WorldWideScience

Sample records for atlas concordance problem

  1. Concorde

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Concorde -volera, volera pas et comment volera-t-il? Film: les Concordes de vol Le Commandant Bernard présente le Concorde, "né" en 1962, et commente l'appareil qui est d'actualité- commentaires techniques à l'aide d'une maquette et présentation des dias

  2. Young Girls' and Caretakers' Reports of Problem Behavior: Comprehension and Concordance across Age, Race, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Lee Ann; Simpson, Sally S.; Hipwell, Alison E.; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses a research instrument developed and utilized by the Pittsburgh Girls Study that asked young girls (ages 7 and 8) and their caretakers to report on the girls' involvement in a variety of problem behaviors. In this article, the authors evaluate whether comprehension, prevalence, and caretaker-child concordance of problem…

  3. Peer victimization in adolescence: Concordance between measures and associations with global and daily internalizing problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, J Loes; Lansu, Tessa A M; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to shed further light on what is measured by self-, peer-, and daily diary-reports of victimization in adolescence. First, the concordance between self-, peer-, and daily diary-reports of victimization was assessed. Participants were 188 Dutch adolescents (43% male, Mage = 16.07 years, SD = .84) who participated in a classroom assessment and daily diary assessment (5 consecutive school days). Peer-reports (15%) and self-reports (13%) yielded higher prevalence rates than diary-reports (3%). Second, associations of self- and peer-reported victimization with self-, peer-, and daily diary-reported internalizing problems were examined. Due to its low prevalence, diary-reported victimization could not be related to internalizing. The association of self- and peer-reported victimization with internalizing problems varied by informant (self- vs. peer-reported internalizing) and problem type (interpersonal vs. intrapersonal). Self- and peer-reported victimization were positively associated with daily internalizing affect. Results indicate that self-, peer-, and daily diary-reports tap into different aspects of victimization. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Attention problems and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in discordant and concordant monozygotic twins: Evidence of environmental mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, H.; Derks, E.M.; Hudziak, J.; Heutink, P.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study familial and nonfamilial environmental influences on attention problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in monozygotic twins discordant and concordant-high and low for these traits. METHOD: Ninety-five twin pairs from The Netherlands Twin Register were

  5. Attention problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in discordant and concordant monozygotic twins: evidence of environmental mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, Hanne; Derks, Eske M.; Hudziak, James J.; Heutink, Peter; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C. E. M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2007-01-01

    To study familial and nonfamilial environmental influences on attention problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in monozygotic twins discordant and concordant-high and low for these traits. Ninety-five twin pairs from The Netherlands Twin Register were selected. Longitudinal

  6. Characteristics Associated With Parent-Teacher Concordance on Child Behavior Problem Ratings in Low-Income Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzer, Tiffany G; Miller, Alison L; Brophy-Herb, Holly E; Peterson, Karen E; Horodynski, Mildred A; Contreras, Dawn; Sturza, Julie; Kaciroti, Niko; Lumeng, Julie C

    2018-01-19

    Assessment of pediatric behavior problems often requires rating scales from multiple reporters in different settings (eg, home and school); however, concordance between reporters may be low. Pediatricians must reconcile differences to inform treatment. We sought to examine characteristics predicting parent-teacher concordance on ratings of preschoolers' behavior problems. Data from 562 preschoolers were used from the Growing Healthy study, an obesity prevention trial in Head Start programs (2011-2015). Parents and teachers completed the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI)/Student Behavior Inventory (SBI) and the Social Competence and Behavior-Evaluation (SCBE). Outcome variables were: parent-teacher concordance (teacher minus parent score on each subscale of ECBI/SBI and SCBE); teacher reports problem behavior, parent does not (children rated in the top quintile of challenging behavior by teacher but not parent); and parent reports problem behavior, teacher does not (children rated in the top quintile of challenging behavior by parent but not teacher). Multiple linear and logistic regression models were created for each subscale outcome, including the following covariates: child sex, child race/ethnicity, parent age, parent education, family structure, parent depressive symptoms, and parenting self-efficacy, and time of school year. Lower concordance was associated with child female sex, and child black or Hispanic race/ethnicity; parent older age, lower education, more depressive symptoms, and greater self-efficacy; and beginning of school year. Low parent-teacher concordance may reflect different perceptions of child behavior. Pediatricians could consider parent depressive symptoms, culture, and implicit bias when interpreting differences in behavior ratings by parents and teachers. Copyright © 2017 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Peer victimization in adolescence: Concordance between measures and associations with global and daily internalizing problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, J.L.; Lansu, T.A.M.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to shed further light on what is measured by self-, peer-, and daily diary-reports of victimization in adolescence. First, the concordance between self-, peer-, and daily diary-reports of victimization was assessed. Participants were 188 Dutch adolescents (43% male, Mage = 16.07

  8. Modal concord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijlstra, H.; Gibson, M.; Friedman, T.

    2008-01-01

    Sentences containing two (or more) modal elements of the same modal type and quantificational force often yield a concord reading, where the semantics of the sentence seems to contain only one modal operator, rather than a cumulative reading. In this paper I have argued that Modal Concord is a

  9. Negative ... concord?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannakidou, A

    The main claim of this paper is that a general theory of negative concord (NC) should allow for the possibility of NC involving scoping of a universal quantifier above negation. I propose that Greek NC instantiates this option. Greek n-words will be analyzed as polarity sensitive universal

  10. Concorde Re-visited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Peter; Moore, Peter

    This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the introduction of Concorde into commercial airline service. The first commercial flights were on 21 January 1976 - British Airways from Heathrow to Bahrain and Air France from Paris to Rio via Dakar. Later in that year commercial flights to Washington/Dulles began on 24 May. Services to New York were delayed until 22 November 1977. The first flight of Concorde was some seven years earlier. The prototype took off out of Toulouse on 2 March 1969 and this was followed by 002 from Filton to Fairford on 9 April. At the time it was anticipated that this was the beginning of an era when supersonic flight would be the normal way to travel long distances. Now, in 1996, Concorde is still the world's only supersonic commercial passenger airliner in airline service. This is an extraordinary achievement. The Boeing SST proved to be too ambitious and the programme was halted in 1971 after the United States Government withdrew support, while the Russian TU 144 was beset with problems. One TU 144 crashed at the Paris Air Show in 1973. The aircraft entered internal airline service in December 1975, flying supersonically between Moscow and Alma-Ata, capital of Kazakhstan, carrying mail and freight, but it did not have the range to operate viable intercontinental passenger serives. Certainly by 1985, if not many years before, the TU 144 was out of service.

  11. SECOND ATLAS DOMESTIC STANDARD PROBLEM (DSP-02 FOR A CODE ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YEON-SIK KIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been operating an integral effect test facility, the Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation (ATLAS, for transient and accident simulations of advanced pressurized water reactors (PWRs. Using ATLAS, a high-quality integral effect test database has been established for major design basis accidents of the APR1400 plant. A Domestic Standard Problem (DSP exercise using the ATLAS database was promoted to transfer the database to domestic nuclear industries and contribute to improving a safety analysis methodology for PWRs. This 2nd ATLAS DSP (DSP-02 exercise aims at an effective utilization of an integral effect database obtained from ATLAS, the establishment of a cooperation framework among the domestic nuclear industry, a better understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena, and an investigation into the possible limitation of the existing best-estimate safety analysis codes. A small break loss of coolant accident with a 6-inch break at the cold leg was determined as a target scenario by considering its technical importance and by incorporating interests from participants. This DSP exercise was performed in an open calculation environment where the integral effect test data was open to participants prior to the code calculations. This paper includes major information of the DSP-02 exercise as well as comparison results between the calculations and the experimental data.

  12. The state of concordance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastin, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    What is the computational power of a quantum computer that is restricted to transitioning from one effectively classical state to another via gates which act on only a few qudits at a time? A plausible answer is that such a machine is no more powerful than a classical computer, but this turns out to be surprisingly difficult to prove. The difficulty is that the effectively classical states referenced are concordant states, which are classical up to the choice of local classical basis, and determining the next local basis in which the state of the computer looks classical appears to be a hard problem. The recent paper by Cable and Browne (2015 New J. Phys. 17 113049), describes powerful new techniques for addressing this fundamental question and provides some partial answers.

  13. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  14. Concordance of gene expression and functional correlation patterns across the NCI-60 cell lines and the Cancer Genome Atlas glioblastoma samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry R Zeeberg

    Full Text Available The NCI-60 is a panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines used by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. We recently clustered genes based on correlation of expression profiles across the NCI-60. Many of the resulting clusters were characterized by cancer-associated biological functions. The set of curated glioblastoma (GBM gene expression data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA initiative has recently become available. Thus, we are now able to determine which of the processes are robustly shared by both the immortalized cell lines and clinical cancers.Our central observation is that some sets of highly correlated genes in the NCI-60 expression data are also highly correlated in the GBM expression data. Furthermore, a "double fishing" strategy identified many sets of genes that show Pearson correlation ≥0.60 in both the NCI-60 and the GBM data sets relative to a given "bait" gene. The number of such gene sets far exceeds the number expected by chance.Many of the gene-gene correlations found in the NCI-60 do not reflect just the conditions of cell lines in culture; rather, they reflect processes and gene networks that also function in vivo. A number of gene network correlations co-occur in the NCI-60 and GBM data sets, but there are others that occur only in NCI-60 or only in GBM. In sum, this analysis provides an additional perspective on both the utility and the limitations of the NCI-60 in furthering our understanding of cancers in vivo.

  15. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  16. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Akhnazarov, V; Canepa, A; Bremer, J; Burckhart, H; Cattai, A; Voss, R; Hervas, L; Kaplon, J; Nessi, M; Werner, P; Ten kate, H; Tyrvainen, H; Vandelli, W; Krasznahorkay, A; Gray, H; Alvarez gonzalez, B; Eifert, T F; Rolando, G; Oide, H; Barak, L; Glatzer, J; Backhaus, M; Schaefer, D M; Maciejewski, J P; Milic, A; Jin, S; Von torne, E; Limbach, C; Medinnis, M J; Gregor, I; Levonian, S; Schmitt, S; Waananen, A; Monnier, E; Muanza, S G; Pralavorio, P; Talby, M; Tiouchichine, E; Tocut, V M; Rybkin, G; Wang, S; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Ocariz, J H; Bertoli, W; Malaescu, B; Sbarra, C; Yamamoto, A; Sasaki, O; Koriki, T; Hara, K; Da silva gomes, A; Carvalho maneira, J; Marcalo da palma, A; Chekulaev, S; Tikhomirov, V; Snesarev, A; Buzykaev, A; Maslennikov, A; Peleganchuk, S; Sukharev, A; Kaplan, B E; Swiatlowski, M J; Nef, P D; Schnoor, U; Oakham, G F; Ueno, R; Orr, R S; Abouzeid, O; Haug, S; Peng, H; Kus, V; Vitek, M; Temming, K K; Dang, N P; Meier, K; Schultz-coulon, H; Geisler, M P; Sander, H; Schaefer, U; Ellinghaus, F; Rieke, S; Nussbaumer, A; Liu, Y; Richter, R; Kortner, S; Fernandez-bosman, M; Ullan comes, M; Espinal curull, J; Chiriotti alvarez, S; Caubet serrabou, M; Valladolid gallego, E; Kaci, M; Carrasco vela, N; Lancon, E C; Besson, N E; Gautard, V; Bracinik, J; Bartsch, V C; Potter, C J; Lester, C G; Moeller, V A; Rosten, J; Crooks, D; Mathieson, K; Houston, S C; Wright, M; Jones, T W; Harris, O B; Byatt, T J; Dobson, E; Hodgson, P; Hodgkinson, M C; Dris, M; Karakostas, K; Ntekas, K; Oren, D; Duchovni, E; Etzion, E; Oren, Y; Ferrer, L M; Testa, M; Doria, A; Merola, L; Sekhniaidze, G; Giordano, R; Ricciardi, S; Milazzo, A; Falciano, S; De pedis, D; Dionisi, C; Veneziano, S; Cardarelli, R; Verzegnassi, C; Soualah, R; Ochi, A; Ohshima, T; Kishiki, S; Linde, F L; Vreeswijk, M; Werneke, P; Muijs, A; Vankov, P H; Jansweijer, P P M; Dale, O; Lund, E; Bruckman de renstrom, P; Dabrowski, W; Adamek, J D; Wolters, H; Micu, L; Pantea, D; Tudorache, V; Mjoernmark, J; Klimek, P J; Ferrari, A; Abdinov, O; Akhoundov, A; Hashimov, R; Shelkov, G; Khubua, J; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Glagolev, V; Dedovich, D; Lykasov, G; Zhemchugov, A; Zolnikov, Y; Ryabenko, M; Sivoklokov, S; Vasilyev, I; Shalimov, A; Lobanov, M; Paramoshkina, E; Mosidze, M; Bingul, A; Nodulman, L J; Guarino, V J; Yoshida, R; Drake, G R; Calafiura, P; Haber, C; Quarrie, D R; Alonso, J R; Anderson, C; Evans, H; Lammers, S W; Baubock, M; Anderson, K; Petti, R; Suhr, C A; Linnemann, J T; Richards, R A; Tollefson, K A; Holzbauer, J L; Stoker, D P; Pier, S; Nelson, A J; Isakov, V; Martin, A J; Adelman, J A; Paganini, M; Gutierrez, P; Snow, J M; Pearson, B L; Cleland, W E; Savinov, V; Wong, W; Goodson, J J; Li, H; Lacey, R A; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H; Lanni, F; Nevski, P; Rescia, S; Kierstead, J A; Liu, Z; Yu, W W H; Bensinger, J; Hashemi, K S; Bogavac, D; Cindro, V; Hoeferkamp, M R; Coelli, S; Iodice, M; Piegaia, R N; Alonso, F; Wahlberg, H P; Barberio, E L; Limosani, A; Rodd, N L; Jennens, D T; Hill, E C; Pospisil, S; Smolek, K; Schaile, D A; Rauscher, F G; Adomeit, S; Mattig, P M; Wahlen, H; Volkmer, F; Calvente lopez, S; Sanchis peris, E J; Pallin, D; Podlyski, F; Says, L; Boumediene, D E; Scott, W; Phillips, P W; Greenall, A; Turner, P; Gwilliam, C B; Kluge, T; Wrona, B; Sellers, G J; Millward, G; Adragna, P; Hartin, A; Alpigiani, C; Piccaro, E; Bret cano, M; Hughes jones, R E; Mercer, D; Oh, A; Chavda, V S; Carminati, L; Cavasinni, V; Fedin, O; Patrichev, S; Ryabov, Y; Nesterov, S; Grebenyuk, O; Sasso, J; Mahmood, H; Polsdofer, E; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Liu, H; Hegazy, K H; Benjamin, D P; Zobernig, G; Ban, J; Brooijmans, G H; Keener, P; Williams, H H; Le geyt, B C; Hines, E J; Fadeyev, V; Schumm, B A; Law, A T; Kuhl, A D; Neubauer, M S; Shang, R; Gagliardi, G; Calabro, D; Conta, C; Zinna, M; Jones, G; Li, J; Stradling, A R; Hadavand, H K; Mcguigan, P; Chiu, P; Baldelomar, E; Stroynowski, R A; Kehoe, R L; De groot, N; Timmermans, C; Lach-heb, F; Addy, T N; Nakano, I; Moreno lopez, D; Grosse-knetter, J; Tyson, B; Rude, G D; Tafirout, R; Benoit, P; Danielsson, H O; Elsing, M; Fassnacht, P; Froidevaux, D; Ganis, G; Gorini, B; Lasseur, C; Lehmann miotto, G; Kollar, D; Aleksa, M; Sfyrla, A; Duehrssen-debling, K; Fressard-batraneanu, S; Van der ster, D C; Bortolin, C; Schumacher, J; Mentink, M; Geich-gimbel, C; Yau wong, K H; Lafaye, R; Crepe-renaudin, S; Albrand, S; Hoffmann, D; Pangaud, P; Meessen, C; Hrivnac, J; Vernay, E; Perus, A; Henrot versille, S L; Le dortz, O; Derue, F; Piccinini, M; Polini, A; Terada, S; Arai, Y; Ikeno, M; Fujii, H; Nagano, K; Ukegawa, F; Aguilar saavedra, J A; Conde muino, P; Castro, N F; Eremin, V; Kopytine, M; Sulin, V; Tsukerman, I; Korol, A; Nemethy, P; Bartoldus, R; Glatte, A; Chelsky, S; Van nieuwkoop, J; Bellerive, A; Sinervo, J K; Battaglia, A; Barbier, G J; Pohl, M; Rosselet, L; Alexandre, G B; Prokoshin, F; Pezoa rivera, R A; Batkova, L; Kladiva, E; Stastny, J; Kubes, T; Vidlakova, Z; Esch, H; Homann, M; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Pfeifer, B; Stenzel, H; Andrei, G V; Wessels, M; Buescher, V; Kleinknecht, K; Fiedler, F M; Schroeder, C D; Fernandez, E; Mir martinez, L; Vorwerk, V; Bernabeu verdu, J; Salt, J; Civera navarrete, J V; Bernard, R; Berriaud, C P; Chevalier, L P; Hubbard, R; Schune, P; Nikolopoulos, K; Batley, J R; Brochu, F M; Phillips, A W; Teixeira-dias, P J; Rose, M B D; Buttar, C; Buckley, A G; Nurse, E L; Larner, A B; Boddy, C; Henderson, J; Costanzo, D; Tarem, S; Maccarrone, G; Laurelli, P F; Alviggi, M; Chiaramonte, R; Izzo, V; Palumbo, V; Fraternali, M; Crosetti, G; Marchese, F; Yamaguchi, Y; Hessey, N P; Mechnich, J M; Liebig, W; Kastanas, K A; Sjursen, T B; Zalieckas, J; Cameron, D G; Banka, P; Kowalewska, A B; Dwuznik, M; Mindur, B; Boldea, V; Hedberg, V; Smirnova, O; Sellden, B; Allahverdiyev, T; Gornushkin, Y; Koultchitski, I; Tokmenin, V; Chizhov, M; Gongadze, A; Khramov, E; Sadykov, R; Krasnoslobodtsev, I; Smirnova, L; Kramarenko, V; Minaenko, A; Zenin, O; Beddall, A J; Ozcan, E V; Hou, S; Wang, S; Moyse, E; Willocq, S; Chekanov, S; Le compte, T J; Love, J R; Ciocio, A; Hinchliffe, I; Tsulaia, V; Gomez, A; Luehring, F; Zieminska, D; Huth, J E; Gonski, J L; Oreglia, M; Tang, F; Shochet, M J; Costin, T; Mcleod, A; Uzunyan, S; Martin, S P; Pope, B G; Schwienhorst, R H; Brau, J E; Ptacek, E S; Milburn, R H; Sabancilar, E; Lauer, R; Saleem, M; Mohamed meera lebbai, M R; Lou, X; Reeves, K B; Rijssenbeek, M; Novakova, P N; Rahm, D; Steinberg, P A; Wenaus, T J; Paige, F; Ye, S; Kotcher, J R; Assamagan, K A; Oliveira damazio, D; Maeno, T; Henry, A; Dushkin, A; Costa, G; Meroni, C; Resconi, S; Lari, T; Biglietti, M; Lohse, T; Gonzalez silva, M L; Monticelli, F G; Saavedra, A F; Patel, N D; Ciodaro xavier, T; Asevedo nepomuceno, A; Lefebvre, M; Albert, J E; Kubik, P; Faltova, J; Turecek, D; Solc, J; Schaile, O; Ebke, J; Losel, P J; Zeitnitz, C; Sturm, P D; Barreiro alonso, F; Modesto alapont, P; Soret medel, J; Garzon alama, E J; Gee, C N; Mccubbin, N A; Sankey, D; Emeliyanov, D; Dewhurst, A L; Houlden, M A; Klein, M; Burdin, S; Lehan, A K; Eisenhandler, E; Lloyd, S; Traynor, D P; Ibbotson, M; Marshall, R; Pater, J; Freestone, J; Masik, J; Haughton, I; Manousakis katsikakis, A; Sampsonidis, D; Krepouri, A; Roda, C; Sarri, F; Fukunaga, C; Nadtochiy, A; Kara, S O; Timm, S; Alam, S M; Rashid, T; Goldfarb, S; Espahbodi, S; Marley, D E; Rau, A W; Dos anjos, A R; Haque, S; Grau, N C; Havener, L B; Thomson, E J; Newcomer, F M; Hansl-kozanecki, G; Deberg, H A; Takeshita, T; Goggi, V; Ennis, J S; Olness, F I; Kama, S; Ordonez sanz, G; Koetsveld, F; Elamri, M; Mansoor-ul-islam, S; Lemmer, B; Kawamura, G; Bindi, M; Schulte, S; Kugel, A; Kretz, M P; Kurchaninov, L; Blanchot, G; Chromek-burckhart, D; Di girolamo, B; Francis, D; Gianotti, F; Nordberg, M Y; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Boyd, J; Wilkens, H G; Pauly, T; Fabre, C; Tricoli, A; Bertet, D; Ruiz martinez, M A; Arnaez, O L; Lenzi, B; Boveia, A J; Gillberg, D I; Davies, J M; Zimmermann, R; Uhlenbrock, M; Kraus, J K; Narayan, R T; John, A; Dam, M; Padilla aranda, C; 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Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; Sadrozinski, H; Lockman, W S; Martinez-mc kinney, G; Goussiou, A; Jones, A; Lie, K; Hasegawa, Y; Olcese, M; Gilewsky, V; Harrison, P F; Janus, M; Spangenberg, M; De, K; Ozturk, N; Pal, A K; Darmora, S; Bullock, D J; Oviawe, O; Derkaoui, J E; Rahal, G; Sircar, A; Frey, A S; Stolte, P; Rosien, N; Zoch, K; Li, L; Schouten, D W; Catinaccio, A; Ciapetti, M; Delruelle, N; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Hoecker, A; Klioutchnikova, T; Macina, D; Malyukov, S; Spiwoks, R D; Unal, G P; Vandoni, G; Petersen, B A; Pommes, K; Nairz, A M; Wengler, T; Mladenov, D; Solans sanchez, C A; Lantzsch, K; Schmieden, K; Jakobsen, S; Ritsch, E; Sciuccati, A; Alves dos santos, A M; Ouyang, Q; Zhou, M; Brock, I C; Janssen, J; Katzy, J; Anders, C F; Nilsson, B S; Bazan, A; Di ciaccio, L; Yildizkaya, T; Collot, J; Malek, F; Trocme, B S; Breugnon, P; Godiot, S; Adam bourdarios, C; Coulon, J; Duflot, L; Petroff, P G; Zerwas, D; Lieuvin, M; Calderini, G; Laporte, D; Ocariz, J; Gabrielli, A; Ohska, T K; Kurochkin, Y; Kantserov, V; Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  17. Concordância associativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingedore Grunfeld Villaça Koch

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetiva discutir o alcance que se vem dando à noção deanáfora associativa, com o objetivo de explicar os casos de concordância ad sensum ou silepses de gênero e número. Recorre-se, também,para justificar tais tipos de concordância, às noções de microssintaxe ede macrossintaxe.

  18. Populating Subentries with Multiword Units from Concordance Lines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Riette Ruthven

    Populating Sub-entries in Dictionaries with Multi-word Units from Concordance Lines 447. What constitutes words is critical in corpus linguistics, since it translates into the problem of what gets counted by the computer. Lexicographically, those ones considered as words are listed in the dictionary. 2. The word problem.

  19. Frontier use in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; The ATLAS collaboration; DeStefano, J; Dewhurst, A; Donno, F; Dykstra, D; Front, D; Gallas, E; Hawkings, R; Luehring, F; Walker, R

    2010-01-01

    Frontier is a distributed database access system, including data caching, that was developed originally for the CMS experiment. This system has been in production for CMS for some time, providing world-wide access to the experiment's conditions data for all user jobs. The ATLAS experiment, which has had similar problems with global data distribution, investigated the use of the system for ATLAS jobs. After months of trials and verification, ATLAS put the Frontier system into production late in 2009. Frontier now supplies database access for ATLAS jobs at over 50 computing sites. This successful deployment of Frontier in ATLAS will be described, along with the scope of the system and necessary resources.

  20. Concorde with the airlines. [operating costs and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyman, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The only supersonic aircraft in airline service, Concorde, offers the first actual test of supersonic cruise feasibility and the only real experience relative to passenger, airline, and community acceptance. The dominant characteristic of Concorde operations is low aircraft utilization, due partly to the restricted route network. Operating costs, the maintenance/reliability record and associated dispatch delays are discussed. Problems with overwater operations, and the secondary boom phenomena are examined. Monthly average load factors for various routes, major causes of technical delays, aircraft technical performance, and aircraft tracks are graphically depicted.

  1. An adaptation of the Interpersonal Problem Areas Rating Scale: pilot and interrater agreement study Adaptação da Escala de Áreas Problema da Psicoterapia Interpessoal: estudo piloto e avaliação de concordância

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Fontes de Andrade

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This article describes the adaptation of a rating scale of interpersonal psychotherapy problem areas to include a fifth problem area appropriate to bipolar disorder and an interrater agreement study in identifying interpersonal problem areas and selecting a primary treatment focus if patients were to engage in treatment. METHOD: Five research interpersonal psychotherapists assessed nine audiotapes of a single interview with five bipolar and four unipolar patients in which the interpersonal inventory and identification of problem areas were undertaken. RESULTS: Raters agreed on presence and absence of problem areas in seven tapes. Kappas for identification of problem areas were 1.00 (grief, 0.77 (role dispute, 0.61 (role transition, 0.57 (interpersonal deficits and 1.00 (loss of healthy self. Kappa for agreement on a primary clinical focus if patients were to engage in interpersonal psychotherapy treatment was 0.64. CONCLUSIONS: The adaptation of the original scale to include an area pertinent to bipolar disorder proved to be applicable and relevant for use with this population. The results show substantial interrater agreement in identifying problem areas and potential treatment focus.OBJETIVO: Este artigo descreve a adaptação de uma escala de avaliação de áreas problema da psicoterapia interpessoal que inclui uma área própria ao transtorno bipolar e um estudo de concordância em identificar áreas problema e selecionar um foco primário de tratamento caso os pacientes fossem participar de tratamento. MÉTODO: Cinco terapeutas interpessoais avaliaram nove audiotapes de uma única entrevista com cinco pacientes bipolares e quatro pacientes unipolares em que o inventário interpessoal e identificação de áreas problema foram empreendidos. RESULTADOS: Os avaliadores concordaram na presença e ausência de áreas problema em sete fitas. Kappas para identificação de áreas problema foram 1,00 (luto, 0,77 (disputa de papel, 0

  2. Negation and negative concord in romance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Henriëtte de; Sag, I.A.

    This paper addresses the two interpretations a combination of negative indefinites can get in concord languages like French, namely a concord reading which amounts to a single negation, or a double negation reading. We develop an analysis in a polyadic framework, in which a sequence of

  3. Morbidities, concordance, and predictors of preterm premature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morbidities, concordance, and predictors of preterm premature rupture of membranes among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, Nigeria. ... Objective: This article aimed to review the morbidities, concordance, and predictors of PPROM over a 10‑year period. Methods: This was a ...

  4. A Semantic Analysis of Negative Concord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouden van der, Ton; Zwarts, Frans

    1993-01-01

    It is not uncommon in natural languages that negation seems to behave in an illogical manner. The general term for the many cases where multiple occurrences of morphologically negative constituents express a single semantic negation is negative concord (Labov 1979). Negative concord may take either

  5. Sociodemographic Correlates of HIV Discordant and Concordant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... Anaekwe, Chidebe Anaekwe. Sociodemographic Correlates of HIV. Discordant and Concordant Couples in. Anambra State, Nigeria. J Health Sci .... and 40 teenagers. Study population and sampling technique: The reference population comprised the HIV- discordant and concordant couples in Dunukofia.

  6. Concordance for prognostic models with competing risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolbers, Marcel; Blanche, Paul; Koller, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    The concordance probability is a widely used measure to assess discrimination of prognostic models with binary and survival endpoints. We formally define the concordance probability for a prognostic model of the absolute risk of an event of interest in the presence of competing risks and relate i...... of the working model. We further illustrate the methods by computing the concordance probability for a prognostic model of coronary heart disease (CHD) events in the presence of the competing risk of non-CHD death.......The concordance probability is a widely used measure to assess discrimination of prognostic models with binary and survival endpoints. We formally define the concordance probability for a prognostic model of the absolute risk of an event of interest in the presence of competing risks and relate...

  7. Sociodemographic Correlates of HIV Discordant and Concordant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... prevalence countries (6,7). Nigeria contributes ... HIV/AIDS in South-Eastern Nigeria (15) and by extrapolation a ... documented literature comparing HIV discordant ..... concordance among Chinese-Burmese mixed couples in ...

  8. Sociodemographic Correlates of HIV Discordant and Concordant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS is significant. An understanding of the characteristics of HIV- affected couples will help modify preventive strategies. The aim of this study was to compare the HIV discordant and concordant partnerships for sociodemographic ...

  9. ATLAS Data Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Roger; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to parallel open access and analysis preservation initiatives, ATLAS is taking steps to ensure that the data taken by the experiment during run-1 remain accessible and available for future analysis by the collaboration. An evaluation of what is required to achieve this is underway, examining the ATLAS data production chain to establish the effort required and potential problems. Several alternatives are explored, but the favoured solution is to bring the run 1 data and software in line with the equivalent to that which will be used for run 2. This will result in a coherent ATLAS dataset for the data already taken and that to come in the future.

  10. Surface activation of Concorde by Be-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, P. R.; Dyer, C. S.; Flatman, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Activation analysis of two airframe components from the Concorde aircraft has identified the presence of Be-7, a nuclide found by other investigators that was deposited on the forward edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) structure. The results of the Concorde analysis indicate that this phenomenon is very much a surface effect, and that the areal densities of the Be-7 are comparable to those found for LDEF. The collection of Be-7 by the aircraft must be greater than in the case of LDEF (since duration for which Concorde is accumulating the nuclide is shorter) and is of the order of 1.2 to 41 nuclei/sq cm(-)s(exp -1) depending upon assumptions made regarding the altitude at which collection becomes appreciable, and the efficiency of the process which removes the radionuclide.

  11. Intimate partner aggression reporting concordance and correlates of agreement among men with alcohol use disorders and their female partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuzio, Jillian; O'Farrell, Timothy J; Marshall, Amy D; Murphy, Christopher M; Murphy, Marie; Taft, Casey T

    2006-09-01

    This study examined relationship aggression reporting concordance among 303 men with alcohol use disorders and their female partners enrolled in couples-based alcohol abuse treatment. Agreement for physical and psychological aggression was generally consistent with, or higher than, concordance rates reported among other populations. Men's antisocial personality disorder characteristics were the strongest predictor of higher concordance for male- and female-perpetrated aggression. Higher alcohol problem severity, poorer relationship adjustment, and higher psychopathic personality features were associated with better concordance in some analyses. Women reported experiencing more physical aggression than men reported perpetrating, and women reported perpetrating more psychological aggression than men reported experiencing. Findings highlight the importance of obtaining aggression reports from both partners and the need for research investigating methods for improving concordance.

  12. THE SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION OF ENGLISH CONCORD (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Setiawan Husada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the types and causes of errors in learning the English concord among Indonesian students of English. The errors would be focused on the students’ interlingual (mother tongue as well as intralingual (learning strategies interference. The data were all collected from the students at Satya Wacana Christian University, Indonesia. Two research questions were answered: 1 between interlingual and intralingual errors, which one did the participants make more in learning English concord? 2 Among intralingual errors, which source of errors was the most evident? Fifteen students (n = 15 participated in this study. In regard to the data collection and analysis, I used the steps suggested by Corder (1974, in Ellis and Barkhuizen, 2005. The results of this study suggest that the intralingual errors were more significant than interlingual ones in the acquisition of the concord. The results were in line with some of the previous findings found by Bataineh (2005, Chan (2004, Duskova (1983, Lim (2003, and Richards (1983. They also supported the claim in the field of SLA that acquisition of a foreign language is determined by the nature of the language that the learners are learning, rather than through contrast between the learners’ first language and the target language.

  13. Interpreter Services, Language Concordance, and Health Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander R; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Legedza, Anna TR; Massagli, Michael P; Phillips, Russell S; Iezzoni, Lisa I

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) have more difficulty communicating with health care providers and are less satisfied with their care than others. Both interpreter- and language-concordant clinicians may help overcome these problems but few studies have compared these approaches. OBJECTIVE To compare self-reported communication and visit ratings for LEP Asian immigrants whose visits involve either a clinic interpreter or a clinician speaking their native language. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey—response rate 74%. PATIENTS Two thousand seven hundred and fifteen LEP Chinese and Vietnamese immigrant adults who received care at 11 community-based health centers across the U.S. MEASUREMENTS Five self-reported communication measures and overall rating of care. RESULTS Patients who used interpreters were more likely than language-concordant patients to report having questions about their care (30.1% vs 20.9%, Pinterpreters highly (“excellent” or “very good”) were more likely to rate the health care they received highly (adjusted odds ratio 4.8, 95% confidence interval, 2.3 to 10.1). CONCLUSIONS Assessments of communication and health care quality for outpatient visits are similar for LEP Asian immigrants who use interpreters and those whose clinicians speak their language. However, interpreter use may compromise certain aspects of communication. The perceived quality of the interpreter is strongly associated with patients' assessments of quality of care overall. PMID:16307633

  14. Structural testing of concorde aircraft: Further report on United Kingdom tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpur, N.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of tests conducted on the Concorde aircraft nacelle structure is presented. The tests were conducted as a part of the structural development and certification program. The nacelle structural specimens are described. The problems associated with the intake testing and engine-bay and nozzle testing are discussed.

  15. Study of concord in the examination scripts of students of Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... insufficient contact hours, amongst others, which continue to account for students' inadequate knowledge in English grammar, the problem of concord continues to linger on in English in Ghanaian schools, colleges and even universities, because of the poor pedagogical approaches to teaching the language. More so, the ...

  16. Concordance of Parent- and Child-Reported Physical Abuse Following Child Protective Services Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulsky, Julia M; Kepple, Nancy Jo; Holmes, Megan R; Hussey, David L

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge about the concordance of parent- and child-reported child physical abuse is scarce, leaving researchers and practitioners with little guidance on the implications of selecting either informant. Drawing from a 2008-2009 sample of 11- to 17-year-olds ( N = 636) from Wave 1 of the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, this study first examined parent-child concordance in physical abuse reporting (Parent-Child Conflict Tactic Scale). Second, it applied multivariate regression analysis to relate parent-child agreement in physical abuse to parent-reported (Child Behavior Checklist) and child-reported (Youth Self Report) child behavioral problems. Results indicate low parent-child concordance of physical abuse (κ = .145). Coreporting of physical abuse was related to clinical-level parent-reported externalizing problems ([Formula: see text] = 64.57), whereas child-only reports of physical abuse were the only agreement category related to child-reported internalizing problems ( B = 4.17, p < .001). Attribution bias theory may further understanding of reporting concordance and its implications.

  17. Monozygotic twins incompletely concordant for narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M; Honda, Y; Uchida, S; Miyazaki, S; Tokunaga, K

    2001-06-01

    Among 15 monozygotic twin pairs described in the literature, only four pairs were considered to be concordant. There is no detailed report of HLA-DRB1*1501/DQB1*0602 positive monozygotic twins concordant for narcolepsy, with marked difference in the age of onset. We compared a pair of female narcoleptic twins clinically. Diagnosis of narcolepsy and monozygosity of the twins were confirmed. The second-born twin demonstrated a typical course of narcolepsy, whereas the first-born twin had a very late onset of recurrent daytime sleep episodes at age 45 and cataplexy at age 50 years, which was apparently triggered by chronic emotional stresses and sleep insufficiency. The atypical course of narcolepsy in the first-born twin supports the multifactorial model for the development of narcolepsy. It was noted that cataplexy was preceded by sustained polyphasic sleep conditions. Our observation implies that the unaffected co-twins in discordant pairs could develop narcolepsy in stressful situations later in their lives.

  18. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases...... of an ordinary case-control design, with variations depending on genetic mode. Importantly, the enriched power for dizygotic twins also applies to disease-concordant sibling pairs, which largely extends the application of the concordant twin design. Overall, our simulation revealed a high value of disease......-concordant twins in genetic association studies and encourages the use of genetically related individuals for highly efficiently identifying both common and rare genetic variants underlying human complex diseases without increasing laboratory cost....

  19. Automated Loads Analysis System (ATLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Stephen; Frere, Scot; O’Reilly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is a generalized solution that can be used for launch vehicles. ATLAS is used to produce modal transient analysis and quasi-static analysis results (i.e., accelerations, displacements, and forces) for the payload math models on a specific Shuttle Transport System (STS) flight using the shuttle math model and associated forcing functions. This innovation solves the problem of coupling of payload math models into a shuttle math model. It performs a transient loads analysis simulating liftoff, landing, and all flight events between liftoff and landing. ATLAS utilizes efficient and numerically stable algorithms available in MSC/NASTRAN.

  20. Concorde sonic booms as an atmospheric probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, N K; Donn, W L; Rind, D H

    1977-07-01

    Infrasound generated by the sonic boom from the inbound Concorde supersonic transport is recorded at Palisades, New York (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), as a series of impulses from distances varying from 165 to about 1000 kilometers. Refraction effects determined by temperature and wind conditions return the signal to the surface from both stratospheric (40 to 50 kilometers) and thermospheric (100 to 130 kilometers) levels. The frequency of the recorded signal is a function of the level of reflection; the frequency decreases from impulse stretching as the atmosphere becomes more rarified relative to the sound pressure. The horizontal trace velocity of the signal across the array of instruments is equal to the acoustic velocity at the reflection level. The sonic boom can thus be used to provide temperature-wind parameters at reflection levels estimated from the signal frequency. Daily observed signal variations have indicated significant variations in these parameters.

  1. "Concordance" Revisited: A Multispecialty Appraisal of "Concordant" Preliminary Abdominopelvic CT Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jordan M; Dickerson, Elliot C; Rabinowitz, Lee C; Cohan, Richard H; Ellis, James H; Litell, John M; Kaza, Ravi K; Lopez, Alexis N; Theyyunni, Nikhil R; Weber, Joseph T; Kocher, Keith E; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether resident abdominopelvic CT reports considered prospectively concordant with the final interpretation are also considered concordant by other blinded specialists and abdominal radiologists. In this institutional review board-approved retrospective cohort study, 119 randomly selected urgent abdominopelvic CT examinations with a resident preliminary report deemed prospectively "concordant" by the signing faculty were identified. Nine blinded specialists from Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Abdominal Radiology reviewed the preliminary and final reports and scored the preliminary report with respect to urgent findings as follows: 1.) concordant; 2.) discordant with minor differences; 3.) discordant with major differences that do not alter patient management; or 4.) discordant with major differences that do alter patient management. Predicted management resulting from scores of 4 was recorded. Consensus was defined as majority agreement within a specialty. Consensus major discrepancy rates (ie, scores 3 or 4) were compared to the original major discrepancy rate of 0% (0/119) using the McNemar test. Consensus scores of 4 were assigned in 18% (21/119, P Medicine), 5% (6/119, P = .03, Internal Medicine), and 13% (16/119, P Medicine), 14% (17/119, P Internal Medicine), and 18% (22/119, P medical therapy (1%-4%), imaging (1%-10%), subspecialty consultation (3%-13%), nonsurgical procedure (3%), operation (1%-3%), and other (0-3%). The historical low major discrepancy rate for urgent findings between resident and faculty radiologists is likely underreported. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing the Concordance of Measures Used to Diagnose Adult ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belendiuk, Katherine A.; Clarke, Tana L.; Chronis, Andrea M.; Raggi, Veronica L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Recent evidence suggests that ADHD persists into adulthood, but the best means of diagnosis and the concordance of measures used to diagnose adult ADHD are unknown. Method: The current study explores the relationships of these measures in a sample of 69 mothers of children with ADHD. Results: This study determines the concordance of (a)…

  3. search of extra space dimensions with ATLAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    search of extra space dimensions with ATLAs. AMBREEsH GUPTA (for the ATLAs Collaboration). 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago,. IL 60637, USA. Abstract. If extra spatial dimensions were to exist, they could provide a solution to the hierarchy problem. The studies done by the ...

  4. Concordant Cues in Faces and Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet M. J. Smith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Information from faces and voices combines to provide multimodal signals about a person. Faces and voices may offer redundant, overlapping (backup signals, or complementary information (multiple messages. This article reports two experiments which investigated the extent to which faces and voices deliver concordant information about dimensions of fitness and quality. In Experiment 1, participants rated faces and voices on scales for masculinity/femininity, age, health, height, and weight. The results showed that people make similar judgments from faces and voices, with particularly strong correlations for masculinity/femininity, health, and height. If, as these results suggest, faces and voices constitute backup signals for various dimensions, it is hypothetically possible that people would be able to accurately match novel faces and voices for identity. However, previous investigations into novel face–voice matching offer contradictory results. In Experiment 2, participants saw a face and heard a voice and were required to decide whether the face and voice belonged to the same person. Matching accuracy was significantly above chance level, suggesting that judgments made independently from faces and voices are sufficiently similar that people can match the two. Both sets of results were analyzed using multilevel modeling and are interpreted as being consistent with the backup signal hypothesis.

  5. Mohs surgery histopathology concordance in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ernest; Elliott, Tim; Yu, Lawrence; Litterick, Kelly

    2011-11-01

    Mohs micrographic surgery is an important technique for dealing with difficult non-melanoma skin cancers. The ability of the Mohs surgeon to correctly interpret the histopathology is crucial to the practice of this surgery. This study sought to assess the concordance between a Mohs surgeon and a dermatopathologist in the reading of Mohs section histopathology slides. This study was a retrospective study of Mohs frozen section histopathology slides of patients from a private Mohs practice. The slides were provided for assessment by a dermatopathologist who had to interpret the histopathology and mark on a Mohs map the location of the tumour. We demonstrate a 95% agreement between the Mohs surgeon and the dermatopathologist in the interpretation of Mohs frozen section histopathology slides. An Australian Mohs surgeon is capable of correctly identifying and interpreting histopathology in non-melanoma skin cancers, and this compares favourably to an overseas study. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  7. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  8. ATLAS online data quality monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cuenca Almenar, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Hadavand, H; Ilchenko, Y; Kolos, S; Slagle, K; Taffard, A

    2010-01-01

    Every minute the ATLAS detector is taking data, the monitoring framework serves several thousands physics events to monitoring data analysis applications, handles millions of histogram updates coming from thousands applications, executes over forty thousand advanced data quality checks for a subset of those histograms, displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in main and satellite ATLAS control rooms. The online data quality monitoring system has been of great help in providing quick feedback to the subsystems about the functioning and performance of the different parts of ATLAS by providing a configurable easy and fast visualization of all this information. The Data Quality Monitoring Display (DQMD) is a visualization tool for the automatic data quality assessment of the ATLAS experiment. It is the interface through which the shift crew and experts can validate the quality of the data being recorded or processed, be warned of problems related to data quality, an...

  9. The Concordance of Parent and Child Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Steve G; Osborn, Andrew W

    2017-05-01

    A substantial body of work has related survey-based parental vaccine hesitancy to noncompliant childhood immunization. However little attention has been paid to the connection between parents' own immunization behavior and the immunizations their children receive. Using the Oregon ALERT Immunization Information System, we identified adult caregiver-child pairs for children between 9 months and 17 years of age. The likelihood of adult-child concordance of influenza immunization per influenza season from 2010-2011 through 2014-2015 was assessed. The utility of adult immunization as a predictor was also assessed for other, noninfluenza recommended immunizations for children and adolescents. A total of 450 687 matched adult caregiver-child pairs were included in the study. The children of immunizing adults were 2.77 times more likely to also be immunized for seasonal influenza across all seasons (95% confidence interval, 2.74-2.79), with similar results applying within each season. Adult immunization status was also significantly associated with the likelihood of children and adolescents getting other noninfluenza immunizations, such as the human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV). When adults improved their own behavior from nonimmunizing to immunizing across influenza seasons, their children if not immunized in the previous season were 5.44 times (95% confidence interval, 5.35-5.53) more likely to become immunized for influenza. Children's likelihood of following immunization recommendations is associated with the immunization behavior of their parents. Encouraging parental immunization is a potential tool for increasing children's immunization rates. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Assessing clinical reasoning in optometry using the script concordance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Caroline; Dufour-Guindon, Marie-Pier; Lapointe, Gabrielle; Gagnon, Robert; Charlin, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Clinical reasoning is central to any health profession but its development among learners is difficult to assess. Over the last few decades, the script concordance test (SCT) has been developed to solve this dilemma and has been used in many health professions; however, no study has been published on the use of the script concordance test in optometry. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a script concordance test for the field of optometry. A 101-question script concordance test (27 short clinical scenarios) was developed and administered online to a convenience sample of 23 second-year and 19 fourth-year students of optometry. It was also administered to a reference panel of 12 experienced optometrists to develop the scoring key. An item-total correlation was calculated for each question. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to evaluate the script concordance test reliability and a t-test compared the two groups. A final 77-question script concordance test was created by eliminating questions with low item-total correlation. Cronbach's alpha for this optimised 77-question script concordance test was 0.80. A group comparison revealed that the second-year students' scores (n = 23; mean score = 66.4 ± 7.87 per cent) were statistically lower (t = -4.141; p script concordance test developed for this study was found to be both reliable and capable of discriminating between second- and fourth-year optometric students. These results demonstrate that the script concordance test may be considered as a new tool in the optometric educators' assessment arsenal. Further studies will be needed to cover additional levels of professional development. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  11. search of extra space dimensions with ATLAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. If extra spatial dimensions were to exist, they could provide a solution to the hierarchy problem. The studies done by the ATLAS Collaboration on the sensitivity of the detector to various extra dimension models are reported in this document.

  12. Estimating twin concordance for bivariate competing risks twin data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas; Holst, Klaus K.; Hjelmborg, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    For twin time-to-event data, we consider different concordance probabilities, such as the casewise concordance that are routinely computed as a measure of the lifetime dependence/correlation for specific diseases. The concordance probability here is the probability that both twins have experienced...... over time, and covariates may be further influential on the marginal risk and dependence structure. We establish the estimators large sample properties and suggest various tests, for example, for inferring familial influence. The method is demonstrated and motivated by specific twin data on cancer...... events with the competing risk death. We thus aim to quantify the degree of dependence through the casewise concordance function and show a significant genetic component...

  13. Caregiver-Teacher Concordance of Challenging Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Served in Community Mental Health Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit high rates of challenging behaviors that impair functioning and represent the primary presenting problem in mental health (MH) services. Obtaining symptom reports from multiple informants is critical for treatment planning. This study evaluated caregiver-teacher concordance of ratings of the…

  14. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  15. Concordance of seabird population parameters: Analytical methods and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    In an ecological context, concordance may be defined as the tendency for paired values of some parameter, such as the annual productivity of bird species, to show similar directions and magnitudes of deviation from the mean. Where concordance among populations is high, there is an implied similarity of the ecological factors affecting performance. Conversely, if populations behave discordantly, dissimilarity of underlying ecological factors is likely. In evaluating birds as indicators of the marine environment, the biologist typically is confronted with a three-dimensional array of observations (species, areas, and years) in which there are more missing values than filled cells. This frustrates attempts to analyze concordance using existing methods (e.g., Kendall's coefficient, or correlation combined with cluster analysis), which are either impossible to apply to incomplete data sets or potentially misleading when applied to incomplete data sets. I suggest an alternative method for analyzing concordance that makes maximal use of available data. For a given data set partitioned into the smallest units containing information about concordance, one computes an index of concordance using a regression approach and tests for significance using randomization methods. This procedure would seem to have wide application to ecological studies generally and to seabird monitoring in particular.

  16. Daily Concordance between Parent and Adolescent Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligni, Andrew J.; Tsai, Kim M.; Krull, Jennifer L.; Gonzales, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the daily concordance between parent and adolescent daily sleep habits, how that concordance compares to other predictors of sleep, and whether the degree of concordance varies across families. Methods A total of 421 adolescents (Mage = 15.03 years) and their primary caregivers (Mage = 41.93 years) reported their sleep, bed, and wake times on a daily basis for a two-week period. Approximately 80% of the sample repeated the same protocol one year later. Results Multi-level modeling indicated a significant concordance between parent and adolescent sleep, bed, and wake times on a daily basis. Concordance existed independent of other predictors of sleep such as day of the week and adolescent study time. Larger families and those with higher levels of parent-adolescent support exhibited greater concordance. Conclusions Adolescent sleep is connected to the sleep habits of their parents, above and beyond commonly-known structural and experiential factors that can shape teenage sleep. Efforts to improve teenage sleep should pay greater attention to the sleep patterns of parents and potentially other family members. PMID:25620309

  17. The Relationship Between Sexual Concordance and Orgasm Consistency in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschinsky, Kelly D; Chivers, Meredith L

    2018-02-08

    Sexual concordance (the relationship between genital and self-reported sexual responses) may be associated with orgasm consistency (OC; the proportion of sexual acts leading to orgasm) during penile-vaginal intercourse (PVI) in women. We investigated the relationship between women's sexual concordance (assessed using different stimulus modalities and self-reported sexual arousal methods) and OC during various sexual activities (assessed using different types of questions). For Study 1 (n = 51), when sexual concordance was assessed using audiovisual sexual stimuli, we did not find a statistically significant relationship between OC and poststimulus self-reports of sexual arousal or genital sensations, raw values of OC, or ranges of OC. For Study 2 (n = 44), where sexual concordance was assessed using audionarrative sexual stimuli, we did find a statistically significant relationship between PVI OC and sexual concordance using change in self-reported sexual arousal, and ranges of orgasm consistency. Two findings were inconsistent with previous research. First, OC varied significantly by activity type in both studies; masturbation yielded the highest OC. Second, PVI OC was significantly related to oral sex and masturbation OC (Study 2). We discuss the need for further research and various factors that may affect women's orgasm consistency and sexual concordance.

  18. Concordance-based adherence support service delivery: consumer perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Pasquier, Sophie; Aslani, Parisa

    2008-12-01

    To explore consumers' attitudes towards, and expectations of, adherence support services in primary health care, specifically in community pharmacy; and to explore consumers' attitudes towards the concept of concordance. An exploratory qualitative study conducted in Metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Three focus group discussions with consumers on chronic therapy (n = 22) and two focus groups with consumer representatives (n = 15) were conducted in 2002. Consumer representatives were peer educators volunteering in an association which promotes quality use of medicines among elderly patients. All discussions were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and thematically content analysed. Consumers' experiences with adherence support services delivered by general practitioners and pharmacists, their expectations towards general practitioners' and pharmacists' role in adherence support; and attitudes towards concordance in consultations. Participants expected an increased provision of medicine information and a reduction in the number of medications taken as the main strategies to promote adherence. They believed that once understandable information had been delivered, it was their responsibility to take their medications as prescribed. Yet participants frequently complained about the information received, especially from doctors. Only a subgroup of participants expected pharmacists to be involved in adherence support services. These participants generally relied on pharmacists for medicine information and were satisfied with the communication process when interacting with the pharmacists. All participants were positive about concordance, because they valued two-way communication and increased consideration of their needs and beliefs by healthcare professionals. However, they were hesitant about being involved in a shared treatment decision-making process. Many participants focused on concordance with doctors and identified barriers to the establishment of concordance: time

  19. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-12-21

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed.

  20. [Quality of vaginal smear for cervical cancer screening: a concordance study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Wiesner, Carolina; Murillo, Raúl Hernando; Piñeros, Marion; Tovar, Sandra; Mejía, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the female population in Colombia. The low impact of Papanicolaou smears in reducing cervical cancer mortality in some countries has been attributed to their low reproducibility and high rates of false negatives. To evaluate the quality of the Papanicolaou smears in four regions of Colombia comparing the original report given by provincial cytologists or pathologists with a second report made by a team of expert pathologists from the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología of Colombia. A sample of 4,863 Papanicolau smears was selected by a simple stratified randomized sampling method. Three strata were defined according to the original cytological report as negative, positive and unsatisfactory. All slides were newly interpreted with Bethesda 2001 by two independent experienced pathologists blinded to the first results. Non-weighted kappa values were calculated for degree of agreement. Overall, the concordance between the two evaluations was very low with a kappa value of 0.03 (95% CI: 0-0.06). With regard to abnormalities in squamous cells, evaluation concordance was moderate with a value of 0.47 (95% CI: 0.41- 0.53); a trend was noted suggesting higher levels of concordance in the evaluations from the Tolima and Magdalena Provinces. Problems related with the quality of Papanicolau smears or the accurate reading thereof may be factors that explain the low impact of massive screening in cervical cancer mortality in Colombia.

  1. Upsurge of infections caused by Salmonella Concord among Ethiopian adoptees in Denmark, 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Kjelsø, C; Torpdahl, M

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Concord has been associated with adoptees from Ethiopia. In 2009, Denmark saw an increase in MDR S. Concord infections among Ethiopian adoptees.......Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Concord has been associated with adoptees from Ethiopia. In 2009, Denmark saw an increase in MDR S. Concord infections among Ethiopian adoptees....

  2. [Concordance of the clinical and autoptic pathological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Martínez, E; Arroyo-Lunagómez, E; Landero-López, L

    1998-01-01

    To determine the degree of concordance between clinical and autopsy diagnosis. The records of 67 autopsies and clinical files of children and adults, comprising the years 1995 to 1996, from a third level hospital in the State of Veracruz, Mexico, were revised. The concordance score was calculated with the statistical kappa. In general, the rate of autopsy was 10.5%, with higher frequency for children (17.5%). In children, 59% of clinical diagnoses revealed mistakes and in adults, 57%. The degree of agreement in the underlying cause ante and postmortem was 26% in children and 41% in adults. The high rate of diagnostic error and low concordance score between clinical and autopsy diagnosis strongly suggests that, in spite of increased availability of modern diagnostic techniques, the necessity of postmortem studies to control the level of medical practice is evident.

  3. Pre and post test analyses for the core scenarios tested in the ATLAS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Goo; Kim, H. J.; Cho, Y. J.; Yang, C. Y.; Yoo, S. O.; Choi, Y. S.; Bang, Y. S.; Shin, A. D.; Huh, B. G.; Kim, S. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    The scope of present study is to establish an environment to operate ATLAS Standard Problem for the core scenarios. Following has been performed in this study : evaluation of the characteristics of ATLAS facility by using RELAP5 code, development of steady input data deck for ATLAS TRACE assessment, evaluation of QA requirements for the important thermal-hydraulic tests, organization of ATLAS standard problem. In this study, the characteristics of ATLAS, which is the first large IET facility, has been analyzed and it was confirmed that ATLAS program will provide meaningful date for the assurance of APR1400 safety. A comparing work on the characteristics of APR1400 and ATLAS confirmed general similarities between two installations. Also, some specific characteristics of each ones were founded in this study. It was recommended that special care should be given to them in developing a test scenario and code assessment. In this study, QA requirements for thermal hydraulic experiments used for proof test and/or code assessment were identified. Finally, an infrastructure for ATLAS Standard Problem (ASP) was successfully established. ASP will play important role of an systematic connection between ATLAS test and code assessment programs, and be actively operated for the next period of ATLAS program. QA requirements proposed in this study would be applied for the quality improvement of experimental programs in Korea. Also, an infrastructure for ATLAS Standard Problem will be directly applied for the next ATLAS program.

  4. Drinking concordance and relationship satisfaction in New Zealand couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Jessica; Connor, Jennie L; Kypri, Kypros

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine alcohol consumption patterns in New Zealand couples and the associations of these patterns with time spent drinking together and the level of satisfaction with the relationship. Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of New Zealand residents aged 18-70 on the combined electoral roll in 2007. Using reports of the respondents' own drinking patterns and their reports of their partners' drinking, couples were classified as concordant, mildly discordant or discordant for both their drinking frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion. The level of concordance was compared by demographic characteristics and relationship type. Ordinal logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between levels of concordance and both time spent drinking as a couple and level of happiness in the relationship (both reported by the respondent). The largest proportion of couples was classified as concordant for both frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion regardless of the relationship type. For both drinking frequency and quantity per occasion, couples identified as discordant or mildly discordant were less likely to report having spent a large amount of time drinking with their partner (odds ratio 0.2-0.5). Reported level of happiness with the relationship was also associated with the degree of concordance of both drinking frequency and quantity. These findings suggest that drinking frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion are concordant in most intimate partnerships and that discordance in either is associated with a lower level of happiness within the relationship.

  5. Status of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra Aldo, F

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is currently being constructed and will be installed in 2006 to be ready for commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider. The complete pixel detector is composed of three concentric barrels and six disks that are populated by 1744 ATLAS Pixel modules. The main components of the pixel module are the readout electronics and the silicon sensor whose active region is instrumented with rectangular pixels. The module has been designed to be able to survive 10 years of operation within the ATLAS detector. A brief description of the pixel detector will be presented with results and problems encountered during the production stage.

  6. [Script Concordance Test: first nationwide experience in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui, Magali; Ferreira, Juan P; Torrents, Milagros; Torres, Fernando; Ibarra, Mariano; Ossorio, Maria F; Urrutia, Luis; Ferrero, Fernando

    2018-02-01

    The Script Concordance Test is a suitable test for assessing clinical reasoning in postgraduate medical education. We present the first nationwide, realtime, web-based experience of a Script Concordance Test administered to 3rd year pediatric residents. The test was administered to 268 residents (postgraduate year 3), from 56 different programs, requiring 46.1 ± 27.1 minutes to complete it, and scoring 65.3 ± 7.47 points. A later survey showed limited satisfaction from participants. This experience showed that this kind of test is feasible in this setting. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Estimating Twin Pair Concordance for Age of Onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas H.; Hjelmborg, Jacob B.; Holst, Klaus K.

    2015-01-01

    Twin and family data provide a key source for evaluating inheritance of specific diseases. A standard analysis of such data typically involves the computation of prevalences and different concordance measures such as the casewise concordance, that is the probability that one twin has the disease...... given that the co-twin has the disease. Most diseases have a varying age-of-onset that will lead to age-specific prevalence. Typically, this aspect is not considered, and this may lead to severe bias as well as make it very unclear exactly what population quantities that we are estimating. In addition...

  8. The ATLAS distributed analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legger, F.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In the LHC operations era, analysis of the multi-petabyte ATLAS data sample by globally distributed physicists is a challenging task. To attain the required scale the ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of Grid computing, realized in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), the largest distributed computational resource existing in the sciences. The ATLAS experiment currently stores over 140 PB of data and runs about 140,000 concurrent jobs continuously at WLCG sites. During the first run of the LHC, the ATLAS Distributed Analysis (DA) service has operated stably and scaled as planned. More than 1600 users submitted jobs in 2012, with 2 million or more analysis jobs per week, peaking at about a million jobs per day. The system dynamically distributes popular data to expedite processing and maximally utilize resources. The reliability of the DA service is high and steadily improving; Grid sites are continually validated against a set of standard tests, and a dedicated team of expert shifters provides user support and communicates user problems to the sites. Both the user support techniques and the direct feedback of users have been effective in improving the success rate and user experience when utilizing the distributed computing environment. In this contribution a description of the main components, activities and achievements of ATLAS distributed analysis is given. Several future improvements being undertaken will be described.

  9. Détection à grande distance et localisation du supersonique "Concorde" à partir de signaux infrasonores

    OpenAIRE

    Ménéxiadis, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to resolve an original reverse problem, i.e. the localization of a supersonic aircraft by one single measurement station. The station-to-aircraft distance is in principle unknown, but it may vary from a few tens to several hundred kilometers. The signals analyzed in the present study are generally included in the infrasound range, below 20 Hz or even 10 Hz. In the days of the first regular transatlantic flights by the Concorde, ONERA conducted a series of measures...

  10. Encoding Probabilistic Brain Atlases Using Bayesian Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Van Leemput, Koen

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of creating probabilistic brain atlases from manually labeled training data. Probabilistic atlases are typically constructed by counting the relative frequency of occurrence of labels in corresponding locations across the training images. However, such an “averaging” approach generalizes poorly to unseen cases when the number of training images is limited, and provides no principled way of aligning the training datasets using deformable registration. In this p...

  11. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the data-taking period at LHC (Run-II), several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed. The results from searches by the ATLAS collaborations are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  12. ATLAS Story

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108663

    2012-01-01

    This film produced in July 2012 explains how fundamental research connects to Society and what benefits collaborative way of working can and may generate in the future, using ATLAS Collaboration as a case study. The film is intellectually inspired by the book "Collisions and Collaboration" (OUP) by Max Boisot (ed.), see: collisionsandcollaboration.com. The film is directed by Andrew Millington (OMNI Communications)

  13. SUSY (ATLAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Sopczak, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the LHC Run-II data-taking period, several searches for supersymmetric particles were performed by the ATLAS collaboration. The results from these searches are concisely reviewed. Model-independent and model-dependent limits on new particle production are set, and interpretations in supersymmetric models are given.

  14. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  15. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  16. ATLAS Data Preservation Policy

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The principal intent of this document is to describe the ATLAS policy ensuring that its data are maintained reliably in a form accessible to ATLAS members. A separate document describes the ATLAS policy for making its data available, and potentially useful, to scientists who are not members of ATLAS.

  17. Concordance between Stages of Behavior Change Questionnaire and IPAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Missaki Nakamura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A low rate of physical activity (PA participation is observed worldwide. The identification of feasible and reliable instruments able to accurately measuring PA and help in the development of interventions to promote PA are necessary. This study aimed to analyze the concordance between the Stages of Behavior Change Questionnaire (SBCQ and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ long-version in assessing adult leisure-time physical activity (LTPA. A total of 1.588 adults completed the IPAQ to assess LTPA and the participants who performed more than 10 min/week were classified in active individuals. Using the SBCQ, active individuals were those classified in the action or maintenance stage and inactive individuals were those classified in the precontemplation, contemplation or preparation stage. The concordance between SBCQ and IPAQ was found to be 0.80. Separated by gender, it was observed a concordance between the two instruments of 0.82 for women, and 0.77 for men. Regarding age group, it was found to be 0.81 for young and middle-aged adults, and 0.77 for older people. The SBCQ presented a very good concordance with IPAQ to assess LTPA.

  18. 14 CFR 36.301 - Noise limits: Concorde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise limits: Concorde. 36.301 Section 36.301 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Noise Limits for Supersonic Transport Category...

  19. Common Ground? The Concordance of Sarcopenia and Frailty Definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnierse, Esmee M.; Trappenburg, Marijke C.; Blauw, Gerard Jan; Verlaan, Sjors; de van der Schueren, Marian A.E.; Meskers, Carel G.M.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to explore the concordance between definitions of sarcopenia and frailty in a clinically relevant population of geriatric outpatients. Design: Data were retrieved from a cross-sectional study. Setting: The study was performed in a geriatric outpatient clinic of a

  20. Negative Concord in Afrikaans: Filling the typological gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biberauer, T.; Zeijlstra, H.

    2012-01-01

    Many languages exhibit Negative Concord (NC), with multiple morphosyntactic instances of negation corresponding to one semantic negation. Traditionally, NC languages are distinguished as Strict and Non-strict (cf. Giannakidou 2000). In the former (e.g. Czech), multiple negative elements may or even

  1. Interlaboratory comparison of autoradiographic DNA profiling measurements: precision and concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duewer, D L; Lalonde, S A; Aubin, R A; Fourney, R M; Reeder, D J

    1998-05-01

    Knowledge of the expected uncertainty in restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) measurements is required for confident exchange of such data among different laboratories. The total measurement uncertainty among all Technical Working Group for DNA Analysis Methods laboratories has previously been characterized and found to be acceptably small. Casework cell line control measurements provided by six Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and 30 U.S. commercial, local, state, and Federal forensic laboratories enable quantitative determination of the within-laboratory precision and among-laboratory concordance components of measurement uncertainty typical of both sets of laboratories. Measurement precision is the same in the two countries for DNA fragments of size 1000 base pairs (bp) to 10,000 bp. However, the measurement concordance among the RCMP laboratories is clearly superior to that within the U.S. forensic community. This result is attributable to the use of a single analytical protocol in all RCMP laboratories. Concordance among U.S. laboratories cannot be improved through simple mathematical adjustments. Community-wide efforts focused on improved concordance may be the most efficient mechanism for further reduction of among-laboratory RFLP measurement uncertainty, should the resources required to fully evaluate potential cross-jurisdictional matches become burdensome as the number of RFLP profiles on record increases.

  2. Is the Concordance model the only game in town?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.

    2012-07-01

    In this lecture we show that for both f(R) theories of gravity and the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi models of standard General Relativity, it is necessary to look at both the background expansion history as well as the growth of density perturbations in order to clearly differentiate them from the standard Concordance model of cosmology.

  3. Modeling Concordance Correlation Coefficient for Longitudinal Study Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Tang, Wan; Yu, Qin; Tu, X. M.

    2010-01-01

    Measures of agreement are used in a wide range of behavioral, biomedical, psychosocial, and health-care related research to assess reliability of diagnostic test, psychometric properties of instrument, fidelity of psychosocial intervention, and accuracy of proxy outcome. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a popular measure of…

  4. The Concordance of Multilingual Legal Texts at the WTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Bradly J.

    2012-01-01

    Multilingualism is a sensitive and complex subject in a global organisation such as the World Trade Organization (WTO). In the WTO legal texts, there is a need for full concordance, not simply translation. This article begins with an overview of the issues raised by multilingual processes at the WTO in the negotiation, drafting, translation,…

  5. Concorde: Verkry 'n houvas op personeel | Broekman | Scientia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of the South African Defence Force's manpower information system, Project Concorde was initiated about two years ago. Its aim has been to gain a fuller perspective of manpower utilisation with the Defence Force by employing scientifically accountable principles. The project incorporates four phases: job analysis, ...

  6. SUSY Searches at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mamuzic, Judita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) is considered one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. It postulates a fundamental symmetry between fermions and bosons, and introduces a set of new supersymmetric particles at the electroweak scale. It addresses the hierarchy and naturalness problem, gives a solution to the gauge coupling unification, and offers a cold dark matter candidate. Different aspects of SUSY searches, using strong, electroweak, third generation production, and R-parity violation and long lived particles are being studied at the LHC. An overview of most recent SUSY searches results using the 13 TeV ATLAS RUN2 data will be presented.

  7. Script concordance testing: a review of published validity evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, Stuart; Charlin, Bernard; Cook, David A; Chalk, Colin; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2011-04-01

    Script concordance test (SCT) scores are intended to reflect respondents' competence in interpreting clinical data under conditions of uncertainty. The validity of inferences based on SCT scores has not been rigorously established. This study was conducted in order to develop a structured validity argument for the interpretation of test scores derived through use of the script concordance method. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases for articles pertaining to script concordance testing. We then reviewed these articles to evaluate the construct validity of the script concordance method, following an established approach for analysing validity data from five categories: content; response process; internal structure; relations to other variables, and consequences. Content evidence derives from clear guidelines for the creation of authentic, ill-defined scenarios. High internal consistency reliability supports the internal structure of SCT scores. As might be expected, SCT scores correlate poorly with assessments of pure factual knowledge, in which correlations for more advanced learners are lower. The validity of SCT scores is weakly supported by evidence pertaining to examinee response processes and educational consequences. Published research generally supports the use of SCT to assess the interpretation of clinical data under conditions of uncertainty, although specifics of the validity argument vary and require verification in different contexts and for particular SCTs. Our review identifies potential areas of further validity inquiry in all five categories of evidence. In particular, future SCT research might explore the impact of the script concordance method on teaching and learning, and examine how SCTs integrate with other assessment methods within comprehensive assessment programmes. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  8. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  9. Concorde Noise-Induced Building Vibrations, Montgomery County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Finley, T. D.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A series of studies are reported to assess the noise induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations. The levels of induced vibration and associated indoor/outdoor noise levels resulting from aircraft and nonaircraft events in selected homes, historic and other buildings near Dulles International Airport were recorded. The building response resulting from aircraft operations was found to be directly proportional to the overall sound pressure level and approximately independent of the aircraft type. The noise levels and, consequently, the response levels were observed to be higher for the Concorde operations than for the CTOL operations. Furthermore, the vibration could be closely reproduced by playing aircraft noise through a loudspeaker system located near the vibration measurement location. Nonaircraft events such as door closing were again observed to result in higher response levels than those induced by aircraft.

  10. What are parents doing to reduce adolescent alcohol misuse? Evaluating concordance with parenting guidelines for adolescent alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Marie B H; Jorm, Anthony F; Lubman, Dan I

    2015-02-10

    The Parenting Guidelines for Adolescent Alcohol Use were developed to support parents in reducing adolescent alcohol misuse. The aims of this paper were to: (1) validate an online parent self-assessment survey as a criterion-referenced measure of parental factors that are important for predicting adolescent alcohol misuse; (2) examine parent web-users' concordance with the Parenting Guidelines (extent to which their knowledge and behaviours align with Guidelines recommendations), and (3) examine the associations of parent and child characteristics with parental Guidelines concordance. Participants were 489 parents who completed the online survey. The survey assessed parent and child characteristics and parental concordance with the Guidelines in nine parenting areas. Reliability of the survey measure was assessed via an estimate of the agreement coefficient for each of the nine areas. Concurrent validity was examined by exploring the correlates of parental Guidelines concordance. Reliability of the measure was acceptable to high in eight of the nine parenting areas. Greater parental Guidelines concordance was associated with being female, beliefs about healthy levels of drinking that align with the Australian national alcohol use guidelines, drinking within guidelines-recommended levels, the reduced likelihood of another adult in the household with a drinking problem, an older age of adolescent alcohol initiation, and greater confidence in the reported age of adolescent initiation. This validated self-assessment parenting measure can be useful for identifying targets for parenting interventions designed to prevent or reduce adolescent alcohol misuse, and as a pre- and post-intervention assessment to assess the effects of such interventions.

  11. Fatigue tests on big structure assemblies of concorde aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V. P.; Perrais, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Fatigue tests on structural assemblies of the Concorde supersonic transport aircraft are reported. Two main sections of the aircraft were subjected to pressure, mechanical load, and thermal static tests. The types of fatigue tests conducted and the results obtained are discussed. It was concluded that on a supersonic aircraft whose structural weight is a significant part of the weight analysis, many fatigue and static strength development tests should be made and fatigue and thermal tests of the structures are absolutely necessary.

  12. Inexact proximal Newton methods for self-concordant functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jinchao; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Vandenberghe, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the proximal Newton method for minimizing a sum of a self-concordant function and a convex function with an inexpensive proximal operator. We present new results on the global and local convergence of the method when inexact search directions are used. The method is illustrated...... matrices with chordal sparsity patterns are used to evaluate gradients and matrix-vector products with the Hessian of the smooth component of the objective....

  13. Script Concordance Testing to Determine Infant Lumbar Puncture Practice Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chime, Nnenna Ogochukwu; Pusic, Martin V; Auerbach, Marc; Mehta, Renuka; Scherzer, Daniel J; Van Ittersum, Wendy; McAninch, Brett; Fein, Daniel M; Seelbach, Elizabeth; Zaveri, Pavan; Jackson, Jennifer M; Kessler, David; Chang, Todd P

    2018-02-01

    Script concordance testing (SCT) is used to assess clinical decision-making. We explore the use of SCT to (1) quantify practice variations in infant lumbar puncture (LP) and (2) analyze physician's characteristics affecting LP decision making. Using standard SCT processes, a panel of pediatric subspecialty physicians constructed 15 infant LP case vignettes, each with 2 to 4 SCT questions (a total of 47). The vignettes were distributed to pediatric attending physicians and fellows at 10 hospitals within the INSPIRE Network. We determined both raw scores (tendency to perform LP) and SCT scores (agreement with the reference panel) as well as the variation with participant factors. Two hundred twenty-six respondents completed all 47 SCT questions. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians tended to select LP more frequently than did general pediatricians, with pediatric emergency medicine physicians showing significantly higher raw scores (20.2 ± 10.2) than general pediatricians (13 ± 15; 95% confidence interval for difference, 1, 13). Concordance with the reference panel varied among subspecialties and by the frequency with which practitioners perform LPs in their practices. Script concordance testing questions can be used as a tool to detect subspecialty practice variation. We are able to detect significant practice variation in the self-report of use of LP for infants among different pediatric subspecialties.

  14. Synesthesia in twins: incomplete concordance in monozygotes suggests extragenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, Hannah G; Eagleman, David M

    2015-06-01

    Colored-sequence synesthesia (CSS) is a neurological condition in which sequential stimuli such as letters, numbers, or days of the week trigger simultaneous, involuntary color perception. Although the condition appears to run in families and several studies have sought a genetic link, the genetic contribution to synesthesia remains unclear. We conducted the first comparative twin study of CSS and found that CSS has a pairwise concordance of 73.9% in monozygotic twins, and a pairwise concordance of 36.4% in dizygotic twins. In line with previous studies, our results suggest a heritable element of synesthesia. However, consonant with the findings of previous single-pair case studies, our large sample size verifies that synesthesia is not completely conferred by genetics; if it were, monozygotic twins should have 100% concordance. These findings implicate a genetic mechanism of CSS that may work differently than previously thought: collectively, our data suggest that synesthesia is a heritable condition with incomplete penetrance that is substantially influenced by epigenetic and environmental factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral and genital HPV genotypic concordance between sexual partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beder Ribeiro, Camila Maria; Ferrer, Iracema; Santos de Farias, Andreza Barkokebas; Fonseca, Débora Diniz; Morais Silva, Igor Henrique; Monteiro Gueiros, Luiz Alcino; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; Porter, Stephen Ross; Leao, Jair Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission and genotype concordance among heterosexual couples. Thirty-one married couples were evaluated. All male subjects presented with clinically diagnosed HPV-related malignant or potentially malignant lesions and underwent peniscopy and penile swab. Their female counterparts underwent swabs of the uterine cervix and oral mucosa. HPV-DNA detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. HPV-DNA was detected in the penis, vagina/cervix, and oral cavity of 16 couples (51.61%). Of these, HPV-DNA concordance was observed in 14 couples (87.5%). HPV-DNA was amplified in penile and oral sites of 14 couples. Of these, 13 couples reported fellatio (92.85%), most of them (10 couples, 76.9%) without condom use. HPV-DNA concordance was observed in 7/10 of these couples (70%). The three couples (100%) who reported use of condom during fellatio were HPV-DNA discordant (p = 0.025). Lifetime number of female sexual partners and detection of HPV-DNA in the penile mucosa are surrogate markers of exposure to HPV during marriage. Consistent use of condoms may reduce the risk of HPV transmission. Oral acquisition of HPV from oro-genital contact is influenced by lack of condom use and previous sexual behavior of the male partner. In addition, oral transmission of the virus due to fellatio is as common as genital transmission.

  16. Concordance: Design Ideal for Facilitating Situated Negotiations in Out-of-clinic Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen L.; Gronvall, Erik; Sokoler, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    and healthcare professional for forging a therapeutic alliance. However, the HCI community has still not adopted concordance as a design ideal. This paper revisits four old design-cases to explore the role of concordance in out-of-clinic healthcare. We argue that concordance, as a design ideal, can guide new...

  17. 78 FR 5717 - Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Military Ocean Terminal Concord Safety Zone, Suisun Bay, Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Interim rule and... Suisun Bay near Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA in support of military onload and offload operations...

  18. EnviroAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web...

  19. ATLAS experimentet

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    Filmen innehåller mycket information om fysik och varför LHC behövs tilsammans med stora detektorer och specielt om behovet av ATLAS Experimentet. Mycket bra film för att förklara det okända- som man undersöker i CERN för att ge svar på frågor som människor har försökt förklara under flere tusen år.

  20. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  1. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  2. Assessing the Relationship Between Sexual Concordance, Sexual Attractions, and Sexual Identity in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suschinsky, Kelly D; Dawson, Samantha J; Chivers, Meredith L

    2017-01-01

    On average, there is a gender difference in sexual concordance, with men exhibiting greater agreement between genital and self-reported sexual arousal, relative to women. Much less is known about the substantial variation in women's sexual concordance; women's genital and self-reported sexual responses may correlate strongly and positively, not at all, or even strongly negatively. The within-gender variation in sexual concordance suggests that individual differences may be related to sexual concordance. We examined whether sexual concordance varies as a function of sexual orientation (based on self-reported sexual attractions and sexual identity labels) in a sample (N = 76) that included exclusively androphilic, predominantly androphilic, ambiphilic, and predominantly/exclusively gynephilic women. Participants viewed sexual and nonsexual stimuli that varied by actor gender while their vaginal vasocongestion and subjective sexual responses were measured. Women's sexual concordance varied as a function of their sexual attractions; women with any degree of gynephilia exhibited higher sexual concordance than exclusively androphilic women across a variety of sexual concordance measures, and these effects were demonstrated using correlation and multi-level modeling analyses. Only sexual concordance based on overall feelings of arousal varied by sexual identity, with heterosexual women exhibiting the lowest sexual concordance. Stimulus gender significantly influenced sexual concordance for most groups of women: Ambiphilic and predominantly/exclusively gynephilic women exhibited greater sexual concordance to female stimuli and exclusively androphilic women exhibited greater sexual concordance to male stimuli. These findings suggest that sexual orientation (particularly one's degree of gynephilia) may explain some of the within-gender variation seen in women's sexual concordance.

  3. A short note on jackknifing the concordance correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2014-02-10

    Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a very popular scaled index of agreement used in applied statistics. To obtain a confidence interval (CI) for the estimate of CCC, jackknifing was proposed and shown to perform well in simulation as well as in applications. However, a theoretical proof of the validity of the jackknife CI for the CCC has not been presented yet. In this note, we establish a sufficient condition for using the jackknife method to construct the CI for the CCC. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Inexact proximal Newton methods for self-concordant functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jinchao; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Vandenberghe, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    with an application to L1-regularized covariance selection, in which prior constraints on the sparsity pattern of the inverse covariance matrix are imposed. In the numerical experiments the proximal Newton steps are computed by an accelerated proximal gradient method, and multifrontal algorithms for positive definite......We analyze the proximal Newton method for minimizing a sum of a self-concordant function and a convex function with an inexpensive proximal operator. We present new results on the global and local convergence of the method when inexact search directions are used. The method is illustrated...

  5. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Green Bay, WI Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  7. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Paterson, NJ Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  8. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, ME Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  9. Concordance of vitamin D peripheral levels in infertile couples' partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffoni, Alessio; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangiarini, Alice; Noli, Stefania; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Vigano, Paola; Parazzini, Fabio; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2017-08-01

    A large number of evidence supports the role of vitamin D insufficiency in both women and men infertility. However, no studies have evaluated the rate of concordance of vitamin D status between the partners. This finding might open new scenarios in the interpretation of the available data linking vitamin D insufficiency and infertility. In the present cross-sectional study, 103 consecutive infertile couples were recruited between April and May 2014. Both partners concomitantly provided a serum sample for the assessment of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25-(OH)-D]. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as serum 25-(OH)-D D insufficient, corresponding to a rate of 73%. Overall, concordance was observed in 73 couples (71%), thus higher than the expected 61% (0.732 + 0.272) based on chance (p = 0.007). The Pearson coefficient of correlation R2 between the partners of the couples was 0.52 (p D insufficiency according to the causes of infertility. Serum 25-(OH)-D correlates within the partners of infertile couples. Further evidence is warranted to determine the clinical relevance and possible clinical applications of this finding.

  10. Monozygotic male twins concordant for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, M.; McPherson, E.; Sherer, C. [West Penn Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Ludwig Institute for Cancer Reseach, LaJolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by macrosomia, macro glossia, visceromegaly, characteristic facies, and in some cases omphalocele, hypoglycemia, hemihypertrophy, and risk of embryonal tumors. Most cases occur sporadically in chromosomally normal individuals, but a few BWS patients have anomalies of 11p and others have evidence of microduplications or paternal isodisomy in this region. In some families with autosomal dominant transmission, BWS maps to 11p15.5, but the mechanism of transmission is not fully understood. BWS has been reported in 11 sets of MZ twins, including 10 female pairs (9 discordant and 1 partially concordant) and one male pair concordant for both BWS & dup 15q11.2-q13. We report a pair of premature male MZ twins with macroglossia, postnatal overgrowth, characteristic BWS facies, and mild developmental delay. One twin had hypoglycemia, but neither had omphalocele or hemihypertrophy and serial abdominal ultrasounds have been normal. DNA fingerprinting confirmed monozygosity. Chromosome studies showed a marker 11p14.2 in one twin only, and molecular genetic studies of the 11p15.5 region showed no evidence of duplication or isodisomy in either twin.

  11. ATLAS25: Facebook Live Events

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    2017-01-01

    This video is a montage of the 5 Facebook Live events that were broadcast on 2nd October 2017, to celebrate ATLAS25. For more details visit: http://atlas.cern/updates/atlas-news/celebrating-25-years-discovery

  12. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  13. Equivalent dose measurements on board an Armenian Airline flight and Concorde (correction of Concord) (9-17 km).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopova, A B; Melkonyan, A A; Tatikyan, S Sh; Capdevielle, J-N

    2002-12-01

    The results of investigations of the neutron component (E=1-10 MeV) of cosmic radiation on board the "Armenian Airlines" aircrafts using nuclear photoemulsion are presented. The emulsions were exposed on the flights from Yerevan to Moscow, St.-Petersburg, Beirut, Athens, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Paris and Sofia, and on Concord supersonic flights from Paris to New York. The dependence of the neutron fluxes, and on absorbed and equivalent doses on the flight parameters were investigated. On the flights of the supersonic Concord, with an altitude of 17 km, the neutron fluxes were essentially higher in comparison to those measured on Armenian airliners. It is interesting to note, that the neutron flux and equivalent dose rate decrease with altitude up to 470 km in space, for example, on board the STS-57. The shape of the differential energy spectrum for fast neutrons is the same on all Armenian airlines flights, but significantly different at 17 km altitude, where the flux in the energy region above 3 MeV is increasing. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multi-Atlas Segmentation using Partially Annotated Data: Methods and Annotation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lisa M; Rajchl, Martin; Bai, Wenjia; Baumgartner, Christian F; Tong, Tong; Passerat-Palmbach, Jonathan; Aljabar, Paul; Rueckert, Daniel

    2017-08-22

    Multi-atlas segmentation is a widely used tool in medical image analysis, providing robust and accurate results by learning from annotated atlas datasets. However, the availability of fully annotated atlas images for training is limited due to the time required for the labelling task. Segmentation methods requiring only a proportion of each atlas image to be labelled could therefore reduce the workload on expert raters tasked with annotating atlas images. To address this issue, we first re-examine the labelling problem common in many existing approaches and formulate its solution in terms of a Markov Random Field energy minimisation problem on a graph connecting atlases and the target image. This provides a unifying framework for multi-atlas segmentation. We then show how modifications in the graph configuration of the proposed framework enable the use of partially annotated atlas images and investigate different partial annotation strategies. The proposed method was evaluated on two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) datasets for hippocampal and cardiac segmentation. Experiments were performed aimed at (1) recreating existing segmentation techniques with the proposed framework and (2) demonstrating the potential of employing sparsely annotated atlas data for multi-atlas segmentation.

  15. Experiment search of the electroweak symmetry breaking in the H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} channel and of a solution of the hierarchy problem in the Atlas experiment: participation to the tests of the electronics of the electromagnetic calorimeter; Recherche experimentale de la brisure spontanee de symetrie electrofaible dans le canal H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} et d'une solution au probleme de hierarchie dans ATLAS. Participation a la preparation de l'electronique du calorimetre electromagnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalier, M

    2005-04-15

    This thesis deals with the understanding of the spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism in the ATLAS experiment at LHC collider, by studying two complementary topics: the search for the Higgs boson in the H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} channel, and a search for extra dimensions in the gluon sector. Tests of the electronic of the electromagnetic calorimeter allowed us to validate various cards that were under the responsibility of the LPNHE. Using full simulation data of the detector allowed us to precisely compute mass resolution of the di-photon system. Due to recent theoretical improvements, signal and background have been studied at the next order of the perturbative development, which increases cross-sections. With regards to the jet background, a study has been done using discriminating variables in order to obtain, for a 80 % photons efficiency, a rejection factor of 7000. The discovery potential benefits from this change of cross-sections and increases by 50 % in comparison with the same analysis done at the leading order. In addition to this, a new analysis using a maximum likelihood method allowed us to increase by 40 % the discovery potential in comparison with our classical analysis. In conclusion, the Higgs boson of 120 GeV/c{sup 2} can be now discovered in this channel with an integrated luminosity of 10 fb{sup -1}. Furthermore, the consistency of the problem of the Higgs boson mass can be solved by introducing extra dimensions in which gluons can propagate. We have shown that it was possible to discover extra-dimensions up to a compactification scale of 15 TeV. (author)

  16. A robust bayesian estimate of the concordance correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A need for assessment of agreement arises in many situations including statistical biomarker qualification or assay or method validation. Concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is one of the most popular scaled indices reported in evaluation of agreement. Robust methods for CCC estimation currently present an important statistical challenge. Here, we propose a novel Bayesian method of robust estimation of CCC based on multivariate Student's t-distribution and compare it with its alternatives. Furthermore, we extend the method to practically relevant settings, enabling incorporation of confounding covariates and replications. The superiority of the new approach is demonstrated using simulation as well as real datasets from biomarker application in electroencephalography (EEG). This biomarker is relevant in neuroscience for development of treatments for insomnia.

  17. Numerical modelling of the Concorde wake during ZEBRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierens, K. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of the Concorde contrail during the ZEBRE experiment have been performed. The main goal of the simulations is to reproduce the fast vanishing of the contrail which disappeared 20-30 s after exhaust. It is difficult to evaporate ice crystals during the jet and vortex phase of the aircraft wake, when the exhaust products are trapped in the vortex cores. The trapping also excludes spatial dispersion of the ice crystals as an explanation of the short contrail lifetime. The disappearance of the contrail within 20-30 s requires that a substantial part of the exhaust gases escapes from the region that is later on trapped in the vortex cores. (author) 10 refs.

  18. Concordance in mate choice in female mound-building mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigneux, Emilie; Féron, Christophe; Gouat, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Females must evaluate male quality to perform mate choice. Since females generally base their selection on different male features, individual females may differ in their choice. In this study, we show that concordance between females in mate choice decisions may arise without any experimental maximization of a particular attractive trait. Choice tests were performed in mound-building mice, Mus spicilegus, a monogamous species. Body odours of two male donors were presented to 12 female subjects individually. To determine female choice, the same pair of males was presented three times to a female. Four different pairs of male body odours were used. Male donors, not related to females, were selected at random in our polymorphic breeding stock. Using this two-way choice design, female mice displayed a clear choice and had a similar preference for particular males. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Concordance Between Primary Breast Cancer and Matched Metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Thomassen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    . The purpose of this review is to illuminate the extent of cancer genome evolution through disease progression and the degree of molecular concordance between primary breast cancers and matched metastases. We present an overview of the most prominent studies investigating the expression of endocrine receptors......Clinical management of breast cancer is increasingly personalized and based on molecular profiling. Often, primary tumors are used as proxies for systemic disease at the time of recurrence. However, recent studies have revealed substantial discordances between primary tumors and metastases, both......, transcriptomics, and genome aberrations in primary tumors and metastases. In conclusion, biopsy of metastatic lesions at recurrence of breast cancer is encouraged to provide optimal treatment of the disease. Furthermore, molecular profiling of metastatic tissue provides invaluable mechanistic insight...

  20. Probabilistic liver atlas construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Esther; Domingo, Juan; Ayala, Guillermo; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Goceri, E

    2017-01-13

    Anatomical atlases are 3D volumes or shapes representing an organ or structure of the human body. They contain either the prototypical shape of the object of interest together with other shapes representing its statistical variations (statistical atlas) or a probability map of belonging to the object (probabilistic atlas). Probabilistic atlases are mostly built with simple estimations only involving the data at each spatial location. A new method for probabilistic atlas construction that uses a generalized linear model is proposed. This method aims to improve the estimation of the probability to be covered by the liver. Furthermore, all methods to build an atlas involve previous coregistration of the sample of shapes available. The influence of the geometrical transformation adopted for registration in the quality of the final atlas has not been sufficiently investigated. The ability of an atlas to adapt to a new case is one of the most important quality criteria that should be taken into account. The presented experiments show that some methods for atlas construction are severely affected by the previous coregistration step. We show the good performance of the new approach. Furthermore, results suggest that extremely flexible registration methods are not always beneficial, since they can reduce the variability of the atlas and hence its ability to give sensible values of probability when used as an aid in segmentation of new cases.

  1. KRAS mutational concordance between primary and metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    PALIOGIANNIS, PANAGIOTIS; COSSU, ANTONIO; TANDA, FRANCESCO; PALMIERI, GIUSEPPE; PALOMBA, GRAZIA

    2014-01-01

    KRAS mutation analysis is commonly performed on tissue samples obtained from primary colorectal cancers (CRCs). The metastatic lesions of CRC are usually considered as qualitatively similar or even identical to the primary tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spectrum and distribution of KRAS mutations in a large collection of CRCs, while also evaluating the concordance of primary and metastatic lesions among available paired specimens from the same patients. A total of 729 patients with histologically confirmed advanced CRC at the University Hospital and Local Health Unit (Sassari, Italy) were included. Clinical and pathological features were obtained from medical records and/or pathology reports. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples were used for mutation analysis. Genomic DNA was isolated using a standard protocol; the coding sequence and splice junctions of exons 2 and 3 in the KRAS gene were screened by direct automated sequencing. Overall, 219 (30%) KRAS mutations were found; 208 (30.1%) were identified in the 690 primary tumors and 11 (28.2%) in the 39 metastatic tissue samples. Among the 31 (4.3%) patients who had paired samples of primary CRC and synchronous or asynchronous metastases, 28 (90.3%) showed consistent mutation patterns between the primary tumors and metastatic lesions. In one case, an additive mutation (Q61L) was found in the metastatic tissue, while two other discrepant cases exhibited a different mutation distribution; Q61H in the primitive lesion and G13V in the metastatic lesion in one case, and a mutated primary tumor (Q61L) and wild-type metastasis in another case. The results of this study confirm that a high concordance exists between the results of KRAS mutation analysis performed in primitive and metastatic CRCs; independent subclones may be generated in a limited amount of patients. PMID:25202344

  2. Shape-Constrained Multi-Atlas Segmentation of Spleen in CT

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; Merkle, Kristen L.; Shanahan, Peter L.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Spleen segmentation on clinically acquired CT data is a challenging problem given the complicity and variability of abdominal anatomy. Multi-atlas segmentation is a potential method for robust estimation of spleen segmentations, but can be negatively impacted by registration errors. Although labeled atlases explicitly capture information related to feasible organ shapes, multi-atlas methods have largely used this information implicitly through registration. We propose to integrate a level set...

  3. Cryptorchidism concordance in monozygotic and dizygotic twin brothers, full brothers, and half-brothers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Søndergaard; Toft, Gunnar; Thulstrup, Ane Marie

    2010-01-01

    To study concordance rates of cryptorchidism (undescended testis) in pairs of boys with varying family structure, to evaluate the risk contribution from the intrauterine environment and genetic factors....

  4. Material science experiments at the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Keinigs, R K; Atchison, W L; Bartsch, R R; Faehl, R J; Flower-Maudlin, E C; Hammerberg, J E; Holtkamp, D B; Kyrala, G A; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Preston, D L; Removsky, R E; Scudder, D W; Sheehey, P T; Shlachter, J S; Taylor, A J; Tonks, D L; Turchi, P J; Chandler, E A

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Three experimental campaigns designed for fielding on the Atlas Pulsed Power Facility are discussed. The foci of these experiments are directed toward a better understanding of three material science issues; (1) strength at high strain and high strain rate, (2) friction at material interfaces moving at high relative velocities, and (3) material failure in convergent geometry. Atlas provides an environment for investigating these problems in parameter regimes and geometries that are inaccessible with standard techniques. For example, flow stress measurements of material strength using conventional Hopkinson bar experiments are limited to strain rates ~10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Atlas will be capable of imploding metal shells to combined strains of 200% and strain rates >10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/. Data obtained regimes is used to test different constitutive strength models used in several Los Alamos hydrocodes. Dynamic friction has been investigated for nearly 300 years, but a first...

  5. World-wide online monitoring interface of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Mineev, M; Hauser, R; Salnikov, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration accounts for more than 3000 members located all over the world. The efficiency of the experiment can be improved allowing system experts not present on site to follow the ATLAS operations in real-time, spotting potential problems which otherwise may remain unattended for a non-negligible time. Taking into account the wide geographical spread of the ATLAS collaboration, the solution of this problem is to have all monitoring information with minimal access latency available world-wide. We have implemented a framework which defines a standard approach for retrieving arbitrary monitoring information from the ATLAS private network via HTTP. An information request is made by specifying one of the predefined URLs with some optional parameters refining data which has to be shipped back in XML format. The framework takes care of receiving, parsing and forwarding such requests to the appropriate plugins. The plugins retrieve the requested data and convert it to XML (or optionally to JSON) format...

  6. Foramen arcuale: a rare morphological variation located in atlas vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpan, Sibel; Yonguc, Goksin Nilufer; Edizer, Mete; Mas, Nuket Gocmen; Magden, A Orhan

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the incidence of foramen arcuale in dry atlas vertebrae which may cause clinical problems. Eighty-one dry human cervical vertebrae were examined. The evaluated parameters of two atlas vertebrae including foramen arcuale were as follows: maximum antero-posterior, transverse diameters and areas of the right and left superior articular facets and transverse foramina; maximum antero-posterior diameters, heights, areas and central sagittal thickness of bony arch forming roof of foramen arcuale, respectively. All parameters were measured with caliper in milimeters. Thirteen of eighty-one cervical vertebrae specimens (13/81, 16.05%) were atlas and the two of thirteen atlas vertebrae (2/13, 15.38%) had macroscopically complete foramen arcuale. Each of the two atlas vertebrae was including one foramen arcuale (one on the left and one on the right side). There was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04) between the mean antero-posterior diameter of superior articular facet located on each side of atlas vertebrae, whereas not (p = 0.51) between mean antero-posterior diameter of transverse foramina. There was not any significant difference between the mean transverse diameters and areas of superior articular facets and transverse foramina located on each side of atlas vertebrae, respectively. Each of the areas of transverse foramina located on the same sides with foramen arcuale in two atlas vertebrae was less than the mean areas of transverse foramina located ipsilateral side with each foramen arcuale in thirteen atlas vertebrae. The present study provides additional information about the incidence and topography of the atlas vertebrae including foramen arcuale.

  7. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  8. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R. [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  9. Future ATLAS Higgs Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Smart, Ben; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC will prove a challenging environment to work in, with for example $=200$ expected. It will however also provide great opportunities for advancing studies of the Higgs boson. The ATLAS detector will be upgraded, and Higgs prospects analyses have been performed to assess the reach of ATLAS Higgs studies in the HL-LHC era. These analyses are presented, as are Run-2 ATLAS di-Higgs analyses for comparison.

  10. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  11. Is There Concordance in Attitudes and Beliefs between Parents and Scientists about Autism Spectrum Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Ruth L.; Harris, Mark J.; Ballan, Michelle S.; Fischbach, Gerald D.; Link, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    There is no reported investigation comparing concordance in attitudes and beliefs about autism spectrum disorder between parents of children with autism spectrum disorder and scientists who research autism spectrum disorder. To investigate the level of concordance between these groups on causes of autism, priorities of research, perceived stigma,…

  12. The chameleonic nature of French ni : negative coordination in a negative concord language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doetjes, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to defend the claim that ni, the French counterpart of neither and nor is always a negative conjunction which takes part in the negative concord system of French. The interpretation one seems to get for this negative concord ni varies depending on the environment where

  13. Commissioning of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069446

    2008-01-01

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The subdetector integration in recent milestone weeks is described, especially the cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6, focusing on simultaneous running and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector. The liquid argon and tile calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The High-Level-Trigger infrastructure is installed and algorithms tested in technical runs. Problems with the inner detector cooling compressors are being fixed.

  14. Parent and Teacher Concordance of Child Outcomes for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kelsey S; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Rieth, Sarah R; Stahmer, Aubyn C

    2017-11-21

    Cross-informant ratings of are considered gold standard for child behavioral assessment. To date, little work has examined informant ratings of adaptive functioning for youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a large, diverse sample of youth with ASD, this study evaluated parent-teacher concordance of ratings of adaptive functioning and ASD-specific symptomatology across time. The impact of child clinical characteristics on concordance was also examined. Participants included 246 children, their caregivers and teachers. Parent-teacher concordance was variable but generally consistent across time. Concordance was significantly impacted by autism severity and child cognitive abilities. Findings inform the broader concordance literature and support the need to consider child clinical factors when assessing child functioning in samples of children with ASD.

  15. Racing the Moon’s shadow with Concorde 001

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This is the unique story of  observing a total solar exlipse for no less than 74 consecutive minutes. On the summer morning of June 30, 1973, the Sun rises on the Canary Islands. But it is strangely indented by the Moon. The eclipse of the century has just begun. From the west, the lunar shadow rushes to the African coast at a velocity of over 2000 kilometers per hour. Astronomers on the ground will enjoy seven short minutes of total eclipse to study the solar corona - too short for Pierre Lena and seven scientists who board the Concorde 001 prototype, an extraordinary plane to become the first commercial supersonic aircraft. With André Turcat as chief pilot and a crew of five, at 17000 m altitude, the aircraft remains in the lunar shadow for 74 minutes, a record time of scientific observations not yet beaten and allowing for exceptional measurements. Science, technology, aviation and history combine in the story of a unique human adventure aboard a legendary aircraft, illustrated with a rich and original ...

  16. [Script concordance test for knowledge assessment of lung cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couraud, S; Girard, P; Girard, N; Souquet, P-J; Coiffard, B; Charlin, B; Milleron, B

    2016-05-01

    Annual screening for lung cancer using low-dose CT-scans is associated with decreased mortality. A survey conducted in Rhône-Alpes area in France found that clinicians need education and information on this topic. Script concordance tests (SCT) are a tool for assessing clinical reasoning in situations of uncertainty. They have not previously been used in France in the context of continuing medical education. We created a questionnaire with 5 multiple-choice questions (MCQ) and two SCT scenarios. The questionnaire was sent to all clinicians and residents who are members of French-Speaking Respiratory Society or the French Young Pulmonologist Association. One hundred and ninety answers were analyzed. Seventy percent stated that decreasing mortality was the best criterion for assessing the effectiveness of a cancer screening policy, and 75% that low-dose CT scan was the best test to achieve this in lung cancer screening. Forty-five percent knew the eligibility criteria of the population, and 62% that low-dose CT scan should be performed annually. Participation in tumor boards and certification in oncology were significantly associated with a better score at MCQ and SCT. SCT and MCQ scores were significantly correlated (Spearman's Rho 0.339; P<0.0001). SCT are feasible by electronic survey and seem relevant. Improving knowledge of clinicians on lung cancer screening is still critical. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Concordance in the radiological diagnosis of thoracolumbar spine fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, M; Rodriguez, M; Cerván, A M; Ortega, J A; Rivas-Ruiz, F; Guerado, E

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are frequent and severe. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment to obtain good clinical results is essential, with many classifications being proposed for this purpose. To determine the external validity of radiographic and computed tomography (CT) measurements for the most used classifications, and decide on the type of treatment required. The working hypothesis is the existence of external validity of radiographic measurements. A sample of patients with thoracolumbar fracture was selected. Three spine specialists and a resident performed measurements on anteroposterior and lateral radiographic images as well as coronal, sagittal and axial CT slices. Fractures were classified as stable or unstable, evaluating the degree of intra-and interobserver agreement based on a standard observer. Sagittal index of Farcy, lateral wedging, Beck Index, traumatic regional angulation and channel occupancy were studied. All indicators studied, except the lateral wedging, showed a high degree of concordance. Instability determinants studied with radiographs and CT, which had obtained statistical significance, are reliable and accurate for the classification of thoracolumbar fractures and, therefore, to indicate an appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. INTERLABORATORY CONCORDANCE IN HER-2 POSITIVE BREAST CANCER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonjić, Nives; Mustać, Elvira; Tomić, Snježana; Razumović, Jasminka Jakić; Sarcević, Bozena; Blazicević, Valerija; Labinac, Loredana Peteh; Svagelj, Dražen; Kopjar, Andrina; Sikić, Natasa Lisica; Vrbicić, Branka; Borić, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of HER-2 status is essential for identifying patients who will benefit from HER-2 targeted therapy. The aim of the present study was to show results on the concordance between local and central laboratory testing results in HER-2 positive breast cancer patients. In cases with discordant findings, the immunohistochemical (IHC) and/or in situ hybridization (FISH/SISH) analysis was performed in central laboratories. A total of 104 out of 143 (72.72%) breast carcinoma cases were HER-2 positive (score 3+), while nearly 14% of tumors (20/43) showed weak (score 2+) and 12% (19/143) negative IHC staining (score 0 and 1+). After repeated IHC and ISH, 88% (126/143) were classified as HER-2 positive and 12% (17/143) as HER-2 negative cases. The results obtained are in agreement with many studies that confirmed similar discordance in HER-2 testing by IHC and/or FISH between local and central laboratory. Thus, our findings as well as those from other studies support the importance of regular quality assessment of the staining procedures performed and consistency of interpretation of HER-2 test results.

  19. Concordance analysis between estimation methods of milk fatty acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Mary Ana Petersen; Petrini, Juliana; Ferreira, Evandro Maia; Mourão, Luciana Regina Mangeti Barreto; Salvian, Mayara; Cassoli, Laerte Dagher; Pires, Alexandre Vaz; Machado, Paulo Fernando; Mourão, Gerson Barreto

    2014-08-01

    Considering the milk fatty acid influence on human health, the aim of this study was to compare gas chromatography (GC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the determination of these compounds. Fatty acid content (g/100g of fat) were obtained by both methods and compared through Pearson's correlation, linear Bayesian regression, and the Bland-Altman method. Despite the high correlations between the measurements (r=0.60-0.92), the regression coefficient values indicated higher measures for palmitic acid, oleic acid, unsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and lower values for stearic acid, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids estimated by GC in comparison to FTIR results. This inequality was confirmed in the Bland-Altman test, with an average bias varying from -8.65 to 6.91g/100g of fat. However, the inclusion of 94% of the samples into the concordance limits suggested that the variability of the differences between the methods was constant throughout the range of measurement. Therefore, despite the inequality between the estimates, the methods displayed the same pattern of milk fat composition, allowing similar conclusions about the milk samples under evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolution of the ATLAS Nightly Build System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrus, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Nightly Build System is a major component in the ATLAS collaborative software organization, validation, and code approval scheme. For over 10 years of development it has evolved into a factory for automatic release production and grid distribution. The 50 multi-platform branches of ATLAS releases provide vast opportunities for testing new packages, verification of patches to existing software, and migration to new platforms and compilers for ATLAS code that currently contains 2200 packages with 4 million C++ and 1.4 million python scripting lines written by about 1000 developers. Recent development was focused on the integration of ATLAS Nightly Build and Installation systems. The nightly releases are distributed and validated and some are transformed into stable releases used for data processing worldwide. The ATLAS Nightly System is managed by the NICOS control tool on a computing farm with 50 powerful multiprocessor nodes. NICOS provides the fully automated framework for the release builds, testing, and creation of distribution kits. The ATN testing framework of the Nightly System runs unit and integration tests in parallel suites, fully utilizing the resources of multi-core machines, and provides the first results even before compilations complete. The NICOS error detection system is based on several techniques and classifies the compilation and test errors according to their severity. It is periodically tuned to place greater emphasis on certain software defects by highlighting the problems on NICOS web pages and sending automatic e-mail notifications to responsible developers. These and other recent developments will be presented and future plans will be described.

  1. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  2. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    La Givrine near St Cergue Cross Country Skiing and Fondue at Basse Ruche with M Nordberg, P Jenni, M Nessi, F Gianotti and Co. ATLAS Management Fondu dinner, reviewing state of play of the experiment Many fun scenes from cross country skiing and after 41 minutes of the film starts the fondue dinner in a nice chalet with many persons working for ATLAS experiment

  3. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  4. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Document Server

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  5. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  6. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  7. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  8. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  9. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  10. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  11. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  12. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  13. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  14. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Shots of aircraft factory where machining for ATLAS is done Shots of aircraft Work on components for ATLAS big wheel Discussions between Tikhonov and Nordberg in workshop Sequence 2 Shots of downtown Novosibirsk, including little church which is mid-point of Russian Federation Sequence 3 Interview of Yuri Tikhonov by Andrew Millington

  15. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  16. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  17. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  18. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  19. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  20. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  1. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  2. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  3. Work happiness among teachers: a day reconstruction study on the role of self-concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, Maja; Bakker, Arnold B; Oerlemans, Wido G M

    2013-12-01

    Self-concordant work motivation arises from one's authentic choices, personal values, and interests. In the present study, we investigated whether self-concordant motivation may fluctuate from one work-related task to the next. On the basis of self-determination theory, we hypothesized that momentary self-concordance buffers the negative impact of momentary work demands on momentary happiness. We developed a modified version of the day reconstruction method to investigate self-concordance, work demands, and happiness during specific work-related tasks on a within-person and within-day level. In total, 132 teachers completed a daily diary on three consecutive work days as well as a background questionnaire. The daily diary resulted in 792 reported work activities and activity-related work demands, self-concordance, and happiness scores. Multilevel analysis showed that-for most work activities-state self-concordant motivation buffered the negative association of work demands with happiness. These findings add to the literature on motivation and well-being by showing that the levels of self-concordance and happiness experienced by employees vary significantly on a within-day level and show a predictable pattern. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings to increase employees' well-being. © 2013.

  4. Behavioral and neural concordance in parent-child dyadic sleep patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Ho Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep habits developed in adolescence shape long-term trajectories of psychological, educational, and physiological well-being. Adolescents’ sleep behaviors are shaped by their parents’ sleep at both the behavioral and biological levels. In the current study, we sought to examine how neural concordance in resting-state functional connectivity between parent-child dyads is associated with dyadic concordance in sleep duration and adolescents’ sleep quality. To this end, we scanned both parents and their child (N = 28 parent-child dyads; parent Mage = 42.8 years; adolescent Mage = 14.9 years; 14.3% father; 46.4% female adolescent as they each underwent a resting-state scan. Using daily diaries, we also assessed dyadic concordance in sleep duration across two weeks. Our results show that greater daily concordance in sleep behavior is associated with greater neural concordance in default-mode network connectivity between parents and children. Moreover, greater neural and behavioral concordances in sleep is associated with more optimal sleep quality in adolescents. The current findings expand our understanding of dyadic concordance by providing a neurobiological mechanism by which parents and children share daily sleep behaviors.

  5. Real Time Energy Reconstruction in the ATLAS Hadronic Calorimeter and ATLAS sensitivity to Extra Dimension Models

    CERN Document Server

    Salvachua, Belen; Ros, Eduardo

    This work has been fulfilled within the ATLAS collaboration. I present here two studies, both related with the ATLAS detector and its operation. The ATLAS detector is described in chapter 1 whereas chapter 2 shows an introduction to the ATLAS tile calorimeter and the TileCal Read-Out Drivers (ROD) where the first part of the thesis is developed. In chapter 3 I present the study and the implementation of the Optimal Filtering algorithm in the TileCal Read-Out Drivers. The ROD provides the energy and the arrival time of the digital signal that is generated in the tile calorimeter. These parameters are reconstructed online using the Optimal Filtering algorithm, the RODs also provide a quality factor of the reconstruction. This information is sent to the standard ATLAS acquisition data flow with a specific data format defined in this thesis. Chapter 4 contains a short introduction to the Standard Model, presents its problems and describes other theories like Supersymmetry, Little Higgs or Extra Dimension models t...

  6. The Hatfield SCT lunar atlas photographic atlas for Meade, Celestron, and other SCT telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In a major publishing event for lunar observers, the justly famous Hatfield atlas is updated in even more usable form. This version of Hatfield’s classic atlas solves the problem of mirror images, making identification of left-right reversed imaged lunar features both quick and easy. SCT and Maksutov telescopes – which of course include the best-selling models from Meade and Celestron – reverse the visual image left to right. Thus it is extremely difficult to identify lunar features at the eyepiece of one of the instruments using a conventional Moon atlas, as the human brain does not cope well when trying to compare the real thing with a map that is a mirror image of it. Now this issue has at last been solved.   In this atlas the Moon’s surface is shown at various sun angles, and inset keys show the effects of optical librations. Smaller non-mirrored reference images are also included to make it simple to compare the mirrored SCT plates and maps with those that appear in other atlases. This edition s...

  7. Smoking concordance during pregnancy: Are there relationship benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Talea; Desrosiers, Alethea; Kershaw, Trace

    2017-11-01

    Couples often engage in similar patterns of behavior, including substance use, and similarity may benefit relationship quality. Such relationship benefits may be especially salient for adolescent and young couples, whose relationships are often unstable and prone to breakups. This study examined the effect of mutual smoking during pregnancy on relationship quality in pregnant adolescent and young adult couples. Couples (N = 228; MAgeFemale = 18.69; MAgeMale = 21.12) were recruited from obstetrics/gynecology clinics in Connecticut from July 2007 to February 2011. Couples completed measures of recent smoking and relationship quality (i.e. satisfaction, affectional expression, cohesion, and consensus) during pregnancy and at six months postpartum. Data were analyzed using multilevel models to account for interdependence within dyads. Discrepant smoking patterns were associated with a reduction in satisfaction and cohesion over time (B = -1.14, p = 0.03, and, B = -2.74, p = 0.03, respectively), and a reduction in consensus over time for female participants, B = -1.98, p = 0.07, but not for male participants, p = 0.51. Discrepant smoking was not related to affectional expression, p = 0.11. Results suggest relationship benefits concordant smoking patterns during pregnancy. Interventions should consider potential unintended relationship consequences of changing individual health behavior and instead work to develop couple-level health interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Concordance between vocal and genetic diversity in crested gibbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gibbons or small apes are, next to great apes, our closest living relatives, and form the most diverse group of contemporary hominoids. A characteristic trait of gibbons is their species-specific song structure, which, however, exhibits a certain amount of inter- and intra-individual variation. Although differences in gibbon song structure are routinely applied as taxonomic tool to identify subspecies and species, it remains unclear to which degree acoustic and phylogenetic differences are correlated. To trace this issue, we comparatively analyse song recordings and mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence data from 22 gibbon populations representing six of the seven crested gibbon species (genus Nomascus. In addition, we address whether song similarity and geographic distribution can support a recent hypothesis about the biogeographic history of crested gibbons. Results The acoustic analysis of 92 gibbon duets confirms the hypothesised concordance between song structure and phylogeny. Based on features of male and female songs, we can not only distinguish between N. nasutus, N. concolor and the four southern species (N. leucogenys, N. siki, N. annamensis, N. gabriellae, but also between the latter by applying more detailed analysis. In addition to the significant correlation between song structure and genetic similarity, we find a similar high correlation between song similarity and geographic distance. Conclusions The results show that the structure of crested gibbon songs is not only a reliable tool to verify phylogenetic relatedness, but also to unravel geographic origins. As vocal production in other nonhuman primate species appears to be evolutionarily based, it is likely that loud calls produced by other species can serve as characters to elucidate phylogenetic relationships.

  9. Intra and interobserver concordance between the different classifications used in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cicone Liggieri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the intra and interobserver concordance rates of the Waldenström, Catterall and Herring classifications for Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. METHODS: One hundred radiographs of the pelvis in anteroposterior and Lauenstein views, from patients with this disease, were selected. The radiographs were classified by four physicians with different levels of experience who had previously been given guidance regarding the classifications used, in order to minimize any bias of interpretation. The radiographs were examined by the same observers at two different times in order to evaluate the intra and interobserver concordance. Reproducibility was assessed using the kappa index. RESULTS: The concordance analysis was stratified into levels (poor, slight, fair, moderate, good and excellent. The intraobserver analysis showed, for the Waldenström classification, moderate concordance for three examiners and fair for one; for Herring, excellent for one examiner and good for three; and for Catterall, good for all the examiners. The interobserver analysis showed: for the three classification systems, no situations of excellent concordance; for Waldenström, four situations of fair concordance, one moderate and one slight; for Herring, four situations of moderate concordance, one good and one fair; and for Catterall, four situations of moderate concordance and two fair. CONCLUSION: The classifications studied are the ones most used for guiding the treatment for Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, but the degree of intra and interobserver concordance is far from ideal. Complementary staging systems need to be taken into consideration, so that there can be greater certainty regarding the treatment.

  10. NDRC: A Disease-Causing Genes Prioritized Method Based on Network Diffusion and Rank Concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minghong; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; He, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    Disease-causing genes prioritization is very important to understand disease mechanisms and biomedical applications, such as design of drugs. Previous studies have shown that promising candidate genes are mostly ranked according to their relatedness to known disease genes or closely related disease genes. Therefore, a dangling gene (isolated gene) with no edges in the network can not be effectively prioritized. These approaches tend to prioritize those genes that are highly connected in the PPI network while perform poorly when they are applied to loosely connected disease genes. To address these problems, we propose a new disease-causing genes prioritization method that based on network diffusion and rank concordance (NDRC). The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross validation on 1931 diseases in which at least one gene is known to be involved, and it is able to rank the true causal gene first in 849 of all 2542 cases. The experimental results suggest that NDRC significantly outperforms other existing methods such as RWR, VAVIEN, DADA and PRINCE on identifying loosely connected disease genes and successfully put dangling genes as potential candidate disease genes. Furthermore, we apply NDRC method to study three representative diseases, Meckel syndrome 1, Protein C deficiency and Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger). Our study has also found that certain complex disease-causing genes can be divided into several modules that are closely associated with different disease phenotype.

  11. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  12. Global Data Grid Efforts for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Gardner, R.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past two years computational data grids have emerged as a promising new technology for large scale, data-intensive computing required by the LHC experiments, as outlined by the recent "Hoffman" review panel that addressed the LHC computing challenge. The problem essentially is to seamlessly link physicists to petabyte-scale data and computing resources, distributed worldwide, and connected by high-bandwidth research networks. Several new collaborative initiatives in Europe, the United States, and Asia have formed to address the problem. These projects are of great interest to ATLAS physicists and software developers since their objective is to offer tools that can be integrated into the core ATLAS application framework for distributed event reconstruction, Monte Carlo simulation, and data analysis, making it possible for individuals and groups of physicists to share information, data, and computing resources in new ways and at scales not previously attempted. In addition, much of the distributed IT...

  13. High concordance between two companion diagnostics tests: a concordance study between the HercepTest and the HER2 FISH pharmDx kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Trøst; Møller, Susanne; Rasmussen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    The present study was done to investigate the concordance between the HER2 status measured by immunohistochemical analysis (HercepTest, DAKO, Carpinteria, CA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH; HER2 FISH pharmDx, DAKO) in a large study cohort (n = 681) of patients with high-risk breast......), the agreement increased to 95.0% with a κ coefficient of 0.90. When the cutoff value for amplified/nonamplified cases in the HER2 FISH assay was increased from 2.0 to 2.2 as recommended in the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines, the concordance between the 2 assays...

  14. ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    Capeans, M.

    Starting on 17th May, the ATLAS TRT 2002 Workshop was organised by Ken MacFarlane and his team at Hampton University, Virginia, USA. During a welcome break in the very dense workshop programme, the group enjoyed a half-day long boat trip along the waterways, offering a first-hand look at the history and heritage of this part of America. The attendance during the six-day workshop was about 50 people representing most of the collaborating institutes, although many Russian colleagues had stayed in their institutes to pursue the start-up of end-cap wheel production at PNPI and DUBNA. The meeting clearly showed that, during the year 2002, the TRT community is focusing on final design issues and module/wheel construction, while moving at the same time towards acceptance testing and integration, including the front-end electronics. The two main topics treated at the workshop were the preparation for beginning full production of the FE electronics, and the wire-joint problem that the US barrel colleagues have been fa...

  15. ATLAS Transition Region Upgrade at Phase-1

    CERN Document Server

    Song, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the L1 Muon trigger transition region (1.0<|ƞ|<1.3) upgrade of ATLAS Detector at phase-1. The high fake trigger rate in the Endcap region 1.0<|ƞ|<2.4 would become a serious problem for the ATLAS L1 Muon trigger system at high luminosity. For the region 1.3<|ƞ|<2.4, covered by the Small Wheel, ATLAS is enhancing the present muon trigger by adding local fake rejection and track angle measurement capabilities. To reduce the rate in the remaining ƞ interval it has been proposed a similar enhancement by adding at the edge of the inner barrel a structure of 3-layers RPCs of a new generation. These RPCs will be based on a thinner gas gap and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standards, a new high performance Front End, integrating fast TDC capabilities, and a new low profile and light mechanical structure allowing the installation in the tiny space available.This design effectively suppresses fake triggers by making the coincidence with both end-cap and interaction point...

  16. ATLAS Offline Data Quality Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Adelman, J; Boelaert, N; D'Onofrio, M; Frost, J A; Guyot, C; Hauschild, M; Hoecker, A; Leney, K J C; Lytken, E; Martinez-Perez, M; Masik, J; Nairz, A M; Onyisi, P U E; Roe, S; Schatzel, S; Schaetzel, S; Wilson, M G

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider reads out 100 Million electronic channels at a rate of 200 Hz. Before the data are shipped to storage and analysis centres across the world, they have to be checked to be free from irregularities which render them scientifically useless. Data quality offline monitoring provides prompt feedback from full first-pass event reconstruction at the Tier-0 computing centre and can unveil problems in the detector hardware and in the data processing chain. Detector information and reconstructed proton-proton collision event characteristics are distilled into a few key histograms and numbers which are automatically compared with a reference. The results of the comparisons are saved as status flags in a database and are published together with the histograms on a web server. They are inspected by a 24/7 shift crew who can notify on-call experts in case of problems and in extreme cases signal data taking abort.

  17. Physical activity and concordance between objective and perceived walkability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Daniel; Kawakami, Naomi; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-02-01

    The study's purpose was to investigate concordance between objective and perceived neighborhood walkability, their associations with self-reported walking and objective physical activity, and sociodemographic characteristics of individuals in neighborhoods with objectively assessed high walkability who misperceive it as low. In 1925 individuals age 20-66 yr of both high and low neighborhood walkability recruited from administrative areas in the city of Stockholm, Sweden, objective neighborhood walkability was assessed within a 1000-m radius of each individual's residential address using geographic information systems. Perceived walkability was based on the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale. Walking was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and total physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were assessed by an accelerometer (ActiGraph). Sociodemographic characteristics were self-reported. Objective and perceived neighborhood walkability agreed in 67.0% of the individuals, with κ = 0.34 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.30-0.38). One-third of the individuals in neighborhoods with objectively assessed high walkability misperceived it as low. This nonconcordance was more common among older and married/cohabiting individuals. After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, high objective neighborhood walkability was associated with 35.0 (95% CI = 14.6-64.6) and 10.5 (95% CI = -5.2 to 28.5) more minutes per week of walking for transportation and leisure, respectively, and 2.8 (95% CI = 0.9-5.0) more minutes per day of MVPA. High perceived neighborhood walkability was associated with 41.5 (95% CI = 15.8-62.9) and 21.8 (95% CI = 2.8-40.0) more minutes per week of walking for transportation and leisure, respectively, and 1.7 (95% CI = -0.3 to 3.7) more minutes per day of MVPA. Objective and perceived neighborhood walkability both contribute to the amount of walking and objective physical activity. Both

  18. Patient-clinician concordance, face-time and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, James E; Drew, Mark A; Kimball, Alexa Boer

    2014-01-01

    People in socially disadvantageous positions may receive less time with their clinicians and consequently reduced access to healthcare resources, potentially magnifying health disparities. Socio-cultural characteristics of clinicians and patients may influence the time spent together. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between clinician/patient time and clinician and patient characteristics using real-time location systems (RTLS). In the MGH/MGPO Outpatient RFID (radio-frequency identification) project clinicians and patients wore RTLS tags during the workday to measure face-time (FT), the duration patients and clinicians are co-located, wait time (WT); i.e. from registration to clinical encounter and flow time (FLT) from registration to discharge. Demographic data were derived from the health system's electronic medical record (EMR). The RTLS and EMR data were synthesized and analyzed using standard structured-query language and statistical analytic methods. From January 1, 2009 to January 1, 2011, 1,593 clinical encounters were associated with RTLS measured FTs, which differed with socioeconomic status and gender: women and lower income people received greater FT. WT was significantly longer for lower socioeconomic patients and for patients seeing trainee clinicians, women or majority ethnic group clinicians (Caucasian). FLT was shortest for men, higher socioeconomic status and for attending physician patients. Demographic concordance between patient and clinician did not significantly affect process times. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using RTLS to capture clinically relevant process measures and suggests that the clinical delivery system surrounding a clinical encounter may more significantly influence access to clinician time than individual patient and clinician characteristics. Applying RTLS to healthcare is coming. We can now successfully install and run these systems in healthcare settings and extract useful information

  19. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - EnviroAtlas Community Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  20. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  1. Expertise in video game playing is associated with reduced valence-concordant emotional expressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, André; Strobach, Tilo; Schubert, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    In carefully selected groups of video game playing (VGP) experts and nonexperts, we examined valence-concordant emotional expressivity. We measured electromyographic (EMG) activity over the corrugator supercilii muscle while participants viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures. Potential group differences concerning valence-concordant expressivity may arise from differences concerning the participants' emotional reactivity. To control for such differences, we concomitantly measured skin conductance response (SCR) and, in a separate affect misattribution procedure (AMP), valence transfer from the same set of stimuli. Importantly, we found attenuated valence-concordant EMG activity over the corrugator supercilii muscle in VGP experts compared to nonexperts, but no differences were evident concerning SCR or valence transfer in the AMP. The findings suggest that expertise in VGP is particularly associated with reduced valence-concordant emotional expressivity. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  2. Trapped in a Loveless Marriage: The Anglo–French Concorde Crisis of 1974

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sakade, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    .... Britain and France joined forces in a 1962 treaty and embarked upon development of the SST-based Concorde with the goal of taking the lead in international air travel and restoring Europe to its former glory...

  3. Concordance of Mother-Daughter Diurnal Cortisol Production: Understanding the Intergenerational Transmission of Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoult, Joelle; Chen, Michael C.; Foland-Ross, Lara C.; Burley, Hannah W.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research is demonstrating concordance between mother and child diurnal cortisol production. In the context of maternal history of depression, intergenerational concordance of cortisol production could contribute to hypercortisolemia in children of depressed mothers, which has been shown to increase risk for MDD. The current study is the first to examine concordance in diurnal cortisol production between mothers with a history of depression and their never-depressed, but high-risk, children. We collected salivary cortisol across two days from mothers with (remitted; RMD) and without (CTL) a history of recurrent episodes of depression and their never-depressed daughters. As expected, RMD mothers and their daughters both exhibited higher cortisol production than did their CTL counterparts. Moreover, both across and within groups, mothers’ and daughters’ cortisol production was directly coupled. These findings suggest that there is an intergenerational concordance in cortisol dysregulation that may contribute to hypercortisolemia in girls at familial risk for depression. PMID:25862380

  4. Let's talk about medication: concordance in rating medication adherence among multimorbid patients and their general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ose, D.; Mahler, C.; Vogel, I.; Ludt, S.; Szecsenyi, J.; Freund, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication adherence can be essential for improving health outcomes. Patients with multiple chronic conditions, often receiving multiple medications, are at higher risk for medication nonadherence. Previous research has focused on concordance between patients and providers about which

  5. 2011 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic Lidar: Concord River Watershed, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Concord AOI consists of one area. Ground Control is collected throughout the AOI for use in the processing of LiDAR data to ensure data accurately represents the...

  6. 2010 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic Lidar: Concord River Watershed, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Concord AOI consists of one area. Ground Control is collected throughout the AOI for use in the processing of LiDAR data to ensure data accurately represents the...

  7. ATLAS Event - First Splash of Particles in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2008-01-01

    A simulated event. September 10, 2008 - The ATLAS detector lit up as a flood of particles traversed the detector when the beam was occasionally directed at a target near ATLAS. This allowed ATLAS physicists to study how well the various components of the detector were functioning in preparation for the forthcoming collisions. The first ATLAS data recorded on September 10, 2008 is seen here. Running time 24 seconds

  8. Decision-Making in Pediatric Transport Team Dispatch Using Script Concordance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapreyar, Prakadeshwari; Marcdante, Karen; Zhang, Liyun; Simpson, Pippa; Meyer, Michael T

    2017-11-01

    Our objective was to compare decision-making in dispatching pediatric transport teams by Medical Directors of pediatric transport teams (serving as experts) to that of Pediatric Intensivists and Critical Care fellows who often serve as Medical Control physicians. Understanding decision-making around team composition and dispatch could impact clinical management, cost effectiveness, and educational needs. Survey was developed using Script Concordance Testing guidelines. The survey contained 15 transport case vignettes covering 20 scenarios (45 questions). Eleven scenarios assessed impact of intrinsic patient factors (e.g., procedural needs), whereas nine assessed extrinsic factors (e.g., weather). Pediatric Critical Care programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (the United States). Pediatric Intensivists and senior Critical Care fellows at Pediatric Critical Care programs were the target population with Transport Medical Directors serving as the expert panel. None. Survey results were scored per Script Concordance Testing guidelines. Concordance within groups was assessed using simple percentage agreement. There was little concordance in decision-making by Transport Medical Directors (median Script Concordance Testing percentage score [interquartile range] of 33.9 [30.4-37.3]). In addition, there was no statistically significant difference between the median Script Concordance Testing scores among the senior fellows and Pediatric Intensivists (31.1 [29.6-33.2] vs 29.7 [28.3-32.3], respectively; p = 0.12). Transport Medical Directors were more concordant on reasoning involving intrinsic patient factors rather than extrinsic factors (10/21 vs 4/24). Our study demonstrates pediatric transport team dispatch decision-making discordance by pediatric critical care physicians of varying levels of expertise and experience. Script Concordance Testing at a local level may better elucidate standards in medical decision-making within

  9. Investigating spousal concordance of diabetes through statistical analysis and data mining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Spousal clustering of diabetes merits attention. Whether old-age vulnerability or a shared family environment determines the concordance of diabetes is also uncertain. This study investigated the spousal concordance of diabetes and compared the risk of diabetes concordance between couples and noncouples by using nationally representative data.A total of 22,572 individuals identified from the 2002-2013 National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan constituted 5,643 couples and 5,643 noncouples through 1:1 dual propensity score matching (PSM. Factors associated with concordance in both spouses with diabetes were analyzed at the individual level. The risk of diabetes concordance between couples and noncouples was compared at the couple level. Logistic regression was the main statistical method. Statistical data were analyzed using SAS 9.4. C&RT and Apriori of data mining conducted in IBM SPSS Modeler 13 served as a supplement to statistics.High odds of the spousal concordance of diabetes were associated with old age, middle levels of urbanization, and high comorbidities (all P < 0.05. The dual PSM analysis revealed that the risk of diabetes concordance was significantly higher in couples (5.19% than in noncouples (0.09%; OR = 61.743, P < 0.0001.A high concordance rate of diabetes in couples may indicate the influences of assortative mating and shared environment. Diabetes in a spouse implicates its risk in the partner. Family-based diabetes care that emphasizes the screening of couples at risk of diabetes by using the identified risk factors is suggested in prospective clinical practice interventions.

  10. The concordance of directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes and physical activity adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Daniel P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Physical activity (PA adoption is essential for obesity prevention and control, yet ethnic minority women report lower levels of PA and are at higher risk for obesity and its comorbidities compared to Caucasians. Epidemiological studies and ecologic models of health behavior suggest that built environmental factors are associated with health behaviors like PA, but few studies have examined the association between built environment attribute concordance and PA, and no known studies have examined attribute concordance and PA adoption. Purpose The purpose of this study was to associate the degree of concordance between directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes with changes in PA over time among African American and Hispanic Latina women participating in a PA intervention. Method Women (N = 410 completed measures of PA at Time 1 (T1 and Time 2 (T2; environmental data collected at T1 were used to compute concordance between directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes. The association between changes in PA and the degree of concordance between each directly and indirectly measured environmental attribute was assessed using repeated measures analyses. Results There were no significant associations between built environment attribute concordance values and change in self-reported or objectively measured PA. Self-reported PA significantly increased over time (F(1,184 = 7.82, p = .006, but this increase did not vary by ethnicity or any built environment attribute concordance variable. Conclusions Built environment attribute concordance may not be associated with PA changes over time among minority women. In an effort to promote PA, investigators should clarify specific built environment attributes that are important for PA adoption and whether accurate perceptions of these attributes are necessary, particularly among the vulnerable population of minority women.

  11. Aligning conservation goals: are patterns of species richness and endemism concordant at regional scales?

    OpenAIRE

    Ricketts, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation strategies commonly target areas of high species richness and/or high endemism. However, the correlation between richness and endemism at scales relevant to conservation is unclear; these two common goals of conservation plans may therefore be in conflict. Here the spatial concordance between richness and endemism is tested using five taxa in North America: butterflies, birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. This concordance is also tested using overall indices of...

  12. Concordance of visual and manipulative responses to novel and familiar stimuli: a reply to Rubenstein (1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, H R

    1975-03-01

    Rubenstein's failure to find evidence for the previously suggested lack of concordance between visual and manipulative responses to novel and familiar stimuli in 6-month-old infants is discussed. It is shown that a lack of concordance is not specific to the use of 1 measure of manipulative behavior, and other possible explanations for the discrepancy in findings are examined. A 2-stage development of responsiveness to familiarity-novelty in infancy remains the most plausible account.

  13. Sleep-Wake Concordance in Couples Is Inversely Associated With Cardiovascular Disease Risk Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Heather E; Buysse, Daniel J; Matthews, Karen A; Kline, Christopher E; Cribbet, Matthew R; Troxel, Wendy M

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether interdependence in couples' sleep (sleep-wake concordance i.e., whether couples are awake or asleep at the same time throughout the night) is associated with two markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and systemic inflammation. This community-based study is a cross-sectional analysis of 46 adult couples, aged 18-45 years, without known sleep disorders. Percent sleep-wake concordance, the independent variable, was calculated for each individual using actigraphy. Ambulatory BP monitors measured BP across 48 h. Dependent variables included mean sleep systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP), mean wake SBP and DBP, sleep-wake SBP and DBP ratios, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Mixed models were used and were adjusted for age, sex, education, race, and body mass index. Higher sleep-wake concordance was associated with lower sleep SBP (b = -.35, SE = .01) and DBP (b = -.22, SE = .10) and lower wake SBP (b = -.26, SE = .12; all p values sleep-wake concordance also had lower CRP values (b = -.15, SE = .03, p Sleep-wake concordance was not associated with wake DBP or sleep/wake BP ratios. Significant findings remained after controlling for individual sleep quality, duration, and wake after sleep onset. Sleep-wake concordance was associated with sleep BP, and this association was stronger for women. Higher sleep-wake concordance was associated with lower systemic inflammation for men and women. Sleep-wake concordance may be a novel mechanism by which marital relationships are associated with long-term CVD outcomes.

  14. How to review 4 million lines of ATLAS code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graeme A.; Lampl, Walter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    As the ATLAS Experiment prepares to move to a multi-threaded framework (AthenaMT) for Run3, we are faced with the problem of how to migrate 4 million lines of C++ source code. This code has been written over the past 15 years and has often been adapted, re-written or extended to the changing requirements and circumstances of LHC data taking. The code was developed by different authors, many of whom are no longer active, and under the deep assumption that processing ATLAS data would be done in a serial fashion. In order to understand the scale of the problem faced by the ATLAS software community, and to plan appropriately the significant efforts posed by the new AthenaMT framework, ATLAS embarked on a wide ranging review of our offline code, covering all areas of activity: event generation, simulation, trigger, reconstruction. We discuss the difficulties in even logistically organising such reviews in an already busy community, how to examine areas in sufficient depth to learn key areas in need of upgrade, yet also to finish the reviews in a timely fashion. We show how the reviews were organised and how the ouptuts were captured in a way that the sub-system communities could then tackle the problems uncovered on a realistic timeline. Further, we discuss how the review has inuenced the overall planning for the Run 3 ATLAS offline code.

  15. Evaluation of atlas-based auto-segmentation software in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenham, Stuart, E-mail: stuart.greenham@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour Health Campus, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales (Australia); Dean, Jenna [North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie Health Campus, Port Macquarie, New South Wales (Australia); Fu, Cheuk Kuen Kenneth [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore Health Campus, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia); Goman, Joanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Mulligan, Jeremy [North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie Health Campus, Port Macquarie, New South Wales (Australia); Tune, Deanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour Health Campus, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales (Australia); Sampson, David [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore Health Campus, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia); Westhuyzen, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour Health Campus, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales (Australia); McKay, Michael [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore Health Campus, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour Health Campus, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    The performance and limitations of an atlas-based auto-segmentation software package (ABAS; Elekta Inc.) was evaluated using male pelvic anatomy as the area of interest. Contours from 10 prostate patients were selected to create atlases in ABAS. The contoured regions of interest were created manually to align with published guidelines and included the prostate, bladder, rectum, femoral heads and external patient contour. Twenty-four clinically treated prostate patients were auto-contoured using a randomised selection of two, four, six, eight or ten atlases. The concordance between the manually drawn and computer-generated contours were evaluated statistically using Pearson's product–moment correlation coefficient (r) and clinically in a validated qualitative evaluation. In the latter evaluation, six radiation therapists classified the degree of agreement for each structure using seven clinically appropriate categories. The ABAS software generated clinically acceptable contours for the bladder, rectum, femoral heads and external patient contour. For these structures, ABAS-generated volumes were highly correlated with ‘as treated’ volumes, manually drawn; for four atlases, for example, bladder r = 0.988 (P < 0.001), rectum r = 0.739 (P < 0.001) and left femoral head r = 0.560 (P < 0.001). Poorest results were seen for the prostate (r = 0.401, P < 0.05) (four atlases); however this was attributed to the comparison prostate volume being contoured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rather than computed tomography (CT) data. For all structures, increasing the number of atlases did not consistently improve accuracy. ABAS-generated contours are clinically useful for a range of structures in the male pelvis. Clinically appropriate volumes were created, but editing of some contours was inevitably required. The ideal number of atlases to improve generated automatic contours is yet to be determined.

  16. A concordance-based study to assess doctors' and nurses' mental models in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondon, Katherine S; Chan, K C Gary; Muller-Juge, Virginie; Cullati, Stéphane; Hudelson, Patricia; Maître, Fabienne; Vu, Nu V; Savoldelli, Georges L; Nendaz, Mathieu R

    2017-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration between doctors and nurses is based on team mental models, in particular for each professional's roles. Our objective was to identify factors influencing concordance on the expectations of doctors' and nurses' roles and responsibilities in an Internal Medicine ward. Using a dataset of 196 doctor-nurse pairs (14x14 = 196), we analyzed choices and prioritized management actions of 14 doctors and 14 nurses in six clinical nurse role scenarios, and in five doctor role scenarios (6 options per scenario). In logistic regression models with a non-nested correlation structure, we evaluated concordance among doctors and nurses, and adjusted for potential confounders (including prior experience in Internal Medicine, acuteness of case and gender). Concordance was associated with number of female professionals (adjusted OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.73), for acute situations (adjusted OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.13 to 3.62), and in doctor role scenarios (adjusted OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.65). Prior experience and country of training were not significant predictors of concordance. In conclusion, our concordance-based approach helped us identify areas of lower concordance in expected doctor-nurse roles and responsibilities, particularly in non-acute situations, which can be targeted by future interprofessional, educational interventions.

  17. Language concordance, interpersonal care, and diabetes self-care in rural Latino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detz, Alissa; Mangione, Carol M; Nunez de Jaimes, Fatima; Noguera, Christine; Morales, Leo S; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Moreno, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Interpersonal care (IPC) is increasingly emphasized as health care systems focus on implementing patient-centered care. Language barriers may be a particularly important influence on IPC ratings among rural Spanish-speaking Latinos. To examine the associations between provider Spanish fluency and Spanish-speaking patients' ratings of IPC and between patient-provider language concordance and patient engagement in diabetes self-care activities. Cross-sectional survey combined with chart reviews. Two hundred fifty Latino adults with diabetes receiving care at safety-net community health centers in two rural California counties. Using a validated questionnaire, we assessed patient ratings of IPC in three areas: communication, decision-making, and interpersonal style. Patient-provider language concordance was measured by physician self-reported fluency in Spanish. We measured participation in diabetes self-care activities by patient self-report. The survey response rate was 68%. Patients with language-concordant providers had more favorable IPC ratings (20% to 41% of language-discordant patients had optimal scores for IPC scales vs. 35% to 69% of language-concordant patients, p activities. This study provides evidence that language concordance is independently associated with high IPC scores in rural Latino adults with diabetes. Moreover, this study suggests that language concordance may contribute to improved participation diabetes self-care activities.

  18. Characteristics of Cigarette Smoking in Individuals in Smoking Concordant and Smoking Discordant Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Erin M; Borrelli, Belinda

    2017-06-01

    Partner smoking status may impact smoking cessation outcomes. The purpose of this study is to compare smokers in smoking concordant couples (both partners smoke) to smokers in smoking discordant couples (one partner smokes) on variables that have been shown to be important for quitting smoking. Participants were 123 cigarette smokers with cohabitating romantic partners (smoking discordant: n=60, smoking concordant: n=63, 63.9% females). We used one-way MANCOVA, controlling for age and number of cigarettes smoked/day, to examine differences between groups on smoking outcome expectancies, motivation to quit smoking, and dyadic efficacy to quit smoking. We examined smoking behavior in a series of exploratory analyses. We found a significant multivariate difference between individuals in smoking concordant and discordant couples (p < .05) such that 20.3% of the variation in the linear combination of dependent variables was accounted for by group membership. Follow-up univariate ANCOVA analyses indicated that those in smoking discordant couples reported greater positive outcome expectancies for cigarettes with regard to facilitating social situations and reducing boredom than those in the smoking concordant group. Participants in smoking concordant couples smoked more cigarettes when their partners were present, fewer cigarettes without their partners present, and were more likely to prefer that their partner be involved in their smoking cessation treatment than those in smoking discordant couples. The results of this study may guide the development of smoking cessation interventions that attend to the unique needs of smoking concordant and discordant couples.

  19. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient-provider language concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nosaiba; Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients' discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient-provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0-100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient-provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients' discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients.

  20. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  1. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN, Building 40 Interview with theorist Mr. Philip Hinchliffe (Berkeley) as well an interview with his wife Mrs. Hinchliffe who is also Physics Department head at Berkeley. They are both working in ATLAS Experiment.

  2. Lunar Sample Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sample Atlas provides pictures of the Apollo samples taken in the Lunar Sample Laboratory, full-color views of the samples in microscopic thin-sections,...

  3. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    ATLAS Physics Workshop at the University of Roma Tre held from Monday 06 June 2005 to Saturday 11 June 2005. Experts establishing workshop, poster, people milling Shots of Peter Jenni introduction Many audience shots Sequences from various talks

  4. The Latest from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Since November 2008, ATLAS has undertaken detailed maintenance, consolidation and repair work on the detector (see Bulletin of 20 July 2009). Today, the fraction of the detector that is operational has increased compared to last year: less than 1% of dead channels for most of the sub-systems. "We are going to start taking data this year with a detector which is even more efficient than it was last year," agrees ATLAS Spokesperson, Fabiola Gianotti. By mid-September the detector was fully closed again, and the cavern sealed. The magnet system has been operated at nominal current for extensive periods over recent months. Once the cavern was sealed, ATLAS began two weeks of combined running. Right now, subsystems are joining the run incrementally until the point where the whole detector is integrated and running as one. In the words of ATLAS Technical Coordinator, Marzio Nessi: "Now we really start physics." In parallel, the analysis ...

  5. Consolidated Lunar Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Consolidated Lunar Atlas is a collection of the best photographic images of the moon, including low-oblique photography, full-moon photography, and tabular and...

  6. ATLAS Cavern baseplate

    CERN Multimedia

    It-UDS-Audiovisual Services

    2002-01-01

    This video shows the incredible amounth of iron used for ATLAS cavern. Please look at the related links and also videos that are concerning the civil engineering where you can see even more detailed cavern excavation work.

  7. VT Planning Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Planning Atlas provides easy access to commonly requested land use planning data – the status of local planning and regulation, state designation boundaries and...

  8. Apollo Image Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Apollo Image Atlas is a comprehensive collection of Apollo-Saturn mission photography. Included are almost 25,000 lunar images, both from orbit and from the...

  9. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  10. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  11. ATLAS soft QCD results

    CERN Document Server

    Sykora, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Recent results of soft QCD measurements performed by the ATLAS collaboration are reported. The measurements include total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, inclusive spectra, underlying event and particle correlations in p-p and p-Pb collisions.

  12. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: June ATLAS Plenary Meeting Tutorial on Physics EDM and Tools (June) Freiburg Overview Week Ketevi Assamagan's Tutorial on Analysis Tools Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  13. ATLAS Transitional Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the transitional radiation tracker within the ATLAS detector. Subjects covered include what the tracker is used to measure, its structure, what happens when particles pass through the tracker, how it distinguishes between different types of particles within it.

  14. Budker INP in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Novosibirsk group has proposed a new design for the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter with a constant thickness of absorber plates. This design has signifi- cant advantages compared to one in the Technical Proposal and it has been accepted by the ATLAS Collaboration. The Novosibirsk group is responsible for the fabrication of the precision aluminium structure for the e.m.end-cap calorimeter.

  15. ATLAS Status and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lankford, AJ; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study a broad range of particle physics at the highest available laboratory energies, from measurements of the standard model to searches for new physics beyond the standard model. The status of ATLAS commissioning and the ATLAS physics program will be reported, and physics prospects for the 2010 LHC run will be discussed.

  16. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1999-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. The film has original working sound.

  17. Atlas Fractures and Atlas Osteosynthesis: A Comprehensive Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandziora, Frank; Chapman, Jens R; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Schroeder, Gregory D; Scholz, Matti

    2017-09-01

    Most atlas fractures are the result of compression forces. They are often combined with fractures of the axis and especially with the odontoid process. Multiple classification systems for atlas fractures have been described. For an adequate diagnosis, a computed tomography is mandatory. To distinguish between stable and unstable atlas injury, it is necessary to evaluate the integrity of the transverse atlantal ligament (TAL) by magnetic resonance imaging and to classify the TAL lesion. Studies comparing conservative and operative management of unstable atlas fractures are unfortunately not available in the literature; neither are studies comparing different operative treatment strategies. Hence all treatment recommendations are based on low level evidence. Most of atlas fractures are stable and will be successfully managed by immobilization in a soft/hard collar. Unstable atlas fractures may be treated conservatively by halo-fixation, but nowadays more and more surgeons prefer surgery because of the potential discomfort and complications of halo-traction. Atlas fractures with a midsubstance ligamentous disruption of TAL or severe bony ligamentous avulsion can be treated by a C1/2 fusion. Unstable atlas fractures with moderate bony ligamentous avulsion may be treated by atlas osteosynthesis. Although the evidence for the different treatment strategies of atlas fractures is low, atlas osteosynthesis has the potential to change treatment philosophies. The reasons for this are described in this review.

  18. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD in Adulthood: Concordance and Differences between Self- and Informant Perspectives on Symptoms and Functional Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mörstedt

    Full Text Available Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a severe mental illness, associated with major impairment and a high comorbidity rate. Particularly undiagnosed ADHD in adulthood has serious consequences. Thus, a valid diagnosis is important. In adulthood, the diagnostic process for ADHD is complicated: symptoms may overlap with comorbid disorders, and the onset and progression of the disorder must be reconstructed retrospectively. Guidelines for the diagnostic process recommend the inclusion of additional informant ratings. Research into the relation between self- and informant ratings shows extremely heterogeneous results. The levels of agreement range from low to high. The focus of this study is the concordance and differences between self- and informant ratings on ADHD symptoms and impairments. In this regard, two possible influencing factors (gender and relationship type are also examined. 114 people participated in this study, 77 with an ADHD diagnosis and 37 without a diagnosis. For all participants, either parents or partners also rated ADHD symptoms and impairments. Small to moderate concordance was found between self- and informant ratings, with females being slightly more concordant than males, particularly for ratings of problems with self-concept. Examination of the consistency within a particular perspective showed that people with ADHD seemed to be unaware of the causal relation between ADHD symptoms and their impairments. A close investigation found almost no influence of gender and relationship type on differences within perspectives. Based on these results, the implications for the diagnostic process are that additional informant information is clearly necessary and helpful.

  19. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Adulthood: Concordance and Differences between Self- and Informant Perspectives on Symptoms and Functional Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörstedt, Beatrice; Corbisiero, Salvatore; Bitto, Hannes; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a severe mental illness, associated with major impairment and a high comorbidity rate. Particularly undiagnosed ADHD in adulthood has serious consequences. Thus, a valid diagnosis is important. In adulthood, the diagnostic process for ADHD is complicated: symptoms may overlap with comorbid disorders, and the onset and progression of the disorder must be reconstructed retrospectively. Guidelines for the diagnostic process recommend the inclusion of additional informant ratings. Research into the relation between self- and informant ratings shows extremely heterogeneous results. The levels of agreement range from low to high. The focus of this study is the concordance and differences between self- and informant ratings on ADHD symptoms and impairments. In this regard, two possible influencing factors (gender and relationship type) are also examined. 114 people participated in this study, 77 with an ADHD diagnosis and 37 without a diagnosis. For all participants, either parents or partners also rated ADHD symptoms and impairments. Small to moderate concordance was found between self- and informant ratings, with females being slightly more concordant than males, particularly for ratings of problems with self-concept. Examination of the consistency within a particular perspective showed that people with ADHD seemed to be unaware of the causal relation between ADHD symptoms and their impairments. A close investigation found almost no influence of gender and relationship type on differences within perspectives. Based on these results, the implications for the diagnostic process are that additional informant information is clearly necessary and helpful.

  20. EnviroAtlas Community Boundaries Web Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundaries of all EnviroAtlas Communities. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in each EnviroAtlas...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Austin, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Cleveland, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://enviroatlas.epa.gov/EnviroAtlas). The layers in this web...

  3. Test Management Framework for the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kazarov, Andrei; The ATLAS collaboration; Avolio, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    Test Management Framework for the Data Acquisition of the ATLAS Experiment Data Acquisition (DAQ) of the ATLAS experiment is a large distributed and inhomogeneous system: it consists of thousands of interconnected computers and electronics devices that operate coherently to read out and select relevant physics data. Advanced diagnostics capabilities of the TDAQ control system are a crucial feature which contributes significantly to smooth operation and fast recovery in case of the problems and, finally, to the high efficiency of the whole experiment. The base layer of the verification and diagnostic functionality is a test management framework. We have developed a flexible test management system that allows the experts to define and configure tests for different components, indicate follow-up actions to test failures and describe inter-dependencies between DAQ or detector elements. This development is based on the experience gained with the previous test system that was used during the first three years of th...

  4. Consolidation of cloud computing in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan P.; Domingues Cordeiro, Cristovao Jose; Giordano, Domenico; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; McNab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the first half of LHC Run 2, ATLAS cloud computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS cloud computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vacuum resources, streamlined usage of the Simulation at Point 1 cloud for offline processing, extreme scaling on Amazon compute resources, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Finally, building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in response to problems.

  5. Consolidation of Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224309; The ATLAS collaboration; Cordeiro, Cristovao; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Hover, John; Kouba, Tomas; Love, Peter; Mcnab, Andrew; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Sobie, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first year of LHC Run 2, ATLAS Cloud Computing has undergone a period of consolidation, characterized by building upon previously established systems, with the aim of reducing operational effort, improving robustness, and reaching higher scale. This paper describes the current state of ATLAS Cloud Computing. Cloud activities are converging on a common contextualization approach for virtual machines, and cloud resources are sharing monitoring and service discovery components. We describe the integration of Vac resources, streamlined usage of the High Level Trigger cloud for simulation and reconstruction, extreme scaling on Amazon EC2, and procurement of commercial cloud capacity in Europe. Building on the previously established monitoring infrastructure, we have deployed a real-time monitoring and alerting platform which coalesces data from multiple sources, provides flexible visualization via customizable dashboards, and issues alerts and carries out corrective actions in response to problems. ...

  6. The Fast Simulation Chain for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00399337; The ATLAS collaboration; Marshall, Zach

    2017-01-01

    In order to generate the huge number of Monte Carlo events that will be required by the ATLAS experiment over the next several runs, a very fast simulation is critical. Fast detector simulation alone, however, is insufficient: with very high numbers of simultaneous proton-proton collisions expected in Run 3 and beyond, the digitization (detector response emulation) and event reconstruction time quickly become comparable to the time required for detector simulation. The ATLAS Fast Chain simulation has been developed to solve this problem. Modules are implemented for fast simulation, fast digitization, and fast track reconstruction. The application is sufficiently fast—several orders of magnitude faster than the standard simulation—that the simultaneous proton-proton collisions can be generated during the simulation job, so Pythia8 also runs concurrently with the rest of the algorithms. The Fast Chain has been built to be extremely modular and flexible, so that each sample can be custom-tailored to match th...

  7. The Fast Simulation Chain for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Basalaev, Artem; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In order to generate the huge number of Monte Carlo events that will be required by the ATLAS experiment over the next several runs, a very fast simulation is critical. Fast detector simulation alone, however, is insufficient: with very high numbers of simultaneous proton-proton collisions expected in Run 3 and beyond, the digitization (detector response emulation) and event reconstruction time quickly become comparable to the time required for detector simulation. The ATLAS Fast Chain simulation has been developed to solve this problem. Modules are implemented for fast simulation, fast digitization, and fast track reconstruction. The application is sufficiently fast -- several orders of magnitude faster than the standard simulation -- that the simultaneous proton-proton collisions can be generated during the simulation job, so Pythia8 also runs concurrently with the rest of the algorithms. The Fast Chain has been built to be extremely modular and flexible, so that each sample can be custom-tailored to match ...

  8. Accuracy of script concordance tests in fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nseir, Saad; Elkalioubie, Ahmed; Deruelle, Philippe; Lacroix, Dominique; Gosset, Didier

    2017-02-25

    This investigation aimed to determine the validity of script concordance test (SCT), compared with clinical-case-related short-answer management problems (SAMP), in fourth-year medical students. This retrospective study was conducted at the Medical School of Lille University. Cardiology and gynecology examinations both included 3 SCT and 2 clinical-case-related SAMP.  Final score did not include SCT results, and was out of 20 points. The passing score was ≥10/20. Wilcoxon and McNemar tests were used to compare quantitative and qualitative variables, respectively. Correlation between scores was also analyzed. A total of 519 and 521 students completed SAMP and SCT in cardiology and gynecology, respectively. Cardiology score was significantly higher in SCT than SAMP (mean ± SD 13.5±2.4 versus 11.4±2.6, Wilcoxon test, p<0.001). In gynecology, SCT score was significantly lower than SAMP score (10.8±2.6 versus 11.4±2.7, Wilcoxon test, p=0.001). SCT and SAMP scores were significantly correlated (p <0.05, Pearson's correlation). However, percentage of students with SCT score ≥ 10/20 was similar among those who passed or failed cardiology (327 of 359 (91%) vs 146 of 160 (91%), χ2=0.004, df =1, p=0.952), or gynecology (274 of 379 (65%) vs 84 of 142 (59%), χ2=1.614, df=1, p=0.204) SAMP test. Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.31 and 0.92 for all SCT and SAMP, respectively.  Although significantly correlated, the scores obtained in SCT and SAMP were significantly different in fourth-year medical students. These findings suggest that SCT should not be used for summative purposes in fourth-year medical students.

  9. Concordance and discrepancy in sexual identity, attraction, and behavior among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igartua, Karine; Thombs, Brett D; Burgos, Giovani; Montoro, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Nonheterosexual youth are at greater risk for mental and physical health problems than heterosexual youth. Definitions of nonheterosexual youth, however, are not consistent between studies, variably including sexual identity, attraction, and/or behavior. This study's objective was to describe the concordance and discrepancy between sexual identification, attraction, and behavior in adolescents. A total of 1,951 students aged 14 and older from 14 high schools in Montreal, Quebec, were surveyed anonymously using the Quebec Youth Risk Behaviour Survey. The survey included three items assessing sexual orientation (sexual identity, sexual attraction, sexual behavior). Twelve percent of adolescents (n=237) endorsed at least one measure of nonexclusive heterosexuality. A total of 3.4% reported gay/lesbian or bisexual (GLB) identity (another 3.4% were unsure), 9.0% reported same-gender attraction, and 4.0% same-gender behavior. There was no consistent pattern of overlap between the three measures, and no single dimension effectively captured this population. The question about attraction identified 71%; identity identified 52%; and behavior only 31%. In raw numbers, more heterosexually identified students reported same-gender attraction (n=95) or same-gender behavior (n=33) than GLB-identified students (n=44 and 29, respectively). "Nonheterosexual" youth are a heterogeneous group that cannot be identified accurately using a single question. In both research and clinical settings, the best way to assess sexual orientation, consistent with American Academy of Pediatrics, is to ask multiple questions that address the dimensions of identity, attraction, and behavior. All youth who endorse any combination of nonexclusively heterosexual identity, behavior, or attraction are potentially at risk for the ill effects of direct and indirect discrimination.

  10. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations, Sully Plantation - Report no. 2, Chantilly, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations were studied. The approach is to record the levels of induced vibrations and associated indoor/outdoor noise levels in selected homes, historic and other buildings near Dulles International Airport. Representative data are presented which were recorded at Sully Plantation, Chantilly, Virginia during the periods of May 20 through May 28, 1976, and June 14 through June 17, 1976. Recorded data provide relationships between the vibration levels of windows, walls, floors, and the noise associated with Concorde operations, other aircraft, and nonaircraft events. The results presented are drawn from the combined May-June data base which is considerably larger than the May data base covered. The levels of window, wall and floor vibratory response resulting from Concorde operations are higher than the vibratory levels associated with conventional aircraft. Furthermore, the vibratory responses of the windows are considerably higher than those of the walls and floors. The window response is higher for aircraft than recorded nonaircraft events and exhibits a linear response relationship with the overall sound pressure level. For a given sound pressure level, the Concorde may cause more vibration than a conventional aircraft due to spectral or other differences. However, the responses associated with Concorde appear to be much more dependent upon sound pressure level than spectral or other characteristics of the noise.

  11. Becoming oneself: the central role of self-concordant goal selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Kennon M

    2014-11-01

    Pursuing personal goals is an important way that people organize their behavior and mature as individuals. However, because people are typically unaware of their own implicit motivations and potentials, they may pick goals that do not serve them well. This article suggests that "self-concordant" goal selection is a difficult self-perceptual skill, with important ramifications for thriving. Various means of conceptualizing and measuring goal self-concordance are considered. Then, relevant literature is reviewed to show that goal self-concordance, as assessed by a self-determination theory methodology, is predicted by goal/motive fit; that goal self-concordance in turn predicts more persistent goal effort and, thus, better goal attainment over time; and that self-concordant goal selection is enhanced by personality variables and interpersonal contexts that promote accurate self-insight and personal autonomy. Implications for the nature of the self, the causes of personality thriving and growth, and the free will question are considered. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  12. Effect of Triage Training on Concordance of Triage Level between Triage Nurses and Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzehi, Nezare; Balouchi, Abbas; Sabzevari, Sakineh; Darban, Fatemeh; Khayat, Nastaran Haydari

    2016-05-01

    The transfer of care occurs frequently between emergency medical technicians and emergency ward nurses during which emergency medical technicians transfer the patients from the society to the hospital. This transfer of care often occurs under crowded conditions and in high acuity which would pave the way for a disruption of communication. This study aimed to investigate the effect of training Emergency Severity Index (ESI) triage on concordance of triage level between emergency medical technicians and triage nurses. This interventional study was conducted on all triage nurses and emergency medical technicians in Iranshahr City in winter of 2014. Five triage nurses and 30 emergency medical technicians were included into the study using census. To collect data, Personal Information Form (PIF) and ESI Triage Criterion were used. During the project implementation, patients were separately classified before and after triage training by emergency medical technicians and triage nurses. To analyse the data, kappa coefficient under SPSS 16 statistical software was used. According to the study results, Cohen's kappa concordance coefficient showed that triage concordance between emergency medical technicians and triage nurses before training was 0.20 which was at an unfavorable level. After training, Cohen's kappa concordance coefficient reached 0.62, which showed a desirable level of concordance as well as a significant difference after training. It is recommended to train and use common triage system to facilitate transfer or delivery of care between emergency medical technicians and triage nurses.

  13. Power Estimation for Gene-Longevity Association Analysis Using Concordant Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihua Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical power is one of the major concerns in genetic association studies. Related individuals such as twins are valuable samples for genetic studies because of their genetic relatedness. Phenotype similarity in twin pairs provides evidence of genetic control over the phenotype variation in a population. The genetic association study on human longevity, a complex trait that is under control of both genetic and environmental factors, has been confronted by the small sample sizes of longevity subjects which limit statistical power. Twin pairs concordant for longevity have increased probability for carrying beneficial genes and thus are useful samples for gene-longevity association analysis. We conducted a computer simulation to estimate the power of association study using longevity concordant twin pairs. We observed remarkable power increases in using singletons from longevity concordant twin pairs as cases in comparison with cases of sporadic proband. A similar power would require doubled sample sizes for fraternal twins than for identical twins who are concordant for longevity suggesting that longevity concordant identical twins are more efficient samples than fraternal twins. We also observed an approximate of 2- to 3-fold increase in sample sizes needed for longevity cutoff at age 90 as compared with that at age 95. Overall, our results showed high value of twins in genetic association studies on human longevity.

  14. Power Estimation for Gene-Longevity Association Analysis Using Concordant Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Torben; Christensen, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Statistical power is one of the major concerns in genetic association studies. Related individuals such as twins are valuable samples for genetic studies because of their genetic relatedness. Phenotype similarity in twin pairs provides evidence of genetic control over the phenotype variation in a population. The genetic association study on human longevity, a complex trait that is under control of both genetic and environmental factors, has been confronted by the small sample sizes of longevity subjects which limit statistical power. Twin pairs concordant for longevity have increased probability for carrying beneficial genes and thus are useful samples for gene-longevity association analysis. We conducted a computer simulation to estimate the power of association study using longevity concordant twin pairs. We observed remarkable power increases in using singletons from longevity concordant twin pairs as cases in comparison with cases of sporadic proband. A similar power would require doubled sample sizes for fraternal twins than for identical twins who are concordant for longevity suggesting that longevity concordant identical twins are more efficient samples than fraternal twins. We also observed an approximate of 2- to 3-fold increase in sample sizes needed for longevity cutoff at age 90 as compared with that at age 95. Overall, our results showed high value of twins in genetic association studies on human longevity. PMID:25309757

  15. Final Report of the ATLAS Reconstruction Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Boisvert, V; George, S; Polesello, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rousseau, D

    2003-01-01

    The reconstruction task force has been charged with performing a top-down design iteration on the ATLAS reconstruction software, considering in particular the granularity of algorithms and event data model, and requirements coming from both offine and high level trigger. One important aim is to find where possible common solutions to common problems across LVL2, EF and offine reconstruction.

  16. ATLAS Review Office

    CERN Multimedia

    Szeless, B

    The ATLAS internal reviews, be it the mandatory Production Readiness Reviews, the now newly installed Production Advancement Reviews, or the more and more requested different Design Reviews, have become a part of our ATLAS culture over the past years. The Activity Systems Status Overviews are, for the time being, a one in time event and should be held for each system as soon as possible to have some meaning. There seems to a consensus that the reviews have become a useful project tool for the ATLAS management but even more so for the sub-systems themselves making achievements as well as possible shortcomings visible. One other recognized byproduct is the increasing cross talk between the systems, a very important ingredient to make profit all the systems from the large collective knowledge we dispose of in ATLAS. In the last two months, the first two PARs were organized for the MDT End Caps and the TRT Barrel Modules, both part of the US contribution to the ATLAS Project. Furthermore several different design...

  17. ATLAS: Exceeding all expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    “One year ago it would have been impossible for us to guess that the machine and the experiments could achieve so much so quickly”, says Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The whole chain – from collision to data analysis – has worked remarkably well in ATLAS.   The first LHC proton run undoubtedly exceeded expectations for the ATLAS experiment. “ATLAS has worked very well since the beginning. Its overall data-taking efficiency is greater than 90%”, says Fabiola Gianotti. “The quality and maturity of the reconstruction and simulation software turned out to be better than we expected for this initial stage of the experiment. The Grid is a great success, and right from the beginning it has allowed members of the collaboration all over the world to participate in the data analysis in an effective and timely manner, and to deliver physics results very quickly”. In just a few months of data taking, ATLAS has observed t...

  18. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  19. Multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Fang, A; Nguyen, B T; Raphel, J K; Jagannathan, L; Raghavan, R; Bryan, R N; Miller, G A

    1997-01-01

    For the purpose of developing multiple, complementary, fully labeled electronic brain atlases and an atlas-based neuroimaging system for analysis, quantification, and real-time manipulation of cerebral structures in two and three dimensions, we have digitized, enhanced, segmented, and labeled the following print brain atlases: Co-Planar Stereotaxic Atlas of the Human Brain by Talairach and Tournoux, Atlas for Stereotaxy of the Human Brain by Schaltenbrand and Wahren, Referentially Oriented Cerebral MRI Anatomy by Talairach and Tournoux, and Atlas of the Cerebral Sulci by Ono, Kubik, and Abernathey. Three-dimensional extensions of these atlases have been developed as well. All two- and three-dimensional atlases are mutually preregistered and may be interactively registered with an actual patient's data. An atlas-based neuroimaging system has been developed that provides support for reformatting, registration, visualization, navigation, image processing, and quantification of clinical data. The anatomical index contains about 1,000 structures and over 400 sulcal patterns. Several new applications of the brain atlas database also have been developed, supported by various technologies such as virtual reality, the Internet, and electronic publishing. Fusion of information from multiple atlases assists the user in comprehensively understanding brain structures and identifying and quantifying anatomical regions in clinical data. The multiple brain atlas database and atlas-based neuroimaging system have substantial potential impact in stereotactic neurosurgery and radiotherapy by assisting in visualization and real-time manipulation in three dimensions of anatomical structures, in quantitative neuroradiology by allowing interactive analysis of clinical data, in three-dimensional neuroeducation, and in brain function studies.

  20. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: International Airport Dulles. [studies by Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Finley, T. D.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to assess the noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations. The vibration levels of windows, walls, and floors were measured along with the associated noise levels of Concorde, subsonic aircraft and some nonaircraft events. Test sites included Sully Plantation which is adjacent to Dulles International Airport and three residential homes located in Montgomery County, Maryland. The measured vibration response levels due to Concorde operations were found to be: (1) higher than the levels due to other aircraft, (2) less than the levels due to certain household events which involve direct impulsive loading such as door and window closing, (3) less than criteria levels for building damage, and (4) comparable to levels which are perceptible to people.

  1. Vertical hepatitis C virus transmission is not related to mother-child class-1 HLA concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, C; Indolfi, G; Betti, L; Moriondo, M; Massai, C; Becciolini, L; Bertelli, L; Poggi, G M; De Martino, M; Resti, M

    2007-01-01

    Mother-child human leukocyte antigen (HLA)diversity is protective for vertical transmission of some viruses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of mother-child HLA diversity on hepatitis C virus (HCV) vertical transmission. Forty consecutive HCV infected and 46 consecutive control uninfected children born to HCV-RNA positive mothers were evaluated for HLA class-1 type concordance with their mothers. No significant difference in the degree of HLA concordance was found between HCV infected and uninfected children both when A, B, C (p=0.30) and when only A and B alleles were evaluated (p=0.59). Mother-infant HLA concordance does not affect HCV vertical transmission.

  2. Power Estimation for Gene-Longevity Association Analysis Using Concordant Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kruse, Torben A

    2014-01-01

    Statistical power is one of the major concerns in genetic association studies. Related individuals such as twins are valuable samples for genetic studies because of their genetic relatedness. Phenotype similarity in twin pairs provides evidence of genetic control over the phenotype variation...... in a population. The genetic association study on human longevity, a complex trait that is under control of both genetic and environmental factors, has been confronted by the small sample sizes of longevity subjects which limit statistical power. Twin pairs concordant for longevity have increased probability...... for carrying beneficial genes and thus are useful samples for gene-longevity association analysis. We conducted a computer simulation to estimate the power of association study using longevity concordant twin pairs. We observed remarkable power increases in using singletons from longevity concordant twin pairs...

  3. Enhancing shared decision making through assessment of patient-clinician concordance on decision quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Selby, Warwick; Salkeld, Glenn

    for the latter. The patient’s MDQ scores were .886 and .954 with SWD scores of 1.0 and .8 respectively. (The correlation between MDQ and SWD instruments for the initial 29 patients was 0.70.) Conclusion: Proof of concept and method is presented in relation to the degree of concordance between patient......Purpose: To explore the feasibility and potential of a prescriptive, web-based, decomposable measure of decision quality (MyDecisionQuality (MDQ)); to assess and enhance patient-clinician decision concordance, thereby facilitating more transparent shared decision making and documentation of better...... informed consent. Methods: Data presented are from patient-clinician dyads in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease decision aid study: web (log, MDQ scores, patient comments), interviews (with patients), presentations of the MDQ and concordance measures. Matched sets of MDQ data (Weightings (W) and Ratings (R...

  4. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient–provider language concordance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients’ discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient–provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. Methods This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0–100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Results Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient–provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients’ discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Conclusion Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients. PMID:25075273

  5. Implications of community concordance for assessing stream health at three nested spatial scales in Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolph, Christine L.; Huff, David D.; Chizinski, Christopher J.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2011-01-01

    1. Fish and invertebrate assemblage data collected from 670 stream sites in Minnesota (U.S.A.) were used to calculate concordance across three nested spatial scales (statewide, ecoregion and catchment). Predictive taxa richness models, calibrated using the same data, were used to evaluate whether concordant communities exhibited similar trends in human-induced taxa loss across all three scales. Finally, we evaluated the strength of the relationship between selected environmental variables and the composition of both assemblages at all three spatial scales.

  6. Measurements on Concorde of the Cosmic Radiation Field at Aviation Altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D.T.; Hager, L.G.; Irvine, D.; Bagshaw, M

    2000-07-01

    The results are reported of the first three years of a five year measurement programme of average route doses on board Concorde. Measurements of the complex cosmic radiation field are made with a passive survey meter comprising thermoluminescent detectors and etched track detectors. The 15% determination level for total dose equivalent is 100 {mu}Sv. The evidence is that the passive survey meter provides a reliable determination of route dose. The average route effective dose for a return flight by Concorde between London and New York measured during the period January 1997 to October 1999, was 74 {mu}Sv. (author)

  7. Prevalence, concordance, and heritability of Scheuermann kyphosis based on a study of twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Frank; Engell, Vilhelm; Andersen, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to establish a cohort of symptomatic twins with Scheuermann kyphosis to provide estimates of prevalence, concordance, odds ratio, and heritability. These estimates indicate to what extent genetic factors contribute to the etiology of this disease. METHODS...... with Scheuermann disease by a doctor"? The prevalence of self-reported Scheuermann disease was calculated, with the total number of answers used as the general population. Pairwise and probandwise concordance, odds ratio, tetrachoric correlations, and heritability were calculated. RESULTS: We found...... that the overall prevalence of Scheuermann disease was 2.8%, with a prevalence of 2.1% among women and 3.6% among men (p

  8. CONCEPTUAL PRINCIPLES OF ATLAS GEOENVIRONMENTAL MAPPING OF GEOSPATIAL OBJECTS AND SYSTEMS OF DIFFERENT RANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk I.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses contemporary issues of digital atlas thematic mapping, which has been gaining momentum in recent decades. It shows that the atlas geoenvironmental mapping allows to perform high quality visualization of various spatial and temporal information in dynamic and static states, reflects the geoenvironmental state of objects that vary by rank, trends in its changes, and evaluates the influence of natural and anthropogenic factors on it. Solution to this problem is possible with the correct choice of cartographic service, which can serve as the basis for creating a wide range of interactive digital atlases. Using the ArcGIS Online service allows you to use a larger range of cartographic imagery, which attracts users. At the same time, there are few examples of the creation of atlases of geoenvironmental issues both in paper and in digital form, so the article discusses actual problems in this area. The views of various scientists on the nature of geoenvironmental atlas are characterized. It is shown that atlases of geoenvironmental content should have in their structure basic maps of such subjects: physical geography (hypsometric, geological, tectonic, hydrogeological, geomorphological, soil, hydrological, meteorological, biogeographical, etc.; Socio-economic (demographic, labor resource potential, health, industry, agrogeography, forestry, water management, mining, recreation and tourism, etc.; Ecological (ecology-geomorphological, ecology-geological, hydroecological, soil-ecological, bioecological, landscape-ecological, air pollution, medical-ecological, sanitary-epidemiological, etc.; Applied maps (recommendations aimed at solving geoenvironmental problems, optimizing the use of natural resources and improving living conditions of the population and biota. The article considers the options of atlases classifications and thematic maps that are part of their composition, offered by domestic and foreign authors. The range of

  9. ATLAS production system

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Mikhail; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Klimentov, Alexei; Golubkov, Dmitry; Maeno, Tadashi; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Wenaus, Torre; Padolski, Siarhei

    2016-01-01

    The second generation of the ATLAS production system called ProdSys2 is a distributed workload manager which used by thousands of physicists to analyze the data remotely, with the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, across a more than hundred heterogeneous sites. It achieves high utilization by combining dynamic job definition based on many criterias, such as input and output size, memory requirements and CPU consumption with manageable scheduling policies and by supporting different kind of computational resources, such as GRID, clouds, supercomputers and volunteering computers. Besides jobs definition Production System also includes flexible web user interface, which implements user-friendly environment for main ATLAS workflows, e.g. simple way of combining different data flows, and real-time monitoring, optimised for using with huge amount of information to present. We present an overview of the ATLAS Production System major components: job and task definition, workflow manager web user i...

  10. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Showing excellence in mechanics, electronics and cryogenics, three industries are honoured for their contributions to the ATLAS experiment. Representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony. For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Close interaction with CERN was a key factor in the selection of each rewarded company, in addition to the high-quality products they delivered to the experiment. Alu Menziken Industrie AG, of Switzerland, was honoured for the production of 380,000 aluminium tubes for the Monitored Drift Tube Chambers (MDT). As Giora Mikenberg, the Muon System Project Leader stressed, the aluminium tubes were delivered on time with an extraordinary quality and precision. Between October 2000 and Jan...

  11. Event visualization in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R. M.; Boudreau, J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Moyse, E.; Thomas, J.; Waugh, B. M.; Yallup, D. P.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  12. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211497; The ATLAS collaboration; Boudreau, Joseph; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Martyniuk, Alex; Moyse, Edward; Thomas, Juergen; Waugh, Ben; Yallup, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  13. ATLAS B Physics Reach

    CERN Document Server

    Smizanska, M

    2004-01-01

    The current scope and status of ATLAS B-physics trigger and off-line performance studies are presented. With the initial low-luminosity LHC runnings the high-statistics analyses will allow to make sensitivity tests of possible New physics contributions by searching for additional CP violation effects and for increased probabilities of rare B-decay channels. In physics of Bs meson system there is sensitivity to mass and width differences and to a weak mixing phase beyond SM expectation. ATLAS will be able to access rare B decays using also high-luminosity running. In beauty production ATLAS will perform measurements sensitive to higher order QCD terms providing new data to investigate present inconsistency between theory and experiment.

  14. Analyse d’atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ouvrages de référence, de lecture, d’actualité, les atlas s’adressent à des publics très divers, de l’école à l’université.La Bibliothèque vient de recevoir des publications intéressantes à faire connaître aux lecteurs d’ EchoGéo. Les exemples choisis et analysés illustrent la variété formelle et thématique de ce type de document. L’atlas des atlas : le Monde vu d’ailleurs200 cartes proposées sous la direction de Philippe Thureau-Dangin, Christine Chameau et al. Paris : Arthaud, 2008. 191 p (...

  15. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  16. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  17. ATLAS TDAQ System Administration:

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Christopher Jon; The ATLAS collaboration; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Ballestrero, Sergio; Contescu, Alexandru Cristian; Dubrov, Sergei; Fazio, Daniel; Korol, Aleksandr; Scannicchio, Diana; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Voronkov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system is responsible for the online processing of live data, streaming from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The online farm is composed of ̃3000 servers, processing the data readout from ̃100 million detector channels through multiple trigger levels. During the two years of the first Long Shutdown (LS1) there has been a tremendous amount of work done by the ATLAS TDAQ System Administrators, implementing numerous new software applications, upgrading the OS and the hardware, changing some design philosophies and exploiting the High Level Trigger farm with different purposes. During the data taking only critical security updates are applied and broken hardware is replaced to ensure a stable operational environment. The LS1 provided an excellent opportunity to look into new technologies and applications that would help to improve and streamline the daily tasks of not only the System Administrators, but also of the scientists who wil...

  18. Two ATLAS suppliers honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has recognised the outstanding contribution of two firms to the pixel detector. Recipients of the supplier award with Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, and Maximilian Metzger, CERN Secretary-General.At a ceremony held at CERN on 28 November, the ATLAS collaboration presented awards to two of its suppliers that had produced sensor wafers for the pixel detector. The CiS Institut für Mikrosensorik of Erfurt in Germany has supplied 655 sensor wafers containing a total of 1652 sensor tiles and the firm ON Semiconductor has supplied 515 sensor wafers (1177 sensor tiles) from its foundry at Roznov in the Czech Republic. Both firms have successfully met the very demanding requirements. ATLAS’s huge pixel detector is very complicated, requiring expertise in highly specialised integrated microelectronics and precision mechanics. Pixel detector project leader Kevin Einsweiler admits that when the project was first propo...

  19. The ATLAS Computing Model

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Bee, C P; Hawkings, R; Jarp, S; Jones, R; Malon, D; Poggioli, L; Poulard, G; Quarrie, D; Wenaus, T

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Offline Computing Model is described. The main emphasis is on the steady state, when normal running is established. The data flow from the output of the ATLAS trigger system through processing and analysis stages is analysed, in order to estimate the computing resources, in terms of CPU power, disk and tape storage and network bandwidth, which will be necessary to guarantee speedy access to ATLAS data to all members of the Collaboration. Data Challenges and the commissioning runs are used to prototype the Computing Model and test the infrastructure before the start of LHC operation. The initial planning for the early stages of data-taking is also presented. In this phase, a greater degree of access to the unprocessed or partially processed raw data is envisaged.

  20. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  1. Analysis Preservation in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Kyle; The ATLAS collaboration; Jones, Roger; South, David

    2015-01-01

    Long before data taking ATLAS established a policy that all analyses need to be preserved. In the initial data-taking period, this has been achieved by various tools and techniques. ATLAS is now reviewing the analysis preservation with the aim to bring coherence and robustness to the process and with a clearer view of the level of reproducibility that is reasonably achievable. The secondary aim is to reduce the load on the analysts. Once complete, this will serve for our internal preservation needs but also provide a basis for any subsequent sharing of analysis results with external parties.

  2. Atlas of Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam; Al-Bilbisi, Hussam; al-Muheisen, Zeydoun; al-Nahar, Maysoun; Alaime, Mathieu; Augé, Christian; Azizeh, Wael Abu; Bakhit, Adnan; De Bel-Air, Françoise; Bourke, Stephen; Courcier, Rémy; Crouzel, Isabelle; Daher, Rami; Daradkeh, Saleh Musa; Darmame, Khadija

    2014-01-01

    L’ambition de cet atlas est d’offrir au lecteur des clés d’analyse spatiale des dynamiques sociales, économiques et politiques qui animent la Jordanie, pays exemplaire de la complexité du Moyen-Orient. Produit de sept années de coopération scientifique entre l’Ifpo, le Centre Royal Jordanien de Géographie et l’Université de Jordanie, l’atlas réunit les contributions de 48 chercheurs européens, jordaniens et internationaux. La formation des territoires jordaniens sur le temps long est éclairée...

  3. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m......A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles...

  4. The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M.A.B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Y.S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Navarro, J.E.; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E.N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M.H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S.M.; Gilbert, L.M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; 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Potter, C.J.; Potter, C.T.; Potter, K.P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L.E.; Prichard, P.M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D.R.; Quayle, W.B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A.M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A.L.; Rebuzzi, D.M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R.A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R.R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robertson, S.H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, JEM; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R.D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.A.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F.J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torrence, E.; Torro Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

  5. ATLAS forward physics program

    CERN Document Server

    HELLER, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The variety of forward detectors installed in the vicinity of the ATLAS experiment allows to look over a wide range of forward physics topics. They ensure a good information about rapidity gaps, and the installation of very forward detectors (ALFA and AFP) will allow to tag the leading proton(s) remaining from the different processes studied. Most of the studies have to be done at low luminosity to avoid pile-up, but the AFP project offers a really exiting future for the ATLAS forward physics program. We also present how these forward detectors can be used to measure the relative and absolute luminosity.

  6. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2005-01-01

    CAMERA ON TOROID The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The video is about the slow lowering of the toroid down to the cavern of ATLAS. It is very demanding task. The camera is placed on top of the toroid.

  7. The Herschel ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eales, S.; Dunne, L.; Clements, D.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Ivison, R.; Jarvis, M.; Lagache, G.; Maddox, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel ATLAS is the largest open-time key project that will be carried out on the Herschel Space Observatory. It will survey 570 sq deg of the extragalactic sky, 4 times larger than all the other Herschel extragalactic surveys combined, in five far-infrared and submillimeter bands. We describe the survey, the complementary multiwavelength data sets that will be combined with the Herschel data, and the six major science programs we are undertaking. Using new models based on a previous submillimeter survey of galaxies, we present predictions of the properties of the ATLAS sources in other wave bands.

  8. Improving ATLAS reprocessing software

    CERN Document Server

    Novak, Tadej

    2014-01-01

    For my CERN Summer Student programme I have been working with ATLAS reprocessing group. Data taken at ATLAS experiment is not only processed after being taken, but is also reprocessed multiple times afterwards. This allows applying new alignments, calibration of detector and using improved or faster algorithms. Reprocessing is usually done in campaigns for different periods of data or for different interest groups. The idea of my project was to simplify the definition of tasks and monitoring of their progress. I created a LIST configuration files generator script in Python and a monitoring webpage for tracking current reprocessing tasks.

  9. ATLAS Fast Physics Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Koeneke, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is recording data from proton-proton collisions with 7 TeV center-of-mass energy since spring 2010. The integrated luminosity has grown nearly exponentially since then and continues to rise fast. The ATLAS collaboration has set up a framework to automatically run over the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2-3 days after data taking). Hints of potentially interesting physics signals obtained this way are followed up by physics groups.

  10. Migration of ATLAS PanDA to CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graeme Andrew; Klimentov, Alexei; Koblitz, Birger; Lamanna, Massimo; Maeno, Tadashi; Nevski, Pavel; Nowak, Marcin; Emanuel De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; Wenaus, Torre

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) is a key component of the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS production jobs, and a substantial amount of user and group analysis jobs, pass through the PanDA system, which manages their execution on the grid. PanDA also plays a key role in production task definition and the data set replication request system. PanDA has recently been migrated from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), a process we describe here. We discuss how the new infrastructure for PanDA, which relies heavily on services provided by CERN IT, was introduced in order to make the service as reliable as possible and to allow it to be scaled to ATLAS's increasing need for distributed computing. The migration involved changing the backend database for PanDA from MySQL to Oracle, which impacted upon the database schemas. The process by which the client code was optimised for the new database backend is discussed. We describe the procedure by which the new database infrastructure was tested and commissioned for production use. Operations during the migration had to be planned carefully to minimise disruption to ongoing ATLAS offline computing. All parts of the migration were fully tested before commissioning the new infrastructure and the gradual migration of computing resources to the new system allowed any problems of scaling to be addressed.

  11. ATLAS looks forward to having beams!

    CERN Multimedia

    Hans von der Schmitt

    Lyn Evans, head of the LHC project at CERN, brought very good news: all problems are now solved or understood, and barring a disaster, the LHC should see beams in July 2008. The ATLAS overview week (8-12 October) showed impressively that the experiment is getting ready for beams on all fronts. Perhaps that is best seen in the recent runs with cosmic events, which are integrating all ATLAS subsystems. The integration milestone M4 ended just a month ago (see the article in the September issue of ATLAS e-news), exercising for one week the complete chain from detectors - trigger and data acquisition - reconstruction at Tier0 - shipment of data worldwide to Tier1s. Event displays and histograms, available both online and offline, were shown throughout the overview week and are proof that the entire chain is actually working. The integration milestones give an enormous boost to the experiment - next time during M5 end of October. During the week we learned about successes and remaining issues along this ent...

  12. Concordance in diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel P.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Bonds, Michael D.; Brown, Daniel R.; Edwards, William H.; Weiser, Glen C.; Drew, Mark L.; Briggs, Robert E.; Fox, Karen A.; Miller, Michael W.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Besser, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic tests are essential for disease investigation and management. This is particularly true for diseases of free-ranging wildlife where sampling is logistically difficult precluding retesting. Clinical assays for wildlife diseases frequently vary among laboratories because of lack of appropriate standardized commercial kits. Results of diagnostic testing may also be called into question when investigators report different etiologies for disease outbreaks, despite similar clinical and pathologic findings. To evaluate reliability of diagnostic testing for respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), we conducted a series of ring tests across 6 laboratories routinely involved in detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, Pasteurellaceae, lktA (the Pasteurellaceae gene encoding leukotoxin), and 3 reference laboratories. Consistency of results for replicate samples within laboratories was high (median agreement = 1.0). Agreement between laboratories was high for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of M. ovipneumoniae and culture isolation of Mannheimia spp. and Bibersteinia trehalosi(median agreement = 0.89–0.95, Kappa = 0.65–0.74), and lower for PCR detection of Mannheimiaspp. lktA (median agreement = 0.58, Kappa = 0.12). Most errors on defined status samples were false negatives, suggesting test sensitivity was a greater problem than specificity. However, tests for M. haemolytica and lktA yielded some false positive results. Despite differences in testing protocols, median agreement among laboratories and correct classification of controls for most agents was ≥0.80, meeting or exceeding the standard required by federal proficiency testing programs. This information is valuable for interpreting test results, laboratory quality assessments, and advancing diagnosis of respiratory disease in wild sheep. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Moderate concordance was found between case-only and parallel group designs in systematic comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen; Mulder, Bianca; Hak, Eelko

    Objectives: To empirically evaluate the concordance of effect estimates between case-only and parallel group designs and to identify predictors of discrepancies. Study Design and Setting: MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched through June 31, 2013. Studies that used both a case only (case

  14. Young Learners and Lexical Awareness: Children's Engagement with Wordlists and Concordances

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Sinclair (1991) found that lexical analysis can be overcomplicated, yet Johns (1994) called for investigation into whether corpus analysis can motivate beginners and near-beginners. The findings of this research suggest that young EFL learners can enjoy using corpus analysis tools (wordlists and concordances) to identify, classify, and generalize…

  15. Concordance of autoimmune disease in a nationwide Danish systemic lupus erythematosus twin cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulff-Møller, Constance Jensina; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Viemose, Louise Nørgaard

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the concordance of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and co-aggregating autoimmune diseases among Danish twins. METHODS: SLE-affected twins were ascertained by record linkage between the National Patient Register (NPR) and the Danish Twin Registry (DTR). Registered SLE...

  16. Patient-clinician ethnic concordance and communication in mental health intake visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Margarita; Roter, Debra L; Valentine, Anne; Chen, Chih-nan; Li, Xinliang; Lin, Julia; Rosen, Daniel; Lapatin, Sheri; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Larson, Susan; Shrout, Patrick E

    2013-11-01

    This study examines how communication patterns vary across racial and ethnic patient-clinician dyads in mental health intake sessions and its relation to continuance in treatment, defined as attending the next scheduled appointment. Observational study of communication patterns among ethnically/racially concordant and discordant patient-clinician dyads. Primary analysis included 93 patients with 38 clinicians in race/ethnic concordant and discordant dyads. Communication was coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and the Working Alliance Inventory Observer (WAI-O) bond scale; continuance in care was derived from chart reviews. Latino concordant dyad patients were more verbally dominant (pcommunication (pcommunication variables. When communication, global affect, and therapeutic process variables were adjusted for, differences were reversed and white dyad patients had higher continuance in care rates than other dyad patients. Communication patterns seem to explain the role of ethnic concordance for continuance in care. Improve intercultural communication in cross cultural encounters appears significant for retaining minorities in care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Motor Impairment in Sibling Pairs Concordant and Discordant for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Claudia List; Zhang, Yi; Whilte, Megan R.; Klohr, Cheryl L.; Constantino, John

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Although motor impairment is frequently observed in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the manner in which these impairments aggregate in families affected by autism is unknown. We used a standardized measure of motor proficiency to objectively examine quantitative variation in motor proficiency in sibling pairs concordant and…

  18. Brief Report: On the Concordance Percentages for Autistic Spectrum Disorder of Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Henry V.; Stewart, Melbourne G.

    2009-01-01

    In the development of genetic theories of Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) various characteristics of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins are often considered. This paper sets forth a possible refinement in the interpretation of the MZ twin concordance percentages for ASD underlying such genetic theories, and, drawing the consequences from…

  19. [Inter-rater concordance of the "Nursing Activities Score" in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Matarín, Josefa; Salamero-Amorós, Maria; Roldán-Gil, Carmen; Quintana-Riera, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate inter-rater concordance in the valuation of the "Nursing Activities Score". Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted from December 2012 until June 2013 in a general intensive care unit with twelve beds. Three evaluator nurses, simultaneously and independently, through the patient daily charts, scored the nursing workload using Nursing Activities Score scale in all patients admitted over 18 years old. Three hundreds and thirty-nine records were collected. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) between evaluators was 0.92 (0.89-0.94). A perfect concordance was obtained in 39.1% of the items, with 52.2% having a high, and 8.7% having lower concordance, corresponding to two of the items with multiple scoring options. Significant differences between two of the evaluators (P=.049) were found. Although the inter-rater concordance was high, more accurate records are needed to reduce the variability of the items with multiple options and to allow more accuracy in the interpretation and measurement of the data regarding nursing workload. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Concordance between Measures of Anxiety and Physiological Arousal Following Treatment of Panic Disorder in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacow, Terri Landon; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Choate-Summers, Molly; Pincus, Donna B.; Mattis, Sara G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concordance (or synchrony/desynchrony) between adolescents' self-reports of anxiety and physiological measures of arousal (heart rate) both prior to and after treatment for panic disorder. Results indicated a decline in reported subjective units of distress (SUDS) for the treatment group only at the post-treatment…

  1. Concordance Between Administrator and Clinician Ratings of Organizational Culture and Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Williams, Nathaniel J; Green, Philip D; Aarons, Gregory A; Becker-Haimes, Emily M; Evans, Arthur C; Rubin, Ronnie; Adams, Danielle R; Marcus, Steven C

    2018-01-01

    Organizational culture and climate are important determinants of behavioral health service delivery for youth. The Organizational Social Context measure is a well validated assessment of organizational culture and climate that has been developed and extensively used in public sector behavioral health service settings. The degree of concordance between administrators and clinicians in their reports of organizational culture and climate may have implications for research design, inferences, and organizational intervention. However, the extent to which administrators' and clinicians' reports demonstrate concordance is just beginning to garner attention in public behavioral health settings in the United States. We investigated the concordance between 73 administrators (i.e., supervisors, clinical directors, and executive directors) and 247 clinicians in 28 child-serving programs in a public behavioral health system. Findings suggest that administrators, compared to clinicians, reported more positive cultures and climates. Organizational size moderated this relationship such that administrators in small programs (culture and climate in contrast to administrators in large programs (≥466 youth clients served annually) who reported more positive cultures and climates than clinicians. We propose a research agenda that examines the effect of concordance between administrators and clinicians on organizational outcomes in public behavioral health service settings.

  2. [Evaluation of the concordance between biological markers and clinical activity in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda García, Pablo; Chaparro, María; Gisbert, Javier P

    2015-01-06

    Endoscopy is the gold standard to assess disease severity in inflammatory bowel disease, although it is an invasive procedure. Clinical activity and biological markers have been routinely used to determine disease activity in a non-invasive manner. The aim of this study was to determine concordance between common biological markers (C reactive protein, orosomucoid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, fibrinogen, platelets, leukocytes, neutrophils and haemoglobin) and clinical activity in inflammatory bowel disease. Consecutive patients with inflammatory bowel disease were included. Clinical activity was evaluated according to the Harvey-Bradshaw index in Crohn's disease and to the partial Mayo score in ulcerative colitis. Serum concentrations of the different biomarkers were analysed. Concordance between clinical activity and elevation of the serological biomarkers was determined using the kappa statistic. In total, 350 patients were included (median age 46 years, Crohn's disease 59%). Eleven percent of patients had clinical activity. Crohn's disease patients had mild clinical activity in 44% of cases, moderate disease in 44% and only 12% of patients had severe clinical activity. In ulcerative colitis, patients had mild, moderate and severe clinical activity in 50, 42 and 8% of cases, respectively. None of the biomarkers included had an acceptable concordance with clinical activity (kappa statistic ≤ 0.30). Concordance between serological biomarkers and clinical activity in inflammatory bowel disease is remarkably low. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical growth and cognitive abilities in concordant versus discordant birth weight twins at three years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Gail S; Krauss, Alfred N; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2012-09-01

    Discordant birth weight twins have been shown to have high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes, but little is known about their growth and development. To determine whether smaller and larger birth weight premature twins in concordant and discordant birth weight groups differ on measures of physical growth and intelligence at 3 years. Prospective cohort study. Eight-four children, 52 concordant and 32 discordant birth weight twin pairs, were measured for height, weight, and head circumference and on intelligence at 3 years. Perinatal and demographic variables, including birth weight, head circumference, small for gestational age, zygosity, in vitro fertilization, gender and social class were recorded. Smaller and larger birth weight twins did not differ significantly from each other on any growth parameters in either concordant or discordant birth weight groups at 3 years of age. Smaller birth weight twins in the discordant birth weight group performed significantly less well on Verbal, Performance, and Full Scale IQ scores (Verbal IQ for smaller twins was 8.6 points lower, ptwin differences between larger and smaller birth weight concordant twins. Smaller discordant birth weight twins performed significantly less well on intelligence, although they did not differ significantly from their larger twins on growth parameters at 3 years old. We conclude that smaller discordant birth weight twins had less optimal intra-uterine environments than their larger birth weight twin, which affected both their birth weights and brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Concordance Between Two Methods to Investigate the Sexual Orientation Among Adolescents in Santa Marta, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Campo-Arias

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since sexual minorities are victims of discrimination, it is possible thatteenagers do not accurately report their sexual orientation. There are differencesin the frequency of non-heterosexual behavior according to theway it is investigated; however, concordance between these ways has notbeen explored yet. The objective was to establish the concordance betweentwo ways of researching sexual orientation among students at Santa Marta,Colombia. In this survey, 3575 students participated, 57% were girls, with amean age of 13.6 (SD=1.9, and mean scholarship, of 8.2 years (SD=1.6.Sexual orientation was established by means of direct and indirect questions.Cohen´s kappa showed concordance beyond chance. Observed concordancereached 76.8%, and Cohen’s kappa, 0.368 (95% CI 0.337-0.399.Concordance between the two ways of asking about sexual orientation wasfound to be low. Investigation of sexual orientation should include researchobjectives and result implications as criteria.

  5. Parent/Child Concordance about Bullying Involvement and Family Characteristics Related to Bullying and Peer Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Melissa K.; Kaufman Kantor, Glenda; Finkelhor, David

    2009-01-01

    This study examined parent perspectives on bullying, parent/child concordance about bullying involvement, and family characteristics associated with bullying perpetration and peer victimization. Participants were 205 fifth-grade students and their parents. Students attended an urban, ethnically diverse school district in the Northeast. Youth…

  6. Concordance analysis for QTL detection in dairy cattle: a case study of leg morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Irene; Rodrigue; Fritz, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    The present availability of sequence data gives new opportunities to narrow down from QTL (quantitative trait locus) regions to causative mutations. Our objective was to decrease the number of candidate causative mutations in a QTL region. For this, a concordance analysis was applied for a leg co...

  7. Parent and Teacher Concordance of Child Outcomes for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kelsey S.; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Rieth, Sarah R.; Stahmer, Aubyn C.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-informant ratings of are considered gold standard for child behavioral assessment. To date, little work has examined informant ratings of adaptive functioning for youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In a large, diverse sample of youth with ASD, this study evaluated parent-teacher concordance of ratings of adaptive functioning and…

  8. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.; Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; van der Meer, K; Spreeuwenberg, P.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. Design: Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Participants: Seven hundred and

  9. Patient factors associated with guideline-concordant treatment of anxiety and depression in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.A.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Smolders, M.; Laurant, M.G.H.; Meer, K. van der; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bensing, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify associations of patient characteristics (predisposing, enabling and need factors) with guideline-concordant care for anxiety and depression in primary care. DESIGN: Analysis of data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). PARTICIPANTS: Seven hundred and

  10. [Concordance and usefulness of a stratification system for clinical decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González González, Ana Isabel; Miquel Gómez, Ana María; Rodríguez Morales, David; Hernández Pascual, Montserrat; Sánchez Perruca, Luis; Mediavilla Herrera, Inmaculada

    2017-04-01

    1) To analyse concordance between the level of risk classification using the Adjusted Groups Morbidity (GMA) tool and the assigned level of intervention by general practitioners (GP). 2) To study the usefulness of the GMA tool as an aid in electronic medical records (EMR) for decision making. Cross-sectional observational study of concordance. Primary Care. Madrid Health Service. Twenty eight GPs. A sample of 840 patients assigned to participating GPs was selected by disproportionate stratified random sampling (0.65 kappa, 0.125 precision, 5% positive rate, 95% confidence level). Weighted Cohen Kappa index for the degree of concordance between the GMA tool and the GPs. The usefulness of the tool was assessed using an ad hoc developed questionnaire. Kappa weighted index obtained was 0.60 (95%CI: 0.55-0.65). In 3% of cases the disagreement was maximum. The GPs found that the grouping tool had been useful in 76% of cases. Moderate strength/good concordance; incorporating a grouping tool in the EMR helps as a reminder for taking more proactive/integrated decisions based on social and health needs of people with chronic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 59167 - Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems Division, Concord, CA; Siemens Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems Division... and former workers of Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. (Siemens), Oncology Care Systems Division... of Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems Division, Concord, California (TA-W-73...

  12. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. When passing throw the walls the succeeding can be heard and seen. The film has original working sound.

  13. Validation of undergraduate medical student script concordance test (SCT) scores on the clinical assessment of the acute abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Matthias; Schubach, Fabian; Seifert, Gabriel; Boeker, Martin

    2016-08-17

    Health professionals often manage medical problems in critical situations under time pressure and on the basis of vague information. In recent years, dual process theory has provided a framework of cognitive processes to assist students in developing clinical reasoning skills critical especially in surgery due to the high workload and the elevated stress levels. However, clinical reasoning skills can be observed only indirectly and the corresponding constructs are difficult to measure in order to assess student performance. The script concordance test has been established in this field. A number of studies suggest that the test delivers a valid assessment of clinical reasoning. However, different scoring methods have been suggested. They reflect different interpretations of the underlying construct. In this work we want to shed light on the theoretical framework of script theory and give an idea of script concordance testing. We constructed a script concordance test in the clinical context of "acute abdomen" and compared previously proposed scores with regard to their validity. A test comprising 52 items in 18 clinical scenarios was developed, revised along the guidelines and administered to 56 4(th) and 5(th) year medical students at the end of a blended-learning seminar. We scored the answers using five different scoring methods (distance (2×), aggregate (2×), single best answer) and compared the scoring keys, the resulting final scores and Cronbach's α after normalization of the raw scores. All scores except the single best answers calculation achieved acceptable reliability scores (>= 0.75), as measured by Cronbach's α. Students were clearly distinguishable from the experts, whose results were set to a mean of 80 and SD of 5 by the normalization process. With the two aggregate scoring methods, the students' means values were between 62.5 (AGGPEN) and 63.9 (AGG) equivalent to about three expert SD below the experts' mean value (Cronbach's α : 0.76 (AGGPEN

  14. Prime wires for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In an award ceremony on 3 September, ATLAS honoured the French company Axon Cable for its special coaxial cables, which were purpose-built for the Liquid Argon calorimeter modules. Working for CERN since the 1970s, Axon' Cable received the ATLAS supplier award last week for its contribution to the liquid argon calorimeter cables of ATLAS (LAL/Orsay, France and University of Victoria, Canada), started in 1996. Its two sets of minicoaxial cables, called harnesses "A" and "B", are designed to function in the harsh conditions in the liquid argon (at 90 Kelvin or -183°C) and under extreme radiation (up to several Mrads). The cables are mainly used for the readout of the calorimeters, and are connected to the outside world by 114 signal feedthroughs with 1920 channels each. The signal from the detectors is transmitted directly without any amplification, which imposes tight restrictions on the impedance and on the signal propagation time of the cables. Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesperson, gives the award for best s...

  15. Taus at ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, Sarah M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-06

    The grant "Taus at ATLAS" supported the group of Sarah Demers at Yale University over a period of 8.5 months, bridging the time between her Early Career Award and her inclusion on Yale's grant cycle within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The work supported the functioning of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and the analysis of ATLAS data. The work included searching for the Higgs Boson in a particular mode of its production (with a W or Z boson) and decay (to a pair of tau leptons.) This was part of a broad program of characterizing the Higgs boson as we try to understand this recently discovered particle, and whether or not it matches our expectations within the current standard model of particle physics. In addition, group members worked with simulation to understand the physics reach of planned upgrades to the ATLAS experiment. Supported group members include postdoctoral researcher Lotte Thomsen and graduate student Mariel Pettee.

  16. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  17. The ATLAS event filter

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, H P; Boissat, C; Davis, R; Duval, P Y; Etienne, F; Fede, E; Francis, D; Green, P; Hemmer, F; Jones, R; MacKinnon, J; Mapelli, Livio P; Meessen, C; Mommsen, R K; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Nacasch, R; Negri, A; Pinfold, James L; Polesello, G; Qian, Z; Rafflin, C; Scannicchio, D A; Stanescu, C; Touchard, F; Vercesi, V

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the studies for the ATLAS Event Filter is given. The architecture and the high level design of the DAQ-1 prototype is presented. The current status if the prototypes is briefly given. Finally, future plans and milestones are given. (11 refs).

  18. A thermosiphon for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2013-01-01

    A new thermosiphon cooling system, designed for the ATLAS silicon detectors by CERN’s EN-CV team in collaboration with the experiment, will replace the current system in the next LHC run in 2015. Using the basic properties of density difference and making gravity do the hard work, the thermosiphon promises to be a very reliable solution that will ensure the long-term stability of the whole system.   Former compressor-based cooling system of the ATLAS inner detectors. The system is currently being replaced by the innovative thermosiphon. (Photo courtesy of Olivier Crespo-Lopez). Reliability is the major issue for the present cooling system of the ATLAS silicon detectors. The system was designed 13 years ago using a compressor-based cooling cycle. “The current cooling system uses oil-free compressors to avoid fluid pollution in the delicate parts of the silicon detectors,” says Michele Battistin, EN-CV-PJ section leader and project leader of the ATLAS thermosiphon....

  19. ATLAS Experiment Brochure

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00085461

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  20. ATLAS fast physics monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ATLAS Collaboration has set up a framework to automatically process the rapidly growing dataset and produce performance and physics plots for the most interesting analyses. The system is designed to give fast feedback. The histograms are produced within hours of data reconstruction (2–3 days after data taking).

  1. ATLAS PDF Results

    CERN Document Server

    Stockton, Mark; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties from parton distribution functions can limit our measurements of new cross sections and searches beyond the SM. Results are presented on recent ATLAS measurements which are sensitive to parton distribution functions. These cover a wide range of cross section measurements, including those from: jets, photons, $W$/$Z$ bosons and top quarks.

  2. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1 March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day.

  3. Prototype ATLAS straw tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This is an early prototype of the straw tracking device for the ATLAS detector at CERN. This detector will be part of the LHC project, scheduled to start operation in 2008. The straw tracker will consist of thousands of gas-filled straws, each containing a wire, allowing the tracks of particles to be followed.

  4. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  5. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  6. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  7. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - French

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  8. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Serbian

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  9. ATLAS Experiment Brochure - Italian

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is a general-purpose particle physics experiment run by an international collaboration, and is designed to exploit the full discovery potential and the huge range of physics opportunities that the LHC provides.

  10. Taking ATLAS to new heights

    CERN Document Server

    Abha Eli Phoboo, ATLAS experiment

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this month, 51 members of the ATLAS collaboration trekked up to the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains, Mt. Toubkal (4,167m), in North Africa.    The physicists were in Marrakech, Morocco, attending the ATLAS Overview Week (7 - 11 October), which was held for the first time on the African continent. Around 300 members of the collaboration met to discuss the status of the LS1 upgrades and plans for the next run of the LHC. Besides the trek, 42 ATLAS members explored the Saharan sand dunes of Morocco on camels.  Photos courtesy of Patrick Jussel.

  11. Spousal Concordance of Diabetes Mellitus among Women in Ajman, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatha S. Al-Sharbatti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Spousal concordance is defined as similar behaviours and associated health statuses between spouses. This study aimed to identify the concordance of diabetes mellitus (DM and related variables among genetically unrelated couples in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 270 married women attending either the Mushairef Health Center or the Gulf Medical College Hospital in Ajman between May and November 2012. A validated questionnaire was designed to determine sociodemographic characteristics and a history or family history of DM, hypertension, coronary artery disease or dyslipidaemia among the women and their husbands. The weight, height, body mass index, waist circumference, fasting blood sugar and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels of all women were measured. Results: Of the women, 39.3% of those with diabetic husbands and 39.9% of those with non-diabetic husbands were diabetic themselves (P >0.050. The prevalence of DM spousal concordance was 17.8%. A history of hypertension, coronary artery disease and dyslipidaemia was significantly more frequent among women whose husbands had a history of the same conditions (P = 0.001, 0.040 and 0.002, respectively. Spousal concordance of abnormal glycaemia among non-diabetic women with diabetic husbands was significant (P = 0.001. Having a diabetic husband (P = 0.006 and being obese (P = 0.009 were the only significant predictors of hyperglycaemia among non-diabetic women after controlling for confounding factors. Conclusion: There was significant concordance of abnormal glycaemia among non-diabetic women with diabetic husbands. The spouses of diabetic patients may therefore be a target population for regular hyperglycaemia and DM screening.

  12. [Diagnostic concordance between seven definitions of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo; Stusser, Beatriz; Cálix, Wenny; Orlandi, Neraldo; Rodríguez, Janet; Cubas-Dueñas, Ileana; Echevarría, Ragmila; Álvarez, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of diagnostic concordance between seven definitions of metabolic syndrome (MS) in a group of overweight and obese adults. 350 subjects aged from 19 to 70 years were recruited for study from a clinic for overweight and obese subjects. The definitions of MS used were those given by the WHO (World Health Organization), EGIR (European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance), NCEP- ATPIII (Adult Treatment Panel), AHA/NHLBI (American Heart Association), IDF (International Diabetes Federation), and JIS (Joint Interim Statement) as well as the Szabo criteria. Concordance between the definitions was calculated with the Kappa coefficient. Insulin resistance (IR) was assessed using the HOMA-IR index. According to the Szabo, WHO, EGIR, NCEP-ATPIII, AHA/NHLBI, IDF, and JIS criteria, MS frequency was 74.3%, 42.0%, 46.8%, 56.0%, 52.9%, 58.6%, and 58.6%, respectively. The concordance between the Szabo and AHA/NHLBI criteria was 0.559, while the Kappa coefficient between the Szabo criteria and the rest of the guides (NCEP-ATPIII, IDF, and JIS) was from 0.612 to 0.657, respectively. The concordance of the WHO with the EGIR was 0.602, but it was between 0.358 and 0.422 with the other guidelines. IR was distributed similarly in all guidelines. There is a considerable concordance between the NCEP-ATPIII, IDF, and JIS guidelines and the Szabo criteria. The Szabo criteria could be an option for the active surveillance of MS in populations.

  13. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  14. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  15. The surgical anatomy of double-outlet right ventricle with concordant atrioventricular connection and noncommitted ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellin, G; Ho, S Y; Anderson, R H; Zuberbuhler, J R; Siewers, R D

    1991-12-01

    In describing hearts with double-outlet right ventricle, we have had problems with how best to use the term noncommitted as applied to the ventricular septal defect. We reviewed, therefore, 63 hearts with double-outlet right ventricle in the setting of usual atrial arrangement and a concordant atrioventricular connection. From these, 18 hearts with potentially noncommitted defects were identified and studied in detail. The defect was unequivocally remote from the ventricular outflow tracts in 16 of these hearts, being perimembranous with excavation to open into the inlet of the right ventricle in 12, two of these also having straddling of an atrioventricular valve. One heart had a muscular defect situated in the inlet part of the muscular septum, whereas the defect was the ventricular component of an atrioventricular septal defect in the other three. In the remaining two hearts the defect was anatomically juxtaposed to a subarterial outlet. The pathway to the outflow tract, however, was obstructed by leaflets of a straddling valve. Our study shows, therefore, the need to distinguish between anatomic "commitment" of the defect from the problems in terms of commitment that may confront the surgeon in the operating room. Not only does the distance between the interventricular communication and one of the subarterial outflow tract need to be assessed (the anatomic commitment), but also the presence and nature of any intervening extraneous tissues (the surgical commitment) requires assessment.

  16. ATLAS data preparation in run 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00037318; The ATLAS collaboration; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Guenther, Jaroslav; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Strandberg, Jonas; Taffard, Anyes; Wang, Song-Ming

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, the data preparation workflows for Run 2 are presented. The challenges posed by the excellent performance and high live time fraction of the LHC are discussed, and the solutions implemented by ATLAS are described. The prompt calibration loop procedures are described and examples are given. Several levels of data quality assessment are used to quickly spot problems in the control room and prevent data loss, and to provide the final selection used for physics analysis. Finally the data quality efficiency for physics analysis is shown.

  17. 'Whose atlas I use, his song I sing?' - The impact of anatomical atlases on fiber tract contributions to cognitive deficits after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Bianca; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, different anatomical atlases exist for the anatomical interpretation of the results from neuroimaging and lesion analysis studies that investigate the contribution of white matter fiber tract integrity to cognitive (dys)function. A major problem with the use of different atlases in different studies, however, is that the anatomical interpretation of neuroimaging and lesion analysis results might vary as a function of the atlas used. This issue might be particularly prominent in studies that investigate the contribution of white matter fiber tract integrity to cognitive (dys)function. We used a single large-sample dataset of right brain damaged stroke patients with and without cognitive deficit (here: spatial neglect) to systematically compare the influence of three different, widely-used white matter fiber tract atlases (1 histology-based atlas and 2 DTI tractography-based atlases) on conclusions concerning the involvement of white matter fiber tracts in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction. We both calculated the overlap between the statistical lesion analysis results and each long association fiber tract (topological analyses) and performed logistic regressions on the extent of fiber tract damage in each individual for each long association white matter fiber tract (hodological analyses). For the topological analyses, our results suggest that studies that use tractography-based atlases are more likely to conclude that white matter integrity is critical for a cognitive (dys)function than studies that use a histology-based atlas. The DTI tractography-based atlases classified approximately 10 times as many voxels of the statistical map as being located in a long association white matter fiber tract than the histology-based atlas. For hodological analyses on the other hand, we observed that the conclusions concerning the overall importance of long association fiber tract integrity to cognitive function do not necessarily depend on the white matter

  18. How to review 4 million lines of ATLAS code

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00226135; The ATLAS collaboration; Lampl, Walter

    2017-01-01

    As the ATLAS Experiment prepares to move to a multi-threaded framework (AthenaMT) for Run3, we are faced with the problem of how to migrate 4 million lines of C++ source code. This code has been written over the past 15 years and has often been adapted, re-written or extended to the changing requirements and circumstances of LHC data taking. The code was developed by different authors, many of whom are no longer active, and under the deep assumption that processing ATLAS data would be done in a serial fashion. In order to understand the scale of the problem faced by the ATLAS software community, and to plan appropriately the significant efforts posed by the new AthenaMT framework, ATLAS embarked on a wide ranging review of our offline code, covering all areas of activity: event generation, simulation, trigger, reconstruction. We discuss the difficulties in even logistically organising such reviews in an already busy community, how to examine areas in sufficient depth to learn key areas in need of upgrade, yet...

  19. How To Review 4 Million Lines of ATLAS Code

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    As the ATLAS Experiment prepares to move to a multi-threaded framework (AthenaMT) for Run3, we are faced with the problem of how to migrate 4 million lines of C++ source code. This code has been written over the past 15 years and has often been adapted, re-written or extended to the changing requirements and circumstances of LHC data taking. The code was developed by different authors, many of whom are no longer active, and under the deep assumption that processing ATLAS data would be done in a serial fashion. In order to understand the scale of the problem faced by the ATLAS software community, and to plan appropriately the significant efforts posed by the new AthenaMT framework, ATLAS embarked on a wide ranging review of our offline code, covering all areas of activity: event generation, simulation, trigger, reconstruction. We discuss the difficulties in even logistically organising such reviews in an already busy community, how to examine areas in sufficient depth to learn key areas in need of upgrade, yet...

  20. The Syntactic Atlas of the Dutch Dialects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjef Barbiers

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of the various choices we had to make in order to realize the Syntactic Atlas of the Dutch Dialects (SAND in a relatively short period. The idea is that by presenting the SAND in this way, we enable the ScanDiaSyn project and other new dialect syntax projects to profit from our experience in a similar enterprise. The presentation and explicitation of the choices we had to make, the problems we had to face and the mistakes we have made will not necessarily be the same choices, problems, and mistakes that will arise in the Scandinavian project, but it might give an indication of where problems may be expected and how mistakes may be prevented.

  1. Ear Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women Hair Loss Hand/Wrist/Arm Problems Headaches Hearing Problems Hip Problems Knee Problems Leg Problems Lower Back ... have ear pain or redness but is having problems hearing?YesNo Back to Questions Step 3 Possible Causes ...

  2. Concordant Oral-Genital HPV Infection in South Africa Couples: Evidence for Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Samantha L; Gravitt, Patti E; Martinson, Neil A; Hoffmann, Jennifer; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in South Africa. However, little is known about oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence settings. Thirty-four adult heterosexual couples attending an HIV testing center in Soweto, South Africa were enrolled. Each participant provided an oral rinse sample and genital swab, which were tested for 37 types of HPV DNA, and completed a risk behavior survey. Median age was 31 years and 9% (3/34) of men and 29% (10/34) of women enrolled tested HIV-positive; median CD4 count was 437 cells/mm(3). Oral HPV prevalence was similar in women and men (12 vs. 18%, p = 0.48), and was non-significantly higher in HIV-infected vs. HIV-uninfected (23 vs. 13%, p = 0.34) subjects. Most men (82%) and women (84%) reported ever performing oral sex. Median number of lifetime sexual partners was "2-5" while median number of lifetime oral sex partners was 1. Oncogenic HPV subtypes were detected in 4% of oral, 26% of penile, and 74% of vaginal samples, including HPV16 in 1, 12, and 21% of these samples respectively. Genital HPV prevalence was significantly higher than oral HPV prevalence (75 vs. 15%, p ≤ 0.001). Thirty-five percent of couples (12/34) had at least one type-specific concordant vaginal-penile HPV infection but only one of nine couples with oral HPV had concordant oral-oral infection. However, 67% (4/6) of men and 25% (1/4) of women with oral HPV infection had partners with concordant genital HPV infection. Implications and Impact: Oral-oral HPV concordance between couples is low, but oral-genital and genital-genital HPV concordance is higher, including concordance of male oral HPV infection with their partners' vaginal HPV infection. This data is consistent with possible transmission of vaginal HPV infection to the oral cavity of sexual partners performing oral sex.

  3. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  4. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance has just been attributed to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months ago at their headquarters in Japan.

  5. ATLAS: civil engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. Nice view from the surface to the cavern from the pit side - all the big machines looked very small. The film has original working sound.

  6. Data challenges in ATLAS computing

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A

    2003-01-01

    ATLAS computing is steadily progressing towards a highly functional software suite, plus a World Wide computing model which gives all ATLAS equal and equal quality of access to ATLAS data. A key component in the period before the LHC is a series of Data Challenges of increasing scope and complexity. The goals of the ATLAS Data Challenges are the validation of the computing model, of the complete software suite, of the data model, and to ensure the correctness of the technical choices to be made. We are committed to 'common solutions' and look forward to the LHC Computing Grid being the vehicle for providing these in an effective way. In close collaboration between the Grid and Data Challenge communities ATLAS is testing large-scale testbed prototypes around the world, deploying prototype components to integrate and test Grid software in a production environment, and running DC1 production at 39 'tier' centers in 18 countries on four continents.

  7. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  8. YAPAY SİNİR AĞLARI KULLANILARAK CONCORDE UÇAKLARININ KONTROLÜ

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Şahin (1966-) (gépészmérnök); Erkaya, Selçuk; Uzmay, İbrahim

    2004-01-01

    Son yıllarda Concorde tipi yolcu uçaklarında kazalar hızla artmaktadır. Bu kazalar sonucu binlerce can ve mal kaybı meydana gelmektedir. Oluşan bu kazaların büyük bir oranı kontrol kaybı neticesinde olmaktadır. Yapay Sinir Ağları (YSA) kontrol algoritmalarında kullanılmak üzere doğrusal olmayan dinamik sistemlerin kapalı-kutu olarak tanımlanmasında uygun bir araç olarak kabul edilmektedir.Bu çalışmada, YSA denetimcisi kullanılarak sonik hıza sahip Concorde tipi uçağın burun eğim açı değişimi ...

  9. Concordance between preoperative and postoperative assessments of primary caries lesion depth: results from the Dental PBRN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Bader, James D; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the concordance between pre- and postoperative assessments of primary caries lesion depths by dentists from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN; www.DentalPBRN.org). A total of 229 DPBRN dentists collected data on 8,351 consecutive restorations inserted due...... depths were recorded as being in the outer half (E1) or inner half (E2) of enamel, or in the outer third (D1), middle third (D2) or inner third (D3) of dentin. Most restorations were placed to treat lesions that were preoperatively assessed as extending to the D1 (53%) and D2 (25%) depths....... Of the restored caries lesions, 10% were preoperatively assessed as being limited to E2 depth and 3% to E1 depth. The majority of the restored enamel lesions were located on occlusal surfaces. Preoperative estimates of caries lesion depth were more concordant with postoperative depths when the lesion...

  10. Agreement between data obtained from repeated interviews with a six-years interval Concordância entre dados obtidos em entrevistas repetidas com seis anos de intervalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Castro Martins

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare information collected through face-to-face interviews at first time and six years later in a city of Southeastern Brazil. In 1998, 32 mothers (N=32 of children aged 20 to 30 months answered a face-to-face interview with structured questions regarding their children's brushing habits. Six years later this same interview was repeated with the same mothers. Both interviews were compared for overall agreement, kappa and weighted kappa. Overall agreement between both interviews varied from 41 to 96%. Kappa values ranged from 0.00 to 0.65 (very bad to good without any significant differences. The results showed lack of agreement when the same interview is conducted six years later, showing that the recall bias can be a methodological problem of interviews.O objetivo do estudo foi comparar a informação coletada em entrevista pessoal num primeiro momento e seis anos depois, em Minas Gerais. Em 1998, 32 mães (N=32 de crianças com idade entre 20 a 30 meses responderam à entrevista pessoal com questões estruturadas sobre os hábitos de escovação das crianças, sendo repetida seis anos depois. As duas entrevistas foram comparadas em concordância geral e em coeficientes kappa e kappa ponderado. A concordância geral entre as entrevistas variou de 41% a 96%. Os valores de kappa variaram de 0,00 a 0,65 (muito ruim a bom, sem diferença significativa. Os resultados mostraram que houve ausência de concordância quando a mesma entrevista foi conduzida seis anos depois, mostrando que o viés de memória pode ser um problema metodológico das entrevistas.

  11. Learning-by-Concordance (LbC): introducing undergraduate students to the complexity and uncertainty of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Foucault, Amélie; Dubé, Serge; Robert, Diane; Lafond, Chantal; Vincent, Anne-Marie; Kassis, Jeannine; Kazitani, Driss; Charlin, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    A current challenge in medical education is the steep exposure to the complexity and uncertainty of clinical practice in early clerkship. The gap between pre-clinical courses and the reality of clinical decision-making can be overwhelming for undergraduate students. The Learning-by-Concordance (LbC) approach aims to bridge this gap by embedding complexity and uncertainty by relying on real-life situations and exposure to expert reasoning processes to support learning. LbC provides three forms of support: 1) expert responses that students compare with their own, 2) expert explanations and 3) recognized scholars' key-messages. Three different LbC inspired learning tools were used by 900 undergraduate medical students in three courses: Concordance-of-Reasoning in a 1st-year hematology course; Concordance-of-Perception in a 2nd-year pulmonary physio-pathology course, and; Concordance-of-Professional-Judgment with 3rd-year clerkship students. Thematic analysis was conducted on freely volunteered qualitative comments provided by 404 students. Absence of a right answer was challenging for 1st year concordance-of-reasoning group; the 2nd year visual concordance group found radiology images initially difficult and unnerving and the 3rd year concordance-of-judgment group recognized the importance of divergent expert opinion. Expert panel answers and explanations constitute an example of "cognitive apprenticeship" that could contribute to the development of appropriate professional reasoning processes.

  12. Dealing with difficult deformations: Construction of a knowledge-based deformation atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann; Darvann, T.A.; Hermann, N.V.

    2010-01-01

    from before to after lip closure in infants with UCLP. The purpose of the present work was to show that use of prior information about typical deformations due to lip closure, through the construction of a knowledge-based atlas of deformations, could overcome the problem. Initially, mean volumes...... (atlases) for the pre- and post-surgical populations, respectively, were automatically constructed by non-rigid registration. An expert placed corresponding landmarks in the cleft area in the two atlases; this provided prior information used to build a knowledge-based deformation atlas. We model the change...... from pre- to post-surgery using thin-plate spline warping. The registration results are convincing and represent a first move towards an automatic registration method for dealing with difficult deformations due to this type of surgery. New or breakthrough work to be presented: The method provides...

  13. An XML generic detector description system and geometry editor for the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalier, L; Meyer, J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a system which was developed to describe the ATLAS muon spectrometer, which is based on a generic XML detector description system (ATLAS Generic Detector Description, AGDD), on the PERSINT visualization program and on a series of parsers, respectively converters which build a generic, transient geometry model and translate it into commonly used geometry descriptions like Geant4, the ATLAS GeoModel, ROOT TGeo or others. The presented system permits an easy, self descriptive approach to the detector description problem, intuitive visualization and rapid turn-around, since the results of the description process can be immediately fed into e.g. a Geant4 simulation for rapid prototyping. Examples of the current usage for the ATLAS detector description will be given and further developments needed to meet future requirements will be discussed.

  14. Jet physics in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet performance and physics measurements, together with results from new physics searches using the 2011 dataset. They include studies of the underlying event and fragmentation models, measurements of the inclusive jet, dijet and multijet cross sections, parton density functions, heavy flavours, jet shape, mass and substructure. Searches for new physics in monojet, dijet and photon-jet final states are also presented.

  15. Jet Physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation periods allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet physics measurements. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime, and show sensitivity to the parton densities in the proton and to the value of the strong coupling, alpha_s.

  16. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  17. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  18. ATLAS IBL operational experience

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237659; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is the inner most pixel layer in the ATLAS experiment, which was installed at 3.3 cm radius from the beam axis in 2014 to improve the tracking performance. To cope with the high radiation and hit occupancy due to proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed for the IBL. After the long shut-down period over 2013 and 2014, the ATLAS experiment started data-taking in May 2015 for Run-2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The IBL has been operated successfully since the beginning of Run-2 and shows excellent performance with the low dead module fraction, high data-taking efficiency and improved tracking capability. The experience and challenges in the operation of the IBL is described as well as its performance.

  19. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  20. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  1. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  2. ATLAS latest results

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Reale, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    With the LHC start-up and the first runs at 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV and 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy in the years 2009 and 2010, the ATLAS detector started to record its first collision events. The integrated luminosity has now reached one inverse pico barn. These data have been used to perform detailed studies on the performance of the detector, including measuring charged and neutral particle mass resonances and the study of QCD cross-sections. The data have already made it possible to commission and calibrate the various ATLAS subdetectors, and understand their performance in detail. The first observation of Standard Model electroweak processes, in particular mass resonances, is also being used as a benchmark for validating the analysis and simulation tools. The status and performance of the detector will be briefly reviewed, the latest physics results will be summarized and limits on new physics will be given.

  3. Concordance of sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction by self-report and those by partner's perception in young adult couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, S; Keskin, U; Gülsün, M; Erdem, M; Ceyhan, S T; Ergün, A

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated concordance levels of young adult spouses (N=107 couples, total N=214) with regards to sexual satisfaction by using Golombock-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS). Each spouse of the couples filled out both female and male forms of the GRISS. Self- and spouse-reported scores were analyzed in terms of inter-rater correlation and agreement. The prevalence of overall sexual dissatisfaction was 10.3% and 26.2% in wives and husbands, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) between the self-reported overall sexual satisfaction scores and those assessed by the spouses was 0.25 (P=0.014) and 0.04 (P=0.680) for wives and husbands, respectively. The sensitivity for perception of partner's sexual problems ranged 11% to 47%, and the specificity was around 64% to 100%, except for vaginismus, which had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 25%. The prevalance-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) value for overall sexual dissatisfaction reported by themselves and that assessed by their spouses was 0.68 and 0.16 for the wives and husbands, respectively. For specific female sexual problems, the PABAK value was the highest in female dissatisfaction (0.81) followed by anorgasmia (0.78), female avoidance (0.44), vaginismus (0.44), infrequency (0.33), non-communication (0.14) and female nonsensuality (0.14). For specific male sexual problems, the PABAK value was the highest in male nonsensuality (1.00), followed by male dissatisfaction (0.78), infrequency (0.46), non-communication (0.42), male avoidance (0.36), impotence (0.27) and premature ejaculation (-0.04). Our findings suggested that in this clinical sample the partner's perception of sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction did not correlate well with the subject's self-reported sexual problems, and generally male sexual problems were less correctly perceived by the partners than were female sexual problems. This result may provide helpful information for clinicians who take care of patients

  4. Estimation of accordance and concordance in inter-laboratory trials of analytical methods with qualitative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voet, Hilko; van Raamsdonk, Leo W D

    2004-09-01

    In this short communication, we discuss alternative ways to estimate accordance and concordance, which are, for qualitative methods, the analogues of the well-known concepts repeatability and reproducibility. We argue that estimators in a random framework appear to be more appropriate than the estimators in a fixed framework as they were originally introduced by Langton et al. [International Journal of Food Microbiology 79 (2002) 171]. A simple example of their application is given.

  5. Can magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict concordant pain provocation during provocative disc injection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Sung, Deuk Jae [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang-Heon [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Seoul (Korea); Derby, Richard [Spinal Diagnostics and Treatment Center, Daly City, CA (United States); Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    To correlate magnetic resonance (MR) image findings with pain response by provocation discography in patients with discogenic low back pain, with an emphasis on the combination analysis of a high intensity zone (HIZ) and disc contour abnormalities. Sixty-two patients (aged 17-68 years) with axial low back pain that was likely to be disc related underwent lumbar discography (178 discs tested). The MR images were evaluated for disc degeneration, disc contour abnormalities, HIZ, and endplate abnormalities. Based on the combination of an HIZ and disc contour abnormalities, four classes were determined: (1) normal or bulging disc without HIZ; (2) normal or bulging disc with HIZ; (3) disc protrusion without HIZ; (4) disc protrusion with HIZ. These MR image findings and a new combined MR classification were analyzed in the base of concordant pain determined by discography. Disc protrusion with HIZ [sensitivity 45.5%; specificity 97.8%; positive predictive value (PPV), 87.0%] correlated significantly with concordant pain provocation (P < 0.01). A normal or bulging disc with HIZ was not associated with reproduction of pain. Disc degeneration (sensitivity 95.4%; specificity 38.8%; PPV 33.9%), disc protrusion (sensitivity 68.2%; specificity 80.6%; PPV 53.6%), and HIZ (sensitivity 56.8%; specificity 83.6%; PPV 53.2%) were not helpful in the identification of a disc with concordant pain. The proposed MR classification is useful to predict a disc with concordant pain. Disc protrusion with HIZ on MR imaging predicted positive discography in patients with discogenic low back pain. (orig.)

  6. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations, John F. Kennedy International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Deloach, R.; Stephens, D. G.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Holliday, B. G.; Miller, W. T.; Ward, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    The outdoor/indoor noise levels and associated vibration levels resulting from aircraft and nonaircraft events were recorded at eight homesites and a school. In addition, limited subjective tests were conducted to examine the human detection/annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Presented herein are the majority of the window and wall vibration data recorded during Concorde and subsonic aircraft overflights.

  7. Correction of technical bias in clinical microarray data improves concordance with known biological information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklund, Aron Charles; Szallasi, Zoltan Imre

    2008-01-01

    The performance of gene expression microarrays has been well characterized using controlled reference samples, but the performance on clinical samples remains less clear. We identified sources of technical bias affecting many genes in concert, thus causing spurious correlations in clinical data...... sets and false associations between genes and clinical variables. We developed a method to correct for technical bias in clinical microarray data, which increased concordance with known biological relationships in multiple data sets....

  8. Magnetic resonance relaxometry in monozygotic twins discordant and concordant for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniel, Filip; Herynek, Vit; Hajek, Tomas; Dezortova, Monika; Horacek, Jiri; Hajek, Milan; Kozeny, Jiri; Dockery, Colleen; Höschl, Cyril

    2005-01-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation times were examined in four pairs of monozygotic (MZ) twins discordant and concordant for schizophrenia with low and high genetic loading for the illness and five healthy control MZ twin pairs. Patients with schizophrenia (n = 11) showed significant prolongation in T1 relaxation times in the globus pallidus (GP) bilaterally (P < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected) when compared to 14 healthy MZ twins.

  9. Age of Onset in Concordant Twins and Other Relative Pairs With Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Yee, Irene M.; Guimond, Colleen; Reis, Jacques; Dyment, David A.; Ebers, George C.

    2009-01-01

    The ages of onset in multiple sclerosis cases span more than 7 decades. Data are presented for affected relative pairs from a Canadian population base of 30,000 multiple sclerosis index cases (1993?2008). The effects of genetic sharing, parent of origin, intergenerational versus collinear differences, and gender on the ages of onset were evaluated in the following concordant pairs: monozygotic twins (n?=?29), dizygotic twins (n?=?10), siblings (n?=?614), first cousins (n?=?405), half siblings...

  10. Reproducibility, accuracy and concordance of Accutrend® Plus for measuring circulating lipid concentration in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Scafoglieri, Aldo; Tresignie, Jonathan; Provyn, Steven; Clarys, Jan Pieter; Bautmans, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The determination of lipid biomarkers by capillary sampling may be useful in the scree-ning, diagnosis and/or personal management of hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular risk. It remains unclear whether the use of the Accutrend® Plus system is appropriate. This study aimed to assess its reproducibility, accuracy and concordance for blood lipid profiling in adults. Materials and methods: Fasting capillary total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) concentration on Accutrend® Pl...

  11. Which factors influence MRI-pathology concordance of tumour size measurements in breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominger, M.; Frauenfelder, T. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Berg, D. [Urbankrankenhaus Berlin, Anesthesiology, Berlin (Germany); Ramaswamy, A. [University Hospital Marburg, Pathology, Marburg (Germany); Timmesfeld, N. [Philipps University Marburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To assess MRI-pathology concordance and factors influencing tumour size measurement in breast cancer. MRI tumour size (greatest diameter in anatomical planes (MRI-In-Plane) and greatest diameter along main tumour axis (MRI-MPR)) of 115 consecutive breast lesions (59 invasive lobular carcinoma, 46 invasive ductal carcinoma, and 10 ductal carcinoma in situ) was retrospectively compared to size measured at histopathology (pT size (Path-TNM) and greatest tumour diameter as relevant for excision (Path-Diameter; reference standard)). Histopathological tumour types, preoperative palpability, surgical management, additional high-risk lesions, and BI-RADS lesion type (mass versus non-mass enhancements) were assessed as possible influencing factors. Systematic errors were most pronounced between MRI-MPR and Path-TNM (7.1 mm, limits of agreement (LoA) [-21.7; 35.9]), and were lowest between MRI-In-Plane and Path-Diameter (0.2 mm, LoA [-19.7; 20.1]). Concordance rate of MRI-In-Plane with Path-Diameter was 86 % (97/113), overestimation 9 % (10/113) and underestimation 5 % (6/113); BI-RADS mass lesions were overestimated in 7 % (6/81) versus 41 % (13/32) for non-mass enhancements. On multivariate analysis only BI-RADS lesion type significantly influenced MRI-pathology concordance (p < 0.001). 2/59 (3 %) ILC did not enhance. Concordance rate varies according to the execution of MRI and histopathological measurements. Beyond this only non-mass enhancement significantly predicted discordance. (orig.)

  12. Child and Caregiver Concordance of Potentially Traumatic Events Experienced by Orphaned and Abandoned Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru Rajan, Divya; Shirey, Kristen; Ostermann, Jan; Whetten, Rachel; O'Donnell, Karen; Whetten, Kathryn

    Exposure to trauma is associated with significant emotional and behavioral difficulties among children (Perepletchikova & Kaufman, 2010). Overall, reports of trauma and violence experienced by children are discrepant from those of their caregivers (Lewis et al., 2012). Even less is known about the extent of concordance between orphans and their caregivers. This study examines the correlates of concordance in reported traumatic experiences between 1,269 orphaned and abandoned children (OAC) and their caregivers. The OAC lived in family-settings in 5 low and middle income countries and were part of a longitudinal study, "Positive Outcomes for Orphans" (POFO) that enrolled children aged 6 to 12 at baseline. By examining concordance with respect to specific types of trauma reported, this study expands the understanding of who reports which types of traumas experienced by orphaned and abandoned children, thereby improving the potential to provide targeted interventions for children who have experienced such events. In this study, children and caregivers were asked separately if the child had experienced different types of potentially traumatic events. Children were significantly more likely to report physical abuse, sexual abuse and family violence than were caregivers. Caregivers were significantly more likely than children to report natural disasters and accidents. High levels of concordance were found in the reporting of wars, riots, killings, and deaths in the family. The impacts of trauma on behavior and mental health are profound, and highly effective interventions targeting sequelae of childhood trauma are currently being developed for use in low resource areas. Findings from this study demonstrate that it is feasible to conduct screening for potentially traumatic events utilizing child self-report in resource limited settings and that child self-report is crucial in evaluating trauma, particularly family violence and physical or sexual assault.

  13. Diagnostic concordance between seven definitions of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. Doctor en Ciencias; Stusser, Beatriz; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. médico endocrinólogo; Cálix, Wenny; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. médico endocrinólogo; Orlandi, Neraldo; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. médico endocrinólogo; Rodríguez, Janet; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. licenciada en Ciencias Tecnológicas de la Salud.; Cubas-Dueñas, Ileana; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. médico inmunólogo; Echevarría, Ragmila; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. licenciada en Ciencias Tecnológicas de la Salud.; Álvarez, Aimee; Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología. La Habana, Cuba. máster en Ciencias Bioquímicas.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the level of diagnostic concordance between seven definitions of metabolic syndrome (MS) in a group of overweight and obese adults. Materials and Methods. 350 subjects aged from 19 to 70 years were recruited for study from a clinic for overweight and obese subjects. The definitions of MS used were those given by the WHO (World Health Organization), EGIR (European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance), NCEPATPIII (Adult Treatment Panel), ...

  14. Concordance between Incisal Pathway with Dental, Functional Skeletal, and Facial Biotype Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Puerta Salazar, Germán Eduardo; Universidad del Valle, Cali; Herrera-Guardiola, Santiago; Práctica privada, Cali; Martínez Cajas, Carlos Humberto; Institución Universitaria Colegios de Colombia UNICOC, Cali

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Background: is necessary to consider which parameter should stablish the central incisor inclination. Purpose: The main objective of the present study was to appraise the possible concordance between the maxillary incisors inclination and the facial axis, the articular eminence inclination and the palatal functional inclination of the maxillary incisors. Methods: We perform an observational cross sectional study with 315 cone beam tomographic images from 63 healthy patients. Then a ...

  15. Impact of Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles on the sensory properties of Concord and Niagara grape juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Luan N; Walsh, Douglas; Ferguson, Holly; Ross, Carolyn F

    2010-01-01

    The presence of Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles (MALB) in grape juice is increasingly problematic. The overall objective of this study was to determine the specific sensory impacts of MALB on Concord and Niagara grape juice. The aroma threshold for MALB-taint in both juices was determined and expressed as the best estimate threshold (BET). The aroma BET for MALB-taint in Concord grape juice was 1.8 and 0.65 MALB/L Niagara grape juice. The specific sensory attributes of the grape juices influenced by the presence of MALB were then described. In Concord grape juice, trained panelists (n = 9) found significant increases in vegetal aroma and earthy flavor as MALB concentration increased from 0.45 to 7.2 MALB/L. In Niagara grape juice, with increasing MALB concentration, trained panelists (n = 8) indicated significant decreases in honey and sweetness with corresponding increases in sourness, astringency, and vegetal and earthy aromas and flavors (P Lady Beetle (MALB), initially used for biocontrol, has been shown in previous literature to impact the sensory properties of wines. The presence of MALB in grape juice is now becoming problematic; however, there is little research describing the specific sensory impacts of MALB on grape juice. This study examined the sensory impact of MALB on both Concord and Niagara grape juice. While the threshold and trained panel evaluations from this study provide valuable sensory profile information, grape juice processors may be particularly interested in the consumer rejection of MALB-tainted grape juice as they can use this research for quality control measures and for establishing tolerance limits.

  16. Exotics searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Renjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new physics accessible by the LHC. The ATLAS experiment all have rigorous search programs ongoing with the aim to find indications for new physics involving state of the art analysis techniques. This talk reports on new results obtained using the pp collision data sample collected in 2015 and 2016 at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  17. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bellagamba, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This report presents an overview of some of the most recent results obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration using pp and heavy-ion collisions at LHC. The review is not intended to be comprehensive and includes recent updates on the Higgs boson properties, precision Standard Model measurements, as well as searches for new physics. Most of the results exploit the data collected in the last LHC run, providing pp collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV.

  18. The ATLAS Experiment Movie

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  19. L'esperimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  20. El experimento ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach Committee

    2000-01-01

    This award winning film gives a glimpse behind the scenes of building the ATLAS detector. This film asks: Why are so many physicists anxious to build this apparatus? Will they be able to answer fundamental questions such as: Where does mass come from? Why does the Universe have so little antimatter? Are there extra dimensions of space that are hidden from our view? Is there an underlying theory to find? Major surprises are likely in this unknown part of physics.

  1. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Torro Pastor, Emma; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures.

  2. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb̄, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  3. Higgs results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00145153; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM) Higgs results, such as $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma,ZZ,WW,\\tau\\tau,\\mu\\mu,b\\bar{b}$, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM) results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  4. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  5. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  6. Grading of Cerebral Glioma with Multiparametric MR Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG-PET: Concordance and Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Choi, Seung Hong; Yun, Tae Jin; Song, Yong Sub [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Jun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Yong [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Kee-Hyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate concordance rates and predictive values in concordant cases among multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET to grade cerebral gliomas. Multiparametric MR imaging and FDG-PET were performed in 60 consecutive patients with cerebral gliomas (12 low-grade and 48 high-grade gliomas). As the dichotomic variables, conventional MRI, minimum apparent diffusion coefficient in diffusion-weighted imaging, maximum relative cerebral blood volume ratio in perfusion-weighted imaging, choline/creatine ratio and (lipid and lactate)/creatine ratio in MR spectroscopy, and maximum standardised uptake value ratio in FDG-PET in low- and high-grade gliomas were compared. Their concordance rates and positive/negative predictive values (PPV/NPV) in concordant cases were obtained for the various combinations of multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET. There were significant differences between low- and high-grade gliomas in all techniques. Combinations of two, three, four, and five out of the five techniques showed concordance rates of 77.0 ± 4.8 %, 65.5 ± 4.0 %, 58.3 ± 2.6 % and 53.3 %, PPV in high-grade concordant cases of 97.3 ± 1.7 %, 99.1 ± 1.4 %, 100.0 ± 0 % and 100.0 % and NPV in low-grade concordant cases of 70.2 ± 7.5 %, 78.0 ± 6.0 %, 80.3 ± 3.4 % and 80.0 %, respectively. Multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET have a concordant tendency in a two-tiered classification for the grading of cerebral glioma. If at least two examinations concordantly indicated high-grade gliomas, the PPV was about 95 %. (orig.)

  7. The hatfield SCT lunar atlas photographic atlas for Meade, Celestron and other SCT telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Schmitt-Cassegrain Telescopes (SCT) and Schmitt-Maksutov telescopes - which include the best-selling models from Meade, Celestron, and other important manufacturers - reverse the visual image left for right, giving a "mirror image". This makes it extremely difficult for observers to identify lunar features at the eyepiece of one of these instruments, using conventional atlases which show the Moon "upside-down" with south at the top. The human brain just doesn't cope well with trying to compare the real thing with a map that is a mirror-image of it!The Hatfield SCT Lunar Atlas solves the problem. Photographs and the detailed key maps are exactly as the Moon appears through the eyepiece of an SCT or Maksutov telescope. Smaller IAU-standard reference photographs are included on each page, to make it simple to compare the mirrored SCT photographs and maps with those that appear in other conventional atlases.Every owner of an SCT - and that's most amateur astronomers - will want this!.

  8. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations for Sully Plantation, Chantilly, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Scholl, H. F.; Stephens, D. G.; Holliday, B. G.; Deloach, R.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Lynch, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study to assess the noise-induced building vibrations associated with Concorde operations is presented. The approach is to record the levels of induced vibrations and associated indoor/outdoor noise levels in selected homes, historic and other buildings near Dulles and Kennedy International Airports. Presented is a small, representative sample of data recorded at Sully Plantation, Chantilly, Virginia during the period of May 20 through May 28, 1976. Recorded data provide relationships between the vibration levels of walls, floors, windows, and the noise associated with Concorde operations (2 landings and 3 takeoffs), other aircraft, nonaircraft sources, and normal household activities. Results suggest that building vibrations resulting from aircraft operations were proportional to the overall sound pressure levels and relatively insensitive to spectral differences associated with the different types of aircraft. Furthermore, the maximum levels of vibratory response resulting from Concorde operations were higher than those associated with conventional aircraft. The vibrations of nonaircraft events were observed in some cases to exceed the levels resulting from aircraft operations. These nonaircraft events are currently being analyzed in greater detail.

  9. Concorde noise-induced building vibrations: John F. Kennedy International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, W. H.; Stephens, D. G.; Deloach, R.; Cawthorn, J. M.; Holmes, H. K.; Lewis, R. B.; Holliday, B. G.; Ward, D. W.; Miller, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor noise levels resulting from aircraft flyovers and certain nonaircraft events were recorded at eight homesites and a school along with the associated vibration levels in the walls, windows, and floors at these test sites. Limited subjective tests were conducted to examine the human detection and annoyance thresholds for building vibration and rattle caused by aircraft noise. Both vibration and rattle were detected subjectively in several houses for some operations of both the Concorde and subsonic aircraft. Seated subjects more readily detected floor vibrations than wall or window vibrations. Aircraft noise generally caused more window vibrations than common nonaircraft events such as walking and closing doors. Nonaircraft events and aircraft flyovers resulted in comparable wall vibration levels, while floor vibrations were generally greater for nonaircraft events than for aircraft flyovers. The relationship between structural vibration and aircraft noise is linear, with vibration levels being accurately predicted from overall sound pressure levels (OASPL) measured near the structure. Relatively high levels of structural vibration measured during Concorde operations are due more to higher OASPL levels than to unique Concorde-source characteristics.

  10. Language lateralization in monozygotic twins discordant and concordant for schizophrenia. A functional MRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniel, Filip; Tintera, Jaroslav; Hajek, Tomas; Horacek, Jiri; Dezortova, Monika; Hajek, Milan; Dockery, Colleen; Kozeny, Jiri; Höschl, Cyril

    2007-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested altered structural and functional asymmetry of the brain in schizophrenia. Functional MRI was used to assess differences in cortical activation during a verbal task in Broca's area and its contralateral homologue in four pairs of right-handed monozygotic (MZ) twins discordant and concordant for schizophrenia with low and high familial loading for the illness and four healthy control MZ twin pairs. Pooled data from all subjects with schizophrenia showed increased activation in the right homologue of Broca's area in contrast to healthy individuals. Concordant twins (i.e. high familial loading group) showed prominent between co-twin differences in lateralization index within given region of interest. Intra-pair differences in lateralization index were significantly higher in concordant twins compared to the controls (0.69+/-0.4 vs. 0.13+/-0.13, P<0.03), albeit no significant differences in the variable were shown between the discordant and control groups. This study provides evidence of reduced cerebral dominance for language processing in patients with schizophrenia. The findings further suggest the need for additional research on relative proportion of genetic and environmental factors underlying deviations of functional asymmetry in schizophrenia.

  11. A new approach to concordance in mid-infrared spectromicroscopy mapping of malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kaiser; Reichert, Todd; Gomez, Daniel; Lu, Yanjie; Jan, Alexander; Christensen, Colleen

    2010-10-01

    Mid-infrared spectromicroscopy studies on biological tissue sections require accurate identification of tumor-bearing areas in histology-stained and infrared-unstained tissue sections. Concordance was achieved as follows: paired stained and unstained thin (5 microm) human brain tumor cryosections mounted on slides were scanned with a Nikon Coolscan 4000 film scanner at 4000 dpi, edited with Adobe Photoshop CS2 software, and both digital images saved. A digital tractile grid, developed in our laboratory, was overlaid onto both images. Boundaries of tumor-containing areas in stained sections were identified by light microscopy, and a digital boundary map constructed. The map was transferred onto the unstained spectromicroscopy tissue image, and finally layered onto the gridded, equisized, spectromicroscope-generated overview image prior to Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy. Accurate identification of tumor-bearing areas, normal brain tissue and transitional zones allowed for meaningful interpretation of respective spectral patterns in detecting subtle differences within biochemical profiles. This is the first reported method of a standardized technique for ensuring concordance in mapping of malignant tumors by mid-infrared spectromicroscopy. This technique is applicable to all biological thin tissue sections, and serves to enhance accuracy of concordance between globar- and synchrotron-light generated infrared data with that obtained by conventional light microscopy.

  12. Learning medical professionalism with the online concordance-of-judgment learning tool (CJLT): A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Amélie; Dubé, Serge; Fernandez, Nicolas; Gagnon, Robert; Charlin, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism development entails learning to make judgments in ambiguous situations. A Concordance of Judgment Learning Tool (CJLT), comprised of 20 vignettes involving professionalism issues, was developed. Students obtained a measure of how concordant their judgments were with a panel of experts and learned from given explanations. Twenty clinical vignettes implying professionalism issues were written including, for each, four possible courses of action. Expert panel, nominated by all clerkship students, was made up of attending physicians that best represented professionalism role models. Experts completed CJLT and gave explanations for their answers. All clerks were invited to answer each vignette, and then received automated expert feedback including explanations. Seventy-nine students sat for the activity. The optimized test included 20 cases and 54 questions (Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.64). Student - expert concordance scores ranged from 54 to 77 with a mean at 64.6 (standard deviation 5.1). Satisfaction survey results indicated high satisfaction and relevance of tool despite some pitfalls. Post-test focus group data revealed relevant experiential learning on professionalism issues. Students' scores and perceptions suggest pedagogic relevance of the CJLT in fostering professionalism development in clerkship. CJLT is user-friendly and shows promise as a situation experiential learning activity.

  13. Detection thresholds for 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine in Concord and Niagara grape juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, G J; Karthik, A; Inglis, D; Sears, M; Ker, K

    2008-08-01

    2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) is the compound responsible for the off-flavor known as ladybug taint, which occurs when Harmnonia axyridis beetles become incorporated with the grapes during juice processing. It is also an important grape-derived component of juice flavor in some varieties. The main objective of this study was to determine the orthonasal (ON) and retronasal (RN) detection thresholds for IPMP in juice. The ASTM E679 ascending forced choice method of limits was used to determine detection thresholds for 26 individuals in Concord and Niagara juices. Group best estimate thresholds (BETs) averaged 0.93 ng/L and were 50% and 21% higher in Concord than in Niagara juices for ON and RN evaluation, respectively. Group BETs for IPMP (ng/L) for Concord were ON: 1.11; RN: 1.02 and for Niagara were ON: 0.74; RN: 0.84. Variation in individual detection thresholds was observed, although familiarity with ladybug taint was not associated with individual threshold values. We conclude that humans are very sensitive to IPMP in juice, and that detection thresholds are more strongly influenced by grape variety than evaluation mode. These results may assist juice producers in establishing tolerance levels for IPMP in juice affected by ladybug taint or derived from grapes of suboptimal ripeness.

  14. Fulminant clostridium difficile colitis: comparing computed tomography with histopathology: are they concordant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Seth I; Larson, Brent; Balzer, Bonnie; Wachsman, Ashley; Haker, Katherine; Fleshner, Phillip; Annamalai, Alagappan; Margulies, Daniel R

    2014-10-01

    A Total abdominal colectomy (TAC) is recommended for fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis (FCDC) because intraoperative assessment of diseased segments is inaccurate. To determine whether computerized tomography (CT) provides an accurate assessment of disease, we examined the concordance between CT and histopathologic colitis distribution in patients undergoing TAC for FCDC. The ileocolon was divided into seven distinct segments. Of 20 patients meeting criteria, the median interval between preoperative CT and TAC was 1.5 days (range, 0 to 23 days), and mortality was 65 per cent. The CT distribution of colitis was pancolitis in 12 patients and segmental in eight. Nine of the 12 patients with CT pancolitis had histologic pancolitis (75% concordance). Four of the eight patients with CT-diagnosed segmental disease had histologic segmental disease (50% concordance). For patients with FCDC, the distribution of colitis on CT agrees with the histopathologic extent of disease in the majority of patients. However, discordance between CT and histologic extent of disease was present in 25 to 50 per cent of patients. Therefore, the recommendation for TAC rather than segmental resection for FCDC remains justified.

  15. Embodied simulation as part of affective evaluation processes: task dependence of valence concordant EMG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, André; Funcke, Jakob Maria

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on recent findings, this study examines whether valence concordant electromyography (EMG) responses can be explained as an unconditional effect of mere stimulus processing or as somatosensory simulation driven by task-dependent processing strategies. While facial EMG over the Corrugator supercilii and the Zygomaticus major was measured, each participant performed two tasks with pictures of album covers. One task was an affective evaluation task and the other was to attribute the album covers to one of five decades. The Embodied Emotion Account predicts that valence concordant EMG is more likely to occur if the task necessitates a somatosensory simulation of the evaluative meaning of stimuli. Results support this prediction with regard to Corrugator supercilii in that valence concordant EMG activity was only present in the affective evaluation task but not in the non-evaluative task. Results for the Zygomaticus major were ambiguous. Our findings are in line with the view that EMG activity is an embodied part of the evaluation process and not a mere physical outcome.

  16. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to `transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  17. ATLAS Job Transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, G A; The ATLAS collaboration; Maddocks, H J; Harenberg, T; Sandhoff, M; Sarrazin, B

    2013-01-01

    The need to run complex workflows for a high energy physics experiment such as ATLAS has always been present. However, as computing resources have become even more constrained, compared to the wealth of data generated by the LHC, the need to use resources efficiently and manage complex workflows within a single grid job have increased. In ATLAS, a new Job Transform framework has been developed that we describe in this paper. This framework manages the multiple execution steps needed to 'transform' one data type into another (e.g., RAW data to ESD to AOD to final ntuple) and also provides a consistent interface for the ATLAS production system. The new framework uses a data driven workflow definition which is both easy to manage and powerful. After a transform is defined, jobs are expressed simply by specifying the input data and the desired output data. The transform infrastructure then executes only the necessary substeps to produce the final data products. The global execution cost of running the job is mini...

  18. ATLAS overview week highlights

    CERN Document Server

    D. Froidevaux

    2005-01-01

    A warm and early October afternoon saw the beginning of the 2005 ATLAS overview week, which took place Rue de La Montagne Sainte-Geneviève in the heart of the Quartier Latin in Paris. All visitors had been warned many times by the ATLAS management and the organisers that the premises would be the subject of strict security clearance because of the "plan Vigipirate", which remains at some level of alert in all public buildings across France. The public building in question is now part of the Ministère de La Recherche, but used to host one of the so-called French "Grandes Ecoles", called l'Ecole Polytechnique (in France there is only one Ecole Polytechnique, whereas there are two in Switzerland) until the end of the seventies, a little while after it opened its doors also to women. In fact, the setting chosen for this ATLAS overview week by our hosts from LPNHE Paris has turned out to be ideal and the security was never an ordeal. For those seeing Paris for the first time, there we...

  19. Nova Scotia wind atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In order to stimulate growth of the wind energy sector in the province of Nova Scotia and to optimize the development of an important renewable energy source in the province, the Nova Scotia Department of Energy has launched the Nova Scotia wind atlas project. The atlas provides valuable information regarding the identification of the optimal locations to install wind farm turbines, both at the large utility scale level and at the private or small business levels. This article presented information on the wind atlas website and on wind resource maps. Background information on the project was presented. The wind resource maps were developed in partnership by the K.C, Irving Chair in Sustainable Development at Moncton University and the Applied Geomatics Research Group at the Nova Scotia Community College. The wind resource maps are available for viewing on the website where users can click on tile section to obtain enlarged versions of wind resource maps for different parts of the province of Nova Scotia. The maps were developed using computer modelling. 7 figs.

  20. ATLAS Detector Upgrade Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Dobre, Monica; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new all-silicon tracker, significant upgrades of the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acquisition. ATLAS is also examining potential benefits of extens...

  1. ATLAS Upgrade Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After the successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010-2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000/fb by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Current planning in ATLAS envisions significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for a new...

  2. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  3. Concordance of visual and manipulative responsiveness to novel and familiar stimuli: a function of test procedures or of prior experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, J

    1976-12-01

    Concordance of differential visual and manipulative responsiveness to novel stimuli at 6 months of age was found when differential attractiveness and familiarity of the stimuli were controlled. This finding corroborates the findings of an earlier study in which the same object was used as the familiarization object for all subjects. The data indicate that concordance at 6 months of age is not an artifact of the test procedure. A hypothesis suggested by the comparison of these findings with others in the literature is that the opportunity to manipulate a wide variety of objects in the natural environment may contribute to the concordance of visual and manipulative responsiveness to novel stimuli at this age.

  4. A Time for Atlases and Atlases for Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Yoav; Mizrahi, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism's experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases. PMID:20204142

  5. A time for atlases and atlases for time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Livneh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neuroanatomy and computational power are leading to the construction of new digital brain atlases. Atlases are rising as indispensable tools for comparing anatomical data as well as being stimulators of new hypotheses and experimental designs. Brain atlases describe nervous systems which are inherently plastic and variable. Thus, the levels of brain plasticity and stereotypy would be important to evaluate as limiting factors in the context of static brain atlases. In this review, we discuss the extent of structural changes which neurons undergo over time, and how these changes would impact the static nature of atlases. We describe the anatomical stereotypy between neurons of the same type, highlighting the differences between invertebrates and vertebrates. We review some recent experimental advances in our understanding of anatomical dynamics in adult neural circuits, and how these are modulated by the organism’s experience. In this respect, we discuss some analogies between brain atlases and the sequenced genome and the emerging epigenome. We argue that variability and plasticity of neurons are substantially high, and should thus be considered as integral features of high-resolution digital brain atlases.

  6. Correlates of non-concordance between perceived and objective measures of walkability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, Klaus; Bauman, Adrian; Owen, Neville

    2009-04-01

    Objective and self-reported physical environmental attributes have been related to physical activity. We examined the characteristics of adults who are resident in objectively identified high walkable neighborhoods but whose perceptions of neighborhood attributes are not concordant with objective attributes relating to high walkability. Neighborhood built-environment attributes relating to walkability (dwelling density, intersection density, land use mix, and net retail area) were determined objectively, using Geographic Information System databases; data on corresponding perceptions of local environment attributes (from the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale) were derived from a self-completion survey of a socially diverse sample of 2,650 adults aged 19 to 65. Objective and perceived walkability attributes were categorized using median splits, and correlates of non-concordance were determined using multiple logistic regression models. There was a fair overall agreement between objectively determined walkability and perceived walkability (Kappa = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.31-0.39). Among those resident in objectively assessed high walkable areas (n = 1,063), 32.1% perceived them to be low walkable; conversely, 32.7% (n = 1,021) resident in objectively determined low walkability areas perceived them to be high. For residents of objectively determined high walkable areas, the characteristics that differentiated those with perceptions of low walkability (non-concordant perceptions) from those with concordant perceptions of high walkability were: not being university-educated (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.06-2.04); having lower household incomes (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.09-2.17); being overweight (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.03-2.07); and walking fewer days per week for transport (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.11-2.70). Higher walking times and more positive cognitive variables were noted among participants who lived in a neighborhood with low walkability that was perceived as high compared

  7. Augmenting atlas-based liver segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning by incorporating image features proximal to the atlas contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Chen, Jinhu; Li, Hongsheng; Yin, Yong; Ibragimov, Bulat; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Atlas-based segmentation utilizes a library of previously delineated contours of similar cases to facilitate automatic segmentation. The problem, however, remains challenging because of limited information carried by the contours in the library. In this studying, we developed a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. This study presented a new concept of atlas based segmentation method. Instead of using the complete volume of the target organs, only information along the organ contours from the atlas images was used for guiding segmentation of the new image. In setting up an atlas-based library, we included not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. In this work, 139 CT images with normal appearing livers collected for radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were first registered to each other using affine registration. The nonlinear narrow shell was generated alongside the object contours of registered images. Matching voxels were selected inside common narrow shell image features of a library case and a new case using a speed-up robust features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the new image by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy optimization within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by physicians. A novel atlas-based segmentation technique with inclusion of neighborhood image features through the introduction of a narrow-shell surrounding the target objects was established. Application of the technique to

  8. Augmenting atlas-based liver segmentation for radiotherapy treatment planning by incorporating image features proximal to the atlas contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Chen, Jinhu; Li, Hongsheng; Yin, Yong; Ibragimov, Bulat; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-07

    Atlas-based segmentation utilizes a library of previously delineated contours of similar cases to facilitate automatic segmentation. The problem, however, remains challenging because of limited information carried by the contours in the library. In this studying, we developed a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. This study presented a new concept of atlas based segmentation method. Instead of using the complete volume of the target organs, only information along the organ contours from the atlas images was used for guiding segmentation of the new image. In setting up an atlas-based library, we included not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. In this work, 139 CT images with normal appearing livers collected for radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were first registered to each other using affine registration. The nonlinear narrow shell was generated alongside the object contours of registered images. Matching voxels were selected inside common narrow shell image features of a library case and a new case using a speed-up robust features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the new image by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy optimization within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by physicians. A novel atlas-based segmentation technique with inclusion of neighborhood image features through the introduction of a narrow-shell surrounding the target objects was established. Application of the technique to

  9. The Locomotive is running full speed in the ATLAS MUONs

    CERN Multimedia

    Mikenberg, G.

    The ATLAS MUON Spectrometer is, like most of the ATLAS systems, a large collection of detectors that operate at the limit of the technology. They have to provide the MUON trigger for the ATLAS detector over very large surfaces (7000m2) and measure the passage of MUONs over distances ranging between 5 to 13m, with relative precisions between the various measurement planes of few tenths of microns, while controlling various external parameters ranging from the relative positions of the detectors (alignment systems controlled to the level of 20 microns) to the magnetic field (to be reconstructed at the level of 20 Gauss). Although many of the integration problems with the rest of the ATLAS detectors have not been fully clarified, one needs to start production, in order to be ready on time to enjoy the Physics of the LHC. This means to start the coordinated work in more than 25 production and testing sites, located all around the world, that have to produce precision detectors at industrial speed, which sho...

  10. PRESERVASI IMAGO JANTAN ULAT SUTERA LIAR ATTACUS ATLAS (LEPIDOPTERA: SATURNIIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Prasetyo Nugroho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild silkworm (Attacus atlas has high economic value. There is a problem in rearing wild silkworm Attacus atlas, the emergence of males and females imagoes are not the same. The aim of this research was to study the survival lifetime and the sperm of the male imago. This research used randomized design experiment, with two treatments of storage temperature (room temperature 27 °C and cool storage temperature 5 °C and eight repetitions. Survival of male imago, sperm survival, and imago body weight had been measured. The results showed that cool temperature (5 °C could to extend significantly (P<0,01 the survival lifetime of male imago and the sperm of male imago A. atlas up to 11.5 ± 0.7 days. There is a positive correlation between body weight and lifetime of male imago of wild silkworm A. atlas, so the lifetime of male imago is predicable from their body weight.

  11. Concordance between nurse-reported quality of care and quality of care as publicly reported by nurse-sensitive indicators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stalpers, Dewi; Kieft, Renate A. M. M; Linden, Dimitri; Kaljouw, Marian J; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    .... However, little is known about the relationship between these kinds of measures. This study aimed to examine concordance between nurse-sensitive screening indicators and nurse-perceived quality of care. Methods...

  12. Neither, (n)or nothing and hardly in negative concord constructions in traditional dialects of British English

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susagna Tubau

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I investigate, within a minimalist framework, how negative concord is composed in non-standard British English constructions containing the negative adverb neither, the general extender (n...

  13. Fine Needle Aspiration Using Improved Agar Microbiopsy is Highly Concordant With Renal Mass Final Diagnosis and Subclassification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieven, Louise W.; Smedts, Frank; Hopman, Anton H.; van der Wijk, Jan; Nijman, Rien J.; de Jong, Igle J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Computerized tomography and ultrasound are usually sufficient for preoperative evaluation of renal masses greater than 5 cm. For renal masses less than 5 cm additional histological evaluation could improve diagnosis and treatment decisions. We investigated the concordance between an

  14. Concordant and discordant reports on shared sexual behaviors and condom use among African American serodiscordant couples in four cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This paper examines the concordance of reported shared sexual behaviors, including condom use, among 535 heterosexual, African American, serodiscordant couples and identifies factors that might predict discordant reports. Percentages of agreement, Kappa and McNemar's statistics and conditional probability indices are used to measure concordance. Logistic regression models identify predictors of couples' discordant sexual reports. Analyses revealed Kappa statistics for reporting anal sex, fellatio and cunnilingus indicated moderate to substantial agreement. The effects of demographics and the couples' relationship contexts on concordance of reported sexual behaviors were found to vary somewhat by gender and type of sexual behavior. Findings showed that concordance of reporting between the couples was consistent for the past 90 and 30 days. Findings from this paper provide new scientific insights into the knowledge base of self-reported couples' data and suggest that these data can be used to evaluate their accuracy and serve as a proxy for validity.

  15. Jet energy calibration in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Schouten, Doug

    A correct energy calibration for jets is essential to the success of the ATLAS experi- ment. In this thesis I study a method for deriving an in situ jet energy calibration for the ATLAS detector. In particular, I show the applicability of the missing transverse energy projection fraction method. This method is shown to set the correct mean energy for jets. Pileup effects due to the high luminosities at ATLAS are also stud- ied. I study the correlations in lateral distributions of pileup energy, as well as the luminosity dependence of the in situ calibration metho

  16. The new European wind atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    European Wind Atlas” aiming at reducing overall uncertainties in determining wind conditions; standing on three legs: A data bank from a series of intensive measuring campaigns; a thorough examination and redesign of the model chain from global, mesoscale to microscale models and creation of the wind atlas...... database. Although the project participants will come from the 27 member states it is envisioned that the project will be opened for global participation through test benches for model development and sharing of data – climatologically as well as experimental. Experiences from national wind atlases...... will be utilized, such as the Indian, the South African, the Finnish, the German, the Canadian atlases and others....

  17. High prevalence of undiagnosed vertebral fractures in patients suffering from hip fracture at their hospital admission: weak concordance among observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Manuel; Saavedra, Pedro; Gómez-de-Tejada, María-Jesús; Navarro, María-del-Carmen; Jódar, Esteban; García, Esther; Fuentes, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Vertebral fracture is often underdiagnosed. Patients with hip fracture may suffer from vertebral fracture without knowing it. The diagnosis of vertebral fracture is sometimes difficult because there is no consensus regarding the definition of osteoporotic vertebral fracture, and several indexes may be used to diagnose it and the concordance between several observers may not be optimal. To study the concordance in the diagnosis of vertebral fracture done by three different doctors: an orthopedic surgeon, a radiologist, and a bone mineral metabolism expert. A lateral thoracic-lumbar spine X-Ray was performed in 177 patients suffering from hip fracture to assess the presence or absence of vertebral fractures. Three different observers applied Genant's criteria for it. Concordance between observers was measured using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Patients suffering from hip fractures have undiagnosed vertebral fractures in a range that varies from 41.8 to 47.5% depending on the observer. The concordance in the diagnosis of vertebral fractures is quite low, ranging a Cohen's kappa coefficient from 0.43 to 0.55 and a percentage of concordance varying from 64 to 72%. The best concordance was found between observers 1 and 3. Depending on the observer who made the diagnosis, the prevalence of previously undiagnosed vertebral fractures in patients with HF varied widely. We selected three different observers to assess the possible differences in the diagnosis of vertebral fractures among these patients and using the same method (Genant's semi-quantitative assessment), surprisingly, there was little concordance among the three of them. Patients with hip fracture have high prevalence of undiagnosed vertebral fractures. The diagnosis of these fractures varies widely depending on the observers and the Cohen's kappa coefficient and percentage of concordance is rather low.

  18. Concordance between clinician and patient ratings as predictors of response, remission, and recurrence in major depressive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Li, Thomas; Kornstein, Susan G.; Friedman, Edward S.; Rothschild, Anthony J.; Pedersen, Ron; Ninan, Philip; Keller, Martin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Prevention of Recurrent Episodes of Depression With Venlafaxine Extended Release (ER) for Two Years (PREVENT) trial to evaluate whether discrepancies between clinician and patient ratings of depression severity were predictive of response, remission, and recurrence during treatment for a depressive episode. Patients who self-rated depression severity in concordance with the clinician (“concordant patients”) were defined as having a standardiz...

  19. Interoperable atlases of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunts, K; Hawrylycz, M J; Van Essen, D C; Van Horn, J D; Harel, N; Poline, J-B; De Martino, F; Bjaalie, J G; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Dehaene, S; Valdes-Sosa, P; Thirion, B; Zilles, K; Hill, S L; Abrams, M B; Tass, P A; Vanduffel, W; Evans, A C; Eickhoff, S B

    2014-10-01

    The last two decades have seen an unprecedented development of human brain mapping approaches at various spatial and temporal scales. Together, these have provided a large fundus of information on many different aspects of the human brain including micro- and macrostructural segregation, regional specialization of function, connectivity, and temporal dynamics. Atlases are central in order to integrate such diverse information in a topographically meaningful way. It is noteworthy, that the brain mapping field has been developed along several major lines such as structure vs. function, postmortem vs. in vivo, individual features of the brain vs. population-based aspects, or slow vs. fast dynamics. In order to understand human brain organization, however, it seems inevitable that these different lines are integrated and combined into a multimodal human brain model. To this aim, we held a workshop to determine the constraints of a multi-modal human brain model that are needed to enable (i) an integration of different spatial and temporal scales and data modalities into a common reference system, and (ii) efficient data exchange and analysis. As detailed in this report, to arrive at fully interoperable atlases of the human brain will still require much work at the frontiers of data acquisition, analysis, and representation. Among them, the latter may provide the most challenging task, in particular when it comes to representing features of vastly different scales of space, time and abstraction. The potential benefits of such endeavor, however, clearly outweigh the problems, as only such kind of multi-modal human brain atlas may provide a starting point from which the complex relationships between structure, function, and connectivity may be explored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Implications of community concordance for assessing stream integrity at three nested spatial scales in Minnesota, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolph, C.L.; Huff, D.D.; Chizinski, C.J.; Vondracek, B.

    2011-01-01

    Fish and invertebrate assemblage data collected from 670 stream sites in Minnesota (U.S.A.) were used to calculate concordance across three nested spatial scales (statewide, ecoregion and catchment). Predictive taxa richness models, calibrated using the same data, were used to evaluate whether concordant communities exhibited similar trends in human-induced taxa loss across all three scales. Finally, we evaluated the strength of the relationship between selected environmental variables and the composition of both assemblages at all three spatial scales. Significant concordance between fish and invertebrate communities occurred at the statewide scale as well as in six of seven ecoregions and 17 of the 21 major catchments. However, concordance was not consistently indicative of significant relationships between rates of fish and invertebrate taxa loss at those same scales. Fish and invertebrate communities were largely associated with different environmental variables, although the composition of both communities was strongly correlated with stream size across all three scales. Predictive taxa-loss models for fish assemblages were less sensitive and precise than models for invertebrate assemblages, likely because of the relatively low number of common fish taxa in our data set. Both models, however, distinguished reference from non-reference sites. The importance of concordance, geographic context and scale are discussed in relation to the design and interpretation of stream integrity indicators. In particular, our findings suggest that community concordance should not be viewed as a substitute for an evaluation of how assemblages respond to environmental stressors. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Brief report: parent-adolescent child concordance in social norms related to gender equity in marriage - findings from rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anita; Ghule, Mohan; Battala, Madhusudana; Dasgupta, Anindita; Ritter, Julie; Nair, Saritha; Saggurti, Niranjan; Silverman, Jay G; Balaiah, Donta

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to assess parent-adolescent child concordance on social norms related to gender equity in marriage in rural Maharashtra, India. Survey data on marital norms related to girl's marital age and choice, contraception, and marital violence (MV) were collected from unmarried adolescents (n = 113 girls, 116 boys) and their parents (n = 227 mothers, 203 fathers). Concordance was assessed using a Cohen's unweighted Kappa statistic, with analyses stratified by sex of parent and child. Analyses revealed fair (K = .25-.27) mother-daughter concordance on girls' right to choose when to marry, contraception use, and acceptability of MV. Father-son concordance was seen on girls' right to choose when (K = .22, slight) and who (K = .20, fair) to marry and MV acceptability (K = .53, moderate). No opposite sex parent-child concordance was revealed. Results indicate same but not opposite sex parent-child concordance on gender equity social norms related to marriage, suggesting same sex transfer of these norms. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An atlas of functions: with equator, the atlas function calculator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oldham, Keith

    2008-01-01

    ... of arguments. The first edition of An Atlas of Functions, the product of collaboration between a mathematician and a chemist, appeared during an era when the programmable calculator was the workhorse for the numerical evaluation of functions. That role has now been taken over by the omnipresent computer, and therefore the second edition delegates this duty to Equator, the Atlas function calculator. This is a software program that, as well as carrying out other tasks, will calculate va...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Cleveland, OH - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Cleveland, OH EnviroAtlas community. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Pittsburgh, PA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Woodbine, IA EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Durham, NC EnviroAtlas Area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Austin, TX EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  8. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a national user facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The ATLAS facility is a leading facility for nuclear structure research in the...

  9. Women of ATLAS - International Women's Day 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Women play key roles in the ATLAS Experiment: from young physicists at the start of their careers to analysis group leaders and spokespersons of the collaboration. Celebrate International Women's Day by meeting a few of these inspiring ATLAS researchers.

  10. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (http://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Phoenix, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Milwaukee, WI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (http://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  13. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Memphis, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  14. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Tampa, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  15. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Woodbine, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  16. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Durham, NC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas ). The layers in these web...

  17. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Paterson, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These EnviroAtlas web services support research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in these web...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Fresno, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  19. EnviroAtlas - Metrics for Portland, ME

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The layers in this web service...

  20. ATLAS : civil engineering at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video.

  1. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 1 - ATLAS: ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN is one of the largest and most complex scientific endeavours ever assembled. The detector, located at collision point 1 of the LHC, is designed to explore the fundamental components of nature and to study the forces that shape our universe. The past year’s discovery of a Higgs boson is one of the most important scientific achievements of our time, yet this is only one of many key goals of ATLAS. During a brief break in their journey, some of the 3000-member ATLAS collaboration will be taking time to share the excitement of this exploration with you. On surface no restricted access  The exhibit at Point 1 will give visitors a chance to meet these modern-day explorers and to learn from them how answers to the most fundamental questions of mankind are being sought. Activities will include a visit to the ATLAS detector, located 80m below ground; watching the prize-winning ATLAS movie in the ATLAS cinema; seeing real particle tracks in a cloud chamber and discussi...

  2. Problems in problem analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The majority of literature on engineering design methods is focused on the processes of fulfilling the design goals as efficiently as possible. This paper will focus on - and discuss - the processes of determining the design goals: the specifications. The purpose is to draw attention to the inher...... to the inherent problems, dilemmas and possibilities in these processes bearing in mind that that the most important decisions in a design project are taken in the beginning of the project....

  3. Application of Grid technologies and search for exotics physics with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    March, Luis; Ros, Eduardo

    The work presented in this thesis has been performed within the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) collaboration. Two subjects have been investigated. One subject is the Computing System Commissioning (CSC) production using an instance of the Production System (ProdSys), called Lexor, and the test of the ATLAS Distributed Analysis (ADA) using ProdSys. The other subject is the sim- ulation and subsequent analysis of processes involving new particles predicted by the Little Higgs model within the ATLAS detector. An introduction to the Standard Model (SM), the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the ATLAS experiment, software and computing is given in chapter 1. The problems of the SM are discussed and some proposed solutions are reviewed. The SM introduction is followed by an overview of LHC and ATLAS. The main AT- LAS subsystems are described and the ATLAS software and computing model is discussed. Many physics processes within and beyond the Standard Model involve b-quark decays. New heavy particles, expected in mo...

  4. Diffractive measurements in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grafstrom, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Several diffractive measurements in ATLAS are discussed. Using a diffractive enhanced event sample, the diffractive fraction of the inelastic cross section is determined to be in the range 25-30 % dependent on what model is used. Rapidity gap studies give similar percentages. The differential cross section as a function of the rapidity gap size has been determined at the hadron level. The diffractive cross section is roughly 1 mb per unit of gap size for gap sizes bigger than 3.5 units.

  5. Top Properties at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sandbach, Ruth Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Properties of the top quark are measured with the ATLAS detector using LHC proton-proton collisions data. Measurements of the top-quark mass and polarisation, as well as of the polarization of W bosons in top quark decays to probe the Wtb-vertex are presented. In addition, measurements of the spin correlation between top and anti-top quarks as well as of the top-quark charge asymmetry, which constitute important tests of QCD and are sensitive to new physics, are discussed.

  6. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CPPM Laboratory Marseille Starting with the Workshop- adding modules to the strip 00:09:19 Exterior-entering the lab site by car, Sascha Rosanov and a PR lady walking, Lab sign on building -Physique des Particules de Marseille 00:20:00 Interviews of the ATLAS pixel work for bio-mediacal research 00:34:00 Interview of Roy Aleksov, Head of CPPM Laboratory, Working in international team, working with CERN and GRID The rest of the film inclusdes lab testingand some exterior shots.

  7. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Reception for Markus Nordberg and Andrew Millington by about 20 physicists from the Budker Nuclear Physics Institute Host: Yuri Tikhonov Various short talks and exchanges, with coffee Sequence 2 Visit to BINP Facilities Tikhonov and Nordberg walking and talking Visit to electron accelerator, old solar detector Sequence 3 Visit to BNIP workshops Work on big wheel segments shots over-exposed Work on Atlas coils LHC Magnets Men playing chess, exterior shots of Tikhonov, Nordberg arriving Sequence 4 Shots from car of journey from workshop to main BNIP building.

  8. Surveying the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The cathedral-like cavern into which the ATLAS experiment will be lowered and installed forms a vital part of the engineering work at CERN in preparation for the new LHC accelerator. This cavern, being measured by surveyors in these images, will have one of the largest spans of any man-made underground structure. The massive 46X25X25 cubic metre detector will be the largest of its type in the world when it is completed for the LHC start-up in 2008.

  9. The ATLAS IBL BOC

    CERN Document Server

    SCHROER, N; The ATLAS collaboration; BRUNI, G; BRUSCHI, M; DANTONE, I; FALCHIERI, D; DOPKE, J; FLICK, T; GABRIELLI, A; GROSSE-KNETTER, J; Heim, T; JOSEPH, J; KRIEGER, N; KUGEL, A; MORETTINI, P; Neumann, M; RIZZI, M; TRAVAGLINI, R; ZANNOLI, S; ZOCCOLI, A

    2011-01-01

    The pixel detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN will be upgraded with an additional layer (IBL) in 2013. To handle the data readout the currently used VME card pairs consisting of a back of crate card (BOC) and a read out driver (ROD) are being redesigned. We present details of the hardware design of the new BOC prototype. It takes advantage from modern FPGA technology and commercial optical modules and abandons the need for a variety of custom components used on the old card. Also the throughput is four times higher and additional features are implemented.

  10. The ATLAS Upgrade programme

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    After the ¯rst successful years of LHC running, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades leading eventually to about ¯ve times the design-luminosity some 10-years from now. Coping with the high instantaneous and integrated luminosity will be a great challenge for the ATLAS detector and will require changes in most of the subsystems, specially those at low radii and large pseudorapidity, as well as in its trigger architecture. Plans to consolidate and improve the physics capabilities of the current detector over the next decade are summarized in this paper.

  11. Higgs searches with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aurousseau, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    This document is an overview of the recent results from the ATLAS experiment in the search for a Standard Model Higgs boson, using an integrated luminosity of 4.8~\\ifb{} and 13~\\ifb{} of data at 7~\\TeV{} and 8~\\TeV{} in the center-of-mass, respectively. The results are presented in the \\HZZllll, \\Hgg, \\HWWlnln, \\Htautau{} and \\Hbb{} channels. An update on the combination of the various channels and on the properties measurement (spin, parity) of the observed state is given.

  12. ATLAS Style Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhandler, E F

    2008-01-01

    This is a compendium of rules, recommendations, information and advice for writing papers and notes within the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It covers what to include in the paper, and some general guidelines and specific points about writing a scientific paper. There are sections on the use of English (though it is not a guide to grammar), punctuation, and typography. Advice about the use of LATEX is given in the main text, and there is an appendix on software tools containing general comments about LATEX and information on using Microsoft Word. Currently on version 2.6, 3 March 2017, 47pp.

  13. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The heavy-ion programme in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider aims to probe and characterise hot and dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. Moreover, smaller collision systems involving nuclei and hadrons are of interest to disentangle initial- from final-state effects. This report presents new results based on lead-lead and proton-proton data collected at √sNN = 5.02 TeV in 2015, including measurements of bulk collectivity, charged-particle production, electroweak bosons, photon-jet correlations, and quarkonium suppression. First attempts to measure electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions are also discussed.

  14. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousson Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC that delivered more than 2 fb−1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  15. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  16. Balance Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady. You may also ... injuries, such as a hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ear. ...

  17. [Concordance in the registry of dementia among the main sources of clinical information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta-Moreno, Javier; Obón-Azuara, Blanca; Gimeno-Felíu, Luis; Achkar-Tuglaman, Nesib Nicolás; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to analyse the concordance in the registry of dementia among the main sources of clinical information, with the aim of determining their usefulness for epidemiological and clinical research. Descriptive study of patients assigned to the Aragon Health Service in 2010 (n=1,344,891). (i)the pharmacy billing database (n=9,392); (ii)Primary Care electronic health records (EHR) (n=9,471), and (iii)the hospital minimum basic data set (n=3,289). When studying the concordance of the databases, the group of patients with a specific treatment for dementia (i.e., acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and/or memantine) was taken as the reference. The diagnosis in Primary Care was missing for 47.3% of patients taking anti-dementia drugs. The same occurred with 38.3% of dementia patients admitted to hospital during the study year. Among patients with a diagnosis of dementia in the EHR, only half (52.3%) was under treatment for this condition. This percentage decreased to 34.4% in patients with the diagnosis registered in the hospital database. The weak concordance in the registry of the dementia diagnosis between the main health information systems makes their use and analysis more complex, and supports the need to include all available health data sources in order to gain a global picture of the epidemiological and clinical reality of this health condition. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinically concordant variations of Alzheimer pathology in aphasic versus amnestic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Tamar; Gasho, Katherine; Rademaker, Alfred; Lalehzari, Mona; Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily; Wieneke, Christina; Bigio, Eileen; Geula, Changiz; Mesulam, M-Marsel

    2012-05-01

    Primary progressive aphasia is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by gradual dissolution of language but relative sparing of other cognitive domains, especially memory. It is associated with asymmetric atrophy in the language-dominant hemisphere (usually left), and differs from typical Alzheimer-type dementia where amnesia is the primary deficit. Various pathologies have been reported, including the tangles and plaques of Alzheimer's disease. Identification of Alzheimer pathology in these aphasic patients is puzzling since tangles and related neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease typically emerge in memory-related structures such as entorhinal cortex and spread to language-related neocortex later in the disease. Furthermore, Alzheimer pathology is typically symmetric. How can a predominantly limbic and symmetric pathology cause the primary progressive aphasia phenotype, characterized by relative preservation of memory and asymmetric predilection for the language-dominant hemisphere? Initial investigations into the possibility that Alzheimer pathology displays an atypical distribution in primary progressive aphasia yielded inconclusive results. The current study was based on larger groups of patients with either primary progressive aphasia or a typical amnestic dementia. Alzheimer pathology was the principal diagnosis in all cases. The goal was to determine whether Alzheimer pathology had clinically-concordant, and hence different distributions in these two phenotypes. Stereological counts of tangles and plaques revealed greater leftward asymmetry for tangles in primary progressive aphasia but not in the amnestic Alzheimer-type dementia (P Alzheimer pathologies. The presence of left-sided tangle predominance and higher neocortical-to-entorhinal tangle ratio in primary progressive aphasia establishes clinical concordance of Alzheimer pathology with the aphasic phenotype. The one case with reversed asymmetry, however, suggests that these concordant

  19. Concordance of In-Home "Smart" Scale Measurement with Body Weight Measured In-Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn M; Wing, Rena R

    2016-06-01

    Newer "smart" scales that transmit participants' body weights directly to data collection centers offer the opportunity to simplify weight assessment in weight management research; however, little data exist on the concordance of these data compared to weights measured at in-person assessments. We compared the weights of 58 participants (mean±SD BMI = 31.6±4.8, age = 52.1±9.7 years, 86.2% White, 65.5% Female) measured by study staff at an in-person assessment visit to weights measured on the same day at home using BodyTrace "smart" scales. These measures occurred after 3 months of an internet-based weight management intervention. Weight (mean±SD) measured at the 3-month in-person assessment visit was 81.5±14.7kg compared to 80.4±14.5kg measured on the same day using in-home body weight scales; mean bias =1.1±0.8kg, 95% limits of agreement = -0.5 to 2.6. Two outliers in the data suggest that there may be greater variability between measurements for participants weighing above 110 kg. Results suggest good concordance between the measurements and support the use of the BodyTrace smart scale in weight management research. Future trials using BodyTrace scales for outcome assessment should clearly define protocols for measurement and associated instructions to participants (e.g., instruct individuals to weigh at the same time of day, similarly clothed). Finally, measure concordance should be investigated in a group of individuals weighing more than 110kg.

  20. [Concordance between 3 methods of measurement the ankle-brachial index to diagnose peripheral artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forés, Rosa; Alzamora, Maria Teresa; Pera, Guillem; Torán, Pere; Urrea, Magalí; Heras, Antonio

    2014-10-21

    To determine the concordance of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) determined by automatic measurements (sphygmomanometer Omron and the triple cuff device) using doppler as the gold-standard, computing as well as sensitivity and specificity. ARTPER population cohort subjects, classified as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) if ABI<0.9, calcified if ABI≥1.4 and healthy otherwise. To asses concordance we used kappa index using the 3 categories and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for ABI continuous values. Eighty-eight participants, 52% women, 57-87 years. It was possible to calculate the ABI using doppler for 100%, 97% using Omron and 95% using triple. ABI means (standard deviation) were: doppler 1.089 (0.236), Omron 1.082 (0.110), triple 1.146 (0.134), with poor agreement (ICC doppler/Omron=0.27, doppler/triple=0.13, and triple/Omron=0.39). Categorizing ABI as PAD-healthy-calcified 13.6% (doppler), 6.8% (Omron) and 3.4% (triple) were PAD and 9.1% (doppler), 1.1% (Omron) and 9.1% (triple) were calcified. Kappa indexes were weak (doppler/Omron=0.22, doppler/triple=0.01, triple/Omron=0.17). Both triple and Omron were highly specific (97%) but had very low sensitivity (8 and 33%, respectively) compared to doppler. Concordance of ABI automatic measurements as Omron and triple with doppler was poor, and they do not seem suitable for screening for PAD in primary care consultations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Two new wheels for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Juergen Zimmer (Max Planck Institute), Roy Langstaff (TRIUMF/Victoria) and Sergej Kakurin (JINR), in front of one of the completed wheels of the ATLAS Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter. A decade of careful preparation and construction by groups in three continents is nearing completion with the assembly of two of the four 4 m diameter wheels required for the ATLAS Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter. The first two wheels have successfully passed all their mechanical and electrical tests, and have been rotated on schedule into the vertical position required in the experiment. 'This is an important milestone in the completion of the ATLAS End Cap Calorimetry' explains Chris Oram, who heads the Hadronic End Cap Calorimeter group. Like most experiments at particle colliders, ATLAS consists of several layers of detectors in the form of a 'barrel' and two 'end caps'. The Hadronic Calorimeter layer, which measures the energies of particles such as protons and pions, uses two techniques. The barrel part (Tile Calorimeter) cons...

  2. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Scandinavia and other countries. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed...... by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the LHC Computing Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous...... environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF....

  3. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  4. The atlas of endangered species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mackay, R

    2009-01-01

    Vividly illustrated with full-color maps and detailed graphics, The Atlas of Endangered Species catalogs the inhabitants of a wide variety of ecosystems, including forests, mangroves, and coral reefs...

  5. ATLAS recognises its best suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    The ATLAS Collaboration has recently rewarded two of its suppliers in the construction of very major detector components, fabricated in Japan. The ATLAS Supplier Award in recognition of excellent supplier performance was attributed on 2nd September 2002 during a ceremony in Hall 180 to Kawasaki Heavy Industries, while Toshiba Corporation received the award two months before at their headquarters in Japan. The ATLAS experiment will become a reality thanks to a large international collaboration partnership. The industrial suppliers for the components all over the world play a major role in the construction of this gigantic jigsaw for the LHC. And sometimes they perform so well, that their work deserves specially to be recognised. This is the case for Kawasaki Heavy Industries and Toshiba Corporation, producers of the Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat and of the Superconducting Central Solenoid, respectively. With these awards, the ATLAS Collaboration wants to congratulate Kawasaki and Toshiba for fulfilling the hi...

  6. Linguistic Atlas of French Polynesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charpentier, Jean-Michel; François, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    ... François, the Linguistic Atlas of French Polynesia pays tribute to the rich linguistic landscape of the country by documenting thoroughly twenty different communalects, in the form of 2250 maps...

  7. World Ocean Atlas 2005, Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — World Ocean Atlas 2005 (WOA05) is a set of objectively analyzed (1° grid) climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, Apparent Oxygen...

  8. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  9. Wheels lining up for ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    On 30 October, the mechanics test assembly of the central barrel of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter was completed in building 185. It is the second wheel for the Tilecal completely assembled this year.

  10. Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For more than 20 years, the Dartmouth Atlas Project has documented glaring variations in how medical resources are distributed and used in the United States. The...

  11. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  12. Candidate region linkage analysis in twins discordant or concordant for depression symptomatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lene; Tan, Q; Kruse, T A

    2009-01-01

    Genetic risk factors contribute considerably to both clinical affective disorders and subsyndromal mood level. There is moreover evidence to suggest that the genetic basis of bipolar disorder and unipolar depression overlap to some extent, and several linkage analyses have suggested evidence...... for a common susceptibility locus in affective disorders on chromosome 12q24. In this study we investigated the chromosome 12 candidate region for linkage to the mean level of depression symptomatology, over a 10-year follow-up, using a highly informative sample of concordant and discordant twin pairs selected...

  13. Beyond concordance cosmology with magnification of gravitational-wave standard sirens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-12

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe's large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer.

  14. Mortality and guideline-concordant care for older patients with schizophrenia: a retrospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan Jack Y

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is associated with excess mortality and multimorbidity, which is possibly associated with difficulty in coordinating care for multiple mental and physical comorbidities. We analyzed the receipt by patients with schizophrenia of 11 types of guideline-concordant care and the association of such care with survival. Methods Guideline-concordant care over an 8-year period (financial years 2002 to 2009 was examined in a nationwide sample of 49,173 male veterans with schizophrenia, who were aged 50 years or older. Administrative databases from the electronic medical record system of the Veterans Health Administration (VA provided comprehensive measures of patient demographics and medical information. Relying on the 2004 American Psychiatric Association guidelines, patterns in 11 types of care were identified and cluster-analyzed. Care types included cardiovascular, metabolic, weight management, nicotine dependence, infectious diseases, vision, and mental health counseling (individual, family, drugs/alcohol, psychiatric medication, and compensated work therapy. Survival analysis estimated association of care patterns with survival, adjusting for clinical and demographic covariates. Results There was an average of four chronic diseases in addition to schizophrenia in the cohort, notably hypertension (43% and dyslipidemia (29%. Three longitudinal trajectories (clusters were identified: 'high-consistent' (averaging 5.4 types of care annually, 'moderate-consistent' (averaging 3.8, and 'poor-decreasing' (averaging 1.9. Most veterans were receiving cardiovascular care (67 to 76%, hepatic and renal function assays (79 to 84%, individual counseling (72 to 85% and psychiatry consults (66 to 82%, with the proportion receiving care varying by cluster group. After adjustment for age, baseline comorbidity, and other covariates, there was a greater survival rate for those with poor-decreasing care compared with high-consistent care

  15. Beyond Concordance Cosmology with Magnification of Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Stefano; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    We show how future gravitational-wave detectors would be able to discriminate between the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmological model and up-to-date competing alternatives, e.g., dynamical dark energy (DE) models or modified gravity (MG) theories. Our method consists of using the weak-lensing magnification effect that affects a standard-siren signal because of its traveling through the Universe’s large scale structure. As a demonstration, we present constraints on DE and MG from proposed gravitational-wave detectors, namely Einstein Telescope and DECI-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Big-Bang Observer.

  16. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  17. ATLAS Overview Week 2009 Barcelona

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    From October 5th to October 9th about 400 physicists from the ATLAS Collaboration met in Barcelona (Catalonia) to discuss the status of the experiment. The event was organized by the Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), a member of the ATLAS Collaboration. Besides the Scientific program, few social events were organized, such as Reception at the Palau de Pedralbes, a visit to the Fundacio Joan Miro and a social dinner at Maremagnunm hall.

  18. Composition of the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00221668; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration consists of about 5,000 members from 178 institutes in 38 countries. About half of the members of the collaboration are scientific authors of the papers, and there are about 1,200 students in the collaboration. This note presents data showing aspects of the composition of the collaboration; in particular the relative fraction of women is described at several levels within the hierarchy of the ATLAS experiment.

  19. Searches for Supersymmetry in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cervelli, Alberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson in ATLAS first run of data taking, and due to the lack of observation of new physics, searches for new particles such as Supersymmetric states are one of the main area of interest for the general purpose detectors operating at LHC. In this talk we will present a review of the searches for Supersymmetric particles, performed by the ATLAS experiment

  20. The ATLAS Student Event Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Fassouliotis, D; Roupas, Z; Vudragovic, D

    2007-01-01

    The ASEC (ATLAS Student Event Challenge) is an educational project which allows the students to learn about the elementary particles by studying "events", the products of beam collisions at the LHC. The events are collected by the ATLAS detector and displayed graphically using the ATLANTIS package. The students are given the means to select and analyse the events on-line, and subsequently present the results and draw conclusions.

  1. Diboson Physics Study with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Simic, Lj

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS prospects for the measurements of the $WW$, $WZ$ and $Wgamma$ cross sections and the limits on the anomalous $WWZ$ and $WWgamma$ couplings at 14 TeV are summarized. Study with full simulation of ATLAS detector leads to the conclusion that with 100 pb^{-1} of accumulated data $WW$, $Wgamma$ and $WZ$ signal can be established with more than 5$sigma$ statistical significance, while with 10-30 fb^{-1} of data systematic uncertainties will dominate diboson measurements.

  2. ATLAS experiment : mapping the secrets of the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2010-01-01

    This 4 page color brochure describes ATLAS and the LHC, the ATLAS inner detector, calorimeters, muon spectrometer, magnet system, a short definition of the terms "particles," "dark matter," "mass," "antimatter." It also explains the ATLAS collaboration and provides the ATLAS website address with some images of the detector and the ATLAS collaboration at work.

  3. CMS and ATLAS honour their suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    In order to motivate the hundreds of companies building their detectors, the CMS and ATLAS collaborations have recently been handing out awards of excellence to their top suppliers. At its second ceremony of this kind, CMS honoured four of its suppliers, while ATLAS for the first time paid tribute to two of its contractors. The atmosphere in the Council Chamber was festive rather than formal at the start of CMS week on Monday 5 March. Before embarking upon a long series of seminars and presentations, the Collaboration held its second awards ceremony to honour its top suppliers. By paying tribute to the exceptional efforts of certain suppliers, the Collaboration's aim is to motivate all the firms, some 500 in total, taking part in the experiment's construction. The CMS Awards panel thus singles out contractors who have not only provided full satisfaction in terms of compliance with specifications, quality and deadlines, but have in addition provided original solutions to delicate problems. Four firms came away...

  4. Federating Distributed Storage For Clouds In ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Berghaus, Frank; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Input data for applications that run in cloud computing centres can be stored at distant repositories, often with multiple copies of the popular data stored at many sites. Locating and retrieving the remote data can be challenging, and we believe that federating the storage can address this problem. A federation would locate the closest copy of the data currently on the basis of GeoIP information. Currently we are using the DynaFed data federation software solution developed by CERN IT. DynaFed supports several industry standards for connection protocols like Amazon's S3, Microsofts Azure, as well as WebDav and HTTP. Protocol dependent authentication is hidden from the user by using their X509 certificate. We have setup an instance of DynaFed and integrated it into the ATLAS Data Distribution Management system. We report on the challenges faced during the installation and integration. We have tested ATLAS analysis jobs submitted by the PanDA production system and we report on our first experiences with its op...

  5. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  6. ATLAS Cloud R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitkin, Sergey; Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Caballero Bejar, Jose; Benjamin, Doug; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Gable, Ian; Hendrix, Val; Hover, John; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramon; Love, Peter; Ohman, Henrik; Paterson, Michael; Sobie, Randall; Taylor, Ryan; Walker, Rodney; Zaytsev, Alexander; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained a significant insight into the cloud computing landscape and has identified points that still need to be addressed in order to fully utilize this technology. This contribution will explain the cloud integration models that are being evaluated and will discuss ATLAS' learning during the collaboration with leading commercial and academic cloud providers.

  7. First operational experience with the positive-ion injector of ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.; Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Munson, F.H.; Zinkann, G.

    1992-08-01

    The recently completed positive-ion injector for the heavy-ion accelerator ATLAS was designed as a replacement for the tandem injector of the present tandem-linac system and, unlike the tandem, the positive-ion injector is required to provide ions from the full range of the periodic table. The concept for the new injector, which consists of an ECR ion source on a voltage platform coupled to a very-low-velocity superconducting linac, introduces technical problems and uncertainties that are well beyond those encountered previously for superconducting linacs. The solution to these problems and their relationship to performance are outlined, and initial experience in the acceleration of heavy-ion beams through the entire ATLAS system is discussed. The unusually good longitudinal beam quality of ATLAS with its new injector is emphasized.

  8. First operational experience with the positive-ion injector of ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Pardo, R.C.; Shepard, K.W.; Bogaty, J.M.; Clifft, B.E.; Munson, F.H.; Zinkann, G.

    1992-01-01

    The recently completed positive-ion injector for the heavy-ion accelerator ATLAS was designed as a replacement for the tandem injector of the present tandem-linac system and, unlike the tandem, the positive-ion injector is required to provide ions from the full range of the periodic table. The concept for the new injector, which consists of an ECR ion source on a voltage platform coupled to a very-low-velocity superconducting linac, introduces technical problems and uncertainties that are well beyond those encountered previously for superconducting linacs. The solution to these problems and their relationship to performance are outlined, and initial experience in the acceleration of heavy-ion beams through the entire ATLAS system is discussed. The unusually good longitudinal beam quality of ATLAS with its new injector is emphasized.

  9. ATLAS DBM Module Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gorisek, Andrej [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, Marko [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sokhranyi, Grygorii [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); McGoldrick, Garrin [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Cerv, Matevz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-18

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Jozef Stefan Institute, CERN, and University of Toronto who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond has a number of properties that make it attractive for high energy physics detector applications. Its large band-gap (5.5 eV) and large displacement energy (42 eV/atom) make it a material that is inherently radiation tolerant with very low leakage currents and high thermal conductivity. CVD diamond is being investigated by the RD42 Collaboration for use very close to LHC interaction regions, where the most extreme radiation conditions are found. This document builds on that work and proposes a highly spatially segmented diamond-based luminosity monitor to complement the time-segmented ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) so that, when Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MTBS) and LUCID (LUminosity measurement using a Cherenkov Integrating Detector) have difficulty functioning, the ATLAS luminosity measurement is not compromised.

  10. ATLAS Future Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00225024; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After the successful operation at the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV in 2010 - 2012, the LHC is ramped up and successfully took data at the center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV in 2015. Meanwhile, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades of the accelerator, culminating roughly ten years from now in the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of the order of five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The ultimate goal is to extend the dataset from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2035 for ATLAS and CMS. In parallel, the experiments need to be keep lockstep with the accelerator to accommodate running beyond the nominal luminosity this decade. Along with maintenance and consolidation of the detector in the past few years, ATLAS has added inner b-layer to its tracking system. The challenge of coping with the HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requir...

  11. ATLAS muon detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Muon detectors from the outer layer of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Over a million individual detectors combine to make up the outer layer of ATLAS. All of this is exclusively to track the muons, the only detectable particles to make it out so far from the collision point. How the muon’s path curves in the magnetic field depends on how fast it is travelling. A fast muon curves only a very little, a slower one curves a lot. Together with the calorimeters, the muon detectors play an essential role in deciding which collisions to store and which to ignore. Certain signals from muons are a sure sign of exciting discoveries. To make sure the data from these collisions is not lost, some of the muon detectors react very quickly and trigger the electronics to record. The other detectors take a little longer, but are much more precise. Their job is to measure exactly where the muons have passed, calculating the curvature of their tracks in the magnetic field to the nearest five hundredths of a ...

  12. ATLAS Distributed Analysis Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Liko, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS production system has been successfully used to run production of simulation data at an unprecedented scale. Up to 10000 jobs were processed in one day. The experiences obtained operating the system on several grid flavours was essential to perform a user analysis using grid resources. First tests of the distributed analysis system were then performed. In the preparation phase data was registered in the LHC File Catalog (LFC) and replicated in external sites. For the main test, few resources were used. All these tests are only a first step towards the validation of the computing model. The ATLAS management computing board decided to integrate the collaboration efforts in distributed analysis in only one project, GANGA. The goal is to test the reconstruction and analysis software in a large scale Data production using Grid flavors in several sites. GANGA allows trivial switching between running test jobs on a local batch system and running large-scale analyses on the Grid; it provides job splitting a...

  13. Jet Calibration at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The accurate measurement of jets at high transverse momentum produced in proton proton collision at a centre of mass energy at \\sqrt(s)=7 TeV is important in many physics analysis at LHC. Due to the non-compensating nature of the ATLAS calorimeter, signal losses due to noise thresholds and in dead material the jet energy needs to be calibrated. Presently, the ATLAS experiment derives the jet calibration from Monte Carlo simulation using a simple correction that relates the true and the reconstructed jet energy. The jet energy scale and its uncertainty are derived from in-situ measurements and variation in the Monte Carlo simulation. Other calibration schemes have been also developed, they use hadronic cell calibrations or the topology of the jet constituents to reduce hadronic fluctuations in the jet response, improving in that way the jet resolution. The performances of the various calibration schemes using data and simulation, the evaluation of the modelling of the properties used to derive each calibration...

  14. ATLAS construction schedule

    CERN Multimedia

    Kotamaki, M

    The goal during the last few months has been to freeze and baseline as much as possible the schedules of various ATLAS systems and activities. The main motivations for the re-baselining of the schedules have been the new LHC schedule aiming at first collisions in early 2006 and the encountered delays in civil engineering as well as in the production of some of the detectors. The process was started by first preparing a new installation schedule that takes into account all the new external constraints and the new ATLAS staging scenario. The installation schedule version 3 was approved in the March EB and it provides the Ready For Installation (RFI) milestones for each system, i.e. the date when the system should be available for the start of the installation. TCn is now interacting with the systems aiming at a more realistic and resource loaded version 4 before the end of the year. Using the new RFI milestones as driving dates a new summary schedule has been prepared, or is under preparation, for each system....

  15. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    Della Mussia, S

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1st March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day. Two road trailers each with 64 wheels, positioned side by side. This was the solution chosen to transport the lower part of the central barrel of ATLAS' tile hadronic calorimeter from Building 185 to the PX16 shaft at Point 1 (see Figure 1). The transportation, and then the installation of the component in the experimental cavern, which took place over three days were, to say the least, rather spectacular. On 25 February, the component, consisting of eight 6-metre modules, was loaded on to the trailers. The segment of the barrel was transported on a steel support so that it wouldn't move an inch during the journey. On 26 February, once all the necessary safety checks had been carried out, the convoy was able to leave Buildi...

  16. The ATLAS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Vandelli, W; Battaglia, A; Beck, H P; Blair, R; Bogaerts, A; Bosman, M; Ciobotaru, M; Cranfield, R; Crone, G; Dawson, J; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drake, G; Ermoline, Y; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Gorini, B; Green, B; Haberichter, W; Haberli, C; Hauser, R; Hinkelbein, C; Hughes-Jones, R; Joos, M; Kieft, G; Klous, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kugel, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann, G; Martin, B; Mapelli, L; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Misiejuk, A; Mornacchi, G; Müller, M; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Petersen, J; Pope, B; Schlereth, J L; Spiwoks, R; Stancu, S; Strong, J; Sushkov, S; Szymocha, T; Tremblet, L; Ünel, G; Vermeulen, J; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Yu, M; Yasu, Y; Zhang, J; Zobernig, H; 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    2008-01-01

    Event data from proton-proton collisions at the LHC will be selected by the ATLAS experiment in a three-level trigger system, which, at its first two trigger levels (LVL1+LVL2), reduces the initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz to $sim$3~kHz. At this rate, the Event Builder collects the data from the readout system PCs (ROSs) and provides fully assembled events to the Event Filter (EF). The EF is the third trigger level and its aim is to achieve a further rate reduction to $sim$200~Hz on the permanent storage. The Event Builder is based on a farm of O(100) PCs, interconnected via a Gigabit Ethernet to O(150) ROSs. These PCs run Linux and multi-threaded software applications implemented in C++. All the ROSs, and substantial fractions of the Event Builder and Event Filter PCs have been installed and commissioned. We report on performance tests on this initial system, which is capable of going beyond the required data rates and bandwidths for Event Building for the ATLAS experiment.

  17. Spring comes for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Butin, F.

    2004-01-01

    (First published in the CERN weekly bulletin 24/2004, 7 June 2004.) A short while ago the ATLAS cavern underwent a spring clean, marking the end of the installation of the detector's support structures and the cavern's general infrastructure. The list of infrastructure to be installed in the ATLAS cavern from September 2003 was long: a thousand tonnes of mechanical structures spread over 13 storeys, two lifts, two 65-tonne overhead travelling cranes 25 metres above cavern floor, with a telescopic boom and cradle to access the remaining 10 metres of the cavern, a ventilation system for the 55 000 cubic metre cavern, a drainage system, a standard sprinkler system and an innovative foam fire-extinguishing system, as well as the external cryogenic system for the superconducting magnets and the liquid argon calorimeters (comprising, amongst other things, two helium refrigeration units, a nitrogen refrigeration unit and 5 km of piping for gaseous or liquid helium and nitrogen), not to mention the handling eq...

  18. ATLAS Physicist in Space

    CERN Multimedia

    Bengt Lund-Jensen

    2007-01-01

    On December 9, the former ATLAS physicist Christer Fuglesang was launched into space onboard the STS-116 Space Shuttle flight from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Christer worked on the development of the accordion-type liquid argon calorimeter and SUSY simulations in what eventually became ATLAS until summer 1992 when he became one out of six astronaut trainees with the European Space Agency (ESA). His selection out of a very large number of applicants from all over the ESA member states involved a number of tests in order to choose the most suitable candidates. As ESA astronaut Christer trained with the Russian Soyuz programme in Star City outside of Moscow from 1993 until 1996, when he moved to Houston to train for space shuttle missions with NASA. Christer belonged to the backup crew for the Euromir95 mission. After additional training in Russia, Christer qualified as ‘Soyuz return commander’ in 1998. Christer rerouting cables during his second space walk. (Photo: courtesy NASA) During...

  19. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Figure 1: Some members of the solenoid and liquid argon teams proudly pose in front of the barrel cryosat, complete with detector and magnet. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. Figure 2: The alignment survey by Dirk Mergelkuhl and Aude Wiart. (EST-SU) At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. Figure 3: The solenoid on the insertion stand, with Akira Yamamoto the solenoid designer and project leader. Figure 4: Taka Kondo, ATLAS Japan spokesperson, and Shoichi Mizumaki, Toshiba project engineer for the ATLAS solenoid, celebrate the insertion. Aft...

  20. ATLAS Christmas lunch

    CERN Multimedia

    Francois Butin; Markus Nordberg

    The end of the year ATLAS pit lunch is now a well established tradition: the 4th edition took place in the most prestigious place at CERN; the "Globe de l'innovation", or simply "the Globe". This end-of-year event is the opportunity to thank all those working so hard at Point 1. The first event took place in December 2003. At that time, there was no Globe yet, and the party took place in SX1 building, at the top of the shafts leading to the ATLAS cavern, with some 100 guests. In December 2004, we had the privilege to be the first to organize a lunch in the Globe with some 200 guests. Since then, many have followed our example! Well, almost: we were requested to refrain from serving "Tartiflette" again in there (a Savoyard specialty, using vast amounts of Reblochon, a smelly cheese...). It was said to have left a poignant odour for following events throughout 2004... Long queues formed for this special event. In December 2005, we were authorized to party in the Globe again (once we promised we would b...

  1. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition system for the ATLAS experiment has to reduce the 40 MHz of LHC bunch crossing rate to ~200 Hz of recording rate. This is achieved through a complex distributed system composed by $sim$ 1.000 CPUs, about a third of the expected final size of the system. Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  2. Experience with the script concordance test to develop clinical reasoning skills in pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Kylee A; Kolar, Claire; Schweiss, Sarah K; Tingen, Jeffrey M; Janke, Kristin K

    2017-11-01

    The script concordance test (SCT) is used to assess clinical reasoning and was originally developed for medical learners. The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) endorses the need for pharmacy students to develop clinical reasoning skills, but there is little documentation of use of the SCT for pharmacy learners. A script concordance test activity was designed for a diabetes and metabolic syndrome pharmacotherapy course. Twenty-five cases were created and evaluated by an expert panel of 20 practicing pharmacists. Ten cases were presented as a formative activity in class. The students, design team, teaching team, and expert panel evaluated the activity. The SCT was received positively from the students, design team, teaching team, and expert panel. The design team noted that case writing was different for this approach and that the inclusion of various perspectives from panelists was beneficial. Although the activity was formative in nature, the teaching team scored the students and this provided insight into areas where the students may struggle. This report provides information on the formative use of the SCT in the classroom, as well as categories of items suitable for pharmacy. The SCT provides an approach to illustrate clinical reasoning and clinical decision making among content experts and can be used to stimulate clinical discussions among student learners and content experts. The SCT could help incorporate clinical reasoning skills in a pharmacy curriculum to meet ACPE standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. On the concordance of cosmological data in the case of the generalized Chaplygin gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, R.; Lustig, S.

    2018-01-01

    The generalized Chaplygin gas cosmology provides a prime example for the class of unified dark matter models, which substitute the two dark components of the standard cosmological ΛCDM concordance model by a single dark component. The equation of state of the generalized Chaplygin gas is characterised by a parameter α such that the standard ΛCDM model is recovered in the case α = 0 with respect to the background dynamics and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) statistics. This allows to investigate the concordance of different cosmological data sets with respect to α. We compare the supernova data of the Supernova Cosmology Project, the data of the baryon oscillation spectroscopic survey (BOSS) of the third Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS-III) and the CMB data of the Planck 2015 data release. The importance of the BOSS Lyman α forest BAO measurements is investigated. It is found that these data sets possess a common overlap of the confidence domains only for Chaplygin gas cosmologies very close to the ΛCDM model.

  4. The diagnostic concordance of endoanal ultrasonography and endoanal MRI in cases of anorectal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan Tae; Yoo, Weon Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Shin, Hyun Ja [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Jae Sik [Kandong Colon and Rectal Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic concordance of morphologic classification of anorectal fistula by endoanal ultrasonography (EUSG) and endoanal magnetic resonance imaging (EMRI). Between January 1998 and March 1999, 17 patients with anorectal fistula underwent endoanal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging for preoperative assessment. The types of fistula and abscess formation were evaluated, and the findings compared with those obtained during surgery. The overall accordance of anorectal fistula was 76% (13 of 17 cases) on ultrasonography and 94% (16 of 17 cases) on magnetic resonance imaging. According to the findings of EUSG, the accordance of each type of anorectal fistula was as follows: transphineteric, 92% (11 of 12 cases); suprasphinteric, 33% (1 of 3); and extrasphincteric, 50% (1 of 2), while for EMRI, the respective figures were 100% (12 of 12 cases), 67% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2). An analysis of reproducibility using kappa value showed that overall concordance between endoanal ultrasonography and surgery ({kappa}=0.820) as well as between endoanal MRI and surgery ({kappa}=0.866), was very close. For the evaluation of anorectal fistula, preoperative endoanal magnetic resonance imaging was more accurate and informative than endoanal ultrasonography.

  5. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR. Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  6. Concordant Patterns of Brain Structure in Mothers with Recurrent Depression and Their Never-Depressed Daughters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foland-Ross, Lara C; Behzadian, Negin; LeMoult, Joelle; Gotlib, Ian H

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of research has demonstrated that having a mother with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the strongest predictors of depression in adolescent offspring. Few studies, however, have assessed neural markers of this increased risk for depression, or examined whether risk-related anomalies in adolescents at maternal risk for depression are related to neural abnormalities in their depressed mothers. We addressed these questions by examining concordance in brain structure in two groups of participants: mothers with a history of depression and their never-depressed daughters, and never-depressed mothers and their never-depressed daughters. We scanned mothers with (remitted; RMD) and without (control; CTL) a history of recurrent episodes of depression and their never-depressed daughters, computed cortical gray matter thickness, and tested whether mothers' thickness predicted daughters' thickness. Both RMD mothers and their high-risk daughters exhibited focal areas of thinner cortical gray matter compared with their CTL/low-risk counterparts. Importantly, the extent of thickness anomalies in RMD mothers predicted analogous abnormalities in their daughters; this pattern was not present in CTL/low-risk dyads. We identified neuroanatomical risk factors that may underlie the intergenerational transmission of risk for MDD. Our findings suggest that there is concordance in brain structure in dyads that is affected by maternal depression, and that the location, direction, and extent of neural anomalies in high-risk offspring mirror those of their recurrent depressed mothers. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Race/Ethnicity and Health Care Communication: Does Patient-Provider Concordance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Casey F; Zinner, Darren; Rust, George; Fryer, George E

    2016-11-01

    Although many minority patients would prefer a provider of their own race/ethnicity, the influence of this relationship on patient-provider communication remains unknown. This analysis examined the effect of patient-provider race/ethnicity concordance on patient-reported provider communication quality using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey years 2002-2012. Ordinary least squares regressions were executed on communication rating, measured by the Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems. Only 13.8% of black, non-Hispanic patients reported their usual source of care provider matched their race/ethnicity, compared with 94.4% of white, non-Hispanic patients and 43.8% of Hispanic patients. Differences in communication ratings were driven by patient race, rather than provider race. Although black, non-Hispanic patients rate their communication significantly higher than their counterparts overall, there was no significant influence of patient-provider racial concordance on ratings of communication when controlling for other sociodemographic variables. Minorities may seek the services of minority providers, but they are not more satisfied with patient-provider communication experience than when in race-discordant provider arrangements.

  8. Aligning conservation goals: are patterns of species richness and endemism concordant at regional scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricketts, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity conservation strategies commonly target areas of high species richness and/or high endemism. However, the correlation between richness and endemism at scales relevant to conservation is unclear; these two common goals of conservation plans may therefore be in conflict. Here the spatial concordance between richness and endemism is tested using five taxa in North America: butterflies, birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles. This concordance is also tested using overall indices of richness and endemism (incorporating all five taxa. For all taxa except birds, richness and endemism were significantly correlated, with amphibians, reptiles, and the overall indices showing the highest correlations (rs = 0.527-0.676. However, 'priority sets' of ecoregions (i.e., the top 10% of ecoregions based on richness generally overlapped poorly with those based on endemism (< 50% overlap for all but reptiles. These results offer only limited support for the idea that richness and endemism are correlated at broad scales and indicate that land managers will need to balance these dual, and often conflicting, goals of biodiversity conservation.

  9. Increase in migraine diagnoses and guideline-concordant treatment in veterans, 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altalib, H H; Fenton, B T; Sico, J; Goulet, J L; Bathulapalli, H; Mohammad, A; Kulas, J; Driscoll, M; Dziura, J; Mattocks, K; Kerns, R; Brandt, C; Haskell, S

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Health administrators, policy makers, and educators have attempted to increase guideline adherence of migraine medications while reducing inappropriate use of opioid- and barbiturate-containing medications. We evaluated the burden of migraine and proportion of guideline-concordant care in a large, national health care system over time. Methods We conducted a time-series study using data from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic health record. Veterans with migraines were identified by ICD-9 code (346.X). Prescriptions and comorbid conditions were evaluated before and after migraine diagnosis. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed. Results A total of 57,064 veterans were diagnosed with migraine headache (5.3%), with women significantly more likely diagnosed (11.6% vs. 4.4%, p migraine has significantly increased over the years. By 2012, triptans were prescribed to 43% of people with migraine, with no difference by gender. However, triptan prescriptions increased from 2004 to 2012 in men, but not women, veterans. Preventive medicines showed a significant increase with the year of migraine diagnosis, after controlling for age, sex, race, and for comorbidities treated with medications used for migraine prevention. Conclusions The burden of migraines is increasing within the VHA, with a corresponding increase in the delivery of guideline-concordant acute and prophylactic migraine-specific medication.

  10. Concordance of Attachment Representations in Mother-/Father-Child Dyads and between Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Stievenart

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the concordance of attachment representations in two-parent, two-child families as an original contribution to the current attachment literature. It uses both categorical attachment patterns and continuous scores. Data was collected on 92 native French-speaking Belgian families. In order to disentangle conceptual and methodological interpretations, each hypothesis was tested in two complementary ways: first in a sample where the parent completed the 'Cartes pour les Modèles Internes de Relation' (CaMir and their young children (four- to seven-year-olds the French version of the 'Attachment Story Completion Task'(Fr-ASCT and second, in a sample where both parents and their teenage to young-adult children (15- to 34-year-olds completed the CaMir. Our results indicated very little if any concordance of attachment representations, either when using categorical scores or when using continuous scores. The implications of these results for both theoretical and research purposes are discussed.

  11. Discordant vs. concordant left bundle branch block: A potential clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Jalkh; Bernard, Abi Saleh; Maurice, Khoury; Zaheer, Yousef; Marwan, Refaat; Abdallah, Rebeiz; Samir, Alam; Hadi, Skouri

    2016-01-01

    LBBB in heart failure patients has prognostic significance. Subtypes of LBBB (concordant and discordant) have not been considered when considering management. The aim of this study is to explore the clinical difference between the two subtypes. 216 patients with LBBB were included and categorized into concordant (LBBBC) and discordant (LBBBD) groups. Of the 216 patients (age 69.13±11.7; 56% male 44% female), 133 (61.5%) were LBBBD and 83 (38.5%) were LBBBC. LBBBD patients presented with lower LVEF (mean 36% vs 51%; P<0.001), wider QRS (mean 160 ms vs 151 ms; P<0.001), larger LA (mean 45 cm(2) vs 40 cm(2); P<0.001), moderate to severe mitral and tricuspid regurgitation (17% vs 3%; P<0.05, 10% vs 1%; P<0.05 respectively), CKD (41% vs 18%; P<0.001), COPD (4.6% vs 0%; P<0.01), CAD (67% vs 36%; P<0.001), and CABG (39% vs 16%; P<0.001). LBBBD is significantly associated with worse cardiac function and clinical characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concord Grape Juice Polyphenols and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Dose-Response Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2015-12-02

    Pure fruit juices provide nutritional value with evidence suggesting some of their benefits on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk may be derived from their constituent polyphenols, particularly flavonoids. However, few data from clinical trials are available on the dose-response relationship of fruit juice flavonoids to these outcomes. Utilizing the results of clinical trials testing single doses, we have analyzed data from studies of 100% Concord grape juice by placing its flavonoid content in the context of results from randomized clinical trials of other polyphenol-rich foods and beverages describing the same outcomes but covering a broader range of intake. We selected established biomarkers determined by similar methods for measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure, platelet aggregation, and the resistance of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) to oxidation. Despite differences among the clinical trials in the treatment, subjects, and duration, correlations were observed between the dose and FMD. Inverse dose-response relationships, albeit with lower correlation coefficients, were also noted for the other outcomes. These results suggest a clear relationship between consumption of even modest serving sizes of Concord grape juice, flavonoid intake, and effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This approach to dose-response relationships may prove useful for testing other individual foods and beverages.

  13. Concordance study of 3 direct-to-consumer genetic-testing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kenta; Kricka, Larry J; Fortina, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    Several companies offer direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing to evaluate ancestry and wellness. Massive-scale testing of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is not error free, and such errors could translate into misclassification of risk and produce a false sense of security or unnecessary anxiety in an individual. We evaluated 3 DTC services and a genomics service that are based on DNA microarray or solution genotyping with hydrolysis probes (TaqMan® analysis) and compared the test results obtained for the same individual. We evaluated the results from 3 DTC services (23andMe, deCODEme, Navigenics) and a genomics-analysis service (Expression Analysis). The concordance rates between the services for SNP data were >99.6%; however, there were some marked differences in the relative disease risks assigned by the DTC services (e.g., for rheumatoid arthritis, the range of relative risk was 0.9-1.85). A possible reason for this difference is that different SNPs were used to calculate risk for the same disease. The reference population also had an influence on the relative disease risk. Our study revealed excellent concordance between the results of SNP analyses obtained from different companies with different platforms, but we noted a disparity in the data for risk, owing to both differences in the SNPs used in the calculation and the reference population used. The larger issues of the utility of the information and the need for risk data that match the user's ethnicity remain, however.

  14. Monozygotic twins with Neurofibromatosis type 1, concordant phenotype and synchronous development of MPNST and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melean German

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common autosomal dominant disorder with full penetrance and variable expression. The condition predisposes individuals to the development of malignant nervous system tumours, most frequently Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumours (MPNSTs. Previous studies indicate that genetic factors other than mutations in NF1 may be responsible for the condition's variable expression. Case report Here we present data from a pair of monozygotic twins affected by Neurofibromatosis type 1 resulting from a de novo mutation. Both twins developed a left sciatic plexiform neurofibroma that evolved into MPNST at a similar age and they also developed pulmonary metastasis at the same age. Other concordant traits between the twins were: macrocephaly, psychomotor delay, café-au-lait spots, cutaneous neurofibromas, retroperitoneal, pleural and paraspinal neurofibromas. The main discordant features observed were tibial pseudoarthrosis, pectus carinatum, osteoporosis and thymus hyperplasia. Conclusions This is the first report of monozygotic twins with Neurofibromatosis type 1 that develop MPNSTs, the localization and chronological evolution of which, and its metastasis, is concordant in both twins. These cases suggest that the events involved in the transformation of benign plexiform neurofibromas to MPNSTs in Neurofibromatosis type 1, follow a spatiotemporally programme that is influenced by heritable factors other than NF1 mutations.

  15. Concordance between otic cytology and culture in diagnosis of external otitis canine by Malassezia spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Pulido-Villamarín

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the correlation between microbiological culture and otic cytology for diagnoses of external otitis by Malassezia in dogs. Materials and methods. 158 ear swabs of dogs with clinical diagnosis of external otitis were analyzed by cytology, mycological culture and metabolic tests. Results. Were obtained a positive results by cytology of 62% and 75.3% by culture. The 31.1% of isolates were identified as M. pachydermatis, 12.6% as M. furfur and 56.3% were classified as Malassezia spp., because was not possible to define the species. We found a positive concordance between cytology and culture for Malassezia spp., of 0.76 with a kappa index of 0.448 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.60 which represents a moderate strength of concordance between the two techniques, without regard the identified species. Conclusions. The use of a diagnostic test is not enough to establish the participation of Malassezia spp., as a causal disease agent.

  16. Family concordance and gender differences in parent-child structured interaction at 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordahl, Kristin Berg; Janson, Harald; Manger, Terje; Zachrisson, Henrik Daae

    2014-04-01

    This observational study examined family concordance and gender differences in early parent-child interaction in the family supportive sociopolitical context of Norway. Mothers and fathers from 39 Norwegian families were observed on separate occasions with their 12-month-old children (20 girls and 19 boys). Data were recorded from observations using microsocial coding methodology based on social interaction learning theory. We found no within-family concordance between mothers' and fathers' behaviors with their child. The children's negative engagement with each parent was moderately correlated. For parents with boys, fathers were overall more positively engaged than mothers. Moreover, fathers of boys displayed more positive engagement than those of girls, whereas mothers of girls and boys displayed similar levels of positive engagement. In contrast to previous findings, mothers did not verbalize more than fathers. Girls were overall more positively engaged during interaction with both mothers and fathers than boys. Thus, in a sociopolitical context that facilitates early parent-child relationships and gender equality, there were few but noteworthy gender differences in parent-child interaction at 12 months. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. NIA-AA staging of preclinical Alzheimer disease: discordance and concordance of CSF and imaging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Gordon, Brian A; Su, Yi; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The National Institute of Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) treat neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of AD pathology as if they would be interchangeable. We tested this assumption in 212 cognitively normal participants who have both neuroimaging and CSF measures of β-amyloid (CSF Aβ1-42 and positron emission tomography imaging with Pittsburgh Compound B) and neuronal injury (CSF t-tau and p-tau and structural magnetic resonance imaging) with longitudinal clinical follow-up. Participants were classified in preclinical AD stage 1 (β-amyloidosis) or preclinical AD stage 2+ (β-amyloidosis and neuronal injury) using the NIA-AA criteria, or in the normal or suspected non-Alzheimer disease pathophysiology group (neuronal injury without β-amyloidosis). At baseline, 21% of participants had preclinical AD based on CSF and 28% based on neuroimaging. Between modalities, staging was concordant in only 47% of participants. Disagreement resulted from low concordance between biomarkers of neuronal injury. Still, individuals in stage 2+ using either criterion had an increased risk for clinical decline. This highlights the heterogeneity of the definition of neuronal injury and has important implications for clinical trials using biomarkers for enrollment or as surrogate end point measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Gradient Boosting Algorithm for Survival Analysis via Direct Optimization of Concordance Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Chen

    2013-01-01

    statistical models have been proposed for survival analysis. They often impose strong assumptions on hazard functions, which describe how the risk of an event changes over time depending on covariates associated with each individual. In particular, the prevalent proportional hazards model assumes that covariates are multiplicatively related to the hazard. Here we propose a nonparametric model for survival analysis that does not explicitly assume particular forms of hazard functions. Our nonparametric model utilizes an ensemble of regression trees to determine how the hazard function varies according to the associated covariates. The ensemble model is trained using a gradient boosting method to optimize a smoothed approximation of the concordance index, which is one of the most widely used metrics in survival model performance evaluation. We implemented our model in a software package called GBMCI (gradient boosting machine for concordance index and benchmarked the performance of our model against other popular survival models with a large-scale breast cancer prognosis dataset. Our experiment shows that GBMCI consistently outperforms other methods based on a number of covariate settings. GBMCI is implemented in R and is freely available online.

  19. A gradient boosting algorithm for survival analysis via direct optimization of concordance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifei; Jia, Zhenyu; Mercola, Dan; Xie, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    Survival analysis focuses on modeling and predicting the time to an event of interest. Many statistical models have been proposed for survival analysis. They often impose strong assumptions on hazard functions, which describe how the risk of an event changes over time depending on covariates associated with each individual. In particular, the prevalent proportional hazards model assumes that covariates are multiplicatively related to the hazard. Here we propose a nonparametric model for survival analysis that does not explicitly assume particular forms of hazard functions. Our nonparametric model utilizes an ensemble of regression trees to determine how the hazard function varies according to the associated covariates. The ensemble model is trained using a gradient boosting method to optimize a smoothed approximation of the concordance index, which is one of the most widely used metrics in survival model performance evaluation. We implemented our model in a software package called GBMCI (gradient boosting machine for concordance index) and benchmarked the performance of our model against other popular survival models with a large-scale breast cancer prognosis dataset. Our experiment shows that GBMCI consistently outperforms other methods based on a number of covariate settings. GBMCI is implemented in R and is freely available online.

  20. The version control service for ATLAS data acquisition configuration files

    CERN Document Server

    Soloviev, Igor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    To configure data taking session the ATLAS systems and detectors store more than 160 MBytes of data acquisition related configuration information in OKS XML files [1]. The total number of the files exceeds 1300 and they are updated by many system experts. In the past from time to time after such updates we had experienced problems caused by XML syntax errors or inconsistent state of files from a point of view of the overall ATLAS configuration. It was not always possible to know who made a modification causing problems or how to go back to a previous version of the modified file. Few years ago a special service addressing these issues has been implemented and deployed on ATLAS Point-1. It excludes direct write access to XML files stored in a central database repository. Instead, for an update the files are copied into a user repository, validated after modifications and committed using a version control system. The system's callback updates the central repository. Also, it keeps track of all modifications pro...