control room of the N4-type PWR. Today the cumulated feedback experience of N4 control rooms represents more than 20 years over a wide range of situations from normal to incidental, a survey shows that the N4 design has fulfilled its aims. (A.C.)

  19. New thinking for the boiler room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Wayne

    2008-09-01

    Wayne Rose, marketing manager at integrated plant room manufacturer Armstrong Integrated Systems, explains how increasing use of off-site manufacture, the latest 3D modelling technology, and advances in control technology, are revolutionising boiler room design and construction.

  20. Electric field control of the γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3 interface conductivity at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn; Trier, Felix; von Soosten, Merlin

    2016-01-01

    Controlling interfaces using electric fields is at the heart of modern electronics. The discovery of the conducting interface between the two insulating oxides LaAlO3 (LAO) and SrTiO3 (STO) has led to a number of interesting electric field-dependent phenomena. Recently, it was shown that replacing...... LAO with a spinel γ-Al2O3 (GAO) allows a good pseudo-epitaxial film growth and high electron mobility at low temperatures. Here, we show that the GAO/STO interface resistance, similar to LAO/STO, can be tuned by orders of magnitude at room temperature using the electric field of a backgate...

  1. Resistive switching and electrical control of ferromagnetism in a Ag/HfO₂/Nb:SrTiO₃/Ag resistive random access memory (RRAM) device at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shaoqing; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Bu, Jianpei; Qin, Hongwei; Hu, Jifan

    2016-02-10

    Electrically induced resistive switching and modulated ferromagnetism are simultaneously found in a Ag/HfO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag resistive random access memory device at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching (RS) can be controlled by the modification of a Schottky-like barrier with an electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of HfO2-Nb:SrTiO3. The multilevel RS transition can be observed in the reset process with larger negative voltage sweepings, which is connected to the different degree of electron detrapping in the interfacial depletion region of the HfO2 layer during the reset process. The origin of the electrical control of room-temperature ferromagnetism may be connected to the change of density of oxygen vacancies in the HfO2 film. The multilevel resistance states and the electric field controlled ferromagnetism have potential for applications in ultrahigh-density storage and magnetic logic device.

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

  3. 19 September 2012 - Indonesian Members of Parliament visiting the CMS control room and experimental cavern at Point 5 with Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    19 September 2012 - Indonesian Members of Parliament visiting the CMS control room and experimental cavern at Point 5 with Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

  4. 4th February 2011- Polish Ambassador to the United Nations Office R. A. Henczel visiting CMS control room and underground experimental area with his daughter, guided by Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4th February 2011- Polish Ambassador to the United Nations Office R. A. Henczel visiting CMS control room and underground experimental area with his daughter, guided by Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  5. 7 April 2010 - Rector, Ghent University, P. Van Cauwenberge with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Coordinator for external relations F. Pauss, visiting CMS control room at Point 5 with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    7 April 2010 - Rector, Ghent University, P. Van Cauwenberge with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Coordinator for external relations F. Pauss, visiting CMS control room at Point 5 with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck.

  6. Two ATLAS trackers become one

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS inner detector barrel comes one step closer to completion as the semiconductor tracker is merged with the transition radiation tracker. ATLAS collaborators prepare for the insertion of the semiconductor tracker (SCT, behind) into the transition radiation tracker (TRT, in front). Some had hoped it would fall on Valentine's Day. But despite the slight delay, Friday 17 February was lovingly embraced as 'Conception Day,' when dozens of physicists and engineers from the international collaboration gathered to witness the insertion of the ATLAS semiconductor tracker into the transition radiation tracker, a major milestone in the assembly of the experiment's inner detector. With just millimeters of room for error, the cylindrical trackers were slid into each other as inner detector integration coordinator Heinz Pernegger issued commands and scientists held out flashlights, lay on their backs and stood on ladders to take careful measurements. Each tracker is the result of about 10 years of international ...

  7. Run control communication for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon-to-Central Trigger Processor Interface (MUCTPI)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00223859; The ATLAS collaboration; Armbruster, Aaron James; Carrillo-Montoya, German D.; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Czodrowski, Patrick; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Eifert, Till; Ellis, Nicolas; Farthouat, Philippe; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Haas, Stefan; Helary, Louis; Lagkas Nikolos, Orestis; Marzin, Antoine; Pauly, Thilo; Ryjov, Vladimir; Schmieden, Kristof; Silva Oliveira, Marcos Vinicius; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wengler, Thorsten

    The Muon-to-Central-Trigger-Processor Interface (MUCTPI) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be upgraded to an ATCA blade system for Run 3, starting in 2021. The new design requires development of new communication models for control, configuration and monitoring. A System-on-Chip (SoC) with a programmable logic part and a processor part will be used for communication to the run control system and to the MUCTPI processing FPGAs. Different approaches have been compared. First, we tried an available UDP-based implementation in firmware for the programmable logic. Although this approach works as expected, it does not provide any flexibility to extend the functionality to more complex operations, e.g. for serial protocols. Second, we used a SoC processor with an embedded Linux operating system and an application-specific software written in C++ using a TCP remote-procedure-call approach. The software is built and maintained using the framework of the Yocto Project. This approa...

  8. Run Control Communication for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon-to-Central-Trigger-Processor Interface (MUCTPI)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00223859; The ATLAS collaboration; Armbruster, Aaron James; Carrillo-Montoya, German D.; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Czodrowski, Patrick; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Eifert, Till; Ellis, Nicolas; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Haas, Stefan; Helary, Louis; Lagkas Nikolos, Orestis; Marzin, Antoine; Pauly, Thilo; Ryjov, Vladimir; Schmieden, Kristof; Silva Oliveira, Marcos Vinicius; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wengler, Thorsten; Farthouat, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Muon-to-Central Trigger Processor Interface (MUCTPI) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be upgraded to an ATCA blade system for Run 3. The new design requires development of new communication models for control, configuration and monitoring. A System-on-Chip (SoC) with a programmable logic part and a processor part will be used for communication to the run control system and to the MUCTPI processing FPGAs. Different approaches have been compared. First, we tried an available UDP-based implementation in firmware for the programmable logic. Although this approach works as expected, it does not provide any flexibility to extend the functionality to more complex operations, e.g. for serial protocols. Second, we used the SoC processor with an embedded Linux operating system and an application-specific software written in C++ using a TCP remote-procedure-call approach. The software is built and maintained using the Yocto/OpenEmbedded framework. This approach was successfully...

  9. RUN CONTROL COMMUNICATION FOR THE UPGRADE OF THE ATLAS MUON-TO-CENTRAL TRIGGER PROCESSOR INTERFACE (MUCTPI)

    CERN Document Server

    Spiwoks, Ralf; The ATLAS collaboration; Carrillo-Montoya, German D.

    2017-01-01

    The Muon-to-Central Trigger Processor Interface (MUCTPI) of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be upgraded to an ATCA blade system for Run 3. The new design requires devel-opment of new communication models for control, con-figuration and monitoring. A System-on-Chip (SoC) with a programmable logic part and a processor part will be used for communication to the run control system and to the MUCTPI processing FPGAs. Different approaches have been compared. First, we tried an available UDP-based implementation in firmware for the programmable logic. Although this approach works as expected, it does not provide any flexibility to extend the functionality to more complex operations, e.g. for serial protocols. Sec-ond, we used the SoC processor with an embedded Linux operating system and an application-specific software written in C++ using a TCP remote-procedure-call ap-proach. The software is built and maintained using the Yocto Project’s framework. This approach was successfu...

  10. Human errors and work performance in a nuclear power plant control room: associations with work-related factors and behavioral coping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecklund, L.J. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden).Dept. of Man-Technology Organization; Svenson, O. [Stockholm University (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology

    1997-12-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between the operator`s appraisal of his own work situation and the quality of his own work performance, as well as self-reported errors in a nuclear power plant control room. In all, 98 control room operators from two nuclear power units filled out a questionnaire and several diaries during two operational conditions, annual outage and normal operation. As expected, the operators reported higher work demands in annual outage as compared to normal operation. In response to the increased demands, the operators reported that they used coping strategies such as increased effort, decreased aspiration level for work performance quality, and increased use of delegation of tasks to others. This way of coping does not reflect less positive motivation for the work during the outage period. Instead, the operators maintain the same positive motivation for their work, and succeed in being more alert during morning and night shifts. However, the operators feel less satisfied with their work result. The operators also perceive the risk of making minor errors as increasing during outage. (Author).

  11. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  12. Sequential introduction of single room isolation and hand hygiene campaign in the control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Vincent CC

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After renovation of the adult intensive care unit (ICU with installation of ten single rooms, an enhanced infection control program was conducted to control the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in our hospital. Methods Since the ICU renovation, all patients colonized or infected with MRSA were nursed in single rooms with contact precautions. The incidence of MRSA infection in the ICU was monitored during 3 different phases: the baseline period (phase 1; after ICU renovation (phase 2 and after implementation of a hand hygiene campaign with alcohol-based hand rub (phase 3. Patients infected with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species were chosen as controls because they were managed in open cubicles with standard precautions. Results Without a major change in bed occupancy rate, nursing workforce, or the protocol of environmental cleansing throughout the study period, a stepwise reduction in ICU onset nonbacteraemic MRSA infection was observed: from 3.54 (phase 1 to 2.26 (phase 2, p = 0.042 and 1.02 (phase 3, p = 0.006 per 1000-patient-days. ICU onset bacteraemic MRSA infection was significantly reduced from 1.94 (phase 1 to 0.9 (phase 2, p = 0.005 and 0.28 (phase 3, p = 0.021 per 1000-patient-days. Infection due to ESBL-producing organisms did not show a corresponding reduction. The usage density of broad-spectrum antibiotics and fluoroquinolones increased from phase 1 to 3. However a significant trend improvement of ICU onset MRSA infection by segmented regression analysis can only be demonstrated when comparison was made before and after the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic. This suggests that the deaths of fellow healthcare workers from an occupational acquired infection had an overwhelming effect on their compliance with infection control measures. Conclusion Provision of single room isolation facilities and promotion of hand

  13. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  14. DESIGNING OF SIMULATION FOR ENGINE ROOM KM. SINABUNG WITH CONTROL MONITORING WEB SERVER BASED BY WIRELESS NETWORK AND POWER LINE COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Sasmito Hadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Engine room monitoring control system is monitoring and controlling main engine and auxiliary engine from long distance by powerline communication network and wireless network to ease the operator in operating the ship and save operational cost. To prevent error in programming the main engine and auxiliary engine, a simulation using instrument software is needed to know the machine characteristic. After simulation result fulfills the requirement which is approached the value of test record, it can be applied to the real machine. In this study, some  steps were done such as: getting know type of main engine and auxiliary engine which performance will be simulated and programmed, getting test record of main engine and auxiliary engine, getting know how the main engine and auxiliary engine work, making simulation of main engine and auxiliary engine work system, doing monitoring control simulation by powerline   communication and wireless network, comparing the results between simulation and test record of main engine and auxiliary engine. Engine programming can be set after simulation result meets the requirement. Result of simulation fulfills the requirement, the difference values between machine simulation using software instrument and test record of main engine and auxiliary engine are around 1%-2%. If engine room monitoring control system by wireless and powerline communication is applied in the ship, the ship owner will get advantages because it will prolong ship durability and can monitor operasional of main engine or Auxiliary engine from long distance ; while the operator will be easier in operating the ship. The disadvantage is only the higher cost

  15. Enhanced ammonia removal at room temperature by pH controlled partial nitrification and subsequent anaerobic ammonium oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, U; del Val Río, A; Campos, J L; Mosquera-Corral, A; Méndez, R

    2014-01-01

    The Anammox-based processes are suitable for the treatment of wastewaters characterized by a low carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio. The application of the Anammox process requires the availability of an effluent with a NO2- -N/NH4+ -N ratio composition around 1 g g-1, which involves the necessity of a previous step where the partial nitrification is performed. In this step, the inhibition of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) is crucial. In the present work, a combined partial nitrification-ANaerobic AMmonia OXidation (Anammox) two-units system operated at room temperature (20 degreeC) has been tested for the nitrogen removal of pre-treated pig slurry. To achieve the successful partial nitrification and inhibit the NOB activity, different ammonium/inorganic carbon (NH4+/IC) ratios were assayed from 1.19 to 0.82g NH4+-Ng-1 HCO3-C. This procedure provoked a decrease of the pH value to 6.0 to regulate the inhibitory effect over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria caused by free ammonia. Simultaneously, the NOB experienced the inhibitory effect of free nitrous acid which avoided the presence of nitrate in the effluent. The NH4+/IC ratio which allowed the obtaining of the desired effluent composition (50% of both ammonium and nitrite) was 0.82 +/- 0.02 g NH4+-N g-1 HCO3- -C. The Anammox reactor was fed with the effluent of the partial nitrification unit containing a NO2 -N/NH4+ -N ratio of 1 g g-1' where a nitrogen loading rate of 0.1 g N L-1 d-1 was efficiently removed.

  16. The ATLAS Overview Week in Freiburg, October 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, K.

    2004-01-01

    The first things that must be said are that the city of Freiburg is a very attractive location for such a meeting, encouraging a relaxed coming together of all sections of the ATLAS Community, and that the Week's activities were splendidly, (while unobtrusively), organised by our hosts, Karl Jakobs and Gregor Herten and their supporting team. The fine sunny weather contributed to our sense of well-being, of course, as did the quality of the local beer! (Some of our native English speaking colleagues were relieved to discover that what was described in restaurants and bars as 'Badisch' turned out, on the contrary, to be rather 'Good-ish' instead!!) The week began with pre-meetings of subgroups on Saturday and Sunday, and included lively discussions on how to commission the detector and on the nature and format of the ATLAS control room and its environs. These discussions were a clear indication of the optimism within the ATLAS community that physics is really beginning to appear on our horizon! During th...

  17. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System in operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Thilo; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking. It receives the 40 MHz bunch clock from the LHC machine and distributes it to all sub-detectors. It initiates the detector read-out by forming the Level-1 Accept decision, which is based on information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, plus a variety of additional trigger inputs from detectors in the forward regions. The L1CT also provides trigger-summary information to the data acquisition and the Level-2 trigger systems for use in higher levels of the selection process, in offline analysis, and for monitoring. In this paper we give an overview of the operational framework of the L1CT with particular emphasis on cross-system aspects. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are monitored coherently on all stages of processing and are logged by the online computing system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. In addition, the synchronisation of trigger inputs is watched based on bunch-by-bunch trigger information. Several software tools allow to efficiently display the relevant information in the control room in a way useful for shifters and experts. We present the overall performance during cosmic-ray data taking with the full ATLAS detector and the experience with first beam in the LHC.

  18. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: an overview and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    LEE, CJ; The ATLAS collaboration; BOGDANCHIKOV, A; BRASOLIN, F; CONTESCU, AC; DARLEA, GL; KOROL, A; SCANNICCHIO, DA; TWOMEY, M; VALSAN, ML

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The system processes the direct data readout from ~100 million channels on the detector through three trigger levels, selecting interesting events for analysis with a factor of 10^7 reduction on the data rate with a latency of less than a few seconds. Most of the functionality is implemented on ~3000 servers composing the online farm. Due to the critical functionality of the system a sophisticated computing environment is maintained, covering the online farm and ATLAS control rooms, as well as a number of development and testing labs. The specificity of the system required the development of dedicated applications (e.g. ConfDB, BWM) for system configuration and maintenance; in parallel other Open Source tools (Puppet and Quattor) are used to centrally configure the operating systems. The health monitoring of the TDAQ system h...

  19. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration: an overview and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    LEE, CJ; The ATLAS collaboration; BOGDANCHIKOV, A; BRASOLIN, F; CONTESCU, AC; DARLEA, G-L; KOROL, A; SCANNICCHIO, DA; TWOMEY, M; VALSAN, ML

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The system processes the direct data readout from ~100 million channels on the detector through multiple trigger levels, selecting interesting events for analysis with a factor of $10^{7}$ reduction on the data rate with a latency of less than a few seconds. Most of the functionality is implemented on ~3000 servers composing the online farm. Due to the critical functionality of the system a sophisticated computing environment is maintained, covering the online farm and ATLAS control rooms, as well as a number of development and testing labs. The specificity of the system required the development of dedicated applications (e.g. ConfDB, BWM) for system configuration and maintenance; in parallel other Open Source tools (Puppet and Quattor) are used to centrally configure the operating systems. The health monitoring of the TDAQ s...

  20. Development of a detector control system for the serially powered ATLAS pixel detector at the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puellen, Lukas

    2015-02-10

    In the years around 2020 the LHC will be upgraded to the HL-LHC. In terms of this upgrade, the ATLAS detector will also be upgraded. This also includes the pixel detector, the innermost of the sub-detectors in ATLAS. Thereby the powering concept of the pixel detector will be changed to reduce the material budget of the detector. From individual powering of each detector module, the concept changes to serial powering, where all modules of a powering group are connected in series. This change makes the development of a new detector control system (DCS) mandatory. Therefore, a new concept for the ATLAS pixel DCS is being developed at the University of Wuppertal. This concept is split into three paths: a safety path, a control path, and a diagnostics path. The safety path is a hard wired interlock system. The concept of this system will not differ significantly, compared to the interlock system of the current detector. The diagnostics path is embedded into the optical data read-out of the detector and will be used for detector tuning with high precision and granularity. The control path supervises the detector and provides a user interface to the hardware components. A concept for this path, including a prototype and proof-of-principle studies, has been developed in terms of this thesis. The control path consists of the DCS network, a read-out and controlling topology created by two types of ASICs: the DCS controller and the DCS chip. These ASICs measure and control all values, necessary for a safe detector operation in situ. This reduces the number of required cables and hence the material budget of the system. For the communication between these ASICs, two very fault tolerant bus protocols have been chosen: CAN bus carries data from the DCS computers, outside of the detector, to the DCS controllers at the edge of the pixel detector. For the communication between the DCS controller and the DCS chip, which is located close to each detector module, an enhanced I2C

  1. A Comparison between Temperature-Controlled Laminar Airflow Device and a Room Air-Cleaner in Reducing Exposure to Particles While Asleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal P Spilak

    Full Text Available People spend approximately one third of their life sleeping. Exposure to pollutants in the sleep environment often leads to a variety of adverse health effects, such as development and exacerbation of asthma. Avoiding exposure to these pollutants by providing a sufficient air quality in the sleep environment might be a feasible method to alleviate these health symptoms. We performed full-scale laboratory measurements using a thermal manikin positioned on an experimental bed. Three ventilation settings were tested: with no filtration system operated, use of portable air cleaner and use of a temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA device. The first part of the experiment investigated the air-flow characteristics in the breathing zone. In the second part, particle removal efficiency was estimated. Measured in the breathing zone, the room air cleaner demonstrated high turbulence intensity, high velocity and turbulence diffusivity level, with a particle reduction rate of 52% compared to baseline after 30 minutes. The TLA device delivered a laminar airflow to the breathing zone with a reduction rate of 99.5%. During a periodical duvet lifting mimicking a subject's movement in bed, the particle concentration was significantly lower with the TLA device compared to the room air cleaner. The TLA device provided a barrier which significantly reduced the introduction of airborne particles into the breathing zone. Further studies should be conducted for the understanding of the transport of resuspended particles between the duvet and the laying body.

  2. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzer, Julian

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of two with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the factor of two increase in the number of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to three different subdetector combinations. An overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis on the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects is given. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition system. Trigger and dead-time rates are monitored coherently at all stages of processing and are logged by the online computing system for physics analysis, data quality assurance and operational debugging. In addition, the synchronisation of trigger inputs is watched based on bunch-by-bunch trigger information. Several software tools allow for efficient display of the relevant information in the control room in a way useful for shifters and experts. The design of the framework aims at reliability, flexibility, and robustness of the system and takes into account the operational experience gained during Run 1. The Level-1 Central Trigger was successfully operated with high efficiency during the cosmic-ray, beam-splash and first Run 2 data taking with the full ATLAS detector.

  3. Development of an ATCA IPMI controller mezzanine board to be used in the ATCA developments for the ATLAS Liquid Argon upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Letendre, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the LHC upgrade, we develop a new Read Out Driver (ROD) for the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) community. ATCA and μTCA (Advanced/Micro Telecom Computing Architecture) is becoming a standard in high energy physics and a strong candidate to be used for boards and crates. We work to master ATCA and to integrate a large number of high speed links (96 links at 8.5 Gbps) on a ROD evaluation ATCA board. A versatile ATCA IPMI controller for ATCA boards which is FPGA Mezzanine Card (FMC) compliant has been developed to control the ROD evaluation board.

  4. The comparative study of evaluating human error assessment and reduction technique and cognitive reliability and error analysis method techniques in the control room of the cement industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Babaei Pouya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present study aimed to evaluate the assessment methods of human errors and compare the results of these techniques in order to introduce the precise method of human error assessment, and recognize the factors affecting the occurrence of these errors. Materials and Methods: This case study was done at three workstation control room of a cement industry in 2014. After determining the responsibilities and critical jobs by hierarchical task analysis, cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM and human error assessment and reduction technique (HEART were used in order to analyze the human errors. Results: The results showed that in the CREAM method, the highest probability of error occurrence is related to monitoring and control (operator with a probability of 0.207, and that of in the HEART method, is related to control signs (operator with a probability of 0.416. The number of errors detected by CREAM and HEART method were 85 and 80, respectively. Time and cost of applying the CREAM methods were 235 h and 1175($, while those in the HEART techniques were 215 h and 1075($. Conclusion: We concluded that the highest probability of calculated errors relates to "monitoring and control (operator," "controlling warning signs (operators," and "cooperation in solving the problem (supervisor" for both techniques. By considering the time and cost factors, HEART has superiority, while CREAM is better due to its extensive evaluation and the number of detected errors.

  5. Uniformity of environmental conditions and plant growth in a hydroponic culture system for use in a growth room with aerial CO2 control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, J. K.; York, E. K.; Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    A portable system of hydroponic culture was developed that maintained temperature, pH, and nutrient concentrations of circulating nutrient solutions. The hydroponic system is used within a controlled-environment room (CER) for control of aerial environment. The CER was equipped with an auto-calibrating system for atmospheric CO2 control. The control systems for the hydroponic chambers were able to maintain acidity within +/- 0.2 pH units and the temperature with +/- 0.5 degree C. Mixing time for the 200-liter volume of solution within a hydroponic chamber was less than 12 min. The CO2 control system was able to maintain aerial concentrations within +/- 10 ppm CO2 during the light period. The only gradient found to occur within the hydroponic chambers or CER was a slight gradient in aerial temperature along the length of hydroponic chambers. Growth of soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] was characterized during a 3-week period of vegetative development by leaf number and area, plant dry weight, total N content of plants, and N depletion from the nutrient solution. The growth characteristics among populations for three hydroponic chambers within the CER were not significantly different, and the percent standard errors of means of the measurements within populations from each chamber were nearly all less than 10%. Thus, the uniformity of plant growth reflected the uniformity of environmental conditions.

  6. ATLAS semiconductor tracker installed into its barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker is installed in the silicon tracker barrel. Absolute precision was required in this operation to ensure that the tracker was inserted without damage through minimal clearance. The installation was performed in a clean room on the CERN site so that no impurities in the air would contaminate the tracker's systems.

  7. File list: InP.Myo.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: InP.Lar.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Lar.10.Input_control.AllCell ce10 Input control Input control Larvae SRX331251,...,SRX188616 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/InP.Lar.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.ALL.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.ALL.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control All cell types SR...X1091031 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.ALL.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Myo.50.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.50.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Muscle SRX018653,...656,SRX038601 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Myo.50.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Plc.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Plc.10.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Placenta SRX344648...310,SRX871506,SRX142911,SRX871507,SRX204148,SRX192098,SRX192097,SRX192099 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Plc.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Plc.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Plc.05.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Placenta SRX344647...160,SRX204147,SRX404310,SRX871506,SRX871507,SRX192098,SRX192097,SRX192099 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Plc.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Oth.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Oth.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Others SRX668215,...RX371462,SRX376724,SRX512177,SRX512179 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Oth.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.CDV.20.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.20.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Cardiovascular SR...SRX220068,SRX220065,SRX220067,SRX080409,DRX021454,SRX189947 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.20.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Unc.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Unc.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Unclassified SRX1...94492,SRX063292,SRX212465,SRX012413,ERX026985 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Unc.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.PSC.10.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.Input_control.AllCell hg19 Input control Input control Pluripotent stem ...RX342849,ERX342851 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.10.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Pan.05.Input_control.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.05.Input_control.AllCell mm9 Input control Input control Pancreas SRX327163...751759,SRX751753,SRX751762,SRX174587,SRX751756,SRX751765,SRX672452,SRX751768 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.05.Input_control.AllCell.bed ...