WorldWideScience

Sample records for atlanta

  1. Advancing Residential Retrofits in Atlanta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Kim, Eyu-Jin [Southface Energy Institute; Roberts, Sydney [Southface Energy Institute; Stephenson, Robert [Southface Energy Institute

    2012-07-01

    This report will summarize the home energy improvements performed in the Atlanta, GA area. In total, nine homes were retrofitted with eight of the homes having predicted source energy savings of approximately 30% or greater based on simulated energy consumption.

  2. The Distribution of Segregation in Atlanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    A prediction from ecological theory relating the distribution of residential segregation between inner and outer zones of a metropolitan area to conditions of population growth, expansion, etc. was tested using 1960 data on the Atlanta standard metropolitan statistical area. (JM)

  3. Revising the Atlanta Fed dollar index

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan Acree

    1999-01-01

    For more than a decade the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta's trade-weighted dollar index has served as a summary statistic for foreign exchange movements of the dollar. Recent revisions acknowledging significant changes in the worldwide economy ensure that the index will continue to contribute valuable information into the future. ; One significant revision to the Atlanta Fed index is to include all eleven countries that adopted the euro on January 4, 1999. Other revisions take into account t...

  4. OVERVIEW OF THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the US EPA along with other sponsors who provided in-kind support primarily through existing studies. ...

  5. Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines 71 of the 605 licensed child care centers in Atlanta for playground hazards and school accidents. Finds 684 hazards in 66 centers, including climbing equipment over 6 feet high with inadequate impact-absorbing undersurfacing that had over twice the rate of fall injuries as climbing equipment under 6 feet high. (FMW)

  6. Three-dimensional urban GIS for Atlanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Dharmajyoti; Faust, Nickolas L.; Estrada, Diana; Linares, Jairo

    1997-07-01

    Georgia Tech has developed a prototype system for the demonstration of the concepts of a virtual 3D geographic information system (GIS) in an urban environment. The virtual GIS integrates the technologies of GIS, remote sensing, and visualization to provide an interactive tool for the exploration of spatial data. A high density urban environment with terrain elevation, imagery, GIS layers, and three dimensional natural and manmade features is a stressing test for the integration potential of such a virtual 3D GIS. In preparation for the 1996 Olympic Games, Georgia Tech developed two highly detailed 3D databases over parts of Atlanta. A 2.5 meter database was used to depict the downtown Atlanta area with much higher resolution imagery being used for photo- texture of individual Atlanta buildings. Less than 1 meter imagery data was used to show a very accurate map of Georgia Tech, the 1996 Olympic Village. Georgia Tech developed visualization software was integrated via message passing with a traditional GIS package so that all commonly used GIS query and analysis functions could be applied within the 3D environment. This project demonstrates the versatility and productivity that can be accomplished by operating GIS functions within a virtual GIS and multi-media framework.

  7. Plaza Central Peachtree Atlanta-(EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portman, John

    1976-10-01

    Full Text Available This 70-storey hotel has been constructed to meet the requirements of the city of Atlanta which needed a building with a sufficient room capacity and adequate premises for Conventions. On a structure of reinforced concrete which serves as a base and in which the common areas are situated rises a big cylindric tower, covered with coloured glass and which contains the 1.100 rooms. 230 m above ground level, the construction is crowned with a roof top cocktail lounge and a revolving restaurant with a splendid view of the city. Among the most noteworthy characteristics of this hotel is the elegantly decorated entrance hall —atrium shaped and 7 storeys high— with a pond in the centre. Further premises worth mentioning in view of their design and dimensions are the great ball room, coffee-shops and luxurious restaurants, one of which is planned in different levels and in which the most impressive feature is a 30 m high waterfall.Este edificio de setenta plantas se construyó para responder a las necesidades hoteleras de la ciudad de Atlanta, que precisaba de una instalación con suficiente capacidad de habitaciones y preparación para albergar Convenciones. Sobre una estructura de hormigón armado, que sirve de base y en la que se sitúan las zonas comunes, se eleva una gran torre cilíndrica, recubierta de vidrio coloreado reflectante, destinada a distribuir las 1.100 habitaciones con las que cuenta el edificio. La construcción se corona, a 230 m de la cimentación, con una sala para cócteles y un restaurante giratorio desde el que se domina una espléndida vista del contorno. El edificio dispone de importantes servicios comunes, entre los que cabe destacar el hall de entrada —a modo de atrio y con una altura equivalente a siete plantas—, que está dotado de un gran estanque y variados elementos de gran efecto decorativo. Otros servicios notables por su diseño y dimensiones son la gran sala de baile, y las cafeterías, comedores y

  8. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-29

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.  Created: 5/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  9. Heat stress in atlanta: preparing for the olympic worst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, R

    1996-06-01

    The weather might provide the toughest competition for endurance athletes at the Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta next month. The heat stress is likely to be higher than in any of the last several summer games. Here's a report on the expected conditions and how medical officials for the games are preparing. PMID:20086999

  10. Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: Temperature and Air quality): A Study of how the Urban Landscape Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G.; Lo, C. P.; Kidder, Stanley Q.; Hafner, Jan; Taha, Haider; Bornstein, Robert D.; Gillies, Robert R.; Gallo, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    It is our intent through this investigation to help facilitate measures that can be Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land-use ANalysis: applied to mitigate climatological or air quality Temperature and Air-quality) is a NASA Earth degradation, or to design alternate measures to sustain Observing System (EOS) Interdisciplinary Science or improve the overall urban environment in the future. investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta. The primary objectives for this research effort are: 1) To In the last half of the 20th century, Atlanta, investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta Georgia has risen as the premier commercial, urban growth, land cover change, and the development industrial, and transportation urban area of the of the urban heat island phenomenon through time at southeastern United States. The rapid growth of the nested spatial scales from local to regional; 2) To Atlanta area, particularly within the last 25 years, has investigate and model the relationship between Atlanta made Atlanta one of the fastest growing metropolitan urban growth and land cover change on air quality areas in the United States. The population of the through time at nested spatial scales from local to Atlanta metropolitan area increased 27% between 1970 regional; and 3) To model the overall effects of urban and 1980, and 33% between 1980-1990 (Research development on surface energy budget characteristics Atlanta, Inc., 1993). Concomitant with this high rate of across the Atlanta urban landscape through time at population growth, has been an explosive growth in nested spatial scales from local to regional. Our key retail, industrial, commercial, and transportation goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how services within the Atlanta region. This has resulted in land cover changes associated with urbanization in the tremendous land cover change dynamics within the Atlanta area, principally in transforming

  11. Why, Where, and How to Infuse the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory into the Sociology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Earl, II

    2012-01-01

    The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory is the moniker bestowed on scholars engaged in sociological research at Atlanta University between 1895 and 1924. Under the leadership of W. E. B. Du Bois, 1897-1914, this school made substantive yet marginalized contributions to the discipline. Its accomplishments include, but are not limited to, its…

  12. A New Definition in Atlanta: Q&A with Beverly Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Beverly Hall has been superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools since 1999. Before coming to Atlanta, Hall was state district superintendent of Newark Public Schools, deputy chancellor for instruction of New York City Public Schools, superintendent of Community School District 27 in New York City, and a principal in Brooklyn. Hall chairs Harvard…

  13. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of...

  14. Ozone trends in Atlanta, Georgia - Have emission controls been effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ronald W.; Richardson, Jennifer L.; Chameldes, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Nine years of summertime ozone data from the Atlanta metropolitan area are analyzed and compared to local emissions of volatile organic carbon and nitrogen oxides. Trends from 1979 to 1987 were studied for the number of days per year ozone exceeded the NAAQS standard, the second-highest ozone level observed per year, and the first quartile summertime average ozone observed, as well as the mean difference between the ozone level observed downwind and upwind of the city. Because this last parameter is sensitive to chemical factors but relatively insensitive to the number of days each year with meteorological conditions conducive to ozone formation, its trend may be best suited for determining how effective emission controls have been in reducing O3 in the Atlanta area. In spite of the fact that sizeable reductions have been claimed for volatile organic carbon emissions over the past several years, the data give no indication that ozone levels have decreased and in fact, imply that summertime ozone production may have increased. The results imply that either emissions have not decreased as much as has been claimed or that ozone is not sensitive to anthropogenic volatile organic carbon emissions.

  15. Flight delay performance at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy Yablonsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of this paper is to determine the annual cyclical flight delays at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then using other data such as annual precipitation, passenger and aircraft traffic volumes and other factors, we attempted to correlate these factors with overall delays. These data could assist airport management in predicting periods of flight delay.Design/methodology/approach: Data were taken and analyzed from the data base “Research and Innovation Technology Administration” (RITA for the years 2005-2011 for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The data included 2.8 million flights originating and departing from this airport. Data were also gathered from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA showing precipitation. Additional data were gathered from the FAA regarding delay causes, number and types of delays and changes to the infrastructure of ATL airportFindings: There is a repeatable annual pattern of delays at ATL that can be modeled using delay data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. This pattern appears to be caused primarily by the frequency and amount of precipitation that falls at ATL and by the amount of flights that arrive and depart at ATL.Originality/value: This information could assist airport operations personnel, FAA air traffic controllers and airlines in anticipating and mitigating delays at specific times of the year.

  16. Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Malformations in Atlanta, Georgia, 1986–2003

    OpenAIRE

    Strickland, Matthew J; Klein, Mitchel; Correa, Adolfo; Reller, Mark D.; Mahle, William T.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Flanders, W. Dana; Mulholland, James A.; Siffel, Csaba; Marcus, Michele; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2009-01-01

    Associations between ambient air pollution levels during weeks 3–7 of pregnancy and risks of cardiovascular malformations were investigated among the cohort of pregnancies reaching at least 20 weeks’ gestation that were conceived during January 1, 1986–March 12, 2003, in Atlanta, Georgia. Surveillance records obtained from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, which conducts active, population-based surveillance on this cohort, were reviewed to classify cardiovascular malformat...

  17. Outcomes among Asylum Seekers in Atlanta, Georgia, 2003--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dabney P; Donato, Caitlin E; Malewezi, Bridget A; Li, Anyie J; Corea, Mario J; Mitchell, Andrew B

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Asylum seekers face a wide array of challenges, including the need for a fair and just adjudication process. In the state of Georgia, the Atlanta Asylum Network addresses the needs of such individuals by providing them physical, psychological and gynecological assessments, the results of which are presented to the courts in the asylum appeal process. OBJECTIVE As a component of the Network's program evaluation, assess outcomes among asylum seekers using its services, as well as relation of outcomes to type of service provided, the individual's geographic origin and English language proficiency. METHODS A retrospective examination was conducted of program data gathered by the Network between 2003 and 2012. Subjects included asylum seekers who received assessments by the Network during this period. The primary variable of interest was the final case outcome, defined as determination of asylum status: granted, withholding of removal, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion, denied or voluntary departure. Outcomes were subsequently collapsed into a single positive or negative outcome variable. Positive outcomes included asylum granted, removal withheld, administrative closure and prosecutorial discretion. Negative outcomes included asylum denied and voluntary departure. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses, relating final case outcomes to Network services, geographic origin and English language proficiency, among the key variables. RESULTS A total of 69 of 120 asylum seekers in the study had a known final case outcome, and of those, 63.8% (44) had a positive outcome; or 37% of the total number of asylum seekers (n = 120). Among the 20 who received 2 of the 3 types of assessment (physical, psychological, gynecological), 16 (80%) received a positive case outcome. Most persons with a known final outcome came from Africa (41), where 78% (32) of cases resulted positive. Asylum seekers not proficient in English were 2.4 times more likely

  18. Project ATLANTA (Atlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality): Use of Remote Sensing and Modeling to Analyze How Urban Land Use Change Affects Meteorology and Air Quality Through Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use ANalysis: Temperature and Air-quality) which is an investigation that seeks to observe, measure, model, and analyze how the rapid growth of the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area since the early 1970's has impacted the region's climate and air quality. The primary objectives for this research effort are: (1) To investigate and model the relationships between land cover change in the Atlanta metropolitan, and the development of the urban heat island phenomenon through time; (2) To investigate and model the temporal relationships between Atlanta urban growth and land cover change on air quality; and (3) To model the overall effects of urban development on surface energy budget characteristics across the Atlanta urban landscape through time. Our key goal is to derive a better scientific understanding of how land cover changes associated with urbanization in the Atlanta area, principally in transforming forest lands to urban land covers through time, has, and will, effect local and regional climate, surface energy flux, and air quality characteristics. Allied with this goal is the prospect that the results from this research can be applied by urban planners, environmental managers and other decision-makers, for determining how urbanization has impacted the climate and overall environment of the Atlanta area. Multiscaled remote sensing data, particularly high resolution thermal infrared data, are integral to this study for the analysis of thermal energy fluxes across the Atlanta urban landscape.

  19. Water crisis: the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, regional water supply conflict

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2014-07-01

    Many large population centres are currently facing considerable difficulties with planning issues to secure future water supplies, as a result of water allocation and environmental issues, litigation, and political dogma. A classic case occurs in the metropolitan Atlanta area, which is a rapidly growing, large population centre that relies solely on surface water for supply. Lake Lanier currently supplies about 70% of the water demand and has been involved in a protracted legal dispute for more than two decades. Drought and environmental management of the reservoir combined to create a water shortage which nearly caused a disaster to the region in 2007 (only about 35 days of water supply was in reserve). While the region has made progress in controlling water demand by implementing a conservation plan, per capita use projections are still very high (at 511 L/day in 2035). Both non-potable reuse and indirect reuse of treated wastewater are contained in the most current water supply plan with up to 380,000 m3/day of wastewater treated using advanced wastewater treatment (nutrient removal) to be discharged into Lake Lanier. The water supply plan, however, includes no additional or new supply sources and has deleted any reference to the use of seawater desalination or other potential water sources which would provide diversification, thereby relying solely on the Coosa and Chattahoochee river reservoirs for the future. © 2014 IWA Publishing.

  20. Publicidad e identidad. Análisis del discurso publicitario televisivo en Atlanta durante el 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Bley, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    [ES]Esta tesis estudia los efectos producidos por la publicidad de los spots dirigidos a la población hispana de Atlanta, su alcance socializador y el poder de persuasión alcanzado con sus técnicas. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar la manera en que el anuncio publicitario condiciona a los miembros de las familias hispanas que viven en Atlanta para convertirlos en leales consumidores de un producto. A través del análisis de la variedad de recursos motivacionales y persuasivos y de las f...

  1. A Pilot Study of Halal Goat-Meat Consumption in Atlanta, Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Liu, Xuanli; Nelson, Mack C.

    2008-01-01

    Atlanta is a relatively large market for goat meat. As in most metropolitan areas around the U.S., goat-meat consumption has grown steadily in Atlanta over the past decade (Northwest Cooperative Development Center 2005; Nettles and Bukenya 2004). This growth is attributed to the influx of immigrants from goat-meat-eating countries into the U.S. over the same period (Gipson 1999). The increase in demand for goat meat has made the U.S. a net importer of competitively priced goat meat from Austr...

  2. Continuous wet denuder measurements of atmospheric nitric and nitrous acids during the 1999 Atlanta Supersite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genfa, Z.; Slanina, J.; Boring, C.B.; Jongejan, A.C.; Purnendu, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    Two different measurement methods for atmospheric nitric and nitrous acid during the Atlanta Supersite study are described and compared. Both approaches combined wet denuder collection coupled to ion chromatographic analysis. One of these utilized a rotating wet annular denuder maintained indoor wit

  3. Social Support and Social Network Ties among the Homeless in a Downtown Atlanta Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzes, Donald C.; Crimmins, Timothy J.; Yarbrough, Johanna; Parker, Josie

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a typology of social support with 3 categories of social networks to investigate social ties and their benefits for homeless people. Data were derived from a 2-year long series of participant observations of homeless or precariously housed people who came regularly to a downtown Atlanta public park. The findings are as follows:…

  4. 75 FR 15415 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... given in the Federal Register (73 FR 60676-60677, 10/14/08; correction, 73 FR 63675, 10/27/ 08) and the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, Atlanta, Georgia, Area Pursuant to...

  5. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  6. 77 FR 2981 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Constitution Road...

  7. 77 FR 8255 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site... available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Constitution Road Drum Superfund...

  8. PREFACE TO SPECIAL SECTION: SOUTHERN OXIDANTS STUDY 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITE PROJECT (SOS3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Atlanta Supersites Project consisted of a one-month intensive field program to compare advanced methods for measurement of PM2.5 mass, chemical composition, including single particle composition in real-time, and aerosol precursor species. The project was the first of EPA's ...

  9. Evaluation of an Intervention to Reduce Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child-Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Revisits 58 child care centers in Atlanta (Georgia) that had received interventions alerting directors to playground safety hazards. Comparison with 71 control centers randomly selected found averages of 9.4 hazards at intervention center playgrounds and 8.0 hazards at control centers. These results indicate the ineffectiveness of the…

  10. Underlying Factors Related to the Atlanta Cheating Scandal: An Autoethnographic Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Emma Mumphery

    2012-01-01

    In this study I used autoethnography to analyze fifty years of African-American educational history in Georgia. The impetus for the study was the Atlanta cheating scandal, widely interpreted as a character problem for individual teachers and administrators. As a lifelong resident of Georgia, a student, a public school teacher, and a parent, it…

  11. Counseling Psychology from Greyston to Atlanta: On the Road to Armageddon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinthall, Norman A.

    1990-01-01

    Briefly describes the model for counseling psychology developed during the Greyston Conference of 1964 and compares it with the current view from the Atlanta Conference. Suggests that the shift of counseling psychology from schools, colleges, and career development toward a medical model of clinical treatment may eliminate an independent…

  12. Newcastle disease B1 vaccine strain in wild rock pigeons in Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    From June to October of 2012, samples were collected from wild Rock Pigeons (Columba livia) in urban neighborhoods of Atlanta, Georgia to ascertain the prevalence of pigeon paramyxovirus serotype-1 (PPMV-1). PPMV-1 strains are a subset of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) commonly isolated fro...

  13. AIR QUALITY MONITORING IN ATLANTA WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. ver path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen d...

  14. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia -- March 16-18, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-05-01

    This summary report outlines needs and issues for increasing energy efficiency of new and existing U.S homes, as identified at the U.S Department of Energy Building America program Spring 2011 stakeholder meeting in Atlanta, Georgia.

  15. ATLANTA COMMUTE VEHICLE SOAK AND START DISTRIBUTIONS AND ENGINE STARTS PER DAY: IMPACT ON MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION RATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Institute of Technology School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers analyzed the 2004 vehicle activity data obtained from vehicles in the Atlanta Commuter Choice Value Pricing Initiative. The onboard monitoring equipment installed in each participating vehi...

  16. The Use of GIS and Remotely Sensed Data in Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT): The HELIX-Atlanta Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Watts, Carol; Rickman, Douglas L.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Qualters, Judith R.; Sinclair, Amber H.; Tolsma, Dennis D.; Adeniyi, Kafayat A.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project in collaboration with the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX-Atlanta). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of metropolitan Atlanta, GA. Under HELIX-Atlanta, pilot projects are being conducted to develop methods to characterize exposure; link health and environmental data; analyze the relationship between health and environmental factors; and communicate findings. There is evidence in the research literature that asthmatic persons are at increased risk of developing asthma exacerbations with exposure to environmental factors, including PM(sub 2.5). Thus, HELIX-Atlanta is focusing on methods for characterizing population exposure to PM(sub 2.5) for the Atlanta metropolitan area that could be used in ongoing surveillance. NASA/MSFC is working with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations in a Geographic Information System (GIS) that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma on the aggregated grid level as well as the individual level at the geographic locations of the patients' residences.

  17. Urban Heat Islands and Summertime Convective Thunderstorms in Atlanta: Three Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert; Lin, Qinglu; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Data from both 27 sites in the Atlanta mesonet surface meteorological network and eight National Weather Service sites were analyzed for the period from 26 July to 3 August 1996. Analysis of the six precipitation events over the city during the period (each on a different day) showed that its urban heat island (UHI) induced a convergence zone that initiated three of the storms at different times of the day, i.e., 0630,0845, and 1445 EDT. Previous analysis has shown that New York City (NYC) effects summer daytime thunderstorm formation and/or movement. That study found that during nearly calm regional flow conditions the NYC UHI initiates convective activity. Moving thunderstorms, however, tended to bifurcate and to move around the city, due to its building barrier effect. The current Atlanta results thus agree with the NYC results with respect to thunderstorm initiation.

  18. Human-Environment Patterns of Metropolitan Spatial Restructuring: Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai, PRC, 1950-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares the spatial and environmental impacts of rapid growth through the five decades in Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai, PRC. Both metropolitan areas represent the prime demographic and economic engines of their respective regions, and exhibit some of the worst environmental degradation problems, though from significantly different sources. Atlanta epitomizes spatial patterns of sprawl arising from an unfettered topographic and economic setting. Shanghai, in a political economy transitioning from decades of centralized constraint, seeks to spread out some of the world's densest core settlement population to its inner suburbs. Remotely sensed photographic images are utilized to classify land use changes, while census figures and environmental data are integrated in a Geographic Information System to correlate shifts through time.

  19. Medical and public health services at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, R J; Keim, M E; Sharp, T W; Wetterhall, S F; Williams, R J; Baker, E L; Cantwell, J D; Lillibridge, S R

    Planning for the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games may benefit from the experience of the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. Excellent health promotion and prevention activities before and during the Games resulted in fewer medical and public health problems than anticipated. Despite this, there was room for improvement in the level of communication and cooperation between the many service providers to ensure the most appropriate and efficient responses. PMID:9418799

  20. Spatial Clustering of HIV Prevalence in Atlanta, Georgia and Population Characteristics Associated with Case Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Hixson, Brooke A.; Omer, Saad B; Del Rio, Carlos; Frew, Paula M.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed prevalent HIV cases in Atlanta to examine case distribution trends and population characteristics at the census tract level that may be associated with clustering effects. We calculated cluster characteristics (area and internal HIV prevalence) via Kuldorff's spatial scan method. Subsequent logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze sociodemographics associated with inclusion in a cluster. Organizations offering voluntary HIV testing and counseling services were identi...

  1. The revised Atlanta criteria 2012 altered the classiifcation, severity assessment and management of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Huang; Hong-Ping Qu; Yun-Feng Zheng; Xu-Wei Song; Lei Li; Zhi-Wei Xu; En-Qiang Mao; Er-Zhen Chen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Atlanta criteria for acute pancreatitis (AP) has been revised recently. This study was to evaluate its practical value in classiifcation of AP, the severity assessment and management. METHODS: The clinical features, severity classiifcation, out-come and risk factors for mortality of 3212 AP patients who had been admitted in Ruijin Hospital from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed based on the revised Atlanta criteria (RAC) and the original Atlanta criteria (OAC). RESULTS: Compared to the OAC group, the incidence of se-vere acute pancreatitis (SAP) was decreased by approximately one half (13.9% vs 28.2%) in the RAC group. The RAC present-ed a lower sensitivity but higher speciifcity, and its predictive value for severity and poor outcome was higher than those of the OAC. The proportion of SAP diagnosis and ICU admission in the early phase in the RAC group was signiifcantly lower than that in the OAC group (P CONCLUSIONS: The RAC showed a higher predictive value for severity and poorer outcome than the OAC. However, the RAC resulted in fewer ICU admissions in the early phase due to its lower sensitivity for diagnosis of SAP. Among SAP cases, older age, high CTSI, renal and cardiovascular failure, com-plications of acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis were independent risk factors for mortality.

  2. The revised Atlanta criteria 2012 altered the classiifcation, severity assessment and management of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Huang; Hong-Ping Qu; Yun-Feng Zheng; Xu-Wei Song; Lei Li; Zhi-Wei Xu; En-Qiang Mao; Er-Zhen Chen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Atlanta criteria for acute pancreatitis (AP) has been revised recently. This study was to evaluate its practical value in classiifcation of AP, the severity assessment and management. METHODS: The clinical features, severity classiifcation, out-come and risk factors for mortality of 3212 AP patients who had been admitted in Ruijin Hospital from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed based on the revised Atlanta criteria (RAC) and the original Atlanta criteria (OAC). RESULTS: Compared to the OAC group, the incidence of se-vere acute pancreatitis (SAP) was decreased by approximately one half (13.9% vs 28.2%) in the RAC group. The RAC present-ed a lower sensitivity but higher speciifcity, and its predictive value for severity and poor outcome was higher than those of the OAC. The proportion of SAP diagnosis and ICU admission in the early phase in the RAC group was signiifcantly lower than that in the OAC group (P CONCLUSIONS: The RAC showed a higher predictive value for severity and poorer outcome than the OAC. However, the RAC resulted in fewer ICU admissions in the early phase due to its lower sensitivity for diagnosis of SAP. Among SAP cases, older age, high CTSI, renal and cardiovascular failure, com-plications of acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis were independent risk factors for mortality.

  3. UNDERSTANDING THE INTERNATIONAL CONSENSUS FOR ACUTE PANCREATITIS: CLASSIFICATION OF ATLANTA 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    de SOUZA, Gleim Dias; SOUZA, Luciana Rodrigues Queiroz; CUENCA, Ronaldo Máfia; JERÔNIMO, Bárbara Stephane de Medeiros; de SOUZA, Guilherme Medeiros; VILELA, Vinícius Martins

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Contrast computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are widely used due to its image quality and ability to study pancreatic and peripancreatic morphology. The understanding of the various subtypes of the disease and identification of possible complications requires a familiarity with the terminology, which allows effective communication between the different members of the multidisciplinary team. Aim: Demonstrate the terminology and parameters to identify the different classifications and findings of the disease based on the international consensus for acute pancreatitis ( Atlanta Classification 2012). Methods: Search and analysis of articles in the "CAPES Portal de Periódicos with headings "acute pancreatitis" and "Atlanta Review". Results: Were selected 23 articles containing radiological descriptions, management or statistical data related to pathology. Additional statistical data were obtained from Datasus and Population Census 2010. The radiological diagnostic criterion adopted was the Radiology American College system. The "acute pancreatitis - 2012 Rating: Review Atlanta classification and definitions for international consensus" tries to eliminate inconsistency and divergence from the determination of uniformity to the radiological findings, especially the terminology related to fluid collections. More broadly as "pancreatic abscess" and "phlegmon" went into disuse and the evolution of the collection of patient fluids can be described as "acute peripancreatic collections", "acute necrotic collections", "pseudocyst" and "necrosis pancreatic walled or isolated". Conclusion: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance represent the best techniques with sequential images available for diagnosis. Standardization of the terminology is critical and should improve the management of patients with multiple professionals care, risk stratification and adequate treatment. PMID:27759788

  4. Comparison of Methods for Estimating Mixing Height Used during the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, Frank J.; Fischer, Kenneth W.; McDonald, Tracey D.; Samson, Perry J.

    1995-08-01

    During the summer of 1992, measurements of the boundary layer mixing height were conducted at five locations around the city of Atlanta, Georgia, as part of the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive of the Southern Oxidants Research Program on Ozone Non-Attainment. These measurements were made during a series of `high-ozone-event days' for the purpose of acquiring information about the temporal evolution of the convective mixed layer. The information acquired from these systems was included in a database of meteorological variables for use in the photochemical modeling efforts associated with the study. The following measurement systems were selected for use in this study by organizers of the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive: one rawinsonde system, four radar wind profiler RASS (radar acoustic sounding system) systems, and two lidar systems.A comparison of the mixing-height estimates from each of the measurement systems used during the 1992 Atlanta Field Intensive was performed in an effort to evaluate the consistency of the estimates between the different systems and, further, to evaluate the relative performance of each system during the study period. Statistical analyses were performed on the dataset, with in-depth statistical analyses presented for two specific days: 30 July and 4 August 1992. Results indicate that there is often disagreement in the mixing-height estimates between the various systems, particularly during the early morning and late afternoon. It is believed that the differences between estimates are the result of 1) the physical limitations of the different instrument system 2) the assumptions used with each system as to which tracer most accurately defines the structure of the convective boundary layer, and 3) the spatial inhomogeneity of convective boundary layer structure across the region studied.In general, the rawinsonde system appeared to give the most accurate mixing-height estimates under the meteorological conditions studied. The lidar estimates

  5. Atlanta ariejansseni, a new species of shelled heteropod from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone (Gastropoda, Pterotracheoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Burridge, Alice K.; Peijnenburg, Katja T.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Atlantidae (shelled heteropods) is a family of microscopic aragonite shelled holoplanktonic gastropods with a wide biogeographical distribution in tropical, sub-tropical and temperate waters. The aragonite shell and surface ocean habitat of the atlantids makes them particularly susceptible to ocean acidification and ocean warming, and atlantids are likely to be useful indicators of these changes. However, we still lack fundamental information on their taxonomy and biogeography, which is essential for monitoring the effects of a changing ocean. Integrated morphological and molecular approaches to taxonomy have been employed to improve the assessment of species boundaries, which give a more accurate picture of species distributions. Here a new species of atlantid heteropod is described based on shell morphology, DNA barcoding of the Cytochrome Oxidase I gene, and biogeography. All specimens of Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. were collected from the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans suggesting that this species has a very narrow latitudinal distribution (37–48°S). Atlanta ariejansseni sp. n. was found to be relatively abundant (up to 2.3 specimens per 1000 m3 water) within this narrow latitudinal range, implying that this species has adapted to the specific conditions of the Southern Subtropical Convergence Zone and has a high tolerance to the varying ocean parameters in this region. PMID:27551204

  6. Socio-demographic Differences in Toxic Release Inventory Siting and Emissions in Metro Atlanta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan; Ramsey-White, Kim; Fuller, Christina H

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has found that low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and minorities in some areas reside in communities with disproportionate exposure to hazardous chemicals. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of socio-demographic characteristics on the presence of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) facilities, air releases, and prevalence and resolution of air quality complaints in the 20-county Atlanta Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). We found that there were 4.7% more minority residents in census tracts where TRI facilities were located. The odds ratio (OR) for the presence of a TRI facility was 0.89 (p < 0.01) for each 1% increase of females with a college degree and 2.4 (p < 0.01) for households with an income of $22,000-$55,000. The estimated reduction in the amount of chemicals emitted per release associated with population of females with a college degree was 18.53 pounds (p < 0.01). Complaints took longer to resolve in census tracts with higher Hispanic populations (OR = 1.031, 95% CI: 1.010-1.054). Overall, results indicate that SES and race/ethnicity are related to TRI facility siting, releases, and complaints in the Atlanta area. These findings have not been documented previously and suggest that lower SES and non-White communities may be disproportionately exposed. PMID:27455302

  7. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  8. 78 FR 28940 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlanta to Charlotte Portion of the Southeast High Speed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor AGENCY: Federal Rail Administration (FRA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent... between Atlanta, GA and Charlotte, NC, along the Southeast High-Speed Rail Corridor (SEHSR) as designated by the USDOT. The Study is being advanced consistent with the federal High-Speed Intercity...

  9. International Year of Astronomy (IYA): A Boost to Astronomy Education in Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazine, Angela R.; Albin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) activities at Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA (USA). The global focus of IYA was to celebrate astronomy and its cultural / scientific contributions, which correlate with the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first look at the heavens with a small telescope. Our planetarium and observatory utilized this opportunity to increase astronomy awareness and education locally. A plethora of special events were organized including two planetarium productions about Galileo and the telescope, special displays in the exhibit hall, two astronaut lectures, a children's workshop with Galileoscopes, and even a Galileo impersonator. Such IYA-related programs increased our overall annual attendance while at the same time served to re-introduce our local audience to astronomy in a creative way.

  10. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELIX)-Atlanta: A CDC-NASA Joint Environmental Public Health Tracking Collaborative Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeff; Crosson, Bill; Estes, Maury; Limaye, Ashutosh; Quattrochi, Dale; Rickman, Doug

    2008-01-01

    HELIX-Atlanta was developed to support current and future state and local EPHT programs to implement data linking demonstration projects which could be part of the CDC EPHT Network. HELIX-Atlanta is a pilot linking project in Atlanta for CDC to learn about the challenges the states will encounter. NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking environmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. Proving the feasibility of the approach is the main objective

  11. Effects of urbanization on streamflow in the Atlanta area (Georgia, USA): A comparative hydrological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, S.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    For the period from 1958 to 1996, streamflow characteristics of a highly urbanized watershed were compared with less-urbanized and non-urbanized watersheds within a 20 000 km2 region in the vicinity of Atlanta, Georgia: In the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of the southeastern USA. Water levels in several wells completed in surficial and crystalline-rock aquifers were also evaluated. Data were analysed for seven US Geological Survey (USGS) stream gauges, 17 National Weather Service rain gauges, and five USGS monitoring wells. Annual runoff coefficients (RCs; runoff as a fractional percentage of precipitation) for the urban stream (Peachtree Creek) were not significantly greater than for the less-urbanized watersheds. The RCs for some streams were similar to others and the similar streams were grouped according to location. The RCs decreased from the higher elevation and higher relief watersheds to the lower elevation and lower relief watersheds: Values were 0.54 for the two Blue Ridge streams. 0.37 for the four middle Piedmont streams (near Atlanta), and 0.28 for a southern Piedmont stream. For the 25 largest stormflows, the peak flows for Peachtree Creek were 30% to 100% greater then peak flows for the other stream. The storm recession period for the urban stream was 1-2 days less than that for the other streams and the recession was characterized by a 2-day storm recession constant that was, on average, 40 to 100% greater, i.e. streamflow decreased more rapidly than for the other streams. Baseflow recession constants ranged from 35 to 40% lower for Peachtree Creek than for the other streams; this is attributed to lower evapotranspiration losses, which result in a smaller change in groundwater storage than in the less-urbanized watersheds. Low flow of Peachtree Creek ranged from 25 to 35% less than the other streams, possibly the result of decreased infiltration caused by the more efficient routing of stormwater and the paving of groundwater

  12. Volatility and Hygroscopicity of Atlanta CCN During New Particle Formation Events in Summer 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Scheckman, J.; Williams, B. J.; Jiang, J.; McMurry, P. H.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-12-01

    New particle formation (NPF) has the potential to substantially impact the population of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by both by altering their number concentrations and the hygroscopic properties. It is currently thought that while NPF proceeds via condensation of gas-phase sulfuric acid, subsequent growth must be dominated by the condensation of secondary organic species in order to reconcile field observations with theory1,2. This implies size-dependent aerosol composition with varying amounts of organic species, yet the impact of these organics on cloud droplet formation remains one of the largest sources of uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-climate interactions studies. Consequently, there is a need for in-situ, size-resolved field measurements of CCN to unravel these complex effects. // // We present a comprehensive characterization of aerosol and CCN sampled in Midtown Atlanta during the August 2009 Nucleation and CCN intensive campaign (NCCN) at the Jefferson Street monitoring site. A Droplet Measurement Technologies Continuous-Flow Stream-wise Thermal-Gradient Chamber was operated in spectrometer mode using Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA)3 to provide size-resolved CCN concentrations over a variety of particle sizes (20-50 nm) and supersaturations (0.3-2%) with high temporal resolution (~30 seconds/scan). Continuous measurements of the aerosol size distribution (1-1000 nm) and chemical composition were also made. The inferred hygroscopicity increased substantially during NPF from ~0.2-0.3 (consistent with soluble secondary organic species) to ~0.6-0.8, consistent with sulfate species or organic salts. This finding is contrary to previous work suggesting less-CCN-active aerosol during NPF4. During two special experiments, a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was coupled with the CCN instrument to examine the volatility-dependence of the CCN hygroscopicity of 40-nm particles. Heating particles in the VTDMA was observed to increase their

  13. Feasibility study of social media to reduce intimate partner violence among gay men in metro atlanta, georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Sheryl M; Smith, Megan; Pendrick-Denney, Danielle; Boos-Beddington, Sarah; Chen, Ken; McCarty, Frances

    2012-08-01

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantly associated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue. PMID:22928060

  14. Feasibility Study of Social Media to Reduce Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay Men in Metro Atlanta, Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl M. Strasser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Intimate Partner Violence (IPV is a major public health issue occurring in the United States and globally. While little is known in general about IPV, understanding about the prevalence of physical IPV among gay men is even more obscure. There is a clear disparity in violence research attention focused on this vulnerable segment of society. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted to examine the feasibility of enrolling 100 gay men from Atlanta into an IPV survey study. The survey was administered via Facebook. Ninety-nine usable surveys were collected. Chi-square tests reveal that minority ethnic status, illicit drug use, and non-disclosed orientation status were all significantlyassociated with positive IPV reports--in terms of both victimization as well as perpetration. Overall, the majority of the study sample indicated that they believe IPV is a health problem in the Atlanta gay community. These findings bear importance for the Atlanta gay community and public health professionals who must address this nearly invisible yet increasing public health issue. [West J Emerg Med.2012;13(3:298-304.

  15. Characterization of CCN and IN activity of bacterial isolates collected in Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue, Sara; Waters, Samantha; Karthikeyan, Smruthi; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of CCN activity of bacteria, other than a few select types such as Pseudomonas syringae, is limited, especially when looked at in conjunction with corresponding IN activity. The link between these two points is especially important for bacteria as those that have high CCN activity are likely to form an aqueous phase required for immersion freezing. Given the high ice nucleation temperature of bacterial cells, especially in immersion mode, it is important to characterize the CCN and IN activity of many different bacterial strains. To this effect, we developed a droplet freezing assay (DFA) which consists of an aluminum cold plate, cooled by a continuous flow of an ethylene glycol-water mixture, in order to observe immersion freezing of the collected bacteria. Here, we present the initial results on the CCN and IN activities of bacterial samples we have collected in Atlanta, GA. Bacterial strains were collected and isolated from rainwater samples taken from different storms throughout the year. We then characterized the CCN activity of each strain using a DMT Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter by exposing the aerosolized bacteria to supersaturations ranging from 0.05% to 0.6%. Additionally, using our new DFA, we characterized the IN activity of each bacterial strain at temperatures ranging from -20oC to 0oC. The combined CCN and IN activity gives us valuable information on how some uncharacterized bacteria contribute to warm and mixed-phase cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  16. The Winter Olympics in Lillehammer: the last dress rehearsal for Atlanta '96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, J D

    1994-06-01

    Buoyed by the Norwegian spirit and example, our Atlanta Olympic medical team returned with a sense of admiration and also with the self-confidence that we can provide the same quality of medical care in 1996. It won't be an easy task, though, as the summer games are at least eight times the size of the winter games. It will take great cooperation and self-sacrifice from area physicians and hospitals that are now seemingly enmeshed in vigorous competition for the health care dollar. Perhaps, like Bjornson, I am also an idealist. But I truly feel that we can rise to the occasion and cooperate fully in unselfish ways to accomplish what needs to be done. We will then be able to look back upon the experience with a great sense of self-satisfaction, not for personal accolades, but for a job well done. In 1996, we can show the world the remarkable and too often maligned American health care system and, in so doing, make friends with people from all over the globe. "Let our deeds speak for themselves," implored Bjornson. I toasted that thought with a second glass of Chateau Batailley, then took a long nap and dreamed that I had slapped the hockey puck past the Russian goalie in double overtime to bring a gold medal back to the good old U.S. of A. PMID:8071635

  17. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment.

  18. The Atlanta Urban Heat Island Mitigation and Air Quality Modeling Project: How High-Resoution Remote Sensing Data Can Improve Air Quality Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Crosson, William L.; Khan, Maudood N.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlanta Urban Heat Island and Air Quality Project had its genesis in Project ATLANTA (ATlanta Land use Analysis: Temperature and Air quality) that began in 1996. Project ATLANTA examined how high-spatial resolution thermal remote sensing data could be used to derive better measurements of the Urban Heat Island effect over Atlanta. We have explored how these thermal remote sensing, as well as other imaged datasets, can be used to better characterize the urban landscape for improved air quality modeling over the Atlanta area. For the air quality modeling project, the National Land Cover Dataset and the local scale Landpro99 dataset at 30m spatial resolutions have been used to derive land use/land cover characteristics for input into the MM5 mesoscale meteorological model that is one of the foundations for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to assess how these data can improve output from CMAQ. Additionally, land use changes to 2030 have been predicted using a Spatial Growth Model (SGM). SGM simulates growth around a region using population, employment and travel demand forecasts. Air quality modeling simulations were conducted using both current and future land cover. Meteorological modeling simulations indicate a 0.5 C increase in daily maximum air temperatures by 2030. Air quality modeling simulations show substantial differences in relative contributions of individual atmospheric pollutant constituents as a result of land cover change. Enhanced boundary layer mixing over the city tends to offset the increase in ozone concentration expected due to higher surface temperatures as a result of urbanization.

  19. Health Impact Assessment of the Boone Boulevard Green Street Project in the Proctor Creek Watershed of Atlanta - Urban Waters National Training Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor Creek is one of the most impaired creeks in metro-Atlanta due to exceedance of state water quality standards for fecal coliforms. The topography, prevalence of impervious surfaces in the watershed, and a strained combined sewer system have contributed to pervasive floodin...

  20. PM emissions measurements of in-service commercial aircraft engines during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Raper, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the physical characterization of aircraft engine PM emission measurements conducted during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Engine exit plane PM emissions were sampled from on-wing engines on several in-service commercial transport aircraft from the fleet of Delta Airlines. The size distributions were lognormal in nature with a single mode. The geometric mean diameter was found to increase with increasing engine thrust, ranging from 15 nm at idle to 40 nm at takeoff. PM number- and mass-based emission indices were observed to be higher at the idle conditions (4% and 7%), lowest at 15%-30% thrust, and then increase with increasing thrust. Emissions measurements were also conducted during an advected plume study where over 300 exhaust plumes generated by a broad mix of commercial transports were sampled 100-350 m downwind from aircraft operational runways during normal airport operations. The range of values measured at take-off for the different engine types in terms of PM number-based emission index was between 7 × 1015-9 × 1017 particles/kg fuel burned, and that for PM mass-based emission index was 0.1-0.6 g/kg fuel burned. PM characteristics of aircraft engine specific exhaust were found to evolve over time as the exhaust plume expands, dilutes with ambient air, and cools. The data from these measurements will enhance the emissions inventory development for a subset of engines operating in the commercial fleet and improve/validate current environmental impact predictive tools with real world aircraft engine specific PM emissions inputs.

  1. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments.

  2. New Horizons at Pluto: An Overview of Educational Activities / Outreach at Fernbank Science Center, Atlanta, Georgia (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Edward F.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-11-01

    We report on educational activities and associated outreach at Fernbank Science Center (Atlanta, GA) in conjunction with the July 2015 New Horizons spacecraft encounter at Pluto. On encounter day, a public lecture about the dwarf planet was presented by Georgia’s NASA Solar System ambassador to kick off the arrival of the space probe at Pluto. In the months following the flyby, we presented a program called “Exploring New Horizons” in the Science Center’s Zeiss planetarium. This program is a digital full-dome presentation about the discovery of Pluto and its subsequent exploration - including an overview of the New Horizons mission. Since NASA continues to receive data from the probe, a brief update (tribute) is included at the end of each planetarium program that features the latest imagery and data from the dwarf planet. We anticipate running the planetarium program throughout the fall semester of 2015. With Pluto visible in the early evening autumn sky, observations are possible with Center’s 0.9 m telescope, which is open for public viewing on clear Thursday and Friday nights following the planetarium program. Although Pluto is somewhat faint through the telescope's eyepiece, it is visible and clearly identified within the surrounding starfield. Intermittent post-encounter lectures ("Messages from the Outer Solar System") have been given on Friday evenings as well. Finally, due to the continued interest in Pluto, we have developed a new outreach program about dwarf planets in general, geared towards 4th - 6th students.

  3. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments. PMID:23991671

  4. Commercial aircraft engine emissions characterization of in-use aircraft at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Scott C; Jayne, John T; Lobo, Prem; Onasch, Timothy B; Fleming, Gregg; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2008-03-15

    The emissions from in-use commercial aircraft engines have been analyzed for selected gas-phase species and particulate characteristics using continuous extractive sampling 1-2 min downwind from operational taxi- and runways at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Using the aircraft tail numbers, 376 plumes were associated with specific engine models. In general, for takeoff plumes, the measured NOx emission index is lower (approximately 18%) than that predicted by engine certification data corrected for ambient conditions. These results are an in-service observation of the practice of "reduced thrust takeoff". The CO emission index observed in ground idle plumes was greater (up to 100%) than predicted by engine certification data for the 7% thrust condition. Significant differences are observed in the emissions of black carbon and particle number among different engine models/technologies. The presence of a mode at approximately 65 nm (mobility diameter) associated with takeoff plumes and a smaller mode at approximately 25 nm associated with idle plumes has been observed. An anticorrelation between particle mass loading and particle number concentration is observed.

  5. Prevalence and Perspectives of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among University Students in Atlanta, Newcastle upon Tyne, and New Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Kritika; Midha, Inuka

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A cross-cultural comparative study was developed that surveyed university students in Atlanta (United States), New Delhi (India), and Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom) to understand the prevalence and perspectives of CAM in three urban societies with different healthcare systems. Design. Surveys were sent to students in the three aforementioned cities. Survey distribution occurred over 6 months from May to November 2015. A total of 314 surveys were received. Results. Dietary and vitamin supplements had the highest prevalence collectively (n = 203), followed by meditation, yoga, and massage. Commentary analysis showed the importance of science and evidence in justifying CAM practice. Conclusions. Matching the most prevalent practices with their designated NCCAM categories suggested that the students were attracted to biologically based, body-based, and mind-body practices as the central themes of attraction. Selected and prevalent CAM practices suggested the students' desire to maintain physical and mental fitness. Access to healthcare may have influence on the prevalence of CAM. Indian students were more likely to view CAM as a viable alternative to conventional medicine. PMID:27382643

  6. “Because He Misses His Normal Life Back Home”: Masculinity and Sexual Behavior Among Mexican Migrants in Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jennifer S.; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Nyhus, Christina M.; Yount, Kathryn M.; Bauermeister, José A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Labor migration presents an important HIV risk context. Effective health promotion begins with understanding cultural and structural influences on sexual risk. Methods This paper presents the quantitative results from a mixed-methods study carried out in 1999 among Mexican migrant men (N=187) in Atlanta, Georgia. The instrument included questions on several domains: Demographic and sexual history, migration motivations, substance use, social support, leisure time practices, and ideas about masculinity, sexuality, and marriage. We created six multivariate regressions to test the association between each of these domains and men's number of partners. Results Greater number of partners was associated with being younger, having fewer years of formal education, and owning a home in Mexico (Model 1); taking more trips to Mexico (Model 2); feeling sex wasn't tied to emotional intimacy and power (Model 3); having a larger social network and fewer frequency of contact with network members (Model 4); having a sex worker as a partner (Model 5); and going out dancing and stripclubs on weekends (Model 6). Conclusion Emergent visions of marriage that include shared sexual intimacy and emotional intimacy and power imply a reorganization of marital sexuality; yet, only those men who emphasize emotional companionship and equity have fewer extramarital sexual partners. An individual-level intervention may be insufficient to transform men's ideas about manhood; programs must acknowledge and target migrant men's social networks and the spaces in which sexual risk may occur. Multilevel strategies, such as the development of more health-enhancing community spaces, active discussions regarding masculinity, and the promotion of safer sexual practices should form part of comprehensive efforts to reduce sexual risk among migrant men. PMID:19291125

  7. Environmental Public Health Surveillance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Estes, Maurice; Crosson, William

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN) the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is leading a project called Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange (HELiX-Atlanta). The goal of developing the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is to improve the health of communities. Currently, few systems exist at the state or national level to concurrently track many of the exposures and health effects that might be associated with environmental hazards. An additional challenge is estimating exposure to environmental hazards such as particulate matter whose aerodynamic diameter is less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5). HELIX-Atlanta's goal is to examine the feasibility of building an integrated electronic health and environmental data network in five counties of Metropolitan Atlanta, GA. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC) is collaborating with CDC to combine NASA earth science satellite observations related to air quality and environmental monitoring data to model surface estimates of PM2.5 concentrations that can be linked with clinic visits for asthma. While use of the Air Quality System (AQS) PM2.5 data alone could meet HELIX-Atlanta specifications, there are only five AQS sites in the Atlanta area, thus the spatial coverage is not ideal. We are using NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for estimating daily ground level PM2.5 at 10 km resolution over the metropolitan Atlanta area supplementing the AQS ground observations and filling their spatial and temporal gaps.

  8. Solar heating and cooling experiment for a school in Atlanta: performance report. [George A. Towns Elementary School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    This report documents the performance, and conclusions therefrom, of a 13 month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The solar collector system involves 10,360 ft/sup 2/ of PPG ''Baseline'' flat-plate collectors with an ALCOA selective coating, augmented by 10,800 square feet of aluminized Mylar reflectors. Three 15,000 gallon steel storage tanks, a 100-ton Arkla absorption chiller together with its cooling tower, a collector gravity drain system with a 1,600 gallon holding tank and a collector nitrogen purge system, six pumps and 26 pneumatic control valves were installed and interfaced with the pre-existing gas furnace and distribution system. In the winter heating mode, the solar energy is stored in all three tanks, total capacity of 45,000 gallons, between design temperatures of 105/sup 0/ to 140/sup 0/F. As soon as Tank 1 is brought up to 140/sup 0/F, the control valves isolate it from the collector loop, and the hot water from the collectors is used to charge Tanks 2 and then Tank 3. Water can be drawn from Tank 1 to heat the school while Tanks 2 and 3 are being charged. As a consequence of the flexibility provided by the three tanks, compared to a single tank of equivalent capacity, the thermal lag in the system is reduced. A variable speed pump, in response to sensors at the inlet and outlet of the collectors, modulates the flow of water through each collector from a maximum of .5 gpm to a minimum of .1 gpm, attempting to maintain a temperature rise of about 10/sup 0/F. In the summer cooling mode, storage tanks 2 and 3 are designed to store hot water at temperatures between 180/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/F, and tank 1 is used to store chilled water. (WHK)

  9. Student cognitive growth and attitudinal changes through conducting authentic research in the Young Scientist Program at Zoo Atlanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, La Tanya Danielle

    This purpose of this study was to determine if authentic research conducted by students in the Young Scientist Program: (a) enhanced scientific research skills, (b) increased cognitive growth in the areas of animal behavior and characteristics, and (c) affected attitudes toward scientific research, science, and zoo-related issues. During the nine-week program, 18 students from Liberty High School completed program-related activities in their classrooms, and at Zoo Atlanta. Here, students completed authentic research in the form of animal behavior research projects. Research-based activities included forming hypotheses based on animal behavior, creating and maintaining ethograms, and making behavioral observations. This was a mixed method study, in which, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed in an attempt to answer the following research questions: (1) How does conducting authentic research within the Young Scientist Program enhance student scientific research skills? (2) How does participation in the Young Scientist Program increase student knowledge of animal behavior and characteristics? (3) How does the Young Scientist Program affect student attitudes? Data were collected pre, mid, and post program. Data sources included: (a) surveys, (b) interviews, (c) student research papers, and (d) researcher field notes. The data were analyzed through a framework of four methodological lenses: (a) knowledge of scientific research, (b) knowledge of animals, (c) attitudes toward scientific research, and (d) attitudes toward science and zoo-related issues. Surveys included knowledge tests and attitude scales. Overall, knowledge test results implied that as students progressed through the Young Scientist Program, their research skills, knowledge of scientific research, and knowledge of their animal were enhanced. Attitudinal data obtained from the attitude scales suggested that students' attitudes toward scientific research, science, and zoo

  10. Exposición «espacios e ilusiones» en el museo superior de arte, Atlanta - EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scogin, Mack

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available This Exhibit, carried out under the auspices of several cultural organizations of the city of Atlanta, intends to offer a distorted vision of space at the same time as it is real. It has been designed as a labyrinth of rooms in which various special effects are set up, such as: mirrors, lights, sound, shadow, movements, etc. Among the different rooms, the following stand out: the illuminated room, with shadows that appear and disappear on its walls; the perspective room, where the length of the vestibule can be easily mistaken; the nature room, where different animal species are seen by T.V., etc.

    Esta Exposición, realizada bajo los auspicios de varias organizaciones culturales de la ciudad de Atlanta, pretende ofrecer una visión distorsionada del espacio a la vez que real. Se ha concebido como un laberinto de salas en las que existen diversos efectos especiales tales como: espejos, luces, sonidos, sombras, movimientos, etc. Entre las diversas salas destacan: la Iluminada, en cuyos muros aparecen y desaparecen sombras; la de perspectiva, en la que se equivoca fácilmente la longitud del vestíbulo; la de la naturaleza, en la que mediante T.V. se ven distintas especies de animales; etc.

  11. Flood-inundation maps for Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.5-mile reach of the Peachtree Creek from the Norfolk Southern Railway bridge to the Moores Mill Road NW bridge, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Atlanta, Georgia. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia (02336300) and the USGS streamgage at Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia (02336490). Current water level (stage) at these USGS streamgages may be obtained at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ and can be used in conjunction with these maps to estimate near real-time areas of inundation. The National Weather Service (NWS) is incorporating results from this study into the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that commonly are collocated at USGS streamgages. The forecasted peak-stage information for the USGS streamgage at Peachtree Creek, which is available through the AHPS Web site, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. A one-dimensional step-backwater model was developed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC–RAS software for a 6.5-mile reach of Peachtree Creek and was used to compute flood profiles for a 5.5-mile reach of the creek. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Peachtree Creek at Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336300), and the Chattahoochee River at Georgia 280, near Atlanta, Georgia, streamgage (02336490) as well as high water marks collected during the 2010 annual peak flow event. The hydraulic model was then used to determine 50 water

  12. Meteorological detrending of primary and secondary pollutant concentrations: Method application and evaluation using long-term (2000-2012) data in Atlanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Lucas R. F.; Holmes, Heather A.; Mulholland, James A.; Russell, Armistead G.

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of air pollution regulations and controls are evaluated based on measured air pollutant concentrations. Air pollution levels, however, are highly sensitive to both emissions and meteorological fluctuations. Therefore, an assessment of the change in air pollutant levels due to emissions controls must account for these meteorological fluctuations. Two empirical methods to quantify the impact of meteorology on pollutant levels are discussed and applied to the 13-year time period between 2000 and 2012 in Atlanta, GA. The methods employ Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filters and linear regressions to detrended pollutant signals into long-term, seasonal, weekly, short-term, and white-noise components. The methods differ in how changes in weekly and holiday emissions are accounted for. Both can provide meteorological adjustments on a daily basis for future use in acute health analyses. The meteorological impact on daily signals of ozone, NOx, CO, SO2, PM2.5, and PM species are quantified. Analyses show that the substantial decreases in seasonal averages of NOx and SO2 correspond with controls implemented in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Detrending allows for the impacts of some controls to be observed with averaging times of as little as 3 months. Annual average concentrations of NOx, SO2, and CO have all fallen by at least 50% since 2000. Reductions in NOx levels, however, do not lead to uniform reductions in ozone. While average detrended summer average maximum daily average 8 h ozone (MDA8h O3) levels fell by 4% (2.2 ± 2 ppb) between 2000 and 2012, winter averages have increased by 12% (3.8 ± 1.4 ppb), providing further evidence that high ozone levels are NOx-limited and lower ozone concentrations are NOx-inhibited. High ozone days (with MDA8h O3 greater than 60 ppb) decreased both in number and in magnitude over the study period.

  13. A plume-in-grid approach to characterize air quality impacts of aircraft emissions at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rissman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the impacts of aircraft emissions during the landing and takeoff cycle on PM2.5 concentrations during the months of June 2002 and July 2002 at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Primary and secondary pollutants were modeled using the Advanced Modeling System for Transport, Emissions, Reactions, and Deposition of Atmospheric Matter (AMSTERDAM. AMSTERDAM is a modified version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model that incorporates a plume-in-grid process to simulate emissions sources of interest at a finer scale than can be achieved using CMAQ's model grid. Three fundamental issues were investigated: the effects of aircraft on PM2.5 concentrations throughout northern Georgia, the differences resulting from use of AMSTERDAM's plume-in-grid process rather than a traditional CMAQ simulation, and the concentrations observed in aircraft plumes at sub-grid scales. Comparison of model results with an air quality monitor located in the vicinity of the airport found that normalized mean bias ranges from −77.5% to 6.2% and normalized mean error ranges from 40.4% to 77.5%, varying by species. Aircraft influence average PM2.5 concentrations by up to 0.232 μg m−3 near the airport and by 0.001–0.007 μg m−3 throughout the Atlanta metro area. The plume-in-grid process increases concentrations of secondary PM pollutants by 0.005–0.020 μg m−3 (compared to the traditional grid-based treatment but reduces the concentration of non-reactive primary PM pollutants by up to 0.010 μg m−3, with changes concentrated near the airport. Examination of sub-grid scale results indicates that puffs within 20 km of the airport often have average PM2.5 concentrations one order of magnitude higher than aircraft contribution to the grid cells containing those puffs, and within 1–4 km of emitters, puffs may have PM2.5

  14. A plume-in-grid approach to characterize air quality impacts of aircraft emissions at the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rissman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the impacts of aircraft emissions during the landing and takeoff cycle on PM2.5 concentrations during the months of June and July 2002 at the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Primary and secondary pollutants were modeled using the Advanced Modeling System for Transport, Emissions, Reactions, and Deposition of Atmospheric Matter (AMSTERDAM. AMSTERDAM is a modified version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model that incorporates a plume-in-grid process to simulate emissions sources of interest at a finer scale than can be achieved using CMAQ's model grid. Three fundamental issues were investigated: the effects of aircraft on PM2.5 concentrations throughout northern Georgia, the differences resulting from use of AMSTERDAM's plume-in-grid process rather than a traditional CMAQ simulation, and the concentrations observed in aircraft plumes at subgrid scales. Comparison of model results with an air quality monitor located in the vicinity of the airport found that normalized mean bias ranges from −77.5% to 6.2% and normalized mean error ranges from 40.4% to 77.5%, varying by species. Aircraft influence average PM2.5 concentrations by up to 0.232 μg m−3 near the airport and by 0.001–0.007 μg m−3 throughout the Atlanta metro area. The plume-in-grid process increases concentrations of secondary PM pollutants by 0.005–0.020 μg m−3 (compared to the traditional grid-based treatment but reduces the concentration of non-reactive primary PM pollutants by up to 0.010 μg m−3, with changes concentrated near the airport. Examination of subgrid-scale results indicates that median aircraft contribution to grid cells is higher than median puff concentration in the airport's grid cell and outside of a 20 km × 20 km square area centered on the airport, while in a 12 km × 12 km square ring centered on the airport, puffs have median concentrations over an order of magnitude higher than aircraft

  15. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of the Atlanta, Georgia, Urban Heat Island Effect and Its Impacts on the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2007-01-01

    the impact of increased urban heating on air quality. The urban landscape impacts surface thermal energy exchanges that determine development of the UHI. This paper will illustrate how we are using high spatial remote sensing data collected over the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area in conjunction with other geographic information, to perform a detailed urban land cover classification and to determine the contribution of these land covers to the urban heat island effect. Also, the spatial arrangement of the land covers and the impact on urban heating from these selected patterns of development are evaluated. Additionally, this paper will show how these data are being used as inputs to improve air quality modeling for Atlanta, including potential benefits from UHI mitigation.

  16. HIV sexual transmission risks in the context of clinical care: a prospective study of behavioural correlates of HIV suppression in a community sample, Atlanta, GA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth C Kalichman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy (ART improves the health of people living with HIV and has the potential to reduce HIV infectiousness, thereby preventing HIV transmission. However, the success of ART for HIV prevention hinges on sustained ART adherence and avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STI. Objectives: To determine the sexual behaviours and HIV transmission risks of individuals with suppressed and unsuppressed HIV replication (i.e., viral load. Methods: Assessed HIV sexual transmission risks among individuals with clinically determined suppressed and unsuppressed HIV. Participants were 760 men and 280 women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, USA, who completed behavioural assessments, 28-daily prospective sexual behaviour diaries, one-month prospective unannounced pill counts for ART adherence, urine screening for illicit drug use and medical record chart abstraction for HIV viral load. Results: Individuals with unsuppressed HIV demonstrated a constellation of behavioural risks for transmitting HIV to uninfected sex partners that included symptoms of STI and substance use. In addition, 15% of participants with suppressed HIV had recent STI symptoms/diagnoses, indicating significant risks for sexual infectiousness despite their HIV suppression in blood plasma. Overall, 38% of participants were at risk for elevated sexual infectiousness and just as many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse with non-HIV-infected partners. Conclusions: Implementation strategies for using HIV treatments as HIV prevention requires enhanced behavioural interventions that extend beyond ART to address substance use and sexual health that will otherwise undermine the potential preventive impact of early ART.

  17. HIV Risk Behaviors, Perceptions, and Testing and Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Awareness/Use in Grindr-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men in Atlanta, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedel, William C; Halkitis, Perry N; Greene, Richard E; Hickson, DeMarc A; Duncan, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    Geosocial-networking smartphone applications such as Grindr can help men who have sex with men (MSM) meet sexual partners. Given the high incidence of HIV in the Deep South, the purpose of our study was to assess HIV risk and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) awareness and use in a sample of HIV-uninfected, Grindr-using MSM residing in Atlanta, Georgia (n = 84). Most (n = 71; 84.6%) reported being somewhat or very concerned about becoming HIV infected. Most (n = 74; 88.1%) had been tested for HIV in their lifetimes. About three fourths (n = 65; 77.4%) were aware of PrEP, but only 11.9% currently used the medication. HIV continues to disproportionately impact MSM and represents a significant source of concern. As the number of new infections continues to rise, it is important to decrease risks associated with acquisition and transmission of HIV by increasing rates of HIV testing and the use of biobehavioral interventions such as PrEP. PMID:26708834

  18. Simulation of Urban Heat Island Mitigation Strategies in Atlanta, GA Using High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data Set to Enhance Meteorological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, William L.; Dembek, Scott; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Lapenta, William; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Johnson, Hoyt; Khan, Maudood

    2006-01-01

    The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) and associated land surface parameters in meteorological models at all scales has a major influence on modeled surface energy fluxes and boundary layer states. In urban areas, accurate representation of the land surface may be even more important than in undeveloped regions due to the large heterogeneity within the urban area. Deficiencies in the characterization of the land surface related to the spatial or temporal resolution of the data, the number of LULC classes defined, the accuracy with which they are defined, or the degree of heterogeneity of the land surface properties within each class may degrade the performance of the models. In this study, an experiment was conducted to test a new high-resolution LULC data set for meteorological simulations for the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area using a mesoscale meteorological model and to evaluate the effects of urban heat island (UHI) mitigation strategies on modeled meteorology for 2030. Simulation results showed that use of the new LULC data set reduced a major deficiency of the land use data used previously, specifically the poor representation of urban and suburban land use. Performance of the meteorological model improved substantially, with the overall daytime cold bias reduced by over 30%. UHI mitigation strategies were projected to offset much of a predicted urban warming between 2000 and 2030. In fact, for the urban core, the cooling due to UHI mitigation strategies was slightly greater than the warming associated with urbanization over this period. For the larger metropolitan area, cooling only partially offset the projected warming trend.

  19. Interaction between epidemiology and laboratory sciences in the study of birth defects: Design of birth defects risk factor surveillance in metropolitan Atlanta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynberg, M.C.; Khoury, M.J. (Dept. of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Despite years of research, the etiology of most birth defects remains largely unknown. Interview instruments have been the major tools in the search for environmental causes of birth defects. Because of respondents' problems with recognition and recall, interviews are limited in their capacity to measure certain exposures. Laboratory scientists can have a major impact on defining markers of environmental exposure and genetic susceptibility. The Centers for Disease Control is starting a case-control study of serious birth defects on the basis of a population-based surveillance system for birth defects diagnosed during the first year of life in metropolitan Atlanta, Each year, 300 infants with selected birth defects (case subjects) and 100 population-based control subjects (infants without birth defects) will be enrolled in an ongoing study that will supplement surveillance. In addition to conducting extensive maternal interviews, we will collect blood and urine specimens from case and control subjects and their mothers for laboratory testing. Eventually, some environmental sampling may be incorporated. Particular areas of emphasis are (1) nutritional factors, specifically measuring maternal folic acid levels and other micronutrients (e.g., zinc) to explore their role in the etiology of neural tube defects, (2) substance use, specifically measuring cocaine metabolites in the blood and urine to explore their role for specific vascular disruption defects, and (3) environmental factors such as pesticides and aflatoxins, to explore their potential relationships with specific defects. In addition, a DNA bank will be maintained to evaluate the role of specific candidate genes in the etiology of birth defects. The development and testing of these methods could be useful to assess the interaction between environmental exposures and genetic susceptibility in the etiology of birth defects. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Trends in the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, hearing loss, intellectual disability, and vision impairment, metropolitan atlanta, 1991-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Van Naarden Braun

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence and characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, cerebral palsy (CP, hearing loss (HL, intellectual disability (ID, and vision impairment (VI over a 15-20 year time period, with specific focus on concurrent changes in ASD and ID prevalence. We used data from a population-based developmental disabilities surveillance program for 8-year-olds in metropolitan Atlanta. From 1991-2010, prevalence estimates of ID and HL were stable with slight increases in VI prevalence. CP prevalence was constant from 1993-2010. The average annual increase in ASD prevalence was 9.3% per year from 1996-2010, with a 269% increase from 4.2 per 1,000 in 1996 to 15.5 per 1,000 in 2010. From 2000-2010, the prevalence of ID without ASD was stable; during the same time, the prevalence of ASD with and without co-occurring ID increased by an average of 6.6% and 9.6% per year, respectively. ASD prevalence increases were found among both males and females, and among nearly all racial/ethnic subgroups and levels of intellectual ability. Average annual prevalence estimates from 1991-2010 underscore the significant community resources needed to provide early intervention and ongoing supports for children with ID (13.0 per 1,000, CP, (3.5 per 1,000, HL (1.4 per 1,000 and VI (1.3 in 1,000, with a growing urgency for children with ASD.

  1. A comparison of HAART outcomes between the US military HIV Natural History Study (NHS and HIV Atlanta Veterans Affairs Cohort Study (HAVACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie L Guest

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Department of Defense (DoD and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA provide comprehensive HIV treatment and care to their beneficiaries with open access and few costs to the patient. Individuals who receive HIV care in the VA have higher rates of substance abuse, homelessness and unemployment than individuals who receive HIV care in the DoD. A comparison between individuals receiving HIV treatment and care from the DoD and the VA provides an opportunity to explore the impact of individual-level characteristics on clinical outcomes within two healthcare systems that are optimized for clinic retention and medication adherence. METHODS: Data were collected on 1065 patients from the HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS and 1199 patients from the US Military HIV Natural History Study (NHS. Patients were eligible if they had an HIV diagnosis and began HAART between January 1, 1996 and June 30, 2010. The analysis examined the survival from HAART initiation to all-cause mortality or an AIDS event. RESULTS: Although there was substantial between-cohort heterogeneity and the 12-year survival of participants in NHS was significantly higher than in HAVACS in crude analyses, this survival disparity was reduced from 21.5% to 1.6% (mortality only and 26.8% to 4.1% (combined mortality or AIDS when controlling for clinical and demographic variables. CONCLUSION: We assessed the clinical outcomes for individuals with HIV from two very similar government-sponsored healthcare systems that reduced or eliminated many barriers associated with accessing treatment and care. After controlling for clinical and demographic variables, both 12-year survival and AIDS-free survival rates were similar for the two study cohorts who have open access to care and medication despite dramatic differences in socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics.

  2. Air quality impacts and health-benefit valuation of a low-emission technology for rail yard locomotives in Atlanta Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Boris; Bergin, Michael; Boylan, James; Huang, Yan; Bergin, Michelle; Russell, Armistead G

    2015-11-15

    One of the largest rail yard facilities in the Southeastern US, the Inman and Tilford yards, is located in the northwestern section of Atlanta, Georgia alongside other industries, schools, businesses, and dwellings. It is a significant source of fine particulate (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) (Galvis, Bergin, & Russell, 2013). We calculate 2011 PM2.5 and BC emissions from the rail yards and primary industrial and on-road mobile sources in the area and determine their impact on local air quality using Gaussian dispersion modeling. We determine the change in PM2.5 and BC concentrations that could be accomplished by upgrading traditional switcher locomotives used in these rail yards to a lower emitting technology and evaluate the health benefits for comparison with upgrade costs. Emissions from the rail yards were estimated using reported fuel consumption data (GAEPD, 2012b) and emission factors previously measured in the rail yards (Galvis et al., 2013). Model evaluation against 2011 monitoring data found agreement between measured and simulated concentrations. Model outputs indicate that the line-haul and switcher activities are responsible for increments in annual average concentrations of approximately 0.5±0.03 μg/m(3) (39%) and 0.7±0.04 μg/m(3) (56%) of BC, and for 1.0±0.1 μg/m(3) (7%) and 1.6±0.2 μg/m(3) (14%) of PM2.5 at two monitoring sites located north and south of the rail yards respectively. Upgrading the switcher locomotives at the yards with a lower emitting technology in this case "mother slug" units could decrease PM2.5 and BC emissions by about 9 and 3 t/year respectively. This will lower annual average PM2.5 concentrations between 0.3±0.1 μg/m(3) and 0.6±0.1 μg/m(3) and BC concentrations between 0.1±0.02 μg/m(3) and 0.2±0.03 μg/m(3) at monitoring sites north and south of the rail yards respectively, and would facilitate PM2.5 NAAQS attainment in the area. We estimate that health benefits of approximately 20 million dollars per year

  3. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia,and Look Rock, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S.; Bairai, Solomon T.; Mueller, Stephen; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    A year-long near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia, in 2012) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee, in 2013) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (up to 76 %) and sulfate (up to 31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the 1 year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA) and 91Fac (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed up to 66 % of total OA mass. HOA was observed during the entire year only at the urban site (on average 21 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly ( ˜ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is well correlated with the m/z 82 ion associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of IEPOX-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The

  4. Air quality impacts and health-benefit valuation of a low-emission technology for rail yard locomotives in Atlanta Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Boris; Bergin, Michael; Boylan, James; Huang, Yan; Bergin, Michelle; Russell, Armistead G

    2015-11-15

    One of the largest rail yard facilities in the Southeastern US, the Inman and Tilford yards, is located in the northwestern section of Atlanta, Georgia alongside other industries, schools, businesses, and dwellings. It is a significant source of fine particulate (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) (Galvis, Bergin, & Russell, 2013). We calculate 2011 PM2.5 and BC emissions from the rail yards and primary industrial and on-road mobile sources in the area and determine their impact on local air quality using Gaussian dispersion modeling. We determine the change in PM2.5 and BC concentrations that could be accomplished by upgrading traditional switcher locomotives used in these rail yards to a lower emitting technology and evaluate the health benefits for comparison with upgrade costs. Emissions from the rail yards were estimated using reported fuel consumption data (GAEPD, 2012b) and emission factors previously measured in the rail yards (Galvis et al., 2013). Model evaluation against 2011 monitoring data found agreement between measured and simulated concentrations. Model outputs indicate that the line-haul and switcher activities are responsible for increments in annual average concentrations of approximately 0.5±0.03 μg/m(3) (39%) and 0.7±0.04 μg/m(3) (56%) of BC, and for 1.0±0.1 μg/m(3) (7%) and 1.6±0.2 μg/m(3) (14%) of PM2.5 at two monitoring sites located north and south of the rail yards respectively. Upgrading the switcher locomotives at the yards with a lower emitting technology in this case "mother slug" units could decrease PM2.5 and BC emissions by about 9 and 3 t/year respectively. This will lower annual average PM2.5 concentrations between 0.3±0.1 μg/m(3) and 0.6±0.1 μg/m(3) and BC concentrations between 0.1±0.02 μg/m(3) and 0.2±0.03 μg/m(3) at monitoring sites north and south of the rail yards respectively, and would facilitate PM2.5 NAAQS attainment in the area. We estimate that health benefits of approximately 20 million dollars per year

  5. Escherichia coli bacteria density in relation to turbidity, streamflow characteristics, and season in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia, October 2000 through September 2008—Description, statistical analysis, and predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Water-based recreation—such as rafting, canoeing, and fishing—is popular among visitors to the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area (CRNRA) in north Georgia. The CRNRA is a 48-mile reach of the Chattahoochee River upstream from Atlanta, Georgia, managed by the National Park Service (NPS). Historically, high densities of fecal-indicator bacteria have been documented in the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries at levels that commonly exceeded Georgia water-quality standards. In October 2000, the NPS partnered with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), State and local agencies, and non-governmental organizations to monitor Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli) density and develop a system to alert river users when E. coli densities exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) single-sample beach criterion of 235 colonies (most probable number) per 100 milliliters (MPN/100 mL) of water. This program, called BacteriALERT, monitors E. coli density, turbidity, and water temperature at two sites on the Chattahoochee River upstream from Atlanta, Georgia. This report summarizes E. coli bacteria density and turbidity values in water samples collected between 2000 and 2008 as part of the BacteriALERT program; describes the relations between E. coli density and turbidity, streamflow characteristics, and season; and describes the regression analyses used to develop predictive models that estimate E. coli density in real time at both sampling sites.

  6. Environmental Public Health Survelliance for Exposure to Respiratory Health Hazards: A Joint NASA/CDC Project to Use Remote Sensing Data for Estimating Airborne Particulate Matter Over the Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Douglas; Mohammad, Al-Hamdan; Crosson, William; Estes, Maurice, Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh; Qualters, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Describes the public health surveillance efforts of NASA, in a joint effort with the Center for Disease Control (CDC). NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking nvironmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value - added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. The venture sought to provide remote sensing data for the 5-country Metro-Atlanta area and to integrate this environmental data with public health data into a local network, in an effort to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. Remote sensing data used environmental data (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Air Quality System [AQS] ground measurements and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth [AOD]) to estimate airborne particulate matter over Atlanta, and linked this data with health data related to asthma. The study proved the feasibility of linking environmental data (MODIS particular matter estimates and AQS) with health data (asthma). Algorithms were developed for QC, bias removal, merging MODIS and AQS particulate matter data, as well as for other applications. Additionally, a Business Associate Agreement was negotiated for a health care provider to enable sharing of Protected Health Information.

  7. How Can I Trust You if You Don’t Know Who You Are? The Consequences of a Fluid Identity on Cross-Racial Organizing between African American Women and Latinas in Atlanta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belisa González

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scholarship in the area of cross-racial organizing between Latina/o and African Americans has increased substantially over the past ten years. Within that literature, scholars have identified many reasons why cross-racial coalitions both succeed and fail. Among the factors most often cited is the issue of trust. Despite the recognition of the crucial role trust plays in cross-racial organizing, little attention has been paid to what contributes to actually building trust between African Americans and Latina/o. I argue that one factor contributing to the distrust of Latinas among African American women involved in cross-racial organizing in Atlanta is the perceived discrepancy between Latinas’ own asserted identity and the identity assigned to them by African American women organizers. Using data gathered from six years of participant observation and forty interviews conducted with African American women and Latinas organizing in Georgia, I discuss the consequences of identity construction for cross-racial organizing. I find that within cross-racial organizing spaces in Atlanta, perceived racial identities are used by African American women as proxies for determining Latina organizers’ commitment to social justice and, correspondingly, how much individual Latinas can be trusted. Specifically, I find that African American respondents view Latina identity as optional and potentially white. Latina respondents, on the other hand, assert strong identities and contend that their perceived “optional” identities are a function of what Anzaldúa calls a mestiza consciousness or the straddeling of multiple identities. I argue that understanding how these identities are assigned and asserted by Latinas and African American women is a crucial and often-overlooked component to building trust, and by extension, to building sustainable cross-racial coalitions.

  8. Influence of septic systems on stream base flow in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin near Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John S.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    Septic systems were identified at 241,733 locations in a 2,539-square-mile (mi2) study area that includes all or parts of 12 counties in the Metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, area. Septic system percolation may locally be an important component of streamflow in small drainage basins where it augments natural groundwater recharge, especially during extreme low-flow conditions. The amount of groundwater reaching streams depends on how much is intercepted by plants or infiltrates to deeper parts of the groundwater system that flows beyond a basin divide and does not discharge into streams within a basin. The potential maximum percolation from septic systems in the study area is 62 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), of which 52 ft3/s is in the Chattahoochee River Basin and 10 ft3/s is in the Flint River Basin. These maximum percolation rates represent 0.4 to 5.7 percent of daily mean streamflow during the 2011–12 period at the farthest downstream gaging site (station 02338000) on the Chattahoochee River, and 0.5 to 179 percent of daily mean streamflow at the farthest downstream gaging site on the Flint River (02344350). To determine the difference in base flow between basins having different septic system densities, hydrograph separation analysis was completed using daily mean streamflow data at streamgaging stations at Level Creek (site 02334578), with a drainage basin having relatively high septic system density of 101 systems per square mile, and Woodall Creek (site 02336313), with a drainage basin having relatively low septic system density of 18 systems per square mile. Results indicated that base-flow yield during 2011–12 was higher at the Level Creek site, with a median of 0.47 cubic feet per second per square mile ([ft3/s]/mi2), compared to a median of 0.16 (ft3/s)/mi2, at the Woodall Creek site. At the less urbanized Level Creek site, there are 515 septic systems with a daily maximum percolation rate of 0.14 ft3/s, accounting for 11 percent of the base flow in

  9. The Impact of Implementing a Test, Treat and Retain HIV Prevention Strategy in Atlanta among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men with a History of Incarceration: A Mathematical Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane D Lima

    Full Text Available Annually, 10 million adults transition through prisons or jails in the United States (US and the prevalence of HIV among entrants is three times higher than that for the country as a whole. We assessed the potential impact of increasing HIV Testing/Treatment/Retention (HIV-TTR in the community and within the criminal justice system (CJS facilities, coupled with sexual risk behavior change, focusing on black men-who-have-sex-with-men, 15-54 years, in Atlanta, USA.We modeled the effect of a HIV-TTR strategy on the estimated cumulative number of new (acquired infections and mortality, and on the HIV prevalence at the end of ten years. We additionally assessed the effect of increasing condom use in all settings.In the Status Quo scenario, at the end of 10 years, the cumulative number of new infections in the community, jail and prison was, respectively, 9246, 77 and 154 cases; HIV prevalence was 10815, 69 and 152 cases, respectively; and the cumulative number of deaths was 2585, 18 and 34 cases, respectively. By increasing HIV-TTR coverage, the cumulative number of new infections could decrease by 15% in the community, 19% in jail, and 8% in prison; HIV prevalence could decrease by 8%, 9% and 7%, respectively; mortality could decrease by 20%, 39% and 18%, respectively. Based on the model results, we have shown that limited use and access to condoms have contributed to the HIV incidence and prevalence in all settings.Aggressive implementation of a CJS-focused HIV-TTR strategy has the potential to interrupt HIV transmission and reduce mortality, with benefit to the community at large. To maximize the impact of these interventions, retention in treatment, including during the period after jail and prison release, and increased condom use was vital for decreasing the burden of the HIV epidemic in all settings.

  10. 1996年亚特兰大奥林匹克运动会的遗产--亚特兰大的尝试、失误与成功%Legacy of the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games - Trials,Errors and the Triumphs of the Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Larry Saben

    2004-01-01

    1996年亚特兰大奥林匹克运动会已经过去38年.这次奥林匹克运动会的遗产、记忆与成功对经济和社会的影响一直在伴随着我们.作为一个奥林匹克运动会的组办城市,亚特兰大不得不面对奥林匹克运动会后的挑战,这些挑战并不比组办奥林匹克运动会来得轻松.本文报导了我们的尝试、失误与成功的经历,它描述了该地区正在前进的方向和相关的交通规划和土地使用策略.%It has been almost 8 years since the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. However, the legacy of the games, the memory of the games, the economic and social impacts of the games is still way from over. As an Olympic city, Atlanta has had to face many challenges after the games, no less challenging than hosting the games. This paper reports our trials,errors and triumphs. It also describes the direction that the region is now moving toward,a coordinated transportation and land use strategy.

  11. Atlanta Nursing Home, Sidmonton Road, Bray, Wicklow.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kabir, Zubair

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined two main hypotheses: a) Polish immigrants\\' smoking estimates are greater than their Irish counterparts (b) Polish immigrants purchasing cigarettes from Poland smoke "heavier" (>\\/= 20 cigarettes a day) when compared to those purchasing cigarettes from Ireland. The study also set out to identify significant predictors of \\'current\\' smoking (some days and everyday) among the Polish immigrants. METHODS: Dublin residents of Polish origin (n = 1,545) completed a previously validated Polish questionnaire in response to an advertisement in a local Polish lifestyle magazine over 5 weekends (July-August, 2007). The Office of Tobacco Control telephone-based monthly survey data were analyzed for the Irish population in Dublin for the same period (n = 484). RESULTS: Age-sex adjusted smoking estimates were: 47.6% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 47.3%; 48.0%) among the Poles and 27.8% (95% CI: 27.2%; 28.4%) among the general Irish population (p < 0.001). Of the 57% of smokers (n = 345\\/606) who purchased cigarettes solely from Poland and the 33% (n = 198\\/606) who purchased only from Ireland, 42.6% (n = 147\\/345) and 41.4% (n = 82\\/198) were "heavy" smokers, respectively (p = 0.79). Employment (Odds Ratio [OR]: 2.89; 95% CI: 1.25-6.69), lower education (OR: 3.76; 95%CI: 2.46-5.74), and a longer stay in Ireland (>24 months) were significant predictors of current smoking among the Poles. An objective validation of the self-reported smoking history of a randomly selected sub-sample immigrant group, using expired carbon monoxide (CO) measurements, showed a highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.64) of expired CO levels with the reported number of cigarettes consumed (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Polish immigrants\\' smoking estimates are higher than their Irish counterparts, and particularly if employed, with only primary-level education, and are overseas >2 years.

  12. Atlanta Nursing Home, Sidmonton Road, Bray, Wicklow.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Idrees, Ahsan

    2012-01-01

    The case of a 39 year old woman who had diastasis of pubic symphysis following childbirth and later developed severe chronic neuropathic pain and disability is presented. She received extensive surgical and medical treatment for 6 years with no improvement of symptoms. The VNRS (Visual Numerical Rating Scale) pain score was 7\\/10 or more most of the time. This was quite disabling in terms of her quality of life. A spinal cord stimulator was inserted after failure of other modalities of pain management which resulted in dramatic improvement in the quality of life measured with SF-36 questionnaire. Her pain score became 0\\/10 VNRS and she was free from opioids and psychotropic medications within 3 months post insertion. Spinal cord stimulator can be considered for the management of pain due to diastasis of pubic symphysis, not amenable to other therapies.

  13. Delta Greenbriar - Atlanta – (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heery, George

    1975-05-01

    Full Text Available «Delta Greenbriar» is a corporate centre for the Delta air line company. The complex comprises four buildings containing: 1 the installations for flight simulation; 2 the air training base; 3 the control centre for flights and communications; 4 the department for tickets and reservations. They consist of one of two storeys. The lower ones can be extended both horizontally as well as vertically, whereas the other ones can only be enlarged in horizontal direction. The unit has been designed like a university campus, with patios, inner gardens and exterior corridors which apart from connecting the various buildings with each other also provide a close contact between the office premises and the park.El «Delta Greenbriar» es un centro corporativo para la compañía de líneas aéreas Delta. El complejo está constituido por cuatro edificios, que alojan: 1 las instalaciones para la simulación de vuelo; 2 la base de entrenamiento aéreo; 3 el centro de control de vuelo y comunicaciones; 4 el departamento de reservas y venta de billetes. Constan de una o dos plantas, pudiéndose ampliar los más bajos tanto horizontal como verticalmente, mientras que los otros sólo pueden aumentarse en sentido horizontal. El conjunto se ha diseñado como un campus universitario, con patios, ajardinamiento interior y corredores exteriores que, además de enlazar los distintos edificios entre sí, ponen en estrecha relación los espacios de oficinas con el parque.

  14. Dante and Oedipus Go to Atlanta, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisch, Richard

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the three main lines of symbolic development in "The Artificial Nigger" by Flannery O'Conner that make this short story an eminently teachable tale in world literature and humanities classes where Dante, Sophocles, and the Bible have been read. (RL)

  15. Selected papers from the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2012) (Atlanta, GA, USA, 2-5 December 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mark G.; Lang, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Welcome to this special section of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM). This section, co-edited by myself and by Professor Jeffrey Lang of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, contains expanded versions of selected papers presented at the Power MEMS meeting held in Atlanta, GA, USA, in December of 2012. Professor Lang and I had the privilege of co-chairing Power MEMS 2012, the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications. The scope of the PowerMEMS series of workshops ranges from basic principles, to materials and fabrication, to devices and systems, to applications. The many applications of power MEMS (microelectromehcanical systems) range from MEMS-enabled energy harvesting, storage, conversion and conditioning, to integrated systems that manage these processes. Why is the power MEMS field growing in importance? Smaller-scale power and power supplies (microwatts to tens of watts) are gaining in prominence due to many factors, including the ubiquity of low power portable electronic equipment and the proliferation of wireless sensor nodes that require extraction of energy from their embedding environment in order to function. MEMS manufacturing methods can be utilized to improve the performance of traditional power supply elements, such as allowing batteries to charge faster or shrinking the physical size of passive elements in small-scale power supplies. MEMS technologies can be used to fabricate energy harvesters that extract energy from an embedding environment to power wireless sensor nodes, in-body medical implants and other devices, in which the harvesters are on the small scales that are appropriately matched to the overall size of these microsystems. MEMS can enable the manufacturing of energy storage elements from nontraditional materials by bringing appropriate structure and surface morphology to these materials as well as fabricating the electrical interfaces

  16. Evaluating Plan Alternatives for Transportation System Sustainability: Atlanta Metropolitan Region%融合可持续理念的交通规划方案比选方法——以亚特兰大大都市区为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christy Mihyeon Jeon; Adjo A.Amekudzi; Randall L.Guensler; 张嵩; 李浩; 黄洪佳

    2011-01-01

    越来越多的机构开始为交通系统的可持续发展定义,并试图将这一概念融入区域交通规划过程.然而,只有极少数的区域规划机构意识到了交通系统和土地利用变化给经济、环境和社会生活质量(这三者通常被认为是可持续交通系统的三个基本方面)带来的广泛影响.首先,论述了使用多个可持续发展指标的多准则决策方法,并应用其评估亚特兰大大都市区的三个交通和土地利用规划方案.然后,介绍了作为交通决策支持工具的可持续发展综合指数,用于减少多指标综合评价方式导致的信息过载.这一评价方法有助于决策者在确定交通规划方案时综合考虑可持续性,并能根据已确定的目标识别最可持续(或最不可持续)的规划方案.%A growing number of agencies have begun to define “sustainability” for transportation systems and are attempting to incorporate the concept into the regional transportation planning process.Still, very few metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) capture the comprehensive impact of transportation system and land use changes on the economy, environment, and social quality of life,which are commonly considered the essential three dimensions of sustainable transportation systems. This paper demonstrates an application of the Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) approach for evaluating selected transportation and land use plans in the Atlanta region using multiple sustainability parameters. A composite sustainability index is introduced as a decision support tool for transportation policymaking, where the sustainability index considers multidimensional conflicting criteria in the transportation planning process.The proposed framework should help decision-makers with incorporating sustainability considerations into transportation planning as well as identifying the most sustainable (or least unsustainable) plan for predetermined objectives.

  17. Exacerbations of childhood asthma and ozone pollution in Atlanta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.C.; Etzel, R.A.; Lloyd, C. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)); Wilcox, W.D. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Asthma prevalence and mortality due to asthma have been increasing during the last decade, and both the rates and the increases in rates have been higher for blacks than whites and higher for children than adults. Whether environmental factors such as air pollution contribute to these increases is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between emergency visits to a hospital for childhood asthma and exposure to ozone in an indigent, predominantly black population. Data were collected by abstracting clinical records for all children with asthma or reactive airway disease in one public hospital during the summer of 1990. From June 1, 1990, to August 31, 1990, 609 visits were made by children aged 1 to 16 years to an emergency clinic for treatment of asthma or reactive airway disease. Monitoring data indicated that maximum ozone levels equalled or exceeded 0.11 ppm on 6 days during the study period. The average number of visits for asthma or reactive airway disease was 37% higher on the days after those 6 days (from 6:00 PM to 6:00 PM the next day) than on other days (95% Cl, RR = 1.02-1.73). The results of the study suggest that among black children from low-income families, asthma may be exacerbated following periods of high ozone pollution. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. 78 FR 1742 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ..., Class B airspace area (77 FR 5429). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking.... There are other Class B airspace areas and many military special use airspace areas depicted on... well since 2006 and increased efficiency has been gained since then with GPS and RNAV...

  19. 第24~26届奥运会各竞技强国优势竞技运动项目研究%Study on the Advantage Sports of the Sports Powers at the Seoul Barcelona and Atlanta Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹景伟

    2001-01-01

    Based on literature and statistics, the dynamic growth and decline of the advantage sports of the sports powers at the Seoul, Barcelona and Atlanta Olympic Games were studied and compared with China. The results indicate that 1. Each sports power has their own superior sport events, of which the amount and quality determine the country's position in the competition; 2. China's superior sports are strongly featured by groups, such as diving, gymnastics and racket balls, but her sports involving body energy got much less medals than USA, Russia and Germany; 3. Australia, the host country of the 27th Olympic Games, has made great progress in her superior sports especially in swimming. It is suggested that besides maintaining the traditional superior sports such as gymnastics, diving, table tennis, badminton, shooting, weightlifting, China should also give more attention to the improvement of swimming.%研究目的:探讨第24~26届奥运会各体育强国的优势项目群及其动态消长,并与我国进行比较,以为我国“奥运争光计划”的完善、发展提供参考。研究方法:文献资料法、数理统计法、归纳法。主要结果和结论:(1)各竞技体育强国均有特色性的优势项目群,其涵盖面大小及其竞争质量决定了它们的竞争地位;(2)我国优势项目群具有鲜明的项群特征,主要集中于技能主导类表现难美性和隔网对抗性项群。与美、俄、德相比,我国体能主导类项群对奥运奖牌总量的贡献率太小;(3)第2集团国家的奥运竞争将更加激烈,特别是第27届奥运会的东道主澳大利亚优势项目群的平均动态消长率已超过我国,其游泳项目的迅速崛起与近年来我国游泳项目的状态低迷形成了鲜明对比,从而使我国在第27届奥运会将面临着空前的竞争压力。建议:依据澳大利亚优势项目群集中于体能主导类的特点,我国的悉尼奥运备战应在确保体操、

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESS MEASUREMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (2ND), HELD AT THE SHERATON-ATLANTA HOTEL IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON FEBRUARY 25-27, 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report documents 22 presentations comprising 12 poster sessions at the symposium. The symposium focused on the state-of-the-art of sampling and analysis techniques that are appropriate for process measurements in the context of an environmental assessment program. Methods are...

  1. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique, Pictometry Oblique Imagery for the 10-County Atlanta Regional Commission Region, Published in 2007, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Oblique dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Pictometry Oblique Imagery...

  2. CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANTS' WORKSHOP, REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS (ATLANTA, MAY 17-20, 1967).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOBROVOLNY, JERRY S.

    THIS REPORT ATTEMPTS TO SHOW ADMINISTRATORS OF JUNIOR COLLEGES, TECHNICAL INSTITUTES, AND GOVERNMENT OR INDUSTRIAL TRAINING PROGRAMS CERTAIN CRITICAL PROBLEMS IN THE TRAINING OF CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS. THE PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNICAL EDUCATION REQUIRES ATTENTION AS DOES THE IDENTIFICATION OF STUDENTS WHO CAN BENEFIT FROM AND SUCCESSFULLY…

  3. American Uveitis Society Meeting October 30, 1995 Marriott Marquis Hotel, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, D M; Chern, K C

    1996-01-01

    1 Retinal vascular occlusion and scleroderma. Tessler H, Flores-Guevara J, Goldstein D, Chicago, IL, USA. 2 MHC Class II antigen expression in ciliary body in spontaneous and experimental uveitis. Kalsow C, Zhavoronkova M, Dwyer A, Rochester, NY & Scottsville, NY, USA. 3 IL-10 in the vitreous of patients with intraocular lymphoma. Whitcup S, Solomon D, Nussenblatt R, Chan C-C, Bethesda, MD, USA 4 Iris juvenile xanthogranuloma studied by immunohistochemistry. Shields J, Shields C, Eagle R, DePotter P, Collins M, Philadelphia, PA, USA. 5 Outcomes analysis in with JRA-associated uveitis. Dana M-R, Merayo-Lloves J, Foster C, Boston MA, USA. 6 Persistent glaucoma secondary to periocular steroids. Akduman L, Conway M, Burchfield J, Kolker A, Black D, DelPriore L, Kaplan H, St. Louis, MO, USA 7 The use of itraconazole in ocular histoplasmosis Callanan D, Fish G, Dallas, TX, USA 8 Succesful treatment of macular hole secondary to sympathetic ophthalmia. Cano J, Diaz M, Navea A, Ruiz C, Castilla M. Barcelona, Spain. 9 HLA-DR2+ intermediate uveitis. Pulido J, Tang W, Han D, Mieler W. Milwaukee, WI, USA. 10 Vein occlusion in AIDS misdiagnosed as CMV retinitis. Park K, Marx J, Rao N. Los Angeles, CA, USA. 11 HIV-associated foveal hemorrhage. Crews K, Zimmerman P, Lohner S. Salt Lake City, UT, USA. 12 Cytomegalovirus papillitis in patients with AIDS. Patel S, Rutzen A, Marx J, Thach A, Chong L, Rao N, Los Angeles, CA, USA. 13 Recurrence rate of CMV retinitis following the ganciclovir implant and pars plans vitrectomy and silicone oil. Marx J, Thach A, Rao N, Chong L. Los Angeles, CA, USA. PMID:22827419

  4. Ambient Air Pollution and Birth Weight in Full-Term Infants in Atlanta, 1994–2004

    OpenAIRE

    Darrow, Lyndsey A.; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2010-01-01

    Background An emerging body of evidence suggests that ambient levels of air pollution during pregnancy are associated with fetal growth. Objectives We examined relationships between birth weight and temporal variation in ambient levels of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone, particulate matter ≤ 10 μm in diameter (PM10), ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), 2.5 to 10 μm (PM2.5–10), and PM2.5 chemical component measurements for 406,627 full-term births occurring between 1994 and ...

  5. Lion, ungulate, and visitor reactions to playbacks of lion roars at Zoo Atlanta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelling, Angela S; Allard, Stephanie M; Kelling, Nicholas J; Sandhaus, Estelle A; Maple, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Felids in captivity are often inactive and elusive in zoos, leading to a frustrating visitor experience. Eight roars were recorded from an adult male lion and played back over speakers as auditory enrichment to benefit the lions while simultaneously enhancing the zoo visitor experience. In addition, ungulates in an adjacent exhibit were observed to ensure that the novel location and increased frequency of roars did not lead to a stress or fear response. The male lion in this study roared more in the playback phase than in the baseline phases while not increasing any behaviors that would indicate compromised welfare. In addition, zoo visitors remained at the lion exhibit longer during playback. The nearby ungulates never exhibited any reactions stronger than orienting to playbacks, identical to their reactions to live roars. Therefore, naturalistic playbacks of lion roars are a potential form of auditory enrichment that leads to more instances of live lion roars and enhances the visitor experience without increasing the stress levels of nearby ungulates or the lion themselves, who might interpret the roar as that of an intruder.

  6. Biennial Conference on Chemical Education, Abstracts (11th, Atlanta, Georgia, August 5-9, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, E. K.; Pulliam, E. J.

    This publication includes more than 470 abstracts of papers scheduled to be presented at a chemical education conference. Topics of the papers include: (1) human impact on the environment; (2) technology; (3) forensic science; (4) paper chemistry; (5) computer interfacing, software, videodisc and graphics; (6) faculty enhancement programs; (7)…

  7. 75 FR 17126 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, Georgia, Application for Expansion and Reorganization under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... (74 FR 1170, 01/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the..., Murray, Whitfield, Catoosa, Walker, Dade, Forsyth, Dawson, Hall, Lumpkin, Union, White, Habersham, Banks... Richmond County, which is adjacent to the Colombia, South Carolina Customs and Border Protection port...

  8. 77 FR 24440 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Ozone 2002 Base Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... Development Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental... Courier: Lynorae Benjamin, Regulatory Development Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics... 30303-8960. Such deliveries are only accepted during the Regional Office's normal hours of...

  9. 77 FR 12526 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia; Atlanta; Fine Particulate Matter 2002...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ..., Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street... Development Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental... accepted during the Regional Office's normal hours of operation. The Regional Office's official hours...

  10. GLOBECOM '84 - Global Telecommunications Conference, Atlanta, GA, November 26-29, 1984, Conference Record. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The subjects discussed are related to LSI/VLSI based subscriber transmission and customer access for the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), special applications of fiber optics, ISDN and competitive telecommunication services, technical preparations for the Geostationary-Satellite Orbit Conference, high-capacity statistical switching fabrics, networking and distributed systems software, adaptive arrays and cancelers, synchronization and tracking, speech processing, advances in communication terminals, full-color videotex, and a performance analysis of protocols. Advances in data communications are considered along with transmission network plans and progress, direct broadcast satellite systems, packet radio system aspects, radio-new and developing technologies and applications, the management of software quality, and Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) aspects of telematic services. Attention is given to personal computers and OSI, the role of software reliability measurement in information systems, and an active array antenna for the next-generation direct broadcast satellite.

  11. Impaired Driving Death Rate, by Age and Gender, 2012, Region 4 - Atlanta

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Rate of deaths by age/gender (per 100,000 population) for people killed in crashes involving a driver with BAC =>0.08%, 2012 Source: Fatality Analysis Reporting...

  12. Bus Routes, Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Routes dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2006. Data by this publisher are often...

  13. DOE ZERH Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  14. 78 FR 76810 - Information Collection; Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339, 24 hours a... collection addresses environmental justice from the perspective of urban trees; and how this resource may... respondents, including the use of automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological...

  15. 78 FR 70895 - Proposed Establishment and Modification of Area Navigation (RNAV) Routes; Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a.... 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2.... 34 48'15'' N., long. 91 36'01'' W.) RICKX, AR WP (Lat. 35 06'30'' N., long. 90 14'16'' W.) TROVE,...

  16. Non Invasive Biomedical Analysis - Breath Networking Session at PittCon 2011, Atlanta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    This was the second year that our breath colleagues organized a networking session at the Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition or ''PittCon'' (http://www.pincon.org/).This time it was called "Non-invasive Biomedical Analysis" to broaden the scope a bit, but the primary focus rema...

  17. Motor Vehicle Occupant Death Rate, by Age and Gender, 2012 & 2014, Region 4 - Atlanta

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Rate of deaths by age/gender (per 100,000 population) for motor vehicle occupants killed in crashes, 2012 & 2014. 2012 Source: Fatality Analysis Reporting...

  18. 77 FR 5429 - Proposed Modification of the Atlanta Class B Airspace Area; GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Reclassification Final Rule (56 FR 65638), the term ``terminal control area'' was replaced by ``Class B airspace... terrain to the east and northwest as well as special use airspace northwest and southwest of the area... specifically invited on the overall regulatory, aeronautical, economic, environmental, and...

  19. Congenital gastrointestinal defects in Down syndrome: a report from the Atlanta and National Down Syndrome Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S B; Torfs, C P; Romitti, P A; Royle, M H; Druschel, C; Hobbs, C A; Sherman, S L

    2009-02-01

    We report Down syndrome (DS)-associated congenital gastrointestinal (GI) defects identified during a 15 year, population-based study of the etiology and phenotypic consequences of trisomy 21. Between 1989 and 2004, six sites collected DNA, clinical and epidemiological information on live-born infants with standard trisomy 21 and their parents. We used chi-squared test and logistic regression to explore relationships between congenital GI defects and infant sex, race, maternal age, origin of the extra chromosome 21, and presence of a congenital heart defect. Congenital GI defects were present in 6.7% of 1892 eligible infants in this large, ethnically diverse, population-based study of DS. Defects included esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (0.4%), pyloric stenosis (0.3%), duodenal stenosis/atresia (3.9%), Hirschsprung disease (0.8%), and anal stenosis/atresia (1.0%). We found no statistically significant associations between these defects and the factors examined. Although not significant, esophageal atresia was observed more often in infants of younger mothers and Hispanics, Hirschsprung disease was more frequent in males and in infants of younger mothers and blacks, and anal stenosis/atresia was found more often among females and Asians. PMID:19021635

  20. Resisting the Status Quo: The Narratives of Black Homeschoolers in Metro-Atlanta and Metro-DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields-Smith, Cheryl; Kisura, Monica Wells

    2013-01-01

    Trends suggest that homeschooling continues to increase among black families. Yet, research on contemporary Black homeschooling remains scarce. Given black educational history, the phenomena of Black families choosing homeschooling over public and private schools in the post-Desegregation era is worthy of investigation. Further, documenting the…

  1. A comparison of traditional food and health strategies among Taiwanese and Chinese immigrants in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Sandy; Quave, Cassandra L

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies on the use of plants amongst migrant populations are of great relevance to public health. Traditional health strategies, which incorporate plants as medicines, foods, or both – can play an important role in individual well-being. However, at the same time, migrant populations’ traditional knowledge of such practices may be under a state of greater threat of decline due to factors such as limited access to the plant materials and physical isolation from the ho...

  2. Symposium on Electromagnetic Windows, 19th, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, Sept. 7-9, 1988, Proceedings. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, J. C.

    The present conference on EM-window technologies discusses the electrical analysis of fenestrated radomes by means of array and reaction-surface integration methods, a spherical-wave point dipole source array technique for radome analysis, a hybrid FEM/boundary-element analysis for a radome/phased-array antenna, the impedance-matching of dielectric space-frame radomes, sidewall reflections in missile radomes, the high Mach number structural performance of radomes, and athermal window materials. Also discussed are CVD-produced erosion-resistant EM windows, polyethylene fibers for use in ballistically resistant radomes, lanthana-strengthened yttria IR windows, coordinate transforms for two-axis gimbals and gimballed radome test fixtures, slip-cast fused silica rain damage, measurement of near-field radome anomalies, and open-resonator measurements of dielectric sandwich panels.

  3. 1988 American Control Conference, 7th, Atlanta, GA, June 15-17, 1988, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2, and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on control are presented. The general topics considered include: simulation and computational methods; linear systems and control; control of flexible structures; intelligent control systems; industrial control systems; computer-aided control engineering; robust adaptive control; frequency-domain methods; filtering, estimation, and tracking; optimization of discrete event systems; trajectory control of robot manipulators; digital signal processsing in process control; control of batch processes; robustness of state space models; stable factorization; aircraft and spacecraft guidance; model order reduction; computer networking of real-time control; and advances in automatic control education. Also addressed are: implementation of adaptive and self-tuning controls in machining, eigenvalue/eigenstructure assignment, robust nonlinear control of manipulators, redundant robot control, fault detection, ACES control theory and verification, decentralized control, damage-tolerant flight control systems, neural networks in control, distributed parameter and time-delay systems, and robust stabilization and control.

  4. 76 FR 37781 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26; Atlanta, GA; Application for Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... would be used in production (representing 64% of the value of the finished product) include: batteries... 8482.40, 5.8%); drill bits (HTSUS 8207.90, 1.6-4.8%); socket wrenches (HTSUS 8204.20, 9.0%); styrene... procedures could exempt Makita from customs duty payments on the foreign components used in export...

  5. Beta titanium alloys in the 80's; Proceedings of the Symposium, Atlanta, GA, March 8, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, R.R.; Rosenberg, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the use of beta-Ti in the SR-71 aircraft, the microstructure and properties of beta-Ti alloys, the effects of hydrogen, heat treatment, and omega-phase formation on beta-Ti, the primary processing of beta- and near-beta-Ti alloys, the processing window for grain size control in metastable beta-Ti, grain growth in beta III-Ti, the processing and properties of Ti-17 alloy for aircraft and turbine applications, the isothermal forging of beta- and near-beta-Ti alloys, the torsional properties of beta-Ti in automotive suspension springs, and the martensitic Transage Ti alloys. Also covered are Ti-Nb superconductors, and property compilations for such commercial and developmental beta-Ti alloys as beta-III, Ti-15-3, Ti-17, Transage 134, and cast and wrought Transage 175.

  6. Inventory of forest and rangeland resources, including forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Black Hills, and Manitou, Colorado test sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Some current beetle-killed ponderosa pine can be detected on S190-B photography imaged over the Bear Lodge mountains in the Black Hills National Forest. Detections were made on SL-3 imagery (September 13, 1973) using a zoom lens microscope to view the photography. At this time correlations have not been made to all of the known infestation spots in the Bear Lodge mountains; rather, known infestations have been located on the SL-3 imagery. It was determined that the beetle-killed trees were current kills by stereo viewing of SL-3 imagery on one side and SL-2 on the other. A successful technique was developed for mapping current beetle-killed pine using MSS imagery from mission 247 flown by the C-130 over the Black Hills test site in September 1973. Color enhancement processing on the NASA/JSC, DAS system using three MSS channels produced an excellent quality detection map for current kill pine. More importantly it provides a way to inventory the dead trees by relating PCM counts to actual numbers of dead trees.

  7. Inventory of forest and rangeland and detection of forest stress. [Manitou, Colorado, Atlanta, Georgia, and Black Hills test sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Eucalyptus tree stands killed by low temperatures in December 1972 were outlined by image enhancement of two separate dates of ERTS-1 images (January 22, 1973-I.D. 1183-18175 and April 22, 1973-I.D. 1273-18183). Three stands larger than 500 meters in size were detected very accurately. In Colorado, range and grassland communities were analyzed by visual interpretation of color composite scene I.D. 1028-17135. It was found that mixtures of plant litter, amount and kind of bare soil, and plant foliage cover made classification of grasslands very difficult. Changes in forest land use were detected on areas as small as 5 acres when ERTS-1 color composite scene 1264-15445 (April 13, 1973) was compared with 1966 ASCS index mosaics (scale 1:60,000). Verification of the changes were made from RB-57 underflight CIR transparencies (scale 1:120,000).

  8. Do Jobs Work? Risk and Protective Behaviors Associated with Employment Among Disadvantaged Female Teens in Urban Atlanta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Janet; Zenilman, Jonathan; Rose, Eve; Wingood, Gina; DiClemente, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent employment predicts lower educational engagement and achievement and greater engagement with risk behaviors. Most research has studied middle class rather than disadvantaged adolescents. We identified risk and protective behaviors associated with employment using data from a 3-wave, 12-month study of 715 low-socio-economic status female African American adolescents who were ages 15-21 at baseline. Adolescents who were employed at wave 2 (n=214) were matched with adolescents who were not employed at wave 2 (n=422) using nearest-neighbor matching on baseline factors within propensity score calipers on factors including marijuana use, sex while high, pregnancy risk, and socioeconomic status. We compared employed and non-employed teens on risk behaviors including marijuana use, sex while high or drunk, and a biomarker for semen exposure in the past 14 days. Employed teens were 44% as likely to say that their boyfriend is their primary spending money source and 43% as likely to be emotionally abused, but these benefits did not persist after employment ended. Six months after employment, employed respondents reported using marijuana 57% more often and had sex while drunk or high 2.7 times as frequently. Women who were employed at both waves 2 and 3 were 17% as likely to have their boyfriend as a primary source of spending money and 13% more likely to graduate high school, but they used marijuana twice as often, alcohol 1.6 times as often, had 1.6 times as many sexual partners, and had sex while high or drunk 2.3 times as often. Female teens who work may avoid potentially coercive romantic relationships, but they may buy drugs or alcohol with their earnings.

  9. 77 FR 75972 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26 - Atlanta, Georgia Notification of Proposed Production Activity Suzuki Mfg...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., footrests, fuel tanks, grips/handle bars, frames, rear box assemblies). Production under FTZ procedures..., springs, sign plates/ labels, brackets, plates, braces, fittings, body parts, engines and related parts... of the notification will be available for public inspection at the Office of the Executive...

  10. Summary of Needs and Opportunities from the 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting: Atlanta, Georgia, March 16-18, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-05-01

    This meeting brought together more than 200 professionals representing organizations with vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings. Participants identified or reinforced a wide variety of needs and issues associated with delivering high-performance homes in both new and existing home scenarios,

  11. 76 FR 45771 - Foreign-Trade Zone 26-Atlanta, GA; Application for Manufacturing Authority; Makita Corporation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ...; resins; caulk; glues and adhesives; vinyl cases; vinyl tubes; labels; plastic bags; water tanks; plastic grips; rubber knobs and handles; plastic cases; dust bag assemblies; tool belts; grinding wheels; tapping screws; lock lever connectors; cotters and cotter pins; lock and spring pins; cup washers;...

  12. Transformation of Emory: A Small Atlanta Institution Is Using a Historic Gift to Vault into Big-Time Ranks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Liz

    1989-01-01

    Ten years after a $105-million gift from a Coca-Cola magnate, the endowment's income is allowing Emory University to decide how and how much it wants to change, in contrast to the situation of other private research universities having to make hard fiscal choices. (MSE)

  13. An Analysis of Causal Factors of Burnout among School Counselors in a Large Urban School System in the Greater Atlanta, Georgia Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Beatrice R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between school counselor participants' perceived levels of job burnout, as measured by Lee's 2007 Counselor Burnout Inventory (CBI) with the assignment of non-counseling duties, as measured by Scarborough's 2005 School Counselors Activity Rating Scale (SCARS) and the alignment of their…

  14. Processing and manufacturing of composite materials; Proceedings of the Symposium, 112th ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Chandrashekhar, S.

    Papers are presented on the machining of fiber reinforced composites, the milling of continuous carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy, advances in composite machining with abrasive water jets, delamination in surface plies of graphite/epoxy caused by the edge-trimming process, and cryogenic machining of Kevlar composites. Consideration is given to a thermodynamic evaluation of ceramic-composite cutting tools for machining titanium, microstructural changes in carbon fibers during high-temperature processing, synthesis of particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites using spray techniques, and on-line monitoring of composite prepreg fabrication. Attention is also given to the effects of postannealing on fatigue behavior in PEEK and its short fiber-reinforced composites, the effect of fabrication parameters on void content for filament-wound composites, and the fabrication of a W-1 percent ThO2-reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0.5Y superalloy matrix composite.

  15. PRESENTATION IN ATLANTA: WORKING TO KEEP WASTE OUT OF THE LANDFILLS AND STREAMS - EPA REGION 4 RESPONSE SUPPORT CORPS ACTIVITIES, A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina it became evident that there were a multitude of problems created by the storm. Although human concerns were foremost, it became evident that during recovery environmental problems must be addressed. The Environmental Protection Agency's effo...

  16. Atlanta Rail Yard Study (ARYS): Evaluation of local-scale air pollution trends and emissions quantification using stationary and mobile monitoring strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intermodal rail yards are important nodes in the freight transportation network, where freight is organized and moved from one mode of transport to another, critical equipment is serviced, and freight is routed to its next destination. Rail yard environments are also areas with ...

  17. Evaluation of ERTS-1 data for inventory of forest and rangeland and detection of forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Manitou, Colorado, and Black Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R. C. (Principal Investigator); Aldrich, R. C.; Driscoll, R. S.; Francis, R. E.; Weber, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results of photointerpretation indicated that ERTS is a good classifier of forest and nonforest lands (90 to 95 percent accurate). Photointerpreters could make this separation as accurately as signature analysis of the computer compatible tapes. Further breakdowns of cover types at each site could not be accurately classified by interpreters (60 percent) or computer analysts (74 percent). Exceptions were water, wet meadow, and coniferous stands. At no time could the large bark beetle infestations (many over 300 meters in size) be detected on ERTS images. The ERTS wavebands are too broad to distinguish the yellow, yellow-red, and red colors of the dying pine foliage from healthy green-yellow foliage. Forest disturbances could be detected on ERTS color composites about 90 percent of the time when compared with six-year-old photo index mosaics. ERTS enlargements (1:125,000 scale, preferably color prints) would be useful to forest managers of large ownerships over 5,000 hectares (12,500 acres) for broad area planning. Black-and-white enlargements can be used effectively as aerial navigation aids for precision aerial photography where maps are old or not available.

  18. Land Market Impacts of Urban Rail Transit and Joint Development: An Empirical Study of Rail Transit in Washington, D.C. and Atlanta

    OpenAIRE

    Cervero, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of joint development programmes, like air-rights leasing, on local land markets as well as the cash flows of transit operators. Joint development takes place because both the public and private sectors recognize the potential financial rewards of coordinating projects. A variety of urban rail-related joint development programmes exist across the U.S., with around two-fifths involving forms of cost-sharing (e.g., sharing construction expenses) and about one-fift...

  19. Gas-solid flows - 1986; Proceedings of the Fourth Fluid Mechanics, Plasma Dynamics, and Lasers Conference, Atlanta, GA, May 11-14, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, J. T.

    Papers are presented on deposition and resuspension of gas-borne particles in recirculating turbulent flows, particle dispersion in decaying isotropic homogeneous turbulence, turbulent dispersion of droplets for air flow in a pipe, a comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian model approaches to turbulent particle dispersion, and the effect of turbulent electrohydrodynamics on electrostatic precipitator efficiency. Also considered are errors due to turbidity in particle sizing using laser Doppler velocimetry, particle motion in a fluidically oscillating jet, high pressure steam/water jet measurements using a portable particle sizing laser Doppler system, the effect of particle shape on pressure drop in a turbulent gas/solid suspension, and the experimental study of gas solid flows in pneumatic conveying. Other topics include entropy production and pressure loss in gas-solid flows, a computational study of turbulent gas-particle flow in a Venturi, a numerical analysis of confined recirculating gas-solid turbulent flows, nozzle and free jet flows of gas particle mixtures, and particle separation in pulsed airflow. Papers are also presented on sampling of solid particles in clouds, particle motion near the inlet of a sampling probe, the effects of slot injection on blade erosion in direct coal-fueled gas turbines, bed diameter effects and incipient slugging in gas fluidized beds, and sedimentation of air fluidized fine graphite particles by methanol vapor.

  20. Road and Street Centerlines, This Layer represents the joint effort between GDOT, with their contractor ITOS, and ARC, with our constituent county governments to produce street centerlines with address ranges for the 20-county Atlanta Region., Published in 2007, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'This Layer represents the joint effort...

  1. Traffic Analysis Zones, This Layer was created by ARC's Transportation Planning Division to identify Traffic Analysis Zones (TAZs) in the 20-county Atlanta Region. These TAZs represent the geography used in the ongoing transportation modeling for the Envision 6 forecast series (, Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Traffic Analysis Zones dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2006. It is described as...

  2. 78 FR 17206 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Bank of Atlanta (Chapelle Davis, Assistant Vice President) 1000 Peachtree Street, NE., Atlanta, Georgia... Trust; James E. Hearns and Sharon L. Hearns, all of Naples, Florida, Keith E. Hearns and...

  3. Bus Routes, This Layer was created by Clayton County DOT by capturing selected segments from Clayton County Water Authority's (CCWA) street centerline database., Published in 2006, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Routes dataset, published at 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2006. It is described as 'This Layer was...

  4. County and Parish Boundaries, This Layer was created from U.S. Census Bureau TIGER/Line files, Published in 2003, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This County and Parish Boundaries dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of 2003....

  5. Light Rail and Subway Lines, This Layer was created in ArcView through "heads up" digitizing, using MARTA's digital road network as a basemap., Published in 2000, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Light Rail and Subway Lines dataset, published at 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It is described as...

  6. 亚特兰大、悉尼、雅典奥运会物流运作的比较研究%Comparison of Logistics Operation in Atlanta, Sydney and Athens Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易华; 张文杰

    2005-01-01

    首先对亚特兰大、悉尼以及雅典奥运会的物流运作状况进行了总结,然后对三届奥运会的物流运作状况进行了比较分析,找出了它们之间的共性与差异,并据此提出了可供北京奥运物流运作借鉴的相关建议.

  7. Railroad Lines, This Layer contains railway features including railroads, rail yards, and public transit rail lines., Published in 1996, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Railroad Lines dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 1996. It is described as 'This Layer...

  8. Contours, This Layer was derived from the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) based on 7.5 minute Digital Elevation Model (DEM) image files., Published in 1999, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Contours dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 1999. It is described as 'This Layer was...

  9. Legislative Districts, This Layer contains boundary polygons depicting the State of Georgia's Senatorial Districts as adopted by the Georgia General Assembly in 2006., Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Legislative Districts dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of 2006. It is...

  10. Legislative Districts, This Layer contains boundary polygons depicting the State of Georgia's House Districts as adopted by the Georgia General Assembly in 2006., Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Legislative Districts dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of 2006. It is...

  11. Contested Place:The Homeless and Atlanta's Downtown Park%争议之地:无家可归者与亚特兰大市中心公园

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐纳德· C.雷泽斯[美; 蒂莫西· J.克里敏斯; 约翰娜· J.伯尔斯; 乔西·帕克(著); 李芸(译); 张卫良(校)

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate attempts by stakeholders over a twenty year period to control the presence and behaviors of the homeless in the prime space of a downtown park, as well as the range of responses devised by the homeless advocates to counter these efforts.We found that the uses and value of Woodruff Park changed by time of day, day of the week, and by the season.In addition, over time the park's stakeholders changed and the strategies used by authorities do not necessarily progress in a consistent direction or change in a regular pattern.Finally, while homeless advocates are less visible today than in the past, their lingering presence plays an important role in protecting the homeless men and women who use the park.The case study suggests that a public park can be a prime space, which serves as a common ground accessible to all and a representative space where no one is treated as an intruder.%  在此项研究中,我们调查了公园利益相关方超过20年控制无家可归者在市中心公园活动规模的举措,以及无家可归拥护者对付这些举措的一系列回应。我们发现,伍德拉夫公园的用途和价值伴随一天的不同时间、一周的不同日子和不同季节而变化。此外,公园利益相关方虽会随时间而变更,但当局使用的策略不一定必然会朝着某个始终如一的方向发展,或者按一种常规模式变化。最终,虽然无家可归的拥护者比起过去已很少看到,但他们仍然保护了公园内的无家可归者。案例研究认为,一个公园应该是一个基础空间,即作为共有地向所有人开放;也应该是一个典范空间,在这里,没有人会被看作是入侵者。

  12. Urban Growth Areas, This Layer represents the current Urbanized Area for Atlanta as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. An Urbanized Area is a concept used by the U.S. Census Bureau to measure the population, land area and population density of a built-up or continuously deve, Published in 2000, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Urban Growth Areas dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It is described as 'This...

  13. Dance therapy for individuals with Parkinson's disease: improving quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Hackney ME; Bennett CG

    2014-01-01

    Madeleine E Hackney,1–3 Crystal G Bennett4,5 1Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Center of Excellence, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Birmingham-Atlanta VA Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Decatur, GA, USA; 3Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Nursing, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, USA; 5Department of Adult and Elderly Nursing, College of Nursing, University of ...

  14. Dance therapy for individuals with Parkinson's disease: improving quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Hackney, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    Madeleine E Hackney,1–3 Crystal G Bennett4,5 1Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Center of Excellence, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Birmingham-Atlanta VA Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Decatur, GA, USA; 3Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Nursing, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, USA; 5Department of Adult and Elderly Nursing, College of Nursing, Univer...

  15. 78 FR 28606 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Housing Choice Voucher Family Self-Sufficiency (HCV FSS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... the 230 John Wesley Atlanta GA 30303 120,000 City of Atlanta, Georgia. Dobbs Avenue. The Housing... Housing Authority of Floyd 402 John M. Stumbo Langley KY 41645 30,603 County. Drive. Housing Authority of... Locke Street.... Chelsea MA 2150 64,909 Commonwealth of Massachusetts... 100 Cambridge Boston MA...

  16. 77 FR 14546 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Housing Choice Voucher Family Self-Sufficiency (HCV-FSS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    .... The Housing Authority of the 230 John Wesley Dobbs Avenue Atlanta GA 30303 120,000 City of Atlanta... Cynthiana........ KY 41031 63,291 Housing Authority of Floyd 402 John M Stumbo Drive..... Langley KY 41645......... 54 Locke Street Chelsea MA 2150 32,779 Commonwealth of Massachusetts.. 100 Cambridge...

  17. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  18. 75 FR 17944 - Credit Watch Termination Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    .... Residential Loan Centers of 2700 S. River Jacksonville......... 11/4/2009 Atlanta. America. Road, Suite 400, Des Plaines, IL 60018. Residential Loan Centers of 2700 S. River Tampa 11/4/2009 Atlanta. America... INFORMATION CONTACT: The Quality Assurance Division, Office of Housing, Department of Housing and...

  19. 9 CFR 91.14 - Ports of embarkation and export inspection facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Hartsfield International Airport. (A) Atlanta Equine Complex, 1270 Woolman Place, Atlanta, GA 30354, (404...—airport only. (A) Acadiana Regional Airport, Star R-3, Box 390-H (ARA), New Iberia, LA 70560, (318) 365.... Equestrian Team's headquarters (horses only), Pottersville Road, Gladstone, NJ 07934, (908) 234-1251....

  20. From the Field: Interview with Susan R. Easterbrooks and Ellen L. Estes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Susan R. Easterbrooks, a professor of deaf education in the Educational Psychology and Special Education Department at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and Ellen L. Estes, the coordinator of the Katherine Hamm Center at the Atlanta Speech School, on their new book "Helping Deaf and Hard of Hearing…

  1. 78 FR 32530 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Georgia the Northwest I-75/I-575...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... downloaded from the project Web site at http://www.nwcproject.com or at the following local libraries: Central Library, Atlanta-Fulton County Library System, One Margaret Mitchell Square, Atlanta, GA 30303; Central Library, Cobb County Public Library System, 266 Roswell Street, Marietta, GA 30060;...

  2. La vigència dels valors olímpics en el discurs periodístic : anàlisi del tractament informatiu dels Jocs Olímpics d’Atlanta a “El Periódico de Catalunya”

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez León, Miguel Ángel

    1997-01-01

    Document publicat com a part de la col·lecció Working Papers, que es va presentar a l’Assignatura Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) “Esport, Olimpisme i Cultura Contemporània”, durant el curs 1996/1997. Amb aquesta recerca l’autor pretén descobrir el sistema de valors que es difon a la premsa, concretament a El Periódico de Catalunya, per analitzar el grau en què els mitjans de comunicació propicien o neguen els valors olímpics que indica el mateix Comitè Olímpic Internacio...

  3. Bus Routes, This Layer was compiled by GRTA to support the annual submission of transit route information to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) for inclusion in the National Transit Database (NTD)., Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bus Routes dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'This Layer was...

  4. Index Grids, This Layer represents the grid of USGS 7.5' quadrangles that are commonly associated with topographic map sheets, Digital Line Graphics (DLG), and Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) files., Published in 2003, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Index Grids dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2003. It is described as 'This Layer...

  5. Zip Codes, This Layer was originally created as a 10-county dataset, then recently expanded to its current extent. In many cases, the boundaries have been significantly changed by ARC's GIS Division using a variety of sources to improve their accuracy, including ESR, Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zip Codes dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2006. It is described as 'This Layer was...

  6. Watershed Boundaries, This Layer was created by selecting all polygons from the national USGS watershed boundaries dataset for the state of Georgia. These "hydrologic units" were originally delineated from 7.5 minute USGS topographic quadrangles and then scanned into a digital, Published in 2000, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Watershed Boundaries dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It is described as 'This...

  7. Light Rail and Subway Stations, This Layer was originally created using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology where rail stations were captured as point locations at adjacent drives or parking lots., Published in 2000, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Light Rail and Subway Stations dataset, published at 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2000. It is described...

  8. Remote Sensing, Air Quality, and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Douglas; Mohammad, Al-Hamdan; Crosson, William; Estes, Maurice, Jr.; Limaye, Ashutosh; Qualters, Judith

    2008-01-01

    HELIX-Atlanta was developed to support current and future state and local EPHT programs to implement data linking demonstratio'n projects which could be part of the EPHT Network. HELIX-Atlanta is a pilot linking project in Atlanta for CDC to learn about the challenges the states will encounter. NASA/MSFC and the CDC are partners in linking environmental and health data to enhance public health surveillance. The use of NASA technology creates value - added geospatial products from existing environmental data sources to facilitate public health linkages. Proving the feasibility of the approach is the main objective

  9. Time will tell: community acceptability of HIV vaccine research before and after the “Step Study” vaccine discontinuation

    OpenAIRE

    Frew, Paula M.; Mulligan, Mark J.; Su-I Hou; et al

    2010-01-01

    Paula M Frew1,2,3,4, Mark J Mulligan1,2,3, Su-I Hou5, Kayshin Chan3, Carlos del Rio1,2,3,61Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2Emory Center for AIDS Research, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 3The Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA; 4Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 5Department of Health Promotion a...

  10. Risk Factors for Late Diagnosis of Rett Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-01-01

    Investigators at Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Stony Brook, New York; University of California, San Diego; and other centers determined the type of physician who makes the Rett syndrome (RTT) diagnosis and identified risk factors for delayed diagnosis.

  11. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for... Promotion, NCEZID, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop A- 07, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, E-mail:...

  12. Comparative Analysis of Selected Scales to Assess Prognosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Koziel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of selected scales to prognosticate the severity and risk for death among patients with acute pancreatitis (AP according to the revised Atlanta classification published in 2012.

  13. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing & Media August 19-21, 2014 Atlanta, GA Harmful Algal Blooms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page What's the ...

  14. 75 FR 82254 - Action To Ensure Authority To Implement Title V Permitting Programs Under the Greenhouse Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ..., natural gas, other 2211, 2212, 2213. systems). Manufacturing (food, beverages, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315..., Pesticides and Carolina, South Toxics Management Carolina, and Division, EPA Tennessee. Region 4, Atlanta.... Miscellaneous manufacturing 3391, 3399. Waste management and remediation....... 5622, 5629. ]...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/ ... STD, and TB Prevention. What Is HIV? ( http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/faq/faq1.htm ). Atlanta, ...

  16. 一个咸汉堡引发的悲剧

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    A fast-food restaurant employee has spent a night in jail and is facing criminal charges. Restaurant employee Kendra Bull from Atlanta Georgia was charged with reckless conduct after serving a "salty" burger.

  17. 78 FR 11808 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee: Approve Knox County Supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    .... Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30303-8960. 5. Hand Delivery... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Supplemental Motor Vehicle Emissions Budget Update AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)....

  18. 76 FR 75910 - Certain Inkjet Ink Supplies and Components Thereof; Final Determination of Violation; Termination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Shanghai, China (``Shanghai Angel''); Shenzhen Print Media Co., Ltd. of Guangdong, China (``Shenzhen...,104,630. 75 FR 45663 (Aug. 3, 2010). Complainant named Mipo International, Ltd. of Atlanta,...

  19. Our Common Legacy——Speechby Former US President Jimmy Carterat the Opening of Exhibition Commemorating 30th Anniversary of Normalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>It is a great honor and privilege for me to open this inspiring exhibition. On November 15, 2008, I opened the exhibit of First Emperor: China’s Terra Cotta Army in Atlanta with Ambassador Zhou Wenzhong.

  20. ADHD Symptoms and Likelihood of Child Maltreatment

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between inattentive and hyperactivity symptoms and child maltreatment was studied among a sample of 14,322 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Healh at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

  1. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your medicine exactly as your doctor or other medical professional tells you to do and by avoiding ... OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) , TTY: 888- ...

  2. Smokeless Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... users have receding gums, gum disease, cavities and tooth decay (from the high sugar content in the tobacco), ... Tobacco . References American Cancer Society. Cancer Prevention & Early Detection Facts & Figures 2015-2016 . Atlanta, Ga. 2015. Campaign ...

  3. 76 FR 28121 - Notice of Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Approvals and Disapprovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ..., 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Marshall, Atlanta Airports District Office, (404) 305-7153... class accounts for less than 1 percent of the total annual enplanements at Boston Logan...

  4. Uudised : Ain Anger tuli ooperilauljate konkursil esikohale. Elton Johni fotokogu näitus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    A. Anger võitis 11.-14. juuliniu Lätis Jurmalas toimunud rahvusvahelise noorte ooperilauljate konkursi "Amber Sea Voices". E. John korraldab novembris Ameerikas Atlantas oma fotokogu avaliku näituse "Chorus of Light"

  5. Eagles at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memo is a letter from Frederick Schmid of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to the Regional Director of Region 4 in Atlanta, Georgia. The author describes his...

  6. 77 FR 35680 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    .... Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta (Chapelle Davis, Assistant Vice President) 1000 Peachtree Street NE..., Missouri; John G. Sturtridge, Oro Valley, Arizona; and Keith L. Roberts, Leawood, Kansas; all as a...

  7. Pulse oximetry screening: a review of diagnosing critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Engel MS; Kochilas LK

    2016-01-01

    Melissa S Engel,1 Lazaros K Kochilas2 1Division of Neonatology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 2Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects, with an incidence of nine out of every 1,000 live births. The mortality of infants with CHD has decreased over the past 3 decades, but significant morbidity and mortality continue to occur if not diagnosed shortly after birth. Pulse...

  8. Pulse oximetry screening: a review of diagnosing critical congenital heart disease in newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Melissa S Engel,1 Lazaros K Kochilas2 1Division of Neonatology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 2Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common birth defects, with an incidence of nine out of every 1,000 live births. The mortality of infants with CHD has decreased over the past 3 decades, but significant morbidity and mortality continue to occur if not diagnosed shortly after birth. P...

  9. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  10. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion. Volume 1. Plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia, April 9-11, 1980. The papers in this volume involved presentation of the research and development programs of the US (US DOE, TVA, EPRI and US EPA), United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany and the People's Republic of China. Eight papers from Vol. 1 (Plenary Sessions) of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  11. Parameters of care for craniosynostosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Joseph G; Warren, Stephen M; Bernstein, Joseph;

    2012-01-01

    A multidisciplinary meeting was held from March 4 to 6, 2010, in Atlanta, Georgia, entitled "Craniosynostosis: Developing Parameters for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management." The goal of this meeting was to create parameters of care for individuals with craniosynostosis.......A multidisciplinary meeting was held from March 4 to 6, 2010, in Atlanta, Georgia, entitled "Craniosynostosis: Developing Parameters for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management." The goal of this meeting was to create parameters of care for individuals with craniosynostosis....

  12. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham TJ; Ford ES; Croft JB; Merrick MT; Rolle IV; Giles WH

    2014-01-01

    Timothy J Cunningham,1 Earl S Ford,1 Janet B Croft,1 Melissa T Merrick,2 Italia V Rolle,3 Wayne H Giles1 1Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and ...

  13. What the better half is thinking: A comparison of men’s and women’s responses and agreement between spouses regarding reported sexual and reproductive behaviors in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy M Hageman; Etienne Karita; Kayitesi Kayitenkore; Roger Bayingana; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Kathy M Hageman1, Etienne Karita2, Kayitesi Kayitenkore2, Roger Bayingana2, Ariane van der Straten3, Rob Stephenson4, Martha Conkling5, Amanda Tichacek1, Lawrence Mwananyanda5, William Kilembe5, Alan Haworth6, Elwyn Chomba6, Susan A Allen11Rwanda Zambia HIV Research Group, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2Projet San Francisco, Kigali, Rwanda; 3Women’s Global Health Imperative, RTI International, San Francisco, USA; 4Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta...

  14. A Validation Study of Merging and Spacing Techniques in a NAS-Wide Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Patricia C.

    2011-01-01

    In November 2010, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) delivered an M&S software tool to that allows system level studies of the complex terminal airspace with the ACES simulation. The software was evaluated against current day arrivals in the Atlanta TRACON using Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (KATL) arrival schedules. Results of this validation effort are presented describing data sets, traffic flow assumptions and techniques, and arrival rate comparisons between reported landings at Atlanta versus simulated arrivals using the same traffic sets in ACES equipped with M&S. Initial results showed the simulated system capacity to be significantly below arrival capacity seen at KATL. Data was gathered for Atlanta using commercial airport and flight tracking websites (like FlightAware.com), and analyzed to insure compatible techniques were used for result reporting and comparison. TFM operators for Atlanta were consulted for tuning final simulation parameters and for guidance in flow management techniques during high volume operations. Using these modified parameters and incorporating TFM guidance for efficiencies in flowing aircraft, arrival capacity for KATL was matched for the simulation. Following this validation effort, a sensitivity study was conducted to measure the impact of variations in system parameters on the Atlanta airport arrival capacity.

  15. TaC Studios New Construction Test House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Curtis, O. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kim, E. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Roberts, S. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Stephenson, R. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2013-03-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA, in the mixed humid climate zone. This home will serve as a model home for the builder partner and addresses Building America energy savings targets through the planning and implementation of a design package will serve as a basis of design for the builder partner’s future homes. As a BA test house, this home will be evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and HVAC and hot water efficiency.

  16. High Performance Polymers and Composites (HiPPAC) Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Eric A.; Veazie, David

    2005-01-01

    NASA University Research Centers funding has allowed Clark Atlanta University (CAU) to establish a High Performance Polymers and Composites (HiPPAC) Research Center. Clark Atlanta University, through the HiPPAC Center has consolidated and expanded its polymer and composite research capabilities through the development of research efforts in: (1) Synthesis and characterization of polymeric NLO, photorefractive, and piezoelectric materials; (2) Characterization and engineering applications of induced strain smart materials; (3) Processable polyimides and additives to enhance polyimide processing for composite applications; (4) Fabrication and mechanical characterization of polymer based composites.

  17. 大学英语四级考试阅读理解试题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强

    2004-01-01

    @@ Passage 1 By the time the Olympics begin in Atlanta this summer,the business world will have spent more than $ 1 billion to link their names and products to the Olympic Games. There are 10 Worldwide Sponsors, 10 Centennial Olympic Partners,about 20 regular sponsors and more than a hundred licensees.The Atlanta Games will boast an"official" scouring pad and timepiece, two official game shows, and three official vehicles: a family car, an import minivan and a luxury sedan.

  18. Daddy's Girl: Kurt Kondrich Gave Up His Career as a Police Officer to Fight for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    A take-charge "people person," Kurt Kondrich began his career in law enforcement in 1985, when he graduated with a criminology degree and landed a job with the Atlanta Police Department. Six years later, he became deputy sheriff in Fort Meyers, Florida, but missed his family in Pittsburgh. So in 1993, when he heard that his hometown police…

  19. 78 FR 28631 - Experian, Experian Healthcare (Medical Present Value (MPV)-Credit Services and Decision Analytics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Sales and Licensing) and Strategic Alliance, Atlanta, Georgia (TA-W-82,506C), Experian, QAS (Experian... Sales and Licensing) and Strategic Alliance, including on- site leased workers from Tapfin, Manpower and... Management, Strategic Business Development and Investor Relations), Credit Services, Experian...

  20. 78 FR 49990 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Revisions to the Knox County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Protection Agency, Region 4, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30303-8960. 5. Hand Delivery or Courier... 30303-8960. Such deliveries are only accepted during the Regional Office's normal hours of operation... ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless...

  1. Cardiovascular Risk Reduction for African-American Men through Health Empowerment and Anger Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Torrance; Braithwaite, Harold; Johnson, Larry; Harris, Catrell; Katkowsky, Steven; Troutman, Adewale

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine impact of CVD risk reduction intervention for African-American men in the Atlanta Empowerment Zone (AEZ) designed to target anger management. Design: Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test was employed as a non-parametric alternative to the t-test for independent samples. This test was employed because the data used in this analysis…

  2. Smokey Road Middle School: Striving to Reach and Motivate Each Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article features Smokey Road Middle School, a Title I school serving 850 middle level students in grades 6-8. The school is located on the outskirts of Newnan, Georgia, a historic city of approximately 27,000 residents. The growth and development of the Coweta County School District is largely attributed to its close proximity to Atlanta. In…

  3. 77 FR 21996 - Certain Equipment for Communications Networks, Including Switches, Routers, Gateways, Bridges...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ...,633,966; and 5,841,360. 76 FR 36154-55 (June 21, 2011). The Notice of Investigation named the following as respondents: Cisco Systems, Inc. of San Jose, California; Cisco Consumer Products LLC of Irvine, California; Cisco Systems International B.V. of Amsterdam, Netherlands; and Scientific Atlanta LLC...

  4. Gerber Technology to Showcase innovation at SPESA EXPO 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Gerber Technology,a business unit of Gerber Scientific,Inc.(NYSE:GRB) and a world leader in automated CAD/CAM and PLM solutions for the apparel and flexible materials industry,showcases its newest additions to their longstanding line of Gerber products for the apparel and other sewn products industries at SPESA EXPO 2010 in Atlanta.

  5. The Relationship between Music Instruction and Academic Achievement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Nechelle Nipper

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between music instruction and mathematics achievement scores for 6th grade students at an Atlanta public school. Guided by Gardner's multiple intelligences model, neurological research, and National Consortium of Arts Education research, this study used a quasi-experimental…

  6. ERNIE: Emory's record number integrity effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardeen, K

    1994-12-01

    Learn how three large, affiliated healthcare facilities in Atlanta accepted the challenge of developing and implementing an electronic medical record system. The main obstacle--dealing with multiple patient identifiers--is outlined and practical and proven solutions are detailed. PMID:10138512

  7. Physician and provider education for improving health and eliminating disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, George; Pattillo, Roland A; Matthews, Roland; Dubois, Anne M

    2007-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Primary Care and Prevention Conference and the Eleventh Annual HeLa Women's Health Conference was held on September 11-13, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia. The reports in this supplement of Ethnicity & Disease provide a sample of the presentations made during the primary care and women's health sessions.

  8. Do Partial Home Smoking Bans Signal Progress toward a Smoke-Free Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C.; Haardörfer, Regine; Bundy, Lucja T.; Escoffery, Cam; Berg, Carla J.; Fernandez, Maria; Williams, Rebecca; Hovell, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding who establishes partial home smoking bans, what these bans cover, and whether they are an intermediate step in going smoke-free would help to inform smoke-free home interventions. Participants were recruited from United Way of Greater Atlanta's 2-1-1 contact center. Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months via telephone…

  9. Glorious People in the Olympics History——Guo Jingjing%奥运风云人物——郭晶晶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜全红

    2006-01-01

    @@ Born in the province of Hebei, south of Beijing, Guo won diving competitions at every level as a youngster, earning a selection to the China team that went to the 1996 Atlanta Games,where she finished fifth in the 10m.platform at the tender age1 of 15.

  10. Middle-Class Mothers on Urban School Selection in Gentrifying Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amy; Lakes, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined middle-class mothers' engagement in urban school selection as residents of two gentrifying neighborhoods in Atlanta, Georgia. Gentrifiers levy social capital when activating or exercising agency and create social networks that valorize child-rearing concerns through exchange of information. Thirty mothers with children under…

  11. Reports to the Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The following are edited/abbreviated versions of the annual reports of the APA Secretary, Treasurer, CEO and Medical Director, Speaker, and Speaker-Elect and the chairpersons of the APA Committee on Bylaws, Membership Committee, Committee of Tellers, and Elections Committee. The full reports were presented at the APA Annual Business Meeting in Atlanta, May 15th, 2016. PMID:27363564

  12. Heaven People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    CD with master musician from Korea recorded in 1995. Performed together at Inaugural Cultural Olympic event Rialto Theatre, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 1996 in association with Georgia Tech University, Special Audiences and Very Special Arts organisation. Research in real-time improvisation across cult...

  13. 78 FR 32392 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention and Treatment In accordance... items include: (1) STD clinical preventive services in primary care setting and integrating STD... Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE., Mailstop E-07, Atlanta, Georgia 30333,...

  14. 75 FR 39264 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment In accordance with section 10(a)(2... health and STD disparities among racial and ethnic minorities. The objectives of the workgroup are: (1..., Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB ] Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop E-07, Atlanta, Georgia...

  15. 75 FR 22145 - Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA); CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... (HRSA); CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment (CHACHSPT) In accordance... STD disparities among racial and ethnic minorities. Agenda items are subject to change as priorities... Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop E-07, Atlanta, Georgia 30333,...

  16. 75 FR 5967 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ...@AbilityOne.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 12/4/2009 (74 FR 63732) and 12/11/2009 (74 FR..., ROME, GA RICHARD B. RUSSELL FB: 75 SPRING ST, ATLANTA, GA R. G. STEPHENS JR FB: 355 HANCOCK AVENUE... NEW STREET, DOVER, DE 21309 BERLIN ROAD, GEORGETOWN, DE 1352 MARROWS ROAD, NEWARK, DE 844 KING...

  17. Overview of Emerging Air Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    These slides will be presented at the 2014 National Ambient Air Monitoring Conference in Atlanta, GA during August 11-15, 2014. The goal is to provide an overview of air sensor technology and the audience will be primarily state air monitoring agencies and EPA Regions.

  18. 75 FR 62113 - Board on Coastal Engineering Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Board on Coastal Engineering Research AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: Board on Coastal Engineering Research. Date of Meeting: October 25-26, 2010. Place: Atlanta... consonance with the needs of the coastal engineering field and the objectives of the Chief of...

  19. Live, Digital Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital reference services, also known as virtual reference, chat reference, or online reference, based on a round table discussion at the 2002 American Library Association annual conference in Atlanta. Topics include numbers and marketing; sustainability; competition and models; evaluation methods; outsourcing; staffing and training;…

  20. MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

    THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

  1. Urban College Graduates: Their Investments in and Returns for Strong Quantitative Skills, Social Capital Skills, and Soft Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Marie Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined strong quantitative skills, social capital skills, and soft skills of urban college graduates using data from the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality Household Survey. The urban college graduates lived in Atlanta, Boston, or Los Angeles and had bachelor's, master's, PhD, and professional degrees. Among the three skills…

  2. The Pleasures and Lessons of Academic Mythbusting: An Interview with Scott Lilienfeld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Tracy E.

    2010-01-01

    Scott O. Lilienfeld is a professor of psychology at Emory University, in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Lilienfeld is founder and editor of the journal, "Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice," and is past president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology. He has been a member of 11 journal editorial boards, including the "Journal of…

  3. Going Google: Privacy Considerations in a Connected World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Marty

    2016-01-01

    Forsyth County Schools (FCS) is a rapidly growing school district just north of Atlanta, Georgia. It has approximately 45,000 students and is one of the top-ranked school districts in the state with a graduation rate of 94 percent and test scores to match this excellent graduation rate. The district has long been known as a leader in the area of…

  4. Disaster Preparedness: Lessons from the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, Richard A.

    Between February 7 and February 24, 2002, Utah and Salt Lake City hosted the Winter Olympics. Due to the bombing at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta and the emotional fallout that resulted, it was recommended that the Utah Psychological Association and Utah Red Cross plan for such an occurrence and organize a coordinated Disaster Mental Health…

  5. Muusika DVD-d / Priit Hõbemägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hõbemägi, Priit, 1957-

    2006-01-01

    Uutest DVD-dest Moody Blues "Lovely to See You - Live", Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds "Road to God Knows Wherw", Thin Lizzy "Thunder and Lightning Tour", Eels "Eels With Strings - Live at Town Hall", Moby "Live. Hotel Tour 2005", Corvus Corax "Cantus Buranus", Destiny's Child "Live in Atlanta"

  6. The Impact of Media Sport Events on the Active Participation of Young People and Some Implications for PE Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Gill

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the impact of selected sports media events on the active participation of a group of young people aged 14/15. Its particular focus is on an intense period of media sport coverage during the European Soccer Championships (Euro '96), the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships and the Atlanta Olympics and on how a group of British…

  7. “Nanogenerators and Piezotronics NGPT 2014”通知(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Meeting Date:June 9-11,2014Meeting Location:Georgia Tech Atlanta,GA,USA Submit Abstract by:Jan.31,2014http://www./Theme I.Nanogenerators:Piezoelectric nanomaterialsNano-scale piezoelectric effectPiezoelectric nanogenerators as power source

  8. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  9. 75 FR 45132 - Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Administration (SAMHSA) National Advisory Council will meet on August 17-18 at the Omni Hotel at CNN Center... Prevention's Fourth National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing, and Media. Attendance by the... Hotel at CNN Center, 100 CNN Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Contact: Toian Vaughn, M.S.W.,...

  10. 76 FR 22708 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ....-5:30 p.m., May 10, 2011. 8 a.m.-3 p.m., May 11, 2011. Place: Loews Atlanta Hotel, 1065 Peachtree... and Coordination of Media and Social Marketing related to HIV, STD and Viral Hepatitis prevention;...

  11. 75 FR 5353 - Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee... and The University of Massachusetts, Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry ( 1191). Dates and Times...: Department of Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332. Department of Chemistry,...

  12. Aaron Douglas and Hale Woodruff: African American Art Education, Gallery Work, and Expanded Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Sharif

    2011-01-01

    This analysis of archival materials discovered at Fisk and Atlanta Universities examines the teaching careers of Aaron Douglas and Hale Woodruff, two African American artists who came to prominence during the New Negro Movement in the 1920s and taught at historically Black universities in the 1930s and 1940s. These artists had a profound influence…

  13. 77 FR 43123 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... percent of the production or sales of the workers' firm; or (B) A loss of business by the workers' firm... Company, ICT- Atlanta, GA June 4, 2011. Infrastructure, Database Administration, Remote Workers Lake... May 23, 2011. Acquisitions, Shelley Investments, d/b/a Salem Business Center. The...

  14. Live and Learn? Contradictions in Residential Patterns and School Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasawa, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Educational and sociological scholars frequently debate how racial dynamics between neighborhoods and their public schools can maintain or exacerbate educational inequality. Drawing on secondary data from the Georgia Department of Education, 2000 Census Bureau, and attendance boundaries for metro Atlanta public high schools, this study…

  15. 3D technologies provide valuable support during all stages of the nuclear power plant life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is an outline of the products and services in the title area offered by the company CSA, based in Atlanta, USA, and its Slovak subsidiary. The core is laser scanning as a basis for the 3D modelling. (orig.)

  16. Greeks in America; Staff Development Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lereah, Lucy; And Others

    This module lists eight staff development objectives pertaining to various aspects of Greek-American culture. Topics dealt with include Greek emigration and immigration, Greek vocabulary, contributions made by prominent Greek-Americans, Greek family life and the changing role of family members, Greek values, and the growth of Atlanta's Greek…

  17. 77 FR 55499 - Certain Light-Emitting Diodes and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Not To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Samsung LED America, Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia (collectively, ``SLED''). 76 FR 51396-97 (Aug. 18, 2011... COMMISSION Certain Light-Emitting Diodes and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Not To Review... States after importation of certain light-emitting diodes and products containing same by reason...

  18. Fernbank Forest Birds in the Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Georgann

    1991-01-01

    Provided is a listing of the common nesting birds and the neotropical migrant birds with nesting records in the approximate 65 acres of Fernbank Forest which is a preserve of mature urban hardwoods and pines within 10 miles of downtown Atlanta and a relic of what was once a large, uninterrupted tract of the Piedmont forest. (JJK)

  19. Bird Populations in Fernbank Forest: MIGRANT SPECIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Georgann

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses fragmented forests in general and provides arrival/departure data about migratory birds collected at Fernbank Forest which is located within metropolitan Atlanta. The data indicate that population trends for selected species have not changed over 19 years of migration recordings within this small, but important, fragmented…

  20. Monthly energy review, December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monthly publication contains statistical data on energy resources in the United States. Petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy are covered. Additional sections include an energy overview, energy consumption, oil and gas resource development and energy prices. This issue includes a market assessment of alternative-fuel vehicles in the Atlanta private fleet for 1994

  1. Extrapancreatic necrosis without pancreatic parenchymal necrosis : a separate entity in necrotising pancreatitis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Olaf J.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar; Besselink, Marc G. H.; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Eijck, Casper; Dejong, Kees; van Goor, Harry; Hofker, Hendrik; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Gooszen, Hein G.; Bollen, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis, the term necrotising pancreatitis also refers to patients with only extrapancreatic fat necrosis without pancreatic parenchymal necrosis (EXPN), as determined on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT). Patients with EXPN are thought to have

  2. Examining the Impact of Servant Leadership on Workplace Related Outcome (JS) at a Selected Private University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Oris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of Servant Leadership on a workplace related outcome (job satisfaction) at a private University in Atlanta, Georgia. The ten characteristics of Servant Leadership previously identified by Greenleaf (1977) and Spears (1998) played a significant role in job satisfaction. Other researchers (Barbuto…

  3. 77 FR 3495 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... 15, 2011. Marine Science Center. 2011. 008519 Zoo Atlanta 75 FR 82409, December March 1, 2011. 30... Zoo..... 76 FR 18239, April 1, May 23, 2011. 2011. 013008 777 Ranch Inc 76 FR 7580, February July 11.... 37786A Minnesota Zoo 76 FR 18239, April 1, August 11, 2011. 2011. 42831A Saint Louis Zoo........ 76...

  4. A Study of School Leaders and How They Impact Classroom Use of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a principal's personality type and a school's classroom use of technology. Myers Briggs Type Indicator data was collected from 48 principals in a large suburban district in the Metro Atlanta area, as well as, observational data documenting student use of technology. The…

  5. 75 FR 65019 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ..., 1600 Clifton Road, MS-D74, Atlanta, GA 30333 or send an e-mail to omb@cdc.gov . Comments are invited on... community. In the Latin American and Caribbean region, 20% of the rural population in 2008 had no access to... use, access and availability; sanitation access, use and maintenance; and hygiene education--when...

  6. 78 FR 75352 - Proposed Data Collections Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... instruments, call 404-639-7570 or send comments to Kim Lane, 1600 Clifton Road, MS D-74, Atlanta, GA 30333 or... of lower socio- economic status, rural populations, Hispanic, African American and other ethnic... estimated burden for system maintenance and annual reporting is 3 hours. For awardees funded at the...

  7. 78 FR 66952 - Certain Point-to-Point Network Communication Devices and Products Containing the Same Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Point-to-Point Network Communication Devices and Products Containing the Same Notice of... Straight Path IP Group, Inc., of Glen Allen, Virginia (``Straight Path''). 78 FR 55096 (Sept. 9, 2013). The..., California (``SCEA Inc.'') and Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications (USA) Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia...

  8. The Balanced Scorecard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert S.; Miyake, Dylan N.

    2010-01-01

    Ten years ago, the Atlanta Public Schools had low and declining student achievement, demoralized teachers, crumbling buildings, high turnover among superintendents (average tenure of two years) and disaffected parents pulling their children out of the system. More than 60 percent of the city's high school students missed at least two weeks of…

  9. 75 FR 66796 - Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (“PwC”), Internal Firm Services Client Account Administrators Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Services, Atlanta, Georgia. The notice was published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2010 (75 FR 32224... Employment and Training Administration Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client... subject firm should read PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (``PwC''), Internal Firm Services Client...

  10. 75 FR 21366 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... 73834 William B. Altman, Inc. Fenelton, PA 04/02/10 04/01/10 (Company). 73835 The Hartford Insurance... (Company). 73837 B. Braun Medical, Inc. Atlanta, GA 04/02/10 04/01/10 (Company). 73838 Entree Alaska... institution petition 73796 TIAA-CREF (State/One-Stop). Denver, CO 03/29/10 03/26/10 73797 Outotech (USA),...

  11. Return of the Diving Queen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AFTER winning two gold medals atthe 1996 Atlanta Olympic,theDiving Queen’Fu Mingxia quit her sportscareer and became a student at QinghuaUniversity,one of the best universities inChina.Recently,due to the less than idealstandard of the younger divers,sheresumed her training under the guidance

  12. 76 FR 72409 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ...), Application Type: New OFF License. MBM International Logistics, LLC (NVO & OFF), 650 Atlanta South Parkway... OTI@fmc.gov . AE Eagle Logistics Inc. (NVO & OFF), 765 Route 83, Suite 111, Bensenville, IL 60106... Type: Add OFF Service. Asecomer International Corporation dba Interworld Freight, Inc. dba Junior...

  13. 76 FR 62407 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... OTI@fmc.gov . Alltransport International Logistics, Inc. (NVO), 63 65th Place, Long Beach, CA 90803... License. American Global Logistics LLC dba AGL (NVO & OFF), 3399 Peachtree Road, NE., 1130, Atlanta, GA... Brodecki, Chairman, Application Type: QI Change. Crowley Logistics, Inc. (NVO & OFF), 9487 Regency...

  14. 77 FR 35384 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Individual), Application Type: New NVO & OFF License Deep Ocean International Logistics LLC (NVO), 9814... Type: QI Change Swift International Logistics, Inc. (NVO), 3 Powell Drive, West Orange, NJ 07052... OTI@fmc.gov . ABC Trucking and Logistics L.L.C. (OFF), 3080 McCall Drive, Suite 1, Atlanta, GA...

  15. Slam-Dunking Scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winbush, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    The Clark Atlanta University (GA) women's basketball coach recruits high academic achievers and supports their academic and athletic performance with discipline, on-the-road study, and teamwork. The approach has been effective for achieving athletic, academic, and interpersonal goals. (MSE)

  16. Ameerika keskkool probleemidega silmitsi / Edgar Krull

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Krull, Edgar

    2001-01-01

    USA-s on hakatud tegema etteheiteid keskkooli (high school) lõpuklassi õppesisule ja töökorraldusele. Ajalehes "The Atlanta Journal-Constitution" ilmus 18. jaan. Andrew Mollisoni artikkel "Liiga palju keskkooli viimase klassi õpilasi tegeleb aja raiskamisega". Kirjutis seab kahtluse alla nii 12. klassi otstarbekuse kui ka keskkooli kui haridusinstitutsiooni üldised põhimõtted

  17. Broadband Trailing-Edge Noise Predictions - Overview of BANC-III Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herr, M.; Ewert, R.; Rautmann, C.;

    2015-01-01

    The Third Workshop on Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations, BANCIII, was held on 14-15 June 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The objective of this workshop was to assess the present computational capability in the area of physics-based prediction of different types of airframe noise p...

  18. Lakewood Elementary School: 1986-87 School Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Nora S.

    This report from the Lakewood Elementary School in Atlanta (Georgia) provides information on student achievement for the 1986-87 school year. The narrative presents 21 findings concerning enrollment, attendance, reading achievement, math achievement, and achievement in other subject areas. Conclusions and recommendations generated from these…

  19. 5 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Appropriated Fund Wage and Survey Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Denver Douglas Gilpin Jefferson Area of Application. Survey area plus: Colorado: Clear Creek Eagle Elbert... plus: Maryland: Calvert St. Mary's Virginia (city): Fredericksburg Virginia (counties): Clarke Fauquier... Thomas Tift Turner Ware Atlanta Survey Area Georgia: Butts Cherokee Clayton Cobb De Kalb Douglas...

  20. ADHD Symptoms and Likelihood of Child Maltreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between inattentive and hyperactivity symptoms and child maltreatment was studied among a sample of 14,322 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Healh at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

  1. Disability and Health: Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data . Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006. Related Pages Breast Cancer Screening - Right To Know Campaign Disability Health and Data System Developmental Disabilities Birth Defects CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and ...

  2. Intrafraction motion correction by tracking of fiducial marker projections on sequential MV images in arc therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Van Herck, Hans; Crijns, Wouter; Slagmolen, Pieter; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Haustermans, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Van Herck H., Crijns W., Slagmolen P., Maes F., Van den Heuvel F., Haustermans K., ''Intrafraction motion correction by tracking of fiducial marker projections on sequential MV images in arc therapy'', Varian Research Partnership Symposium, March 18-20, 2013, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

  3. Rescaling Vocational Education: Workforce Development in a Metropolitan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles a vocational charter school located in Atlanta as an institutional model for customized industry training in the high-tech production firms located nearby. Social partnerships with business and industry, parents and educators, and elected officials will be illuminated, exhibiting new forms of neoliberalism that reconstitute…

  4. An Introduction to the Sociology of W.E.B. Du Bois

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Wortham

    2005-01-01

    W.E.B. Du Bois was the founder of the Atlanta School of sociology, writing more than a dozen books in almost as many years. One of his significant contributions to modern sociology was his pioneering work in the use of empirical data which include census materials and original surveys.

  5. 78 FR 58559 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-U.S. Photovoltaic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    .... Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on August 20, 2013, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium, Inc. (``USPVMC'') has filed written..., Ultrasonic Technologies, Wesley Chapel, FL; Polaritek Systems, Inc., Atlanta, GA; Spire Solar, Bedford,...

  6. 77 FR 25485 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... for Preventing Violence and Violence Related Injury, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) CE12-002... Street NE., Atlanta Georgia 30308. Status: The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance with... to ``Research Grants for Preventing Violence and Violence Related Injury, FOA CE12-002,...

  7. 78 FR 19491 - Walking as a Way for Americans To Get the Recommended Amount of Physical Activity for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE., MS-K46, Atlanta..., Physical Activity, and Obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE., MS-K46..., attractive and convenient places to walk (and wheelchair roll) and creating a culture that supports...

  8. Synthesis of Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) micro- and nanoparticles via a continuous-flow supercritical carbon dioxide process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciato, Michael J; Levitin, Galit; Hess, Dennis W; Grover, Martha A

    2012-07-01

    CZTS: Atlanta. A supercritical CO(2) continuous-flow reactor is employed to deposit micro- and nanoparticles of copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), a promising material for thin-film solar cells, onto a silicon wafer. The image shows a chemical map of deposited CZTS particles (scale bar: 15 μm), and a Raman spectrum with a peak characteristic of CZTS. PMID:22707477

  9. "Working Together, Unlimited Things Can Happen": CDC, Tribes, Colleges Strive to Improve Native Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Ron

    2004-01-01

    The article focuses on the overall health of American Indians. Native people living on reservations and in urban areas face a broad array of health problems. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta is committed to improving the health of Native Americans. CDC is one of the agencies within the U.S. Department of Health and Human…

  10. Exposing Privilege and Racism in "The Great White North": Tackling Whiteness and Identity Issues in Canadian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Darren E.; Carr, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This article talks about a collaborative "Great White North" project which began through a chance meeting of the authors at the annual meeting of the "National Association for Multicultural Education" (NAME) in Atlanta in November of 2005. The authors are two White males from Canada of about the same age (late 40s) who have both been involved in…

  11. Motivation and Job Satisfaction of Catholic School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convey, John J.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between Catholic school teachers' motivation and job satisfaction. The data are derived from a survey of 716 teachers in Catholic elementary and secondary schools in three dioceses in the US (Atlanta, GA; Biloxi, MS; and Cheyenne, WY). The school's academic philosophy and its environment were…

  12. 78 FR 22291 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Cathedral State Park, Aurora, 13000264 WYOMING Albany County Snow Train Rolling Stock, S. 1st & E. Sheridan... 696 Peachtree Street Apartments, 826 Peachtree St., Atlanta, 13000240 McDuffie County Lazenby, John... District, Roughly bounded by Mt. Vernon Rd., SE., 15th St., SE., S. & E. lot lines, Cedar Rapids,...

  13. Knowledge and Skill Requirements for Marketing Jobs in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Harich, Katrin R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the skills and conceptual knowledge that employers require for marketing positions at different levels ranging from entry- or lower-level jobs to middle- and senior-level positions. The data for this research are based on a content analysis of 500 marketing jobs posted on Monster.com for Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York…

  14. DOAS URBAN POLLUTION MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. ver path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen d...

  15. The Cyber-Olympics--Schools, Sports and the Superhighway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Morag F.; Kent, Fionna H.; Muir, David

    1998-01-01

    The Internet-based CyberOlympics project involved 17 primary schools from five different countries competing against each other in an international sporting event (concurrent with the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games). Activities that benefited from Internet access, difficulties involved in running such projects, and suggestions as to how schools can…

  16. 78 FR 50145 - Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... overview briefings from the Atlanta VA Medical Center leadership and the VA Southeast Network (Veterans... briefings on RO business lines and services for women Veterans. A briefing from local Memorial Affairs leadership will also be presented. On August 23, the Committee will convene an open session at the...

  17. Freedman's March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the American Library Association's 2002 annual conference in Atlanta. Topics include incoming president Mitch Freedman's initiative to improve librarian salaries; author presentations; new technology, especially Amazon.com, and the library's role; ALA politics; intellectual freedom issues; salaries and recruiting; interoperability; and…

  18. The Art of Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  19. Impact of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program on a Middle School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purugulla, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods research study sought to find if the implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) would reduce incidences of bullying in a suburban Atlanta middle school. Data was collected and compared over a two year period with Year 1 data representing pre-implementation of the OBPP. Discipline records associated with…

  20. 78 FR 29134 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking Activities The companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C...., Atlanta, Georgia 30309: 1. HCBF Holding Company, Inc., Fort Pierce, Florida; to acquire 100 percent of...

  1. Memorial Alexander Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AECK Associates, Arquitectos

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available En Atlanta, el Instituto Tecnológico de Georgia acaba de ampliar sus instalaciones deportivas, construyendo el Alexander Memorial Center. Consta este nuevo Centro de dos edificios: una pista de baloncesto cubierta y un edificio anejo con vestuarios, duchas, una pista de entrenamiento, equipos técnicos y la emisora de radio Georgia Tech W. G. S. T.

  2. Dental Care among Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancherla, Vijaya; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2013-01-01

    Dental care among young adults with intellectual disability (ID) is poorly documented and largely unmet. By using population-based data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Follow-Up Study, we assessed factors associated with at least one or two dental visits per year among young adults with and without ID. Significantly fewer…

  3. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  4. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting July 9--1, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    The fifth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held July 9--11, 1991, in Atlanta, Georgia. The subject areas included the generation, retention, and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the chemistry of ferrocyanide wastes.

  5. Images of Paris: Big C Culture for the Nonspeaker of French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, May; York, Holly U.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a course offered in both French and English at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia that is based on the study of representations of Paris from the Middle Ages to the present. It uses architecture as a point of departure and explores the myth of Paris as expressed through a profusion of images in literature, painting, and film.…

  6. Worthy Work, Unlivable Wages: The National Child Care Staffing Study, 1988-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitebook, Marcy; Howes, Carollee; Phillips, Deborah

    In 1988, the National Child Care Staffing Study first gathered information on staffing and quality from a sample of child care centers in five metropolitan areas--Atlanta, Boston, Detroit, Phoenix, and Seattle--and returned for updated information in 1992. In 1997, directors of the original sample of centers still in operation were contacted again…

  7. Generic data base for security equipment and its utility in the safeguards inspection process. Final report 8151-79-FR-16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains material presented at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conference of regional inspectors in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 17, 1979. It describes the contents of the generic data base for security equipment, which was developed by SRI for NRC under a Sandia Laboratories' subcontract, and examines its potential utility in the process of inspection of NRC-licensed facilities

  8. Outsourcing Facility Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Patrick J.; Klein, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Fulton County Schools in Atlanta were looking at average enrollment growth of more than 2,500 students a year and a new source of significant revenue to drive its capital improvement program. With funding from Georgia's new special purpose local option sales tax, or SPLOST, for school capital needs, total revenue from the…

  9. Job Search Methods: Consequences for Gender-based Earnings Inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Matt L.; Torres, Lisa

    2001-01-01

    Data from adults in Atlanta, Boston, and Los Angeles (n=1,942) who searched for work using formal (ads, agencies) or informal (networks) methods indicated that type of method used did not contribute to the gender gap in earnings. Results do not support formal job search as a way to reduce gender inequality. (Contains 55 references.) (SK)

  10. Urban Sustainability and Public Health: Throwing the Bath Water Out and Not the Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the affect of urbanization on community health. It exams urbanization trends in the Atlanta metro area and includes information on impervious surfaces, air quality, mitigation strategies, spatial growth modeling, land use, public health surveillance and different data collection methods.

  11. Selected Strategies and Activities To Provide Challenging Instruction to ESOL Students in Content Area Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutiger, Eliso

    This paper describes how a large school district in suburban Atlanta, Georgia dealt with the challenges presented by the relatively sudden influx of a large number of highly heterogeneous limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. The eight most critical specific problems that underlay the assimilation of the new students included the following: a…

  12. Science Teachers' Drawings of What Is inside the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Patricia G.; Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report United States of America (USA) science teachers' understandings of the internal structures of the human body. The 71 science teachers who participated in this study attended a frog/pig, two-hour dissection workshop at the 2004 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The…

  13. 77 FR 50689 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies The companies listed in this notice... Peachtree Street NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30309: 1. Drummond Banking Company, Chiefland, Florida; to merge...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airports/Locations: Special Operating.... D Appendix D to Part 91—Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions Section 1. Locations at..., GA (The William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport) Baltimore, MD (Baltimore...

  15. [Determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity. International multidisciplinary classification of acute pancreatitis severity: the 2013 German edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Layer, P.; Dellinger, E.P.; Forsmark, C.E.; Levy, P.; Maravi-Poma, E.; Shimosegawa, T.; Siriwardena, A.K.; Uomo, G.; Whitcomb, D.C.; Windsor, J.A.; Petrov, M.S.; Geenen, E.J.M. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop a new international classification of acute pancreatitis severity on the basis of a sound conceptual framework, comprehensive review of published evidence, and worldwide consultation. BACKGROUND: The Atlanta definitions of acute pancreatitis severity a

  16. 75 FR 67771 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ..., Quincy, IL June 2, 2009. LLC. 74,253 International Business Phoenix, AZ June 3, 2009. Machines (IBM), Global Tech., Unix System, Support Disney, Teleworker. 74,253A International Business Costa Mesa and El...,253B International Business Atlanta, GA June 3, 2009. Machines (IBM), Global Tech., Unix...

  17. 75 FR 71459 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Products, Leased Workers from Staff Mark & SC Voc. Rehab. 74,575 International Business Charleston, WV... International Business Dallas, TX......... August 25, 2009. Machines (IBM), Global Sales Operations Organization; One Teleworker, etc. 74,575B International Business Atlanta, GA........ August 25, 2009. Machines...

  18. 45 CFR 5.31 - Designation of authorized officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Freedom of Information Officer, Centers for Disease Control, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Atlanta, Georgia... of Information Officers. To provide coordination and consistency in responding to FOIA requests, only... exclusively records of the Centers for Disease Control and/or the Agency for Toxic Substances and...

  19. Building-owners energy-education program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-01

    The objectives of the program are to develop and test market a cogent education program aimed specifically at building owners to help them be more decisive and knowledgeable, and to motivate them to direct their managers and professionals to implement a rational plan for achieving energy conservation in their commercial office buildings and to establish a plan, sponsored by the Building Owners and Managers Association International (BOMA) to implement this educational program on a nation-wide basis. San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta were chosen for test marketing a model program. The procedure used in making the energy survey is described. Energy survey results of participating buildings in San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta are summarized. (MCW)

  20. TaC Studios New Construction Test House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T.; Curtis, O.; Kim, E.; Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2013-03-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA in the mixed humid climate zone. This home will serve as a model home for the builder partner and addresses Building America energy savings targets through the planning and implementation of a design package will serve as a basis of design for the builder partner's future homes. As a BA test house, this home will be evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and HVAC and hot water efficiency.

  1. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume II. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. The papers covered recent developments in atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, especially the design, operation and control of pilot and demonstration plants. The cleanup of combustion products and the erosion, corrosion and fouling of gas turbines was emphasized also. Fifty-five papers from Volume 2 of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; five papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  2. Primate study suggests pentobarbital may help protect the brain during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy, an often indispensable treatment for a wide range of brain tumors, is a double-edged sword, especially when used to treat children. Research reported at the 72nd Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Atlanta, Ga., now suggests that pentobarbital and perhaps other barbiturates may help protect the brain from radiation-induced damage, especially to the pituitary and hypothalmus, where such damage can lead to serious, life-long problems for children. Jeffrey J. Olson, MD, now assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, reported the results of a study of the radioprotective effects of pentobarbital on the brain of a primate, which he and colleagues at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recently completed

  3. Metal Stents in Management of Pancreatic Pseudocyst and Walled Off Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Paramasivam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The science behind pancreatitis and its complications is an ever evolving and challenging field. More than two centuries after the first description of pancreatic pseudocyst by Eugene Opie, some clear consensus and guidelines have evolved. Atlanta Symposium in 1992 attempted to offer a global ‘consensus’ and a universally applicable classification system for acute pancreatitis, tough comprehensive; some of the definitions were confusing [1]. Recent data and deeper understanding of pathophysiology of organ failure and necrotising pancreatitis, and the advent of superior diagnostic imaging have propelled towards the formation of revised Atlanta classification in 2012. Local complications of acute pancreatitis among others are acute pancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis. Rarer complications are gastric outlet dysfunction, splenic and portal vein thrombosis, and colonic necrosis

  4. 美国亚特兰大孔子学院揭牌,将协助学子学习中国文化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    由爱默蕾大学((Emory University)、南京大学与亚特兰大公立学校(Atlanta Public Schools)系统,共同合作成立的孔子学院于日前在美国Sammye E.Coan中学揭牌启用,首任院长为在爱默蕾大学任教的蔡蓉博士。

  5. ОЦЕНКА ВЗАИМОСВЯЗИ ПЕРСИСТЕНТНОЙ ОРГАННОЙ ДИСФУНКЦИИ С ГОСПИТАЛЬНОЙ ЛЕТАЛЬНОСТЬЮ И ЛОКАЛЬНЫМИ ОСЛОЖНЕНИЯМИ У БОЛЬНЫХ ТЯЖЕЛЫМ ОСТРЫМ ПАНКРЕАТИТОМ

    OpenAIRE

    МИРОНОВ П.И.; ЛУТФАРАХМАНОВ И.И.; ИШМУХАМЕТОВ И.Х.; МЕДВЕДЕВ О.И

    2008-01-01

    The investigation aimed at determining mortality rate in patients with transient (< 72 hours) and persistent (>72 hours) early organ failure and showing whether persistent organ failure predicts death or local complications. From February 2000 to December 2005,767 consecutive cases of acute pancreatitis were studied. A total of 100 patients with severe acute pancreatitis and failure of at least 1 organ were included into a trial. APACHE II, MOD, LODS and Sofa scores, Atlanta criteria an...

  6. Comparative Analysis of Selected Scales to Assess Prognosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Dorota Koziel; Stanislaw Gluszek; Jaroslaw Matykiewicz; Piotr Lewitowicz; Zuzanna Drozdzak

    2015-01-01

    Sudden inflammation of the pancreas is a serious condition requiring hospitalization depending on severity, which is generally defined according to the accepted Atlanta classification system. Although several prognostic scales and indicators for acute pancreatitis are available, sensitivity and specificity remain a debatable issue among clinicians. This Polish study aimed to address this lack of consensus in a prospective analysis involving more than 1000 patients in whom acute pancreatitis w...

  7. Comparative Analysis of Selected Scales to Assess Prognosis in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Koziel, Dorota; Gluszek, Stanislaw; Matykiewicz, Jaroslaw; Lewitowicz, Piotr; Drozdzak, Zuzanna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of selected scales to prognosticate the severity and risk for death among patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) according to the revised Atlanta classification published in 2012.METHODS: Prospective data regarding patients hospitalized due to AP were analyzed. The final analysis included a total of 1014 patients. The bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP), Panc 3 scores and Ranson scales were calculated using data from the first 24 h of adm...

  8. Youth Understanding of Healthy Eating and Obesity: A Focus Group Study

    OpenAIRE

    Allison C. Sylvetsky; Monique Hennink; Dawn Comeau; Welsh, Jean A.; Trisha Hardy; Linda Matzigkeit; Swan, Deanne W.; Walsh, Stephanie M.; Vos, Miriam B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States, we aimed to investigate youth's understanding of obesity and to investigate gaps between their nutritional knowledge, dietary habits, and perceived susceptibility to obesity and its co-morbidities. Methods. A marketing firm contracted by Children's Healthcare of Atlanta facilitated a series of focus group discussions (FGD) to test potential concepts and sample ads for the development of an obesity awareness cam...

  9. Report on the AAAI 2010 Robot Exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Monica; University of Alabama; Chernova, Sonia; Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Dodds, Zachary; Harvey Mudd College; Thomaz, Andrea L.; Georgia Institute of Technology; Touretsky, David; Carnegie Mellon University

    2011-01-01

    The 19th robotics program at the annual AAAI conference was held in Atlanta, Georgia in July 2010. In this article we give a summary of three components of the exhibition: small scale manipulation challenge: robotic chess; the learning by demonstration challenge, and the education track. In each section we detail the challenge task. We also describe the participating teams, highlight the research questions they tackled and briefly describe the systems they demonstrated.

  10. Desire Across Borders: markets, migration, and marital HIV risk in rural Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents five concepts that articulate specific processes through which political and economic factors shape sexuality, drawing on ethnographic research on changing notions of marriage, love, and sexuality conducted in migrant-exporting rural Mexico and with Mexican migrants in Atlanta and New York. The first section describes how changing beliefs about love, marriage, sexual intimacy and fidelity constitute a cultural terrain which facilitates ‘vaginal marital bare backing’ in rur...

  11. Implications of different approaches for characterizing ambient air pollutant concentrations within the urban airshed for time-series studies and health benefits analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Winquist Andrea; Flanders W Dana; Klein Mitchel; Mulholland James A; Darrow Lyndsey A; Strickland Matthew J; Tolbert Paige E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In time-series studies of the health effects of urban air pollutants, decisions must be made about how to characterize pollutant levels within the airshed. Methods Emergency department visits for pediatric asthma exacerbations were collected from Atlanta hospitals. Concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10), particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), and the PM2.5...

  12. A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Rick

    2002-03-18

    The accompanying report, manual and assimilated data represent the initial preparation for submission of an Application for Primacy under the Class II Underground Injection Control (UIC) program on behalf of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to identify deficiencies in Kentucky law and regulation that would prevent the Kentucky Division of Oil and Gas from receiving approval of primacy of the UIC program, currently under control of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Atlanta, Georgia.

  13. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Saulino M; Kim PS; Shaw E

    2014-01-01

    Michael Saulino,1,2 Philip S Kim,3,4 Erik Shaw5 1MossRehab, Elkins Park, PA, USA; 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Helen F Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, USA; 4Center for Interventional Pain Spine, LLC., Bryn Mawr, PA, USA; 5Shepherd Pain Institute, Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Chronic pain continues to pose substantial and growing challenges for patients, caregivers, health care profes...

  14. Knowledge and attitudes in Alzheimer’s Disease in a cohort of older African Americans and Caucasians

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, J. Christina; Soyinka, Oretunlewa; Parker, Monica; Jarrett, Thomas L.; Roberts, David L.; Dorbin, Cornelya D.; Hu, William T

    2015-01-01

    African American participation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research studies has been historically low. To determine if older African Americans and Caucasians had different knowledge or attitudes related to AD, we administered the Alzheimer’s Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS) to 67 older African Americans and 140 older Caucasians in the greater Atlanta area, as well as questions targeting locus of control over general health and AD risks. Older African Americans scored slightly lower on ADKS than...

  15. Olympische Spiele in Hamburg - produktive Vision oder teure Fiktion? Regionalwirtschaftliche und standortpolitische Chancen und Risiken einer Bewerbung Hamburgs für die Ausrichtung Olympischer Spiele

    OpenAIRE

    Vöpel, Henning

    2014-01-01

    In Hamburg wird unverändert darüber diskutiert, inwieweit die Ausrichtung Olympischer Sommerspiele eine sinnvolle Option sein kann, um die Stadtentwicklung langfristig positiv zu beeinflussen und die Standortattraktivität zu erhöhen. Die bisherigen Erfahrungen zeigen, dass Städte sehr unterschiedlich von Olympischen Spielen profitiert haben. Während die Olympischen Spiele 1992 in Barcelona der Stadt einen erheblichen Impuls verliehen haben, verzeichnete Atlanta vier Jahre später sogar einen I...

  16. Preface - rethinking structural reform in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen J. Kay; Michael J. Chriszt

    2004-01-01

    The process of structural reform in Latin America has thus far been uneven, and various economic crises have raised doubts about reforms’ effectiveness and have caused public support for further reforms to wane. To promote and highlight research exploring structural reform’s impact on economic growth and income distribution in Latin America, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) cosponsored the conference “Rethinking Structural Reform in Latin Ameri...

  17. Prevalence of Childhood Physical and Sexual Abuse in Veterans With Psychiatric Diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Koola, Maju Mathew; Qualls, Clifford; Kelly, Deanna L.; Skelton, Kelly; Bradley, Bekh; Amar, Richard; Duncan, Erica J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of childhood (≤18 years) physical and sexual abuse reported among patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service and the differential rates of this abuse associated with psychiatric diagnoses. This study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 603 patients admitted to a psychiatric ward during a period of 1 year at Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center who had data on childhood physical and sexual abuse. The prevalence of reported childhood physical o...

  18. Association between Intimate Partner Violence and Health Behaviors of Female Emergency Department Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha Elizabeth Mathew; Brittany Marsh; L. Shakiyla Smith; Debra Houry

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We assessed the correlation between intimate partner violence (IPV) and health behaviors, including seat belt use, smoke alarm in home, handgun access, body mass index, diet, and exercise. We hypothesized that IPV victims would be less likely to have healthy behaviors as compared to women with similar demographics. Methods: All adult female patients who presented to 3 Atlanta-area emergency department waiting rooms on weekdays from 11AM to 7PM were asked to participate ...

  19. Exploration of amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis as an effective tool for discriminating pathogenic strains of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Robert; Weinbrecht,; Taylor,, Samuel ,; Beaumann,

    2012-01-01

    K Weinbrecht,1 A Taylor,2 C Beaumann,3 RW Allen11Department of Forensic Sciences, Center for Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK; 2Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA; 3PharmaNet-i3, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The detrimental effect pathogens used as bioweapons could have on the US is sufficient to warrant extensive efforts to establish preparedness to prevent, and, if necessary, respond to such an event. The objective of this research was to adapt and refine ampl...

  20. The Image of Brazil as a Tourism Destination: An Exploratory Study of the American Market

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the image of Brazil as a tourism destination as perceived by travel agents and tourism experts in the United States. The research was qualitative and exploratory, consisting of a literature review followed by an empirical investigation using in-depth interviews with travel agents and tourism experts located in the cities of New York, Miami, Orlando, and Atlanta. The findings reveal that images of Brazil have been converging in terms of diversity and ambigu...

  1. Promoting Undergraduate Interest, Preparedness, and Professional Pursuit in the Sciences: An Outcomes Evaluation of the SURE Program at Emory University

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, Benjamin; Quiñones, Catherine; Kakietek, Jakub; Teodorescu, Daniel; Marsteller, Pat

    2010-01-01

    We report on an outcomes assessment of the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. Using follow-up survey data and academic transcripts, we gauge SURE's impact on levels of interest in, preparedness for, and actual pursuit of graduate study and professional careers in the sciences for the program's first 15 summer cohorts (1990–2004). Our follow-up survey indicated significant increases in all research preparedness skills considered, notably...

  2. 1st International Conference on Internet Computing and Information Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Awasthi, Lalit; Masillamani, M; Sridhar, S

    2014-01-01

    The book presents high quality research papers presented by experts in the International Conference on Internet Computing and Information Communications 2012, organized by ICICIC Global organizing committee (on behalf of The CARD Atlanta, Georgia, CREATE Conferences Inc). The objective of this book is to present the latest work done in the field of Internet computing by researchers and industrial professionals across the globe. A step to reduce the research divide between developed and under developed countries.

  3. The influence of high profile events on the creation of international joint ventures

    OpenAIRE

    Achampong, Charles K.

    2005-01-01

    International Joint Ventures (IJVs) are an increasingly popular mode of entry into foreign markets. This project explores the possibility that high profile events (HPEs) have stimulated their creation. I examined two HPEs, the Sydney and Atlanta Olympics Games, and how they used various incentives through their Investment 2000 and Operation Legacy economic programs to influence the formation of IJVs. From this a number of key learnings emerge to form a best practices guide that can be used to...

  4. Georgia – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Based on research conducted as of January 1, 2009, Georgia has no state statute prohibiting public or private discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender expression. Furthermore, Georgia courts have issued no judicial rulings that prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender expression in either the public or private contexts. A few municipalities such as Atlanta and Doraville have created their own statutes protecting either sexual orientation or gender expre...

  5. Stress management interventions for HIV-infected individuals: review of recent intervention approaches and directions for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Jennifer L Brown1,2, Peter A Vanable3 1Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, 2Center for AIDS Research, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: To promote psychological wellbeing and adaptive coping among people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (PLWHA), a number of stress management interventions have been designed and evaluated. This paper reviews recent stre...

  6. Predictors of trips to food destinations

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr Jacqueline; Frank Lawrence; Sallis James F; Saelens Brian; Glanz Karen; Chapman Jim

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Food environment studies have focused on ethnic and income disparities in food access. Few studies have investigated distance travelled for food and did not aim to inform the geographic scales at which to study the relationship between food environments and obesity. Further, studies have not considered neighborhood design as a predictor of food purchasing behavior. Methods Atlanta residents (N = 4800) who completed a travel diary and reported purchasing or consuming food a...

  7. Predictors of trips to food desintations

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Frank, Lawrence; Sallis, James F.; Saelens, Brian; Glanz, Karen; Chapman, Jim

    2012-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundFood environment studies have focused on ethnic and income disparities in food access. Few studies have investigated distance travelled for food and did not aim to inform the geographic scales at which to study the relationship between food environments and obesity. Further, studies have not considered neighborhood design as a predictor of food purchasing behavior.MethodsAtlanta residents (N = 4800) who completed a travel diary and reported purchasing or consumin...

  8. 75 FR 74624 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Georgia: Stage II Vapor Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... February 2, 1996. 61 FR 3819. B. CAA Onboard Refueling Vapor Recovery (ORVR) Provisions Generally speaking...-.03(6)(j), 391-3-1-.03(11)(b)3(i), 391-3-1-.03(11)(b)5(i), and 391-3-1-.05. 75 FR 6309. In today's...''). 56 FR 56694. The original attainment date for the Atlanta 1-Hour Area to attain the 1-hour...

  9. Costs of Rapid HIV Screening in an Urban Emergency Department and a Nearby County Jail in the Southeastern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Spaulding, Anne C.; MacGowan, Robin J.; Brittney Copeland; Shrestha, Ram K.; Chava J Bowden; Kim, Min J.; Andrew Margolis; Genetha Mustaafaa; Reid, Laurie C.; Heilpern, Katherine L.; Shah, Bijal B.

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments and jails provide medical services to persons at risk for HIV infection and are recommended venues for HIV screening. Our main objective in this study was to analyze the cost per new HIV diagnosis associated with the HIV screening program in these two venues. The emergency department's parallel testing program was conducted at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia starting in 2008; the jail's integrated testing program began at the Fulton County (GA) Jail in 2011. ...

  10. Trial of Immune Globulin in Infant Botulism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the orphan drug Human Botulism Immune Globulin Intravenous (BIG-IV in 122 infants in California with confirmed infant botulism (75 caused by type A Clostridium botulinum toxin, and 47 by type B toxin was conducted at the California Department of Health Services, Richmond, CA; National Botulism Surveillance and Reference Laboratory, CDC and P, Atlanta; and Division of Biostatistics, University of California, Berkeley.

  11. Synergistic Effects of Food Insecurity and Drug Use on Medication Adherence among People Living with HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiyun; Kalichman, Seth C.

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity and drug use are closely connected in the context of poverty, and both have been suggested to interfere with HIV medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). Yet the potential interaction between the two factors on adherence has not been examined. For this study we collected longitudinal data on HIV medication adherence among PLWH in Atlanta, GA, to assess a possible synergistic effect between the two factors on HIV medication adherence. People informed about...

  12. Validity of reaction to severe stress and adjustment disorder diagnoses in the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson E; Lash TL; Resick PA; Hansen JG; Gradus JL

    2015-01-01

    Elisabeth Svensson,1 Timothy L Lash,1,2 Patricia A Resick,3 Jens Georg Hansen,1 Jaimie L Gradus4–61Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; 5Department of Psy...

  13. Sketches of the Chinese Women’s Soccer Team

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    ON 6 August 1996, the women’s football team returned to Beijing from Atlanta with other Olympic athletes. Finally, after years of preparation, they could remove their athletic gear and don suits and dresses. For many years, the heavy schedule of training and competitions allowed the team few opportunities to wear skirts. Even if they did, some of the women dared not—their legs were full of scars. Some didn’t care and said: "After the

  14. Retrospective drug utilization review: impact of pharmacist interventions on physician prescribing

    OpenAIRE

    Angalakuditi M; Gomes J.

    2011-01-01

    Mallik Angalakuditi1, Joseph Gomes21Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Baxter Health Care, Deerfield, IL, USAObjectives: To evaluate the impact of retrospective drug utilization review (RDUR), pharmacist’s interventions on physician prescribing, and the level of spillover effect on future prescriptions following the intervention.Methods: A retrospective case–control study was conducted at a pharmacy benefits management company using the available prescription dat...

  15. Center for Behavioral Neuroscience: a prototype multi-institutional collaborative research center

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Kelly R; Albers, H. Elliott

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Behavioral Neuroscience was launched in the fall of 1999 with support from the National Science Foundation, the Georgia Research Alliance, and our eight participating institutions (Georgia State University, Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Clark-Atlanta University, Spelman College, Morehouse College, Morris Brown College). The CBN provides the resources to foster innovative research in behavioral neuroscience, with a specific focu...

  16. 美国中学生守则古怪规定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    新生入学时,学校给每一位同学发一个小册子.Student Handbook,即《学生手册》。这本册子是亚特兰大教育委员会编写的。所以这些规定对亚特兰大地区的所有公立中小学校(Atlanta Public School,APS)都适用。

  17. Epi Info™: Now an Open-source application that continues a long and productive “life” through CDC support and funding

    OpenAIRE

    Nieves, Enrique; Jones, Jay

    2009-01-01

    About the authors: Enrique Nieves Jr is the Acting Director of the Division of Integrated Surveillance Systems and Services (DISSS), National Center for Public for Health Informatics (NCPHI), Coordinating Center for Health information and Service (CCHIS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA. Jay Jones is a BearingPoint Consultant to the CDC/NCPHI Division of Alliance Management and Consultation (DAMC), National Center for Public for Health Informatics (NCPHI), Coord...

  18. Significance of Increasing Poverty Levels for Determining Late-Stage Breast Cancer Diagnosis in 1990 and 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Janis; Breen, Nancy; Barrett, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We examine the association between late-stage breast cancer diagnosis and residential poverty in Detroit, Atlanta, and San Francisco in 1990 and 2000. We tested whether residence in census tracts with increasing levels of poverty were associated with increased odds of a late-stage diagnosis in 1990 and 2000 and found that it was. To test this, we linked breast cancer cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registries with poverty data from the census. Tracts were gro...

  19. Ant-Man and the quantum realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Spiros

    2015-11-01

    I was in Los Angeles airport, stuffing French fries into my mouth and waiting for a flight to Charlotte, North Carolina, when my phone buzzed. The e-mail was from the Science and Entertainment Exchange, a non-profit organization working to elevate the level of science in the movies, and it told me to report to Atlanta to consult on a new superhero movie: Ant-Man.

  20. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-01-01

    Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It ha...

  1. The Health Intervention Project: HIV risk reduction among African American women drug users.

    OpenAIRE

    Sterk, Claire E.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the Health Intervention Project, an intervention for African American women in Atlanta, Georgia, who are crack cocaine users. METHODS:A formative phase involved ethnographic mapping of the physical and social infrastructure of the study communities and in-depth interviews with women crack cocaine users. Key findings that were incorporated into the intervention program included the exchange of sex for money or drugs, the women's experience with trauma and abus...

  2. Patient acceptability of the Tecnis® multifocal intraocular lens

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, Maria; Sood,Priyanka

    2011-01-01

    Priyanka Sood1, Maria A Woodward21Emory Eye Center, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Cataract surgery has evolved. The goal of the surgeon includes both restoration of vision and refinement of vision. Patients' desire for spectacle independence has driven the market for presbyopia-correcting cataract surgery and development of novel intraocular lens (IOL) designs. The Tecnis® Multifocal Intraocular Lens incorporates an aspheric, modified anter...

  3. Regional resilience in the face of foreclosures: Evidence from six metropolitan areas

    OpenAIRE

    Swanstrom, Todd; Chapple, Karen; Immergluck, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Based on approximately fifty interviews, along with analysis of data and newspaper coverage, this report compares local responses to surging foreclosures in three pairs of regions with similar housing markets and foreclosure-related challenges (St. Louis/Cleveland, East Bay/Riverside, and Chicago/Atlanta). The authors examine the choices made by leaders and organizations both to prevent foreclosures and to reduce their negative spillovers (neighborhood stabilization). Resilience is defined as...

  4. DUNK YOU VERY MUCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jam

    2011-01-01

    Josh Smith #5 of the Atlanta Hawks dunksagainst Joel Anthony #50 of the Miami Heaton January 18,2011 at American AirlinesArena in Miami,Florida.其实对于J.史密斯(Josh Smith)再度(不意外的)成为明星赛遗珠,我们不想多说什么,这张照片或许可以代表我们的心声:"哇咧DUNK YOU VERYMUCH啦!"

  5. Pediatric glaucoma medical therapy: who more accurately reports medication adherence, the caregiver or the child?

    OpenAIRE

    Moore DB; Neustein RF; Jones SK; Robin AL; Muir KW

    2015-01-01

    Daniel B Moore,1 Rebecca F Neustein,2 Sarah K Jones,1 Alan L Robin,3 Kelly W Muir1,4 1Duke Eye Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 4Health Services Research & Development, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: As they grow older, most children with glaucoma must eventually face...

  6. Alcohol, tobacco and breast cancer – collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 58 515 women with breast cancer and 95 067 women without the disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hamajima, N; Hirose, K.; Tajima, K; Rohan, T.; Calle, E.E.; Heath, C W; Coates, R J; Liff, J. M.; Talamini, R.; N. Chantarakul; Koetsawang, S.; Rachawat, D.; Morabia, A.; L. Schuman; Stewart, W.

    2002-01-01

    COLLABORATORS (in alphabetical order of institution, study name, or location) Aichi Cancer Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan: N Hamajima, K Hirose, K Tajima; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY, USA: T Rohan; American Cancer Society, GA, USA: EE Calle, CW Jr Heath; Atlanta, Emory University, GA, USA: RJ Coates, JM Liff; Aviano Cancer Center, Pordenone, Italy: R Talamini; Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand: N Chantarakul, S Koetsawang, D Rachawat; Breast Tumor Collaborative Study, Johns...

  7. The Application of Satellite-Derived, High-Resolution Land Use/Land Cover Data to Improve Urban Air Quality Model Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Lapenta, W. M.; Crosson, W. L.; Estes, M. G., Jr.; Limaye, A.; Kahn, M.

    2006-01-01

    Local and state agencies are responsible for developing state implementation plans to meet National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Numerical models used for this purpose simulate the transport and transformation of criteria pollutants and their precursors. The specification of land use/land cover (LULC) plays an important role in controlling modeled surface meteorology and emissions. NASA researchers have worked with partners and Atlanta stakeholders to incorporate an improved high-resolution LULC dataset for the Atlanta area within their modeling system and to assess meteorological and air quality impacts of Urban Heat Island (UHI) mitigation strategies. The new LULC dataset provides a more accurate representation of land use, has the potential to improve model accuracy, and facilitates prediction of LULC changes. Use of the new LULC dataset for two summertime episodes improved meteorological forecasts, with an existing daytime cold bias of approx. equal to 3 C reduced by 30%. Model performance for ozone prediction did not show improvement. In addition, LULC changes due to Atlanta area urbanization were predicted through 2030, for which model simulations predict higher urban air temperatures. The incorporation of UHI mitigation strategies partially offset this warming trend. The data and modeling methods used are generally applicable to other U.S. cities.

  8. Temperature sensitivity (Q10), and dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in permafrost soils with different carbon quality and under experimental warming. R. Bracho1, E.A.G Schuur1, E. Pegoraro1, K.G. Crummer1, S. Natali2, J. Zhou, Y Luo3, J. L. Wu3, M. Tiedje4, K. Konstantinidis5 1Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 2Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA. 3Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 4Center for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; 5Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics and School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, R. G.; Schuur, E. A.; Pegoraro, E.; Crummer, K. G.; Natali, S.; Zhou, J.; Wu, L.; Luo, Y.; Tiedje, J. M.; Konstantinidis, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils contain approximately1700 Pg of carbon (C), twice the amount of C in the atmosphere. Temperatures in higher latitudes are increasing, inducing permafrost thaw and subsequent microbial decomposition of previously frozen C. This process is one of the most likely positive feedbacks to climate change. Understanding the temperature sensitivity (Q10) and dynamics of SOM decomposition under warming is essential to predict the future state of the earth - climate system. Alaskan tundra soils were exposed to two winter warming (WW) seasons in the field, which warmed the soils by 4°C to 40 cm depth. Soils were obtained from three depths (0 - 15, 15 - 25 and 45 - 55 cm) and differed in initial amounts of labile and recalcitrant C. Soils were incubated in the lab under aerobic conditions, at 15 and 25°C over 365 days. Q10 was estimated at 14, 100 & 280 days of incubation (DOI); C fluxes were measured periodically and dynamics of SOM decomposition (C pool sizes and decay rates) were estimated by fitting a two pool C model to cumulative respired C (Ccum, mgC/ginitialC). After two WW seasons, initial C content tended to decrease through the soil profile and C:N ratio was significantly decreased in the top 15 cm. After one year of incubation, Ccum was twice as high at 25°C as at 15°C and significantly decreased with depth. No significant WW field treatment was detected, although Ccum tended to be lower in warmed soils. Labile C accounted for up to 5% of initial soil C content in the top 15 cm and decreased with depth. Soils exposed to WW had smaller labile C pools, and higher labile C decay rates in the top 25 cm. Q10 significantly decreased with time and depth as labile pool decreased, especially for WW. This decrease with time indicates a lower temperature sensitivity of the most recalcitrant C pool. The deepest WW soil layer, where warming was more pronounced, had significantly lower Q10 compared to control soils at the same depth. After two seasons, the warming treatment affected decomposition by reducing labile C pools and increasing its decay rates. Warming also reduced temperature sensitivity, showing acclimation of the most recalcitrant C pool in the tundra ecosystem.

  9. Weather and Tourism: Thermal Comfort and Zoological Park Visitor Attendance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Perkins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weather events have the potential to greatly impact business operations and profitability, especially in outdoor-oriented economic sectors such as Tourism, Recreation, and Leisure (TRL. Although a substantive body of work focuses on the macroscale impacts of climate change, less is known about how daily weather events influence attendance decisions, particularly relating to the physiological thermal comfort levels of each visitor. To address this imbalance, this paper focuses on ambient thermal environments and visitor behavior at the Phoenix and Atlanta zoos. Daily visitor attendances at each zoo from September 2001 to June 2011, were paired with the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET to help measure the thermal conditions most likely experienced by zoo visitors. PET was calculated using hourly atmospheric variables of temperature, humidity, wind speed, and cloud cover from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at each zoological park location and then classified based on thermal comfort categories established by the American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE. The major findings suggested that in both Phoenix and Atlanta, optimal thermal regimes for peak attendance occurred within “slightly warm” and “warm” PET-based thermal categories. Additionally, visitors seemed to be averse to the most commonly occurring thermal extreme since visitors appeared to avoid the zoo on excessively hot days in Phoenix and excessively cold days in Atlanta. Finally, changes in the daily weather impacted visitor attendance as both zoos experienced peak attendance on days with dynamic changes in the thermal regimes and depressed attendances on days with stagnant thermal regimes. Building a better understanding of how weather events impact visitor demand can help improve our assessments of the potential impacts future climate change may have on tourism.

  10. Hacia un producto integral: campaña promocional de Canarias durante los JJ.OO. de 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. María A. Gabino Campos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Los JJ.OO. de Atlanta en 1996 fueron el marco elegido por la Consejería de Turismo y Transporte del Gobierno de Canarias para introducir la marca "Canarias" en EE.UU. La ambiciosa campaña promocional se llevó a cabo desde el 18 de junio al 5 de agosto de 1996, para lo cual se instaló un pabellón promocional en el centro de la ciudad de Atlanta. Asimismo se aprovechó el viaje a Atlanta, para visitar Augusta y vender las islas como un lugar ideal para practicar golf. En esta ocasión, el Gobierno de Canarias vende el archipiélago como una única marca, "Canarias", con siete destinos. A la oferta tradicional de sol y playa se le une la historia, la cultura, la gastronomía, los deportes náuticos, la sanidad e incluso las ventajas fiscales de las islas. Por primera vez, el archipiélago se da a conocer con todas sus peculiaridades.Canarias no sólo realiza una campaña en solitario, fuera de las promociones tradicionales de ferias o impactos publicitarios, en un mercado arriesgado, sino que cambia sus ya experimentadas estrategias en el mercado europeo por una iniciativa novedosa, con el objeto de atraer nuevos inversores turísticos que sondean novedosos destinos y a empresarios en busca de lugares con regímenes fiscales especiales para instalar sus empresas.

  11. Forum-ing: Signature practice for public theological discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P. Wimberly

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a unique model for public theological conversation and discourse, which was developed by the Concerned Black Clergy of Atlanta (CBC. It was a model developed in response to the problems of poverty, homelessness, and the ‘missing and murdered children’ victimised in Atlanta, Georgia in the United States of America in the early 1980s. It was originally organised to respond to the economic, financial, spiritual, emotional, employment, housing and resource needs of the underserved poor. This unique practice is called forum-ing. The forum meets every Monday morning, except when there is a national holiday. It has operated 30 consecutive years. The forum has a series of presentations, including the opening prayer, self-introductions of each person, a report of the executive director, special presentations from selected community groups, reports, and then questions and answers. The end result is that those attending engage in a process of discourse that enables them to internalise new ideas, approaches, and activities for addressing poverty and injustice in the community. Key to forum-ing for the 21st century is that it is a form of public practical theology rooted and grounded in non-violence growing out of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s in the United States. The overall purpose of this article is to contribute to the effort of the Faculty of Theology at the University of Pretoria (South Africa to identify those variables that will assist religious leaders in South Africa to develop public conversational spaces to enhance democratic participation. This article presents one model from the African American community in Atlanta, Georgia. The hope is to lift up key variables that might assist in the practical and pastoral theological conversation taking place in South Africa at present.

  12. Contribution of particulate brown carbon to light absorption in the rural and urban Southeast US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, J. Jai; Bergin, Michael H.; Mckenzie, Michael; Schauer, James J.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol light absorption coefficients were carried out as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during the summer of 2013 to determine the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon (BrC) to total aerosol light absorption in a rural location (Centreville, AL) and an urban area (Atlanta, GA). The light absorption coefficients in the near UV and visible wavelengths were measured for both ambient air, as well as ambient air heated in a thermal denuder to 200 °C to remove the semi-volatile organic compounds. Atlanta measurements show dominance of semi-volatile brown carbon with an average absorption angstrom exponent (AAE) of 1.4 before heating and about 1.0 after heating. In urban Atlanta, a decrease of about ∼35% in the light absorption coefficient at 370 nm after heating indicates that light absorbing organic compounds are a substantial fraction of the light absorption budget. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the fraction of light absorption by the semi-volatile aerosol occurs during the daytime, likely linked with photochemistry. Measurements at rural Centerville, on the other hand, do not show any major change in AAE with values before and after heating of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. Overall the results suggest that photochemical aged urban emissions result in the presence of light absorbing BrC, while at rural locations which are dominated by aged aerosol and local biogenic emissions (based on measurements of Angstrom exponents) BrC does not significantly contribute to light absorption.

  13. Gaming Against Violence: A Grassroots Approach to Teen Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecente, Drew

    2014-08-01

    Teen dating violence is a pervasive problem that affects millions of adolescents worldwide. Although there have been various approaches to addressing this problem, using videogames had not been employed before 2008, when Jennifer Ann's Group, an Atlanta, GA-based nonprofit organization, created an annual competition. The Life.Love. Game Design Challenge rewards game developers for creating videogames about teen dating violence without using any violence in the games themselves. The resulting videogames have increased awareness about teen dating violence and provided educational information to assist adolescents, parents, and teachers in identifying abusive relationships. PMID:26192368

  14. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. PMID:26602933

  15. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis.

  16. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  17. Classificação de gravidade na pancreatite aguda Classification of severity of acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Tercio De Campos; José Gustavo Parreira; José Cesar Assef; Sandro Rizoli; Barto Nascimento; Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    2013-01-01

    De acordo com a Classificação de Atlanta a pancreatite aguda pode ser dividida, baseado em sua severidade, em uma forma leve ou grave. Uma série de aspectos têm sido discutidos nos últimos anos, tais como, quantas categorias de gravidade devem ser consideradas; se o doente com falência orgânica é igual ao doente com necrose infectada; qual o papel da falência orgânica transitória; e como avaliar a falência orgânica. A reunião de revista"Telemedicina Baseada em Evidência - Cirurgia do Trauma e...

  18. Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

    1996-12-31

    A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

  19. 50 kW on-site concentrating solar photovoltaic power system. Phase I: design. Final report, 1 June 1978-28 February 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittman, P F

    1979-03-30

    This contract is part of a three phase program to design, fabricate, and operate a solar photovoltaic electric power system with concentrating optics. The system will be located beside a Local Operating Headquarters of the Georgia Power Company in Atlanta, Georgia and will provide part of the power for the on-site load. Fresnel lens concentrators will be used in 2-axis tracking arrays to focus solar energy onto silicon solar cells producing a peak power output of 56 kW. The present contract covers Phase I which has as its objective the complete design of the system and necessary subsystems.

  20. Functionalized milk-protein-coated magnetic nanoparticles for MRI-monitored targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Jing Huang,1,2 Weiping Qian,3 Liya Wang,1,2 Hui Wu,1 Hongyu Zhou,3 Andrew Yongqiang Wang,4 Hongbo Chen,5 Lily Yang,3 Hui Mao1,2 1Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, 2Center for Systems Imaging, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Ocean Nanotech LLC, Springdale, AR, USA; 5School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, Guangxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Engineered nanocar...

  1. 2005年考研英语阅读第一部分题解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王若平

    2005-01-01

    Everybody loves a fat pay rise. Yet pleasure at your own can vanish if you learn that a colleague has been given a bigger one. Indeed, if he has a reputation for slacking, you might even be outraged. Such behaviour is regarded as ""all too1 human"", with the underlying assumption that other animals would not be capable of this finely developed sense of grievance. But a study by Sarah Brosnan and Frans de Waal of Emory University in Atlanta, which has just been published in Nature, suggests that it is all too monkey, as well.

  2. Tendencias de infecciones intrahospitalarias en un centro oncológico, 1986-1996

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow Patricia; Rosa Margarita de la; Gordillo Patricia; Vilar-Compte Diana; Lazo de la Vega Sergio; Aranda-Cortés Grisel; Sandoval Silvia

    2000-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Describir los resultados de diez años de vigilancia de infecciones intrahospitalarias (II) en un centro oncológico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Es un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo, del programa de vigilancia del Comité de Vigilancia y Control de Infecciones Intrahospitalarias del Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, realizado en 1997. Se utilizaron los criterios de infección intrahospitalaria por sitio propuestos por el Centro para la Prevención y el Control de Enfermedades de Atlanta, ...

  3. Tendencias de infecciones intrahospitalarias en un centro oncológico, 1986-1996 Trends in nosocomial infections in an oncology center, 1986-1996

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Volkow; Margarita de la Rosa; Patricia Gordillo; Diana Vilar-Compte; Sergio Lazo de la Vega; Grisel Aranda-Cortés; Silvia Sandoval

    2000-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Describir los resultados de diez años de vigilancia de infecciones intrahospitalarias (II) en un centro oncológico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Es un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo, del programa de vigilancia del Comité de Vigilancia y Control de Infecciones Intrahospitalarias del Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, realizado en 1997. Se utilizaron los criterios de infección intrahospitalaria por sitio propuestos por el Centro para la Prevención y el Control de Enfermedades de Atlanta, ...

  4. Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun in 2015: Five Takeaways and Five Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    I present a highly biased and skewed summary of IAU Symposium 314, "Young Stars and Planets Near the Sun," held in Atlanta. This summary includes takeaway thoughts about the rapidly evolving state of the field, as well as crowd-sourced predictions for progress over the next ~10 years. We predict the elimination of 1-2 of the currently recognized young moving groups, the addition of 3 or more new moving groups within 100 pc, the continued lack of a predictive theory of stellar mass, robust measurements of the gas and dust content of circumstellar disks, and an ongoing struggle to achieve a consensus definition for a planet.

  5. Drive like the wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M.

    2001-06-09

    This article reports on research carried out by Robert J. Englar at the Georgia Technical Research Institute in Atlanta on the transformation of the aerodynamics of cars, trucks, buses etc using a series of nozzles or slots that pumps air over the back of the vehicle to aid steering, improve the hold on the road, and reduce fuel costs. The use of the Coanda effect to cut the aerodynamic drag on vehicles is discussed along with wind tunnel tests on a model car, and the reduction in the drag achieved by rounding the top and rear of a trailer.

  6. The Impact of Urbanization on the Precipitation Component of the Water Cycle: A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, J. Marshal

    2002-01-01

    It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world s population will live in cities (UNFP, 1999). As cities continue to grow, urban sprawl (e.g., the expansion of urban surfaces outward into rural surroundings) creates unique problems related to land use, transportation, agriculture, housing, pollution, and development. Urban expansion also has measurable impacts on environmental processes. Urban areas modify boundary layer processes through the creation of an urban heat island (UHI). The literature indicates that the signature of the urban heat island effect may be resolvable in rainfall patterns over and downwind of metropolitan areas. However, a recent U.S. Weather Research Program panel concluded that more observational and modeling research is needed in this area (Dabberdt et al. 2000). NASA and other agencies initiated programs such as the Atlanta Land-use Analysis: Temperature and Air Quality Project (ATLANTA) (Quattrochi et al. 1998) which aimed to identify and understand how urban heat islands impact the environment. However, a comprehensive assessment of the role of urban-induced rainfall in the global water and energy cycle (GWEC) and cycling of freshwater was not a primary focus of these efforts. NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) seeks to develop a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural or human-induced changes to enable improved prediction capability for climate, weather, and natural hazards (NASA, 2000). Within this mission, the ESE has three basic thrusts: science research to increase Earth system knowledge; an applications program to transfer science knowledge to practical use in society; and a technology program to enable new, better, and cheaper capabilities for observing the earth. Within this framework, a research program is underway to further address the co-relationship between land cover use and change (e.g. urban development) and its impact on key components of the GWEC (e.g., precipitation). This

  7. KSC-04PD-1874

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. talks to students and staff. Dr. Whitlow was visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  8. KSC-04PD-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Astronaut Leland Melvin involves students at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, during a presentation. He accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., who is visiting to the school to share The vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  9. KSC-04PD-1873

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, astronaut Leland Melvin talks to students. Melvin accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (right), who was visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  10. KSC-04PD-1875

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, astronaut Leland Melvin talks to students. Melvin accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., who was visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  11. KSC-04PD-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Astronaut Leland Melvin talks to students at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School. He accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., who is visiting to the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. He talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  12. KSC-04PD-1871

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, astronaut Leland Melvin talks to students. Melvin accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., who was visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  13. KSC-04PD-1872

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, astronaut Leland Melvin talks to students. Melvin accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., who was visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  14. KSC-04PD-1869

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (left) is welcomed by Jim Harris, principal of University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School. Dr. Whitlow is visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  15. Gaming Against Violence: A Grassroots Approach to Teen Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecente, Drew

    2014-08-01

    Teen dating violence is a pervasive problem that affects millions of adolescents worldwide. Although there have been various approaches to addressing this problem, using videogames had not been employed before 2008, when Jennifer Ann's Group, an Atlanta, GA-based nonprofit organization, created an annual competition. The Life.Love. Game Design Challenge rewards game developers for creating videogames about teen dating violence without using any violence in the games themselves. The resulting videogames have increased awareness about teen dating violence and provided educational information to assist adolescents, parents, and teachers in identifying abusive relationships.

  16. Proposed national strategies for the prevention of leading work-related diseases and injuries. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary strategies developed at the National Symposium on the Prevention of Leading Work Related Diseases and Injuries, held in Atlanta, Georgia on May 1 to 3, 1985 were revised, elaborated, and further developed. Strategies were developed for the prevention of occupational lung diseases, musculoskeletal injuries, occupational cancers, severe occupational traumatic injuries, and occupational cardiovascular diseases. Lung diseases considered included silicosis, asbestosis, lung cancer mesothelioma, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asphyxiation, irritation, pulmonary edema, brucellosis, psitticosis, anthrax, mycobacterioses, histoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidioidomycosis. Occupational cancers were discussed as they occur in the lung, pleura, peritoneum, bladder, kidneys, blood, nasal cavity, skin, nasal sinuses, and liver.

  17. Principles Underlying the Adjudication of Selection Disputes Preceding the Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games: Notes for Adjudicators

    OpenAIRE

    Findlay, Hilary A.; Corbett, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Selection disputes inevitably arise prior to any major games such as an Olympics. Prior to the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, some 25 disputes were heard in Canada. 1 In anticipation of the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, an ad-hoc arbitration system was put in place in Canada to deal with these disputes. To assist the roster of adjudicators appointed to hear these matters, the Centre for Sport and Law 2 compiled and reviewed some 30 sport selection disputes from Canadian courts and tribuna...

  18. The Urban Heat Island Phenomenon and Potential Mitigation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Gorsevski, Virginia; Russell, Camille; Quattrochi, Dale; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    A survey of urban heat island research is provided to describe how heat islands develop, urban landscape and meteorological characteristics that facilitate development, use of aircraft remote sensing data, and why heat islands are of interest to planners, elected officials, and the public. The roles of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), other federal agencies, national laboratories and universities, state and local governments, and non-governmental organizations (NGOS) in studying the urban heat island effect and developing mitigation strategies are explored. Barriers that hamper mitigation efforts and case studies in Atlanta and Salt Lake City are discussed.

  19. Ethical perspectives on the management of disorders of sex development in children

    OpenAIRE

    Lathrop, Breanna

    2015-01-01

    Breanna Lathrop,1,2 Teresa B Cheney3 1Good Samaritan Health Center, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2South University, Savannah, GA, USA; 3AppleCare Immediate Care, LLC, Statesboro, GA, USA Abstract: The management of a child with disorders of sex development is complex from both a medical and sociocultural perspective. Decisions impacting the future sexual function and sex identity of the child are made on behalf of the child by their parents and health care providers. Such decisions are rarely straightf...

  20. 16th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Cryocoolers 16 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 16th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 17-20, 2010. The program of this conference consisted of 116 papers; of these, 89 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  1. Korean Air Excellence in Flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Korean Air with a fleet of 119 aircraft, is one of the world's top 20 airlines, and oper-ates almost 400 flights everyday to 90 cities in 33 countries. The airline has about 50 flights per week between the US and Asia from nine US gateways: New York, Los Angeles, Washington,Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, Atlanta, Anchorage and Honolulu.The carrier is a founding member of SkyTeam, the global airline alliance partnering AeroMexico, Air France, Alitalia, CSA Czech Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, KLM and Northwest Airlines to provide customers with extensive worldwide destina-tions, flights and services.

  2. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Schumacher, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lukachko, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report explains the moisture-related concerns for high R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. In this project, hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones. The modeling program assessed the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage; the report presents results of the study.

  3. Environmental toxicology and risk assessment: Standardization of biomarkers for endocrine disruption and environmental assessment: Eighth volume. Special technical publication 1364

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshel, D.S.; Black, M.C.; Harrass, M.C. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    This conference was held April 20--22, 1998 in Atlanta, Georgia. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biological markers in toxicology and risk assessment, including endocrine disrupter screening assays. Attention is focused on the following: aquatic toxicology; behavioral toxicology; biochemical indicators; developmental indicators; endocrine indicators; biodegradation and fate of chemicals; quality assurance and quality control within laboratory and field studies; risk assessment and communication, and harmonization of standards development. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  4. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  5. Thirteenth annual U.S. DOE low-level radioactive waste management conference: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    The 40 papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy`s Thirteenth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference that was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on November 19--21, 1991. General subjects addressed during the conference included: disposal facility design; greater-than-class C low-level waste; public acceptance considerations; waste certification; site characterization; performance assessment; licensing and documentation; emerging low-level waste technologies; waste minimization; mixed waste; tracking and transportation; storage; and regulatory changes. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. A Formative Evaluation of a Social Media Campaign to Reduce Adolescent Dating Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Danielle N; Bishop, Lauren E; Guetig, Stephanie; Frew, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Emory Jane Fonda Center implemented the Start Strong Atlanta social marketing campaign, “Keep It Strong ATL”, in 2007 to promote the development of healthy adolescent relationships and to foster the prevention of adolescent dating abuse among 11-14 year olds. Objective A formative evaluation was conducted to understand whether messages directed at the target audience were relevant to the program’s relationship promotion and violence prevention goals, and whether the “Web 2.0” s...

  7. National solar heating and cooling programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, S; Allen, J [eds.

    1979-08-01

    This document is a compilation of status reports on the national solar heating and cooling programs of seventeen countries participating in the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society's Solar Energy Pilot Study. These reports were presented in two special sessions of the 25th Congress of the International Solar Energy Society held in May 1979, in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. This information exchange activity was part of the two-year follow up (1978-1980) of the Solar Energy Pilot Study, which ended in October 1978.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  9. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  10. Delineating Urban-enhanced Lightning Production: An approach using Flash-defined Thunderstorm Tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M. L.; Stallins, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Lightning hazards are often less spectacular and more isolated than those produced by hurricanes or tornadoes. Consequently, lightning has been under recognized in its potential to generate large economic losses. Recent studies have found that heat generated from large urban areas alter the local distribution of lightning. However, little is known about the characteristics of this lightning and how surface properties and land-use trends influence its damage potential. Evidence suggests, trends in lightning property damage can be attributed to the background thunderstorm regime, a control imposed by the physical environment. Other studies emphasize that these loss trends are caused by an increasing societal sensitivity to thunderstorms through urbanization. This investigation is unique in that there is simultaneous consideration of the physical environment and the societal template as interacting causal agents. The study region, Atlanta, Georgia, USA provides an ideal setting to investigate how these interactions shape lightning hazards. Results suggest that the highly populated suburban counties to the northeast of downtown Atlanta have lightning strike densities approaching those along the lightning active northern Gulf Coast of Florida. This flash density hotspot is collocated with a zone of high-density land use indicative of urban flash augmentation. In addition, a lightning tracking algorithm revealed the nature of individual thunderstorm tracks creating the hotspot. Increases in lightning flash production were noted in individual storms passing over high-density urban land use.

  11. Spatial Variation of the Impacts of Climate Change and Population Growth on Water Resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lownsbery, K.; Steinschneider, S.; Brown, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Water resource systems around the world are increasingly stressed from climate change and human development, which often results in conflict and highlights the need for appropriate management strategies. One example is the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint basin in the southeastern US, where decades of legal battles have attempted to apportion the water between metropolitan Atlanta, GA and other stakeholders. This study examines the relative impact of the most significant regional stressors - climate change and population growth, on stakeholder relevant metrics at appropriate time (the next 50 years) and spatial (basin and sub-basin) scales. The system is analyzed within a framework that imposes transient changes and encompasses the range of system response to projected changes. Significant findings are that population growth is the most significant stressor in the upper basin which encompasses the metropolitan Atlanta region. However, climate change, specifically precipitation decrease, is the most significant stressor for the center and Gulf of Mexico portions of the basin. Temperature has little impact because changes in agricultural water use are not considered. Additionally, the metric elasticity to stressor changes is nonlinear.

  12. Modeled PM2.5 removal by trees in ten U.S. cities and associated health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban particulate air pollution is a serious health issue. Trees within cities can remove fine particles from the atmosphere and consequently improve air quality and human health. Tree effects on PM2.5 concentrations and human health are modeled for 10 U.S. cities. The total amount of PM2.5 removed annually by trees varied from 4.7 tonnes in Syracuse to 64.5 tonnes in Atlanta, with annual values varying from $1.1 million in Syracuse to $60.1 million in New York City. Most of these values were from the effects of reducing human mortality. Mortality reductions were typically around 1 person yr−1 per city, but were as high as 7.6 people yr−1 in New York City. Average annual percent air quality improvement ranged between 0.05% in San Francisco and 0.24% in Atlanta. Understanding the impact of urban trees on air quality can lead to improved urban forest management strategies to sustain human health in cities. -- Highlights: •Paper provides the first broad-scale estimates of city-wide tree impacts on PM2.5. •Trees improve overall air quality by intercepting particulate matter. •Particle resuspension can lead to short-term increases in pollutant concentrations. •Urban trees produce substantial health improvements and values. -- Air pollution modeling reveals broad-scale impacts of pollution removal by urban trees on PM2.5 concentrations and human health

  13. Advances in the proteomic discovery of novel therapeutic targets in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shanchun Guo,1 Jin Zou,2 Guangdi Wang3 1Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 2Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Research Centers in Minority Institutions Cancer Research Program, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Proteomic approaches are continuing to make headways in cancer research by helping to elucidate complex signaling networks that underlie tumorigenesis and disease progression. This review describes recent advances made in the proteomic discovery of drug targets for therapeutic development. A variety of technical and methodological advances are overviewed with a critical assessment of challenges and potentials. A number of potential drug targets, such as baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat-containing protein 6, macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1, phosphoglycerate mutase 1, prohibitin 1, fascin, and pyruvate kinase isozyme 2 were identified in the proteomic analysis of drug-resistant cancer cells, drug action, and differential disease state tissues. Future directions for proteomics-based target identification and validation to be more translation efficient are also discussed. Keywords: proteomics, cancer, therapeutic target, signaling network, tumorigenesis

  14. Simulation of air quality impacts from prescribed fires on an urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongtao; Odman, M Talat; Chang, Michael E; Jackson, William; Lee, Sangil; Edgerton, Eric S; Baumann, Karsten; Russell, Armistead G

    2008-05-15

    On February 28, 2007, a severe smoke event caused by prescribed forest fires occurred in Atlanta, GA. Later smoke events in the southeastern metropolitan areas of the United States caused by the Georgia-Florida wild forest fires further magnified the significance of forest fire emissions and the benefits of being able to accurately predict such occurrences. By using preburning information, we utilize an operational forecasting system to simulate the potential air quality impacts from two large February 28th fires. Our "forecast" predicts that the scheduled prescribed fires would have resulted in over 1 million Atlanta residents being potentially exposed to fine particle matter (PM2.5) levels of 35 microg m(-3) or higher from 4 p.m. to midnight. The simulated peak 1 h PM2.5 concentration is about 121 microg m(-3). Our study suggests that the current air quality forecasting technology can be a useful tool for helping the management of fire activities to protect public health. With postburning information, our "hindcast" predictions improved significantly on timing and location and slightly on peak values. "Hindcast" simulations also indicated that additional isoprenoid emissions from pine species temporarily triggered by the fire could induce rapid ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation during late winter. Results from this study suggest that fire induced biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions missing from current fire emissions estimate should be included in the future. PMID:18546707

  15. Insights into genetic susceptibility in the etiology of spontaneous preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parets SE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sasha E Parets,1 Anna K Knight,2 Alicia K Smith,1,2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Genetics and Molecular Biology Program, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Preterm birth (PTB; <37 weeks of gestation is a complex disorder, whose etiology is influenced by a variety of factors. A greater understanding of the biological mechanisms that contribute to PTB will facilitate identification of those at increased risk and may inform new treatments. To accomplish this, it is vital to elucidate the heritability patterns of this condition as well as the environment and lifestyle factors that increase risk for PTB. Identifying individual genes that contribute to the etiology of PTB presents particular challenges, and there has been little agreement among candidate gene and genome-wide studies performed to date. In this review we will evaluate recent genetic studies of spontaneous PTB, discuss common themes among their findings, and suggest approaches for future studies of PTB. Keywords: PTB, GWAS, linkage, candidate gene, African–American, epigenetic

  16. Health on wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, N; Porter-O'Grady, T

    1994-11-01

    To adequately meet the needs of the poor and underserved, we must bring healthcare services to them. Saint Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta is doing just that through its Mercy Mobile Health Program. Even though Mercy Mobile has been available for a decade, the health status of Atlanta's homeless and working poor has deteriorated. The program has therefore increased its services to include primary care, disease prevention, health promotion, case management, and information and referral. With four vans and two mobile clinics, the program operates five days and three evenings a week, often in space donated by churches and other not-for-profit organizations. It provided more than 50,000 episodes of care last year. Developing strategies and resources to treat medically-at-risk, hard-to-reach clients with multiple diagnoses is a complex task, requiring the resources of more than one organization. One example of an effective collaborative effort is the "Street Home" program for HIV-infected homeless persons. This program, which provides early intervention and primary care to persons with HIV, is funded through the federal Ryan White "CARE" (Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency) Act. PMID:10137948

  17. Measurement of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) with I-·H2O as the reagent ions: instrumentation and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Ng, N. L.; Li, J.; Dibb, J. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) is formed by the association reaction of HO2 and NO2, which couples both the HOx (HO2+OH) and NOx (=NO2+NO) families. The thermal decomposition at higher temperatures is sufficiently fast that HO2NO2 is in steady state with HO2 and NO2. This allows HO2 levels to be inferred from HO2NO2 observations. In Polar Regions and higher altitudes, significant levels of HO2NO2 can build up and influences local HOx and NOx photochemistry. Here, we present an in situ measurement technique of HO2NO2 based on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) using the reagent ion I- and its hydrated form I-·H2O, together with our calibration technique for HO2NO2 measurements. We will also present observations of HO2NO2: (1) in a polar boundary layer on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer 2011, and (2) in an urban boundary layer in metropolitan Atlanta during winter 2014. The local chemistry of HO2NO2 at Summit will be evaluated. The local HO2 in Atlanta will be inferred and assessed with models.

  18. Support of Helicopter 'Free Flight' Operations in the 1996 Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstetter, James R.; Cooper, Eric G.

    1996-01-01

    The microcosm of activity surrounding the 1996 Olympic Games provided researchers an opportunity for demonstrating state-of-the art technology in the first large-scale deployment of a prototype digital communication/navigation/surveillance system in a confined environment. At the same time it provided an ideal opportunity for transportation officials to showcase the merits of an integrated transportation system in meeting the operational needs to transport time sensitive goods and provide public safety services under real-world conditions. Five aeronautical CNS functions using a digital datalink system were chosen for operational flight testing onboard 91 aircraft, most of them helicopters, participating in the Atlanta Short-Haul Transportation System. These included: GPS-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance, Cockpit Display of Traffic Information, Controller-Pilot Communications, Graphical Weather Information (uplink), and Automated Electronic Pilot Reporting (downlink). Atlanta provided the first opportunity to demonstrate, in an actual operating environment, key datalink functions which would enhance flight safety and situational awareness for the pilot and supplement conventional air traffic control. The knowledge gained from such a large-scale deployment will help system designers in development of a national infrastructure where aircraft would have the ability to navigate autonomously.

  19. Evaluation of innovative air-monitoring technologies for the measurement of ambient concentrations of ozone and its precursors at the 1996 Summer Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamiles, Donald S.; Rodgers, Michael; Meeker, Charles; Olive, Brent S.; Simpson, Orman A.

    1997-05-01

    An open path Fourier transform IR spectrometer and an ultra- violet differential optical absorption spectrometer were used during the 1996 Atlanta Olympics games to monitor for ambient ozone and its precursors near the Olympic Village. Both systems were operated continuously before, during, and after the increase in Atlanta's population associated with the Summer games. The study utilized the massive changes in population patterns to observe and measure changes in local air quality due to an increased local population. A second goal of the program was to evaluate both open path instruments in continuous field use over a period of several weeks. The evaluation included the following criteria: instrumentation operability, system precision and accuracy, detection capability, and over-all ease of use. Both open path systems selected and measured ambient levels of ozone. A limited number of ozone precursors were detected. The study was sponsored by the Georgia Institute of Technology's Air Quality Laboratory, the US Department of Energy, and the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  20. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 1: acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yener, Ö

    2015-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas that may also involve surrounding tissues or remote organs. The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Generally, imaging is recommended to confirm the clinical diagnosis, investigate the etiology, and grade the extend and severity of the acute pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality in most centers for the confirmation of the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and the ruling out of other causes of acute abdomen, but it has limitations in the acute clinical setting. Computed tomography not only establishes the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but also enables to stage severity of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging has earned an ever more important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. It is especially useful for imaging of patients with iodine allergies, characterizing collections and assessment of an abnormal or disconnected pancreatic duct. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the acute pancreatitis, clarify confusing terminology, underline the role of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging according to the proper clinical context and compare the advantages and limitations of each modality.

  1. Clinical utility of 5-aminolevulinic acid HCl to better visualize and more completely remove gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halani SH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sameer H Halani,1 D Cory Adamson1,2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Neurosurgery Section, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA Abstract: Surgical resection is typically the first line of treatment for gliomas. However, the neurosurgeon faces a major challenge in achieving maximal resection in high-grade gliomas as these infiltrative tumors make it difficult to discern tumor margins from normal brain with conventional white-light microscopy alone. To aid in resection of these infiltrative tumors, fluorescence-guided surgery has gained much popularity in intraoperative visualization of malignant gliomas, with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA leading the way. First introduced in an article in Neurosurgery, 5-ALA has since become a safe, effective, and inexpensive method to visualize and improve resection of gliomas. This has undoubtedly led to improvements in the clinical course of patients as demonstrated by the increased overall and progression-free survival in patients with such devastating disease. This literature review aims to discuss the major studies and trials demonstrating the clinical utility of 5-ALA and its ability to aid in complete resection of malignant gliomas. Keywords: aminolevulinic acid, 5-ALA, fluorescence, glioblastoma multiforme, high-grade glioma, resection

  2. The Philadelphia Negro - zapomenutý počátek empirické sociologie ve Spojených státech amerických

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynek Jeřábek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on "The Philadelphia Negro": a community study that stands at the start of American social research. This somewhat forgotten empirical study from 1899 describes the historical conditions and the economic and social causes and circumstances behind the formation and existence of the "Seventh Ward", a slum neighbourhood in Philadelphia inhabited by African-Americans. The study used survey and other methods of observation and analysis of historical, economic and social data. The study was written by the erudite Harvard University graduate William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, an African-American, and an economist, historian and sociologist. Using primary and secondary literature and archive sources this paper shows that Du Bois was the author of the first empirical social research study in the United States. It looks at his life, his research, and his opinions on racial issues. He created a programme of research on the African-American population and from 1898 to 1910 he headed the first school of sociology on the American continent at the University of Atlanta. He published the results of scientific analyses of the lives of African-Americans in the south of the United States in sixteen volumes of the Atlanta University Studies. Racial prejudices among the American sociological elites prevented both Du Bois and his work from receiving the attention they rightly deserve.

  3. Time will tell: community acceptability of HIV vaccine research before and after the “Step Study” vaccine discontinuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M Frew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Paula M Frew1,2,3,4, Mark J Mulligan1,2,3, Su-I Hou5, Kayshin Chan3, Carlos del Rio1,2,3,61Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2Emory Center for AIDS Research, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 3The Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA; 4Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 5Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA; 6Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAObjective: This study examines whether men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM and transgender (TG persons’ attitudes, beliefs, and risk perceptions toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine research have been altered as a result of the negative findings from a phase 2B HIV vaccine study.Design: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among MSM and TG persons (N = 176 recruited from community settings in Atlanta from 2007 to 2008. The first group was recruited during an active phase 2B HIV vaccine trial in which a candidate vaccine was being evaluated (the “Step Study”, and the second group was recruited after product futility was widely reported in the media.Methods: Descriptive statistics, t tests, and chi-square tests were conducted to ascertain differences between the groups, and ordinal logistic regressions examined the influences of the above-mentioned factors on a critical outcome, future HIV vaccine study participation. The ordinal regression outcomes evaluated the influences on disinclination, neutrality, and inclination to study participation.Results: Behavioral outcomes such as future recruitment, event attendance, study promotion, and community mobilization did not reveal any differences in participants’ intentions between the groups. However, we observed

  4. Spatial and seasonal variations of fine particle water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC over the Southeastern United States: implications for secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA in the Southeastern US is investigated by analyzing the spatial-temporal distribution of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC and other PM2.5 components from 900 archived 24 h Teflon filters collected at 15 urban or rural EPA Federal Reference Method (FRM network sites throughout 2007. Online measurements of WSOC at an urban/rural-paired site in Georgia in the summer of 2008 are contrasted to the filter data. Based on FRM filters, excluding biomass-burning events (levoglucosan < 50 ng m−3, WSOC and sulfate were highly correlated with PM2.5 mass and both comprised a large mass fraction of PM2.5 (13% and 35%, respectively. Sulfate and WSOC both tracked ambient temperature throughout the year, suggesting the temperature effects were mainly on the photochemical processes that lead to secondary formation. FRM WSOC, and to a lesser extent sulfate, were spatially homogeneous throughout the region, yet WSOC was moderately enhanced (27% in locations of greater predicted isoprene emissions in summer. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF analysis identified two major source types for the summer WSOC; 22% of the WSOC were associated with ammonium sulfate, and 56% of the WSOC was associated with brown carbon and oxalate. A small urban excess of FRM WSOC (10% was observed in the summer of 2007, however, comparisons of online WSOC measurements at one urban/rural pair (Atlanta/Yorkville in August 2008 showed substantially greater difference in WSOC (31% relative to the FRM data, suggesting a low bias for urban filters. The measured Atlanta urban excess, combined with the estimated boundary layer heights, gave an estimated Atlanta daily WSOC production rate in August of 0.55 mg C m−2 h−1 between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. This study characterizes the regional nature of fine particles in the Southeastern US, confirming the importance of secondary organic

  5. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 measured by Dithiothreitol (DTT) and Ascorbic Acid (AA) assays in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Verma, V.; Bates, J. T.; Abrams, J.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through catalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and have recently developed a similar semi-automated system using the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed using both assays. We found that water-soluble DTT activity on a per air volume basis was more spatially uniform than water-soluble AA activity. DTT activity was higher in winter than in summer/fall, whereas AA activity was higher in summer/fall compared to winter, with highest levels near highly trafficked highways. DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species, whereas AA activity was correlated with water-soluble metals (especially water-soluble Cu, r=0.70-0.91 at most sites). Source apportionment models, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and a Chemical Mass Balance Method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metal mobilization by formation of an aqueous particle with secondary acids) and traffic emissions to both DTT and AA activities in urban Atlanta. Biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. DTT activity was well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r=0.49-0.86 across sites/seasons), while AA activity did not co-vary strongly with mass. A linear model was developed to estimate DTT and AA activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources that are statistically significant with positive

  6. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations between ascorbic acid (AA) and dithiothreitol (DTT) assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ting; Verma, Vishal; Bates, Josephine T.; Abrams, Joseph; Klein, Mitchel; Strickland, Matthew J.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Chang, Howard H.; Mulholland, James A.; Tolbert, Paige E.; Russell, Armistead G.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and report here the development of a similar semi-automated system for the ascorbic acid (AA) assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed for a host of aerosol species, along with AA and DTT activities. We present a detailed contrast in findings from these two assays. Water-soluble AA activity was higher in summer and fall than in winter, with highest levels near heavily trafficked highways, whereas DTT activity was higher in winter compared to summer and fall and more spatially homogeneous. AA activity was nearly exclusively correlated with water-soluble Cu (r = 0.70-0.94 at most sites), whereas DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species. Source apportionment models, positive matrix factorization (PMF) and a chemical mass balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E), suggest a strong contribution from traffic emissions and secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metals mobilization by secondary acids) to both AA and DTT activities in urban Atlanta. In contrast, biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. AA activity was not correlated with PM2.5 mass, while DTT activity co-varied strongly with mass (r = 0.49-0.86 across sites and seasons). Various linear models were developed to estimate AA and DTT activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources. The models were then used to estimate daily

  7. The Calibration and Characterization of Earth Remote Sensing and Environmental Monitoring Instruments. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James J.; Johnson, B. Carol; Barnes, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The use of remote sensing instruments on orbiting satellite platforms in the study of Earth Science and environmental monitoring was officially inaugurated with the April 1, 1960 launch of the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) [1]. The first TIROS accommodated two television cameras and operated for only 78 days. However, the TIROS program, in providing in excess of 22,000 pictures of the Earth, achieved its primary goal of providing Earth images from a satellite platform to aid in identifying and monitoring meteorological processes. This marked the beginning of what is now over four decades of Earth observations from satellite platforms. reflected and emitted radiation from the Earth using instruments on satellite platforms. These measurements are input to climate models, and the model results are analyzed in an effort to detect short and long-term changes and trends in the Earth's climate and environment, to identify the cause of those changes, and to predict or influence future changes. Examples of short-term climate change events include the periodic appearance of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the tropical Pacific Ocean [2] and the spectacular eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the Philippine island of Luzon in 1991. Examples of long term climate change events, which are more subtle to detect, include the destruction of coral reefs, the disappearance of glaciers, and global warming. Climatic variability can be both large and small scale and can be caused by natural or anthropogenic processes. The periodic El Nino event is an example of a natural process which induces significant climatic variability over a wide range of the Earth. A classic example of a large scale anthropogenic influence on climate is the well-documented rapid increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide occurring since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution [3]. An example of the study of a small-scale anthropogenic influence in climate variability is the Atlanta Land

  8. Reactive oxygen species associated with water-soluble PM2.5 in the southeastern United States: spatiotemporal trends and source apportionment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Verma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We assess the potential of the water-soluble fraction of atmospheric fine aerosols in the southeastern US to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS and identify major ROS-associated emission sources. ROS-generation potential of particles was quantified by the dithiothreitol (DTT assay and involved analysis of fine particulate matter (PM extracted from high-volume quartz filters (23 h integrated samples collected at various sites in different environmental settings in the southeast, including three urban Atlanta sites, in addition to a rural site. Paired sampling was conducted with one fixed site in Atlanta (Jefferson Street, representative of the urban environment, with the others rotating among different sites, for ~250 days between June 2012 and September 2013 (N = 483. A simple linear regression between the DTT activity and aerosol chemical components revealed strong associations between PM ROS generation potential and secondary organic aerosol (WSOC in summer, and biomass burning markers in winter. Redox-active metals were also correlated with the DTT activity, but mostly at urban and roadside sites. Positive matrix factorization (PMF was applied to apportion the relative contribution of various sources to the ROS generation potential of water-soluble PM2.5 in urban Atlanta. PMF showed that vehicular emissions contribute uniformly throughout the year (12 to 25%, while secondary oxidation processes dominated the DTT activity in summer (46% and biomass burning in winter (47%. Mineral dust was significant only during drier periods (~12% in summer and fall. Source apportionment by chemical mass balance (CMB was reasonably consistent with PMF, but with higher contribution from vehicular emissions (32%. Given the spatially large data set of PM sampled over an extended period, the study reconciles the results from previous work that showed only region- or season-specific aerosol components or sources contributing to PM ROS activity, possibly due to

  9. Oxidative potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 measured by Dithiothreitol (DTT and Ascorbic Acid (AA assays in the southeastern United States: contrasts in sources and health associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of certain components of particulate matter to induce oxidative stress through catalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in vivo may be one mechanism accounting for observed linkages between ambient aerosols and adverse health outcomes. A variety of assays have been used to measure this so-called aerosol oxidative potential. We developed a semi-automated system to quantify oxidative potential of filter aqueous extracts utilizing the dithiothreitol (DTT assay and have recently developed a similar semi-automated system using the ascorbic acid (AA assay. Approximately 500 PM2.5 filter samples collected in contrasting locations in the southeastern US were analyzed using both assays. We found that water-soluble DTT activity on a per air volume basis was more spatially uniform than water-soluble AA activity. DTT activity was higher in winter than in summer/fall, whereas AA activity was higher in summer/fall compared to winter, with highest levels near highly trafficked highways. DTT activity was correlated with organic and metal species, whereas AA activity was correlated with water-soluble metals (especially water-soluble Cu, r=0.70–0.91 at most sites. Source apportionment models, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF and a Chemical Mass Balance Method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles (CMB-E, suggest a strong contribution from secondary processes (e.g., organic aerosol oxidation or metal mobilization by formation of an aqueous particle with secondary acids and traffic emissions to both DTT and AA activities in urban Atlanta. Biomass burning was a large source for DTT activity, but insignificant for AA. DTT activity was well correlated with PM2.5 mass (r=0.49–0.86 across sites/seasons, while AA activity did not co-vary strongly with mass. A linear model was developed to estimate DTT and AA activities for the central Atlanta Jefferson Street site, based on the CMB-E sources that are statistically significant with

  10. Teaching to the test: A very large red herring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Phelps

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Elevating teaching-to-the-test to dogma, from the beginning with the distortion of Dr. Cannell’s findings, has served to divert attention from scandals that should have threatened US educators’ almost complete control of their own evaluation.[10] Had the scandal Dr. Cannell uncovered been portrayed honestly to the public—educators cheat on tests administered internally with lax security—the obvious solution would have been to externally manage all assessments (Oliphant, 2011. Recent test cheating scandals in Atlanta, Washington, DC, and elsewhere once again drew attention to a serious problem. But, instead of blaming lax security and internally managed test administration, most educators blamed the stakes and alleged undue pressure that ensues (Phelps 2011a. Their recommendation, as usual: drop the stakes and reduce the amount of testing. Never mind the ironies: they want oversight lifted so they may operate with none, and they admit that they cannot be trusted to administer tests to our children properly, but we should trust them to educate our children properly if we leave them alone. Perhaps the most profound factoids revealed by the more recent scandals were, first, that the cheating had continued for ten years in Atlanta before any responsible person attempted to stop it and, even then, it required authorities outside the education industry to report the situation honestly. Second, in both Atlanta and Washington, DC, education industry test security consultants repeatedly declared the systems free of wrongdoing (Phelps 2011b. Meanwhile, thirty years after J. J. Cannell first showed us how lax security leads to corrupted test scores, regardless the stakes, test security remains cavalierly loose. We have teachers administering state tests in their own classrooms to their own students, principals distributing and collecting test forms in their own schools. Security may be high outside the schoolhouse door, but inside, too much is left

  11. Dance therapy for individuals with Parkinson's disease: improving quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackney ME

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Madeleine E Hackney,1–3 Crystal G Bennett4,5 1Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Center of Excellence, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Birmingham-Atlanta VA Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Decatur, GA, USA; 3Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 4Department of Nursing, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, USA; 5Department of Adult and Elderly Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Parkinson's disease (PD affects mobility and health-related quality of life (HRQOL, through a neurodegenerative disease process. Drugs and pharmacology do not fully address motor, cognitive, and psychosocial symptoms; therefore, adjunctive therapies have been researched for their efficacy at addressing these issues. One form of exercise, dance, has received attention because recent studies have demonstrated dance's ability to improve mobility and HRQOL in people with PD. The purpose of this integrative review was to present evidence supporting or refuting improved HRQOL in individuals with PD after participation in a dance- or music-based movement intervention. Potential mechanisms of HRQOL improvement are offered. Search terms including "Parkinson's disease", "dance", "quality of life", "exercise", "dance/movement therapy", and "music" were entered in groupings into PubMed, CINAHL®, EMBASE™, PsycINFO®, Web of Science™, and the Cochrane Library databases. Papers were included if they were randomized controlled trials, pilot studies, or case reports that were related to HRQOL and dance/movement and/or specifically related to determining the mechanisms potentially underlying dance effects. To date, the available research has been inconclusive in demonstrating that dance has a positive impact on HRQOL; however, further research is required. This review suggests that, at the very least, dance has the potential to impact the

  12. Chemical PM2.5 Speciation in Major Cities Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Graydon; Weagle, Crystal; Brauer, Michael; Cohen, Aaron; Gibson, Mark; Liu, Yang; Martins, Vanderlei; Rudich, Yinon; Martin, Randall

    2016-04-01

    We examined the chemical composition of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) across 13 globally dispersed urban locations (including Atlanta, Buenos Aires, Beijing, Manila, and Dhaka), as part of the Surface PARTiculate mAtter Network (SPARTAN). At each site sampling was conducted over 4 to 24 months for the years 2013 to 2015. Analysis of filter samples revealed that several PM2.5 chemical components varied by more than an order of magnitude between sites. Ammonium sulfate ranged from 2 μg m-3 (Ilorin) to 17 μg m-3 (Kanpur). Ammonium nitrate ranged from 0.2 μg m-3 (Atlanta) to 6.7 μg m-3 (Kanpur). Effective black carbon ranged from 0.4 μg m-3 (Atlanta) to 5 μg m-3 (Dhaka and Kanpur). The all-site mean values of major PM2.5 constituents were ammonium sulfate (20 ± 10 %), crustal material (12 ± 6.5%), effective black carbon (10 ± 7.4 %), ammonium nitrate (3.7 ± 2.5%), sea salt (2.2 ± 1.5%), trace element oxides (0.9 ± 0.7 %), water (7.2 ± 3.0%) and residue materials (44 ± 24%). Based on the evaluation with collocated studies we treated residue material as mostly organic. Major ions generally agreed well with previous studies at the same urban locations (e.g. sulfate fractions agreed within 4% for eight out of 11 collocation comparisons). Enhanced crustal material (CM) concentrations with high Zn:Al ratios at large cities (e.g. Hanoi, Dhaka, Manila) imply significant anthropogenic CM contributions that deserve more attention. Detailed chemical speciation also aided our characterization of site-specific PM2.5 water retention. The expected water contribution to aerosols was calculated via the hygroscopicity parameter for each filter. Hourly PM2.5 at specified relative humidity (35%) was inferred from nephelometer measurements of light scatter at ambient relative humidity and 9-day filter measurements of PM2.5 mass. Our PM2.5 estimates compared favorably with a beta attenuation monitor (BAM) at the nearby US embassy in Beijing, with a coefficient of variation

  13. Replicating MISTERS: an epidemiological criminology framework analysis of a program for criminal justice-involved minority males in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Roberto Hugh; Akers, Timothy A; Bowman, Daniel Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Men in STD Training and Empowerment Research Study (MISTERS) program and epidemiological criminology began their development in Atlanta at about the same time. MISTERS focuses on men recently released from jail to reduce both HIV/STD and crime-related risk factors through a brief educational intervention. This article examines ways in which MISTERS and epidemiological criminology have been used to inform one another in the replication of the MISTERS program in Orange County, Florida. Data from 110 MISTERS participants during the first 10 months of operation are analyzed to examine the overlapping occurrence of health and criminal risk behaviors in the men's lives. This provides a test of core hypotheses from the epidemiological criminology framework. This article also examines application of the epidemiological criminology framework to develop interventions to address health and crime risk factors simultaneously in Criminal Justice-Involved populations in the community.

  14. "The food represents": Barbadian foodways in the diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tookes, Jennifer Sweeney

    2015-07-01

    As migrants adjust to life in a new country, food practices often shift. The literature shows that many migrants alter their diets to more closely reflect those in the host nation, at least in public venues. Some adjust native dishes to accommodate available ingredients, but may view these changes as rendering foods less "traditional." However, Barbadian transnational migrants in Atlanta experience these alterations differently. They consciously perform Barbadianness by electing to serve "traditional" foods when eating with each other, or sharing with an American audience. Yet, while numerous changes are made to these "traditional" dishes, this does not make them less authentic. These shifts do not alter the legitimacy of a dish, but rather this interaction between the available ingredients and the attempt to create a traditional food is actually a practice of authenticity. The dynamic change that food undergoes in the migrant experience echoes the changing nature of Barbadian foodways throughout Caribbean history. PMID:25733378

  15. A study in time: performance improvement to reduce excess holding time in PACU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, M

    2000-08-01

    The early 1990s saw prolonged patient stays in the PACU at St Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta, a 350-bed tertiary-care hospital. PACU discharge was delayed for various reasons: no room available, no receiving nurse, no help to transport patients, and prolonged recovery from anesthesia. These prolonged stays resulted in occasional backups in receiving patients from the OR, as well as having alert patients among arriving patients, unstable patients, and patients with nausea or pain. These delays were perceived to be stressful to the patient, their families, and to the staff. It was also expensive for the patient and costly in terms of nursing care. A multiyear, intermittent study was conducted to seek and implement solutions to this problem and evaluate the results. This article details these efforts and the resulting accomplishments.

  16. Textile Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2008-01-01

    The meeting of architecture and textiles is a continuous but too often forgotten story of intimate exchange. However, the 2nd Ventulett Symposium hosted by the College of Architecture, within Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, was one of these precious moments celebrating such a marriage....... Organized by Lars Spuybroeck, principal of Nox, Rotterdam, and current Thomas W. Ventulett III distinguished chair of Architectural Design, the event was embracing the textile tectonics as a core topic, praising textiles as the key component of architecture, relying on Gottfried Semper’s understanding...... of the discipline. Inspiring time gathering some of the most exciting architects of the moment, Lars Spuybroeck, Mark Burry, Evan Douglis, Michael Hensel and Cecil Balmond were invited to discuss their understanding of tectonics. Full text available at http://textilefutures.co.uk/exchange/bin/view/TextileFutures/TextileTectonics...

  17. Mapping U.S. long-haul truck drivers' multiplex networks and risk topography in inner-city neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil; Lemke, Michael Kenneth; Rothenberg, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    This article illustrates how urban inner-city trucking milieux may influence STI/BBI/HIV acquisition and transmission risks for U.S. long-haul truckers, as well as their social and risk relationships. Using mixed methods, we collected ethnoepidemiological and biological data from long-haul truck drivers and their risk contacts in inner-city trucking milieux in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. Key findings indicate that within the risk-endemic environment of distressed inner-city areas, diverse trucking risk milieux can amplify STI/BBI/HIV risk for multiplex networks of truckers. Inner-city neighborhood location, short geographic distance among risk contacts, and trucker concurrency can potentially exacerbate transmission via bridging higher-risk individuals with lower-risk populations at disparate geographic and epidemiological locations. PMID:25863181

  18. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiran; K; Busireddy; Mamdoh; AlObaidy; Miguel; Ramalho; Janaka; Kalubowila; Liu; Baodong; Ilaria; Santagostino; Richard; C; Semelka

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrastenhanced computed tomography(MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI.

  19. SCORING IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS: WHEN IMAGING IS APPROPRIATE?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucuteanu, B; Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi; Mihai, Cătălina; Dranga, Mihaela; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent presentation to the emergency departments with a rising incidence and a great variability in clinical severity and outcome. The aim of this review is to offer a succinct presentation on acute pancreatitis scoring systems and the use of different imaging methods in severity prediction: Ranson criteria, Glasgow criteria, Hong Kong Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), computed tomography scoring systems, Bedside Index of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) score, Panc 3, Japanese Severity Score (JSS), Harmless Acute Pancreatitis Score (HAPS), Pancreatitis Outcome Prediction (POP), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). This article also describes the Revised Atlanta Classification of AP (2012) and the correlation with computed tomography.

  20. 1995 Area 1 bird survey/Zone 1, Operable Unit 2, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    Robins Air Force Base is located in Warner Robins, Georgia, approximately 90 miles southeast of Atlanta, Georgia. As part of the Baseline Investigation (CDM Federal 1994) a two day bird survey was conducted by M. C. Wade (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and B.A. Beatty (CDM Federal Programs) in May 1995. The subject area of investigation includes the sludge lagoon, Landfill No. 4, and the wetland area east of the landfill and west of Hannah Road (including two ponds). This is known as Area 1. The Area 1 wetlands include bottomland hardwood forest, stream, and pond habitats. The objectives of this survey were to document bird species using the Area I wetlands and to see if the change in hydrology (due to the installation of the Sewage Treatment Plant effluent diversion and stormwater runon control systems) has resulted in changes at Area 1 since the previous survey of May 1992 (CDM Federal 1994).

  1. Endosonography guided management of pancreatic fluid collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Tang, Shou-Jiang;

    2015-01-01

    The revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was adopted by international consensus, and is based on actual local and systemic determinants of disease severity. The local determinant is pancreatic necrosis (sterile or infected), and the systemic determinant is organ failure. Local com...... methods or EUS. Finally, the authors propose an algorithm for managing fluid collections based on their size, location, associated symptoms, internal echogenic patterns, and content....... complications of pancreatitis can include acute peri-pancreatic fluid collection, acute necrotic collection, pseudocyst formation, and walled-off necrosis. Interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been increasing utilized in managing these local complications. After performing a PubMed search, the authors...... manually applied pre-defined inclusion criteria or a filter to identify publications relevant to EUS and pancreatic collections (PFCs). The authors then reviewed the utility, efficacy, and risks associated with using therapeutic EUS and involved EUS devices in treating PFCs. Due to the development...

  2. Systems Engineering Management Plan NASA Traffic Aware Planner Integration Into P-180 Airborne Test-Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) is a cockpit decision support tool that provides aircrew with vertical and lateral flight-path optimizations with the intent of achieving significant fuel and time savings, while automatically avoiding traffic, weather, and restricted airspace conflicts. A key step towards the maturation and deployment of TAP concerned its operational evaluation in a representative flight environment. This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) addresses the test-vehicle design, systems integration, and flight-test planning for the first TAP operational flight evaluations, which were successfully completed in November 2013. The trial outcomes are documented in the Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) flight evaluation paper presented at the 14th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration, and Operations Conference, Atlanta, GA. (AIAA-2014-2166, Maris, J. M., Haynes, M. A., Wing, D. J., Burke, K. A., Henderson, J., & Woods, S. E., 2014).

  3. Law of Urination: all mammals empty their bladders over the same duration

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Patricia J; Choo, Jerome; Hu, David L

    2013-01-01

    The urinary system evolved to eject fluids from the body body quickly and efficiently. Despite a long history of successful urology treatments in humans and animals, the physics of urination has received comparatively little attention. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate the hydrodynamics of urination across five orders of magnitude in animal mass, from mice to elephants. Using high-speed fluid dynamics videos and flow-rate measurement at Zoo Atlanta, we discover the "Law of Urination", which states animals empty their bladders over nearly constant duration of average 21 seconds (standard deviation 13 seconds), despite a difference in bladder volume from 100 mL to 100 L. This feat is made possible by the increasing urethra length of large animals which amplifies gravitational force and flow rate. We also demonstrate the challenges faced by the urinary system for rodents and other small mammals for which urine flow is limited to single drops. Our findings reveal the urethr...

  4. Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles marajoara (Diptera: Culicidae susceptibility to pyrethroids in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Kardec Ribeiro Galardo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of Anopheles darlingi Root (1926 and Anopheles marajoara Galvão & Damasceno (1942 to pyrethroids used by the National Malaria Control Program in Brazil. METHODS: Mosquitoes from Amapá, Brazilian Amazon, were assessed for resistance to cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and alpha-cypermethrin. Insecticide-impregnated bottles were used as suggested by the CDC/Atlanta. RESULTS: Diagnostic dose for Anopheles darlingi was 12.5µg/bottle during 30 min of exposure. Concentrations for Anopheles marajoara were 20µg/bottle of cypermethrin and deltamethrin and 12.5µg/bottle of alpha-cypermethrin. CONCLUSIONS : No resistance was recorded for Anopheles darlingi , but Anopheles marajoara requires attention.

  5. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enclosed are proceedings of the workshop on Internal Dosimetry held on Atlanta, Georgia in April 1992. The recommendations from the Workshop were considered by the CIRRPC Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research in identifying those areas to be undertaken by individual Federal Agencies or in cooperative efforts. This document presents summaries of the following sessions: A.1 Applications and limitations of ICRP and other metabolic models, A.2 Applications and implementation of proposed ICRP lung model, A.3 Estimates of intake from repetitive bioassay data, A.4 Chelation models for plutonium urinalysis data, B.1 Transuranium/uranium registry data, B.2 Autopsy tissue analysis, B.3 Bioassay / Whole body counting, B.4 Data base formatting and availability, C.1 An overview of calculational techniques in use today, C.2 The perfect code, C.3 Dose calculations based on individuals instead of averages, C.4 From macro dosimetry to micro dosimetry

  6. Knowledge and Attitudes in Alzheimer's Disease in a Cohort of Older African Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J Christina; Soyinka, Oretunlewa; Parker, Monica; Jarrett, Thomas L; Roberts, David L; Dorbin, Cornelya D; Hu, William T

    2016-06-01

    African American participation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research studies has been historically low. To determine whether older African Americans and Caucasians had different knowledge or attitudes related to AD, we administered the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS) to 67 older African Americans and 140 older caucasians in the greater Atlanta area as well as questions targeting locus of control over general health and AD risks. Older African Americans scored slightly lower on ADKS than older caucasians, with race only accounting for 1.57 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-2.61, P < .001) points of difference in a multivariate model. Attitudes toward AD were also similar between the 2 groups but 1 (35.7%) in 3 adults reported control over general health but not AD risks. In addition to enhancing education content in outreach efforts, there is an urgent need to address the perception that future AD risks are beyond one's own internal control. PMID:26646115

  7. "There's no-fresh air there": narratives of smoke exposure among residents of extended-stay hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Terri; Bryant, Lawrence Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Hotel environments have been identified as places where hospitality workers and patrons are at an increased risk for smoke exposure and associated health hazards. However, little research has been conducted to understand experiences of long-term hotel residents. This article presents narrative accounts of tobacco smoke exposure from 37 residents at extended-stay hotels in a large metropolitan Atlanta county. Residents' narratives included an awareness of smoking as an unhealthy habit but a shared activity that facilitates social engagement at the hotel. Secondhand smoke narratives included descriptions of exposure from roommates and hotel neighbors. Thirdhand smoke narratives included reports of persistent pollution and smoke residue in the hotel environment. These results suggest a need for further research to understand the extent and impact of tobacco smoke exposure among this understudied population. The implications of this research support the efforts of social workers to engage in clean air advocacy and policy making for a vulnerable population.

  8. Trends in neural tube defect prevalence, folic acid fortification, and vitamin supplement use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Richard S; Mulinare, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    In this review, the authors analyze international trends in rates of neural tube defects (NTDs) during the past three decades. Population-based data sources include the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program and other US birth defects surveillance programs in the National Birth Defects Prevention Network, the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems, and US and Canadian vital records. To analyze trends in vitamin consumption, we review data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys and international surveys of multivitamin use. We discuss the role of factors associated with historic and continuing declines in NTD rates in most countries. These factors include the introduction and increased utilization of prenatal diagnosis, recommendations for multivitamin use in women of childbearing age, and population-wide increases in blood folate levels that have occurred since food fortification was mandated. We also discuss research needs for further NTD prevention. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  9. How gender disparities drive imbalances in health care leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoss MAK

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mary Ann Keogh Hoss1, Paula Bobrowski2, Kathryn J McDonagh3, Nancy M Paris41Health Services Administration, Eastern Washington University, College of Business and Public Administration, Spokane, WA, USA; 2College of Liberal Arts, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA; 3Executive Relations, Hospira Inc, Lake Forest, IL, USA; 4Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: Low female representation in US hospital chief executive officer positions has persisted for decades. This article addresses gender disparity in professional development, the rationale for gender differences, and practical strategies to address this imbalance. The health care workforce consists of 75% women, but according to two recent surveys, ie, a state survey and a survey of the top 100 US hospitals, women hold only about 12% of chief executive officer positions in US hospitals. Significant and dedicated efforts by both individuals and organizations are necessary to rectify this imbalance.Keywords: gender, imbalance, leadership, United States, hospitals

  10. Implications of solar energy alternatives for community design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.; Steinitz, C.

    1980-06-01

    A graduate-level studio at the Harvard School of Design explored how a policy of solar-based energy independence will influence the design of a new community of approximately 4500 housing units and other uses. Three large sites outside Tucson (a cooling problem), Atlanta (a humidity problem), and Boston (a heating problem) were selected. Each is typical of its region. A single program was assumed and designed for. Each site had two teams, one following a compact approach and one following a more dispersed approach. Each was free to choose the most appropriate mix of (solar) technology and scale, and was free to integrate energy and community in the design as it saw fit. These choice and integration issues are key areas where our experience may be of interest to those involved in community design and solar energy.

  11. KSC-04PD-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Julian Earls (left), a school board member of Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, and Sarah Copelin-Wood (far left), chair of the Board of Education, sign a Memorandum of Understanding after a presentation by KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., astronaut Leland Melvin and Dr. Julian Earls, director of NASA Glenn Research Center. McNair is a NASA Explorer School (NES). Whitlow visited the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. He talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  12. KSC-04PD-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. talks to students at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School. He is visiting to the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Astronaut Leland Melvin(second from right) accompanied Whitlow, talking with students about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success. Also on the visit was Dr. Julian Earls (far right), director of NASA Glenn Research Center, who discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  13. KSC-04PD-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Two students at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta proudly display the banner identifying McNair as a NASA Explorer School. The students enjoyed a presentation earlier by KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., astronaut Leland Melvin and Dr. Julian Earls, director of NASA Glenn Research Center. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  14. KSC-04PD-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. (From left) Dr. Julian Earls, director of NASA Glenn Research Center, astronaut Leland Melvin, Sara Thompson, team lead, and KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. pose for a photo at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, after a presentation. Dr. Whitlow visited the school to share The vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  15. KSC-04PD-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Principal Albert Sye, astronaut Leland Melvin, Dr. Julian Earls and KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. share the stage at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School. Dr. Earls is director of the NASA Glenn Research Center. He joined Dr. Whitlow on a visit to the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  16. KSC-04PD-1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Dr. Julian Earls, director of the NASA Glenn Research Center, talks to students at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School. He accompanied KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., who is visiting to the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Astronaut Leland Melvin (far right) accompanied Whitlow, talking with students about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space.

  17. KSC-04PD-1877

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At University Community Academy in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School, KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. (fourth from right) and astronaut Leland Melvin (fifth from right) stand for a group photo with students and staff members. At far left is Jim Harris, principal of the school. Dr. Whitlow was visiting the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Also on the tour, Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  18. KSC-04PD-1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. From left, Sarah Copelin-Wood, chair of the Board of Education, astronaut Leland Melvin, Dr. Julian Earls, Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr. and a school board member pose for photos after a presentation to students at Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, a NASA Explorer School. Dr. Earls is director of NASA Glenn Research Center. During their visit to the school, Whitlow talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  19. The 1996 meeting of the national technical workgroup on mixed waste thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Technical Workgroup on Mixed Waste Thermal Treatment held its annual meeting in Atlanta Georgia on March 12-14, 1996. The National Technical Workgroup (NTW) and this meeting were sponsored under an interagency agreement between EPA and DOE. The 1996 Annual Meeting was hosted by US DOE Oak Ridge Operations in conjunction with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems - Center for Waste Management. A new feature of the annual meeting was the Permit Writer Panel Session which provided an opportunity for the state and federal permit writers to discuss issues and potential solutions to permitting mixed waste treatment systems. In addition, there was substantial discussion on the impacts of the Waste Combustion Performance Standards on mixed waste thermal treatment which are expected to proposed very soon. The 1996 meeting also focussed on two draft technical resource documents produced by NTW on Waste Analysis Plans and Compliance Test Procedures. Issues discussed included public involvement, waste characterization, and emission issues

  20. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings: Field Measurements and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wanyu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007-2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL).

  1. 亚瑟小子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强

    2004-01-01

    @@ Usher 歌手简介 Genre: Soul/R&B, Neo-Soul, Contemporary R&B Hometown: Atlanta, GA, US By the time he was upon the threshold of puberty,Usher already had a record deal and a gold album. By the time he graduated from high school, he'd established himself as one of the most visible artists in R&B. Armed with a soultul voice and impressive songwriting skills, Usher's songs vary from floor-rattling dance tracks to between-the-sheets ballads. Between 1994 and 2004, he released six albums, appeared in several films, earned multiple platinum plaques, and collaborated with a wide variety of top-shelf artists.

  2. Response of Stream Chemistry During Base Flow to Gradients of Urbanization in Selected Locations Across the Conterminous United States, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Lori A.; Harned, Douglas A.; Hall, David W.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Bauch, Nancy J.; Richards, Kevin D.

    2007-01-01

    During 2002-2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program conducted a study to determine the effects of urbanization on stream water quality and aquatic communities in six environmentally heterogeneous areas of the conterminous United States--Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Denver, Colorado; and Portland, Oregon. This report compares and contrasts the response of stream chemistry during base flow to urbanization in different environmental settings and examines the relation between the exceedance of water-quality benchmarks and the level of urbanization in these areas. Chemical characteristics studied included concentrations of nutrients, dissolved pesticides, suspended sediment, sulfate, and chloride in base flow. In three study areas where the background land cover in minimally urbanized basins was predominantly forested (Atlanta, Raleigh-Durham, and Portland), urban development was associated with increased concentrations of nitrogen and total herbicides in streams. In Portland, there was evidence of mixed agricultural and urban influences at sites with 20 to 50 percent urban land cover. In two study areas where agriculture was the predominant background land cover (Milwaukee-Green Bay and Dallas-Fort Worth), concentrations of nitrogen and herbicides were flat or decreasing as urbanization increased. In Denver, which had predominantly shrub/grass as background land cover, nitrogen concentrations were only weakly related to urbanization, and total herbicide concentrations did not show any clear pattern relative to land cover - perhaps because of extensive water management in the study area. In contrast, total insecticide concentrations increased with increasing urbanization in all six study areas, likely due to high use of insecticides in urban applications and, for some study areas, the proximity of urban land cover to the sampling sites. Phosphorus

  3. Second annual clean coal technology conference: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference was held at Atlanta, Georgia, September 7--9, 1993. The Conference, cosponsored by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), seeks to examine the status and role of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) and its projects. The Program is reviewed within the larger context of environmental needs, sustained economic growth, world markets, user performance requirements and supplier commercialization activities. This will be accomplished through in-depth review and discussion of factors affecting domestic and international markets for clean coal technology, the environmental considerations in commercial deployment, the current status of projects, and the timing and effectiveness of transfer of data from these projects to potential users, suppliers, financing entities, regulators, the interested environmental community and the public. Individual papers have been entered separately

  4. "The food represents": Barbadian foodways in the diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tookes, Jennifer Sweeney

    2015-07-01

    As migrants adjust to life in a new country, food practices often shift. The literature shows that many migrants alter their diets to more closely reflect those in the host nation, at least in public venues. Some adjust native dishes to accommodate available ingredients, but may view these changes as rendering foods less "traditional." However, Barbadian transnational migrants in Atlanta experience these alterations differently. They consciously perform Barbadianness by electing to serve "traditional" foods when eating with each other, or sharing with an American audience. Yet, while numerous changes are made to these "traditional" dishes, this does not make them less authentic. These shifts do not alter the legitimacy of a dish, but rather this interaction between the available ingredients and the attempt to create a traditional food is actually a practice of authenticity. The dynamic change that food undergoes in the migrant experience echoes the changing nature of Barbadian foodways throughout Caribbean history.

  5. Second annual clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-09

    The Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference was held at Atlanta, Georgia, September 7--9, 1993. The Conference, cosponsored by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), seeks to examine the status and role of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) and its projects. The Program is reviewed within the larger context of environmental needs, sustained economic growth, world markets, user performance requirements and supplier commercialization activities. This will be accomplished through in-depth review and discussion of factors affecting domestic and international markets for clean coal technology, the environmental considerations in commercial deployment, the current status of projects, and the timing and effectiveness of transfer of data from these projects to potential users, suppliers, financing entities, regulators, the interested environmental community and the public. Individual papers have been entered separately.

  6. Effectiveness of competitive activity of high class hockey players accounting a level of their self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhnov A.P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : study the effect of increasing the level of self-esteem on the efficiency of competitive activity of high class players. Material : the study involved sixteen athletes (Atlanta, Moscow region. - Continental Hockey League. Results : it was found that the application of special training self-esteem increases the level of implementation of technical and tactical action games. Number of goals increased by 8.92%, assists - 21.5%, the total number of shots on goal - to 20.02%. Conclusions : it is recommended specialized program correction level of self-esteem from 10 separate studies. Classes have different target setting: habit forming positive attitudes towards themselves, develop skills of active life position, securing high self-esteem. The program is used for two weeks in the preparatory period of training.

  7. Early phase of acute pancreatitis: Assessment and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veit; Phillip; Jrg; M; Steiner; Hana; Algül

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis(AP) is a potentially life-threatening disease with a wide spectrum of severity. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. According to the revised Atlanta classification system, AP can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Severe AP often takes a clinical course with two phases, an early and a late phase, which should both be considered separately. In this review article, we first discuss general aspects of AP, including incidence, pathophysiology, etiology, and grading of severity, then focus on the assessment of patients with suspected AP, including diagnosis and risk stratification, followed by the management of AP during the early phase, with special emphasis on fluid therapy, pain management, nutrition, and antibiotic prophylaxis.

  8. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-10

    Enclosed are proceedings of the workshop on Internal Dosimetry held on Atlanta, Georgia in April 1992. The recommendations from the Workshop were considered by the CIRRPC Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research in identifying those areas to be undertaken by individual Federal Agencies or in cooperative efforts. This document presents summaries of the following sessions: A.1 Applications and limitations of ICRP and other metabolic models, A.2 Applications and implementation of proposed ICRP lung model, A.3 Estimates of intake from repetitive bioassay data, A.4 Chelation models for plutonium urinalysis data, B.1 Transuranium/uranium registry data, B.2 Autopsy tissue analysis, B.3 Bioassay / Whole body counting, B.4 Data base formatting and availability, C.1 An overview of calculational techniques in use today, C.2 The perfect code, C.3 Dose calculations based on individuals instead of averages, C.4 From macro dosimetry to micro dosimetry.

  9. Handbook of international insurance between global dynamics and local contingencies

    CERN Document Server

    Venard, Bertrand

    2007-01-01

    THE HANDBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE Gordon Stewart, President, Insurance Information Institute, New York, USA "The globalization of insurance markets means that understanding both international developments and local trends around the world is now fundamental for insurance executives coping with today’s complex and competitive environment. By providing such a comprehensive picture of the world’s insurance markets, this unique and necessary book becomes an essential tool for anyone seeking to operate wisely and successfully. Richard D. Phillips, Professor and Chairman, Department of Risk Management and Insurance, Georgia State University, Atlanta, USA "Comprehensive surveys, written by international experts, provide in depth descriptions and discuss recent developments of the world’s major insurance markets. Each chapter contains essential insights for insurance executives and academic researchers interested in risk management and the globalization of insurance markets." Patrick Liedtke, Secretary Ge...

  10. Targeting mulitple dyslipidemias with fixed combinations – focus on extended release niacin and simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbu Pandian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Anbu Pandian1, Anjali Arora2, Laurence S Sperling1, Bobby V Khan11Emory University School of Medicine and Grady Memorial Hospital Vascular Research Atlanta, Georgia USA; 2Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Several pharmacological agents have been developed over the past 50 years which target various lipid components such as low density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol. Similar to other risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, the management of dyslipidemia can be complicated and may require combination therapy for effective treatment. This review discusses the biochemical mechanisms of action and clinical uses for simvastatin (the most widely available and commercially prescribed statin and niacin, and the combination of these agents in the management and treatment of dyslipidemia.Keywords: dyslipidemia, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, statin, niacin

  11. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  12. Realignment in the NHL, MLB, the NFL, and the NBA

    CERN Document Server

    Macdonald, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Sports leagues consist of conferences subdivided into divisions. Teams play a number of games within their divisions and fewer games against teams in different divisions and conferences. Usually, a league structure remains stable from one season to the next. However, structures change when growth or contraction occurs, and realignment of the four major professional sports leagues in North America has occurred more than twenty-five times since 1967. In this paper, we describe a method for realigning sports leagues that is flexible, adaptive, and that enables construction of schedules that minimize travel while satisfying other criteria. We do not build schedules; we develop league structures which support the subsequent construction of efficient schedules. Our initial focus is the NHL, which has an urgent need for realignment following the recent move of the Atlanta Thrashers to Winnipeg, but our methods can be adapted to virtually any situation. We examine a variety of scenarios for the NHL, and apply our met...

  13. Bronze Casting Sculptures in Commemoration of the 30th Anniversary of China-US Diplomatic Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Chunliang

    2010-01-01

    @@ The activity of peace and friendship sculptures to commemorate the 30th anniversary of China-US diplomatic relations,co-organized by the Beijing Returned Overseas Chinese Federation,Consolidated Society of Chinese University Alumni Associations(CSCUAA),the Association of Chinese Professionals in Atlanta(ACP),US-China Sculpture Friendship Center,was to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between China and the United States,to last peace and friendship between our two countries by means of arts,to advocate the values of our Chinese nation that peace is valuable and to express the sincere hopes and best wishes of our Chinese people for constructing the harmonic world.

  14. "There's no-fresh air there": narratives of smoke exposure among residents of extended-stay hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Terri; Bryant, Lawrence Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Hotel environments have been identified as places where hospitality workers and patrons are at an increased risk for smoke exposure and associated health hazards. However, little research has been conducted to understand experiences of long-term hotel residents. This article presents narrative accounts of tobacco smoke exposure from 37 residents at extended-stay hotels in a large metropolitan Atlanta county. Residents' narratives included an awareness of smoking as an unhealthy habit but a shared activity that facilitates social engagement at the hotel. Secondhand smoke narratives included descriptions of exposure from roommates and hotel neighbors. Thirdhand smoke narratives included reports of persistent pollution and smoke residue in the hotel environment. These results suggest a need for further research to understand the extent and impact of tobacco smoke exposure among this understudied population. The implications of this research support the efforts of social workers to engage in clean air advocacy and policy making for a vulnerable population. PMID:26027415

  15. Safety and acceptability of couples HIV testing and counseling for US men who have sex with men: a randomized prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick S; White, Darcy; Rosenberg, Eli S; Barnes, Jasper; Jones, Jeb; Dasgupta, Sharoda; O'Hara, Brandon; Scales, Lamont; Salazar, Laura F; Wingood, Gina; DiClemente, Ralph; Wall, Kristin M; Hoff, Colleen; Gratzer, Beau; Allen, Susan; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    We tested a couples HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) intervention with male couples in Atlanta by randomizing eligible couples to receive either CHTC or separate individual voluntary HIV counseling and testing (iVCT). To evaluate the acceptability and safety of CHTC, main outcomes were satisfaction with the intervention and the proportions of couples reporting intimate partner violence (IPV) and relationship dissolution after the service. The results indicated that the service was very acceptable to men (median 7-item index of satisfaction was 34 for CHTC and 35 for iVCT, P = .4). There was no difference in either incident IPV (22% versus 17% for CHTC and iVCT, respectively, P = .6) or relationship dissolution (42% versus 51% for CHTC and iVCT, respectively, P = .5). Based on the preliminary data, CHTC is safe for male couples, and it is equally acceptable to iVCT for men who have main partners.

  16. Serenbe Nest Cottages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Curtis, O. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kim, E. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Roberts, S. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Stephenson, R. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with Martin Dodson Builders and the Serenbe community on the construction of a new test home in the suburbs of Atlanta, GA, in the mixed humid climate zone. The most recent subdivision within the Serenbe community, the Nest, will contain 15 small footprint cottage-style homes, and Southface has selected Lot Nine, as the test home for this study. This Nest subdivision serves as a project showcase for both the builder partner and the Serenbe community as a whole. The planning and design incorporated into the Nest cottages will be implemented in each home within the subdivision. These homes addresses Building America savings targets and serve as a basis of design for other homes Martin Dodson plans to build within the Serenbe community.

  17. Serenbe Nest Cottages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T.; Curtis, O.; Kim, E.; Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with Martin Dodson Builders and the Serenbe community on the construction of a new test home in the suburbs of Atlanta, GA in the mixed humid climate zone. The most recent subdivision within the Serenbe community, the Nest, will contain 15 small footprint cottage style homes, and Southface has selected Lot Nine, as the test home for this study. This Nest subdivision serves as a project showcase for both the builder partner and the Serenbe community as a whole. The planning and design incorporated into the Nest cottages will be implemented in each home within the subdivision. These homes addresses Building America Savings targets and serve as a basis of design for other homes Martin Dodson plans to build within the Serenbe community.

  18. The Importance of Standard Definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jose Morera-Ocon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir: Sanjay et al. [1] assessed compliance with the revised guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis published by the work group of the British Society of Gastroenterology in 2005 [2]. This article is valuable in reminding us of the standards of care in this disease but there are some points which may require comments and questions. First, a distinction between severe acute pancreatitis, defined by the presence of complications, and predicted severe acute pancreatitis as determined by multiple score systems should be encouraged. The recommendation of the guidelines for the definition of severity is that the Atlanta criteria should be used. Nevertheless, the authors use C-reactive protein level, Glasgow score and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score to determine the severity and, based on these, 46% of their patients had severe pancreatitis and 54% had mild pancreatitis. Those results are far from those published regarding severity distribution in acute pancreatitis [2].

  19. A simple model for predicting sprint-race times accounting for energy loss on the curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureika, J. R.

    1997-11-01

    The mathematical model of J. Keller for predicting World Record race times, based on a simple differential equation of motion, predicted quite well the records of the day. One of its shortcoming is that it neglects to account for a sprinter's energy loss around a curve, a most important consideration particularly in the 200m--400m. An extension to Keller's work is considered, modeling the aforementioned energy loss as a simple function of the centrifugal force acting on the runner around the curve. Theoretical World Record performances for indoor and outdoor 200m are discussed, and the use of the model at 300m is investigated. Some predictions are made for possible 200m outdoor and indoor times as run by Canadian 100m WR holder Donovan Bailey, based on his 100m final performance at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

  20. A Simple Model for Predicting Sprint Race Times Accounting for Energy Loss on the Curve

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical model of J. Keller for predicting World Record race times, based on a simple differential equation of motion, predicted quite well the records of the day. One of its shortcoming is that it neglects to account for a sprinter's energy loss around a curve, a most important consideration particularly in the 200m--400m. An extension to Keller's work is considered, modeling the aforementioned energy loss as a simple function of the centrifugal force acting on the runner around the curve. Theoretical World Record performances for indoor and outdoor 200m are discussed, and the use of the model at 300m is investigated. Some predictions are made for possible 200m outdoor and indoor times as run by Canadian 100m WR holder Donovan Bailey, based on his 100m final performance at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

  1. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It has various clinical aspects, ranging from a mild form which is easily treated, to a severe form that causes complications leading to mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease has not been fully elucidated and several theories have been suggested. New scoring systems and laboratory methods such as proteomics have been suggested for both diagnosis and to predict disease severity, and research on these topics is still in progress. Novel therapeutic approaches with technological developments such as ERCP, ES, MRCP, and EUS are also suggested.

  2. Patient acceptability of the Tecnis® multifocal intraocular lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Sood1, Maria A Woodward21Emory Eye Center, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Cataract surgery has evolved. The goal of the surgeon includes both restoration of vision and refinement of vision. Patients' desire for spectacle independence has driven the market for presbyopia-correcting cataract surgery and development of novel intraocular lens (IOL designs. The Tecnis® Multifocal Intraocular Lens incorporates an aspheric, modified anterior prolate IOL with a diffractive multifocal lens design. The design aims to minimize spherical aberration and improve range of focus. The purpose of this review is to assess patient acceptability of the Tecnis® multifocal intraocular lens.Keywords: Tecnis®, intraocular lens, multifocal, presbyopia 

  3. Genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates determined by EcoRI restriction fragment length polymorphism of heat-shock protein 70 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, John C; de Mestral, Jacqueline; Stiles, Jonathan K; Secor, W Evan; Finley, Richard W; Cleary, John D; Lushbaugh, William B

    2009-02-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis using a multilocus heat-inducible cytoplasmic heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) hybridization probe with EcoRI-digested genomic DNA was used in molecular typing of 129 Trichomonas vaginalis isolates. Results indicate that Trichomonas organisms exhibit considerable polymorphism in their Hsp70 RFLP patterns. Analysis of seven American Type Culture Collection reference strains and 122 clinical isolates, including 84 isolates from Jackson, Mississippi, 18 isolates from Atlanta, Georgia, and 20 isolates from throughout the United States, showed 105 distinct Hsp70 RFLP pattern subtypes for Trichomonas. Phylogenetic analysis of the Hsp70 RFLP data showed that the T. vaginalis isolates were organized into two clonal lineages. These results illustrate the substantial genomic diversity present in T. vaginalis and indicate that a large number of genetically distinct Trichomonas isolates may be responsible for human trichomoniasis in the United States. PMID:19190222

  4. Human dynamics revealed through Web analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Ramasco, José J.

    2008-08-01

    The increasing ubiquity of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using the Web to better observe, understand, and monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Web sites with large numbers of frequently returning users are ideal for this task. If these sites belong to companies or universities, their usage patterns can furnish information about the working habits of entire populations. In this work, we analyze the properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University’s Web site. Emory is a medium-sized university located in Atlanta, Georgia. We find interesting structure in the activity patterns of the domain and study in a systematic way the main forces behind the dynamics of the traffic. In particular, we find that linear preferential linking, priority-based queuing, and the decay of interest for the contents of the pages are the essential ingredients to understand the way users navigate the Web.

  5. ANÁLISIS Y PROPUESTAS DE MEJORA DE UNA EMPRESA VALENCIANA DEL SECTOR DE LAS BEBIDAS NO ALCOHÓLICAS BAJO LA CONCESIÓN DE LAS MARCAS DE COCA-COLA CO.

    OpenAIRE

    FLOR SERRANO, CRISTINA

    2013-01-01

    El presente trabajo consiste en la realización de un análisis global de la empresa Compañía Levantina de Bebidas Gaseosas, S.A. y, a partir de los resultados de este análisis, proponer medidas cuya finalidad será la mejora de la empresa. Compañía Levantina de Bebidas Gaseosas, S.A., en adelante la Sociedad, se constituyó en Valencia en 1954 y se dedica a la fabricación y distribución de bebidas refrescantes, bajo concesión de las marcas de The Coca- Cola Co. (Atlanta, U.S...

  6. Human ocular Thelaziasis in Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar S Krishnachary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thelaziasis is an Arthropod-born disease of the eye and adnexa caused by Thelazia callipaeda, a nematode parasite transmitted by drosophilid flies to carnivores and humans. Because of its distribution mainly confined to South Asian countries and Russia, it is commonly known as Oriental Eye worm. It is often under-reported and not been given its due clinical importance. We report first case of human Thelaziasis from Hassan District, Karnataka. Five creamy-white, translucent worms were removed from the conjunctival sac of a 74-year-old male patient. Based on morphological characters, the worms were identified as nematodes belonging to the genus Thelazia and speciation was confirmed by CDC, Atlanta as callipaeda. Rarity of the disease and its ability to cause both extra and intraocular manifestations leading to ocular morbidity is the reason for presenting this case. From the available data, this is the first case report from Karnataka, India.

  7. Ebola… How far away are we?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hollywood adores an infectious disease film. One of the most shocking was the 1995 film “Outbreak”, in which Dustin Hoffman and Rene Russo worked to stop a fictional virus similar to Ebola. In the movie the virus is introduced from Africa to the US by a monkey. In another film, “28 Days Later,” a virus from experimental monkeys infects humans in London. Several additional films about the human fear of “killer viruses” have been released. A real-life scare to the US and the western world came when two American Ebola patients were recently transported from West Africa to an Atlanta hospital for treatment. Currently, there is a pervasive public fear of the dissemination of Ebola in the US and the rest of the world.

  8. Selected papers in the hydrologic sciences, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subitzky, Seymour

    1986-01-01

    West Point Reservoir is a multiple-purpose project on the Chattahoochee River about 112 river kilometers downstream from Atlanta on the Alabama-Georgia border. Urbanization has placed large demands on the Chattahoochee River, and water quality below Atlanta was degraded even before impoundment. Water-quality, bottom-sediment, and fish-tissue samples were collected from the reservoir to determine whether water-quality problems have occurred subsequent to impoundment. Severe hypolimnetic oxygen deficiency occurred in the reservoir following thermal stratification in the spring of 1978 and 1979. During stratified periods, concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese in the hypolimnion at the dam pool ranged from 0 to 7,700 and 30 to 2,000 micrograms per liter, respectively. During thermally stratified periods, phytoplankton standing crops in the upper lentic section of the reservoir ranged from 39,000 to 670,000 cells per milliliter. A maximum algal growth potential value (U.S. Geological Survey method) of 48.0 milligrams per liter was obtained at the uppermost data-collection station. The primary growth-limiting nutrients were nitrogen in the Iotic section and phosphorus in the lentic section. The highest measured concentrations of volatile solids and total iron, manganese, phosphorus, and organic carbon in sediments occurred in the lentic section of the reservoir, where bottom sediments consist mainly of silt and clay. Polychlorinated biphenyls and chlordane concentrations in the bottom sediments were as high as 740 and 210 micrograms per kilogram, respectively. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlordane in fish tissue ranged from 19 to 3,800 and 6.0 to 280 micrograms per kilogram, respectively.

  9. Approaches to hepatitis C treatment and cure using NS5A inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohler JJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available James J Kohler,1,2 James H Nettles,1,2 Franck Amblard,1,2 Selwyn J Hurwitz,1,2 Leda Bassit,1,2 Richard A Stanton,1 Maryam Ehteshami,1 Raymond F Schinazi1,2 1Center for AIDS Research and Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA Abstract: Recent progress in the understanding of hepatitis C virus (HCV biology and the availability of in vitro models to study its replication have facilitated the development of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs that target specific steps in the viral replication cycle. Currently, there are three major classes of DAA in clinical development: NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B polymerase inhibitors, and NS5A directed inhibitors. Several compounds thought to bind directly with NS5A are now in various clinical trial phases, including the most advanced, daclatasvir (BMS-790052, ledipasvir (GS-5885, and ABT-267. While many NS5A-targeted compounds demonstrate picomolar potency, the exact mechanism(s of their action is still unclear. In the clinic, NS5A HCV inhibitors show promise as important components in DAA regimens and have multifunctionality. In addition to inhibiting viral replication, they may synergize with other DAAs, possibly by modulating different viral proteins, to help suppress the emergence of resistant viruses. Structure-based models have identified target interaction domains and spatial interactions that explain drug resistance for mutations at specific positions (eg, residues 93 and 31 within NS5A and potential binding partners. This review provides, insights into the unique complexity of NS5A as a central platform for multiple viral/host protein interactions, and possible mechanism(s for the NS5A inhibitors currently undergoing clinical trials that target this nonstructural viral protein. Keywords: HCV replication complex, direct acting antivirals (DAAs, clinical trials

  10. Understanding racial HIV/STI disparities in black and white men who have sex with men: a multilevel approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S Sullivan

    Full Text Available The reasons for black/white disparities in HIV epidemics among men who have sex with men have puzzled researchers for decades. Understanding reasons for these disparities requires looking beyond individual-level behavioral risk to a more comprehensive framework.From July 2010-December 2012, 803 men (454 black, 349 white were recruited through venue-based and online sampling; consenting men were provided HIV and STI testing, completed a behavioral survey and a sex partner inventory, and provided place of residence for geocoding. HIV prevalence was higher among black (43% versus white (13% MSM (prevalence ratio (PR 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.5-4.4. Among HIV-positive men, the median CD4 count was significantly lower for black (490 cells/µL than white (577 cells/µL MSM; there was no difference in the HIV RNA viral load by race. Black men were younger, more likely to be bisexual and unemployed, had less educational attainment, and reported fewer male sex partners, fewer unprotected anal sex partners, and less non-injection drug use. Black MSM were significantly more likely than white MSM to have rectal chlamydia and gonorrhea, were more likely to have racially concordant partnerships, more likely to have casual (one-time partners, and less likely to discuss serostatus with partners. The census tracts where black MSM lived had higher rates of poverty and unemployment, and lower median income. They also had lower proportions of male-male households, lower male to female sex ratios, and lower HIV diagnosis rates.Among black and white MSM in Atlanta, disparities in HIV and STI prevalence by race are comparable to those observed nationally. We identified differences between black and white MSM at the individual, dyadic/sexual network, and community levels. The reasons for black/white disparities in HIV prevalence in Atlanta are complex, and will likely require a multilevel framework to understand comprehensively.

  11. Correlations Between Textures and Infrared Spectra of the Martian Surface in Valles Marineris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, S. J.; Wray, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    RALSTON, S. J., School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, sralston3@gatech.edu, WRAY, James, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, jwray@eas.gatech.edu In the past few decades, a wealth of information has become available on the appearance and composition of the Martian surface. While some previous research has examined possible correlations between certain surface features and mineralogy (such as the hypothesized connection between Recurring Slope Lineae and perchlorate salts), little has yet been done to determine possible correlations between mineralogy and texture in less extraordinary circumstances. In this project, one hundred images taken from across the Valles Marineris region were examined both in infrared (obtained from the CRISM instrument aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) and in visible-light images from the HiRISE camera. Spectra were obtained from regions of interest, focusing mainly on the identification of monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates. Other materials were included in the imaging, including phyllosilicate clays, gypsum, and jarosite, although those materials proved less abundant than the sulfates. The areas from which the spectra were taken were then examined in visible-light wavelengths using HiRISE images to determine textural qualities. The focus of this research was on two particular textures, a 'reticulated' texture and a 'stepped texture,' hypothesized to correlate to monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfates, respectively. Results showed that over 55% of areas containing monohydrated sulfates also contained reticulate texture, whereas areas that contained other materials, such as polyhydrated sulfates and clays, had only a 2-8% correlation with reticulate texture. The stepped texture was shown to have no significant correlation to any one material, although other texture/mineral pairs did

  12. The Second Annual Primary Care Conference--Programming to eliminate health disparities among ethnic minority populations: an introduction to proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Michael; Blumenthal, Daniel S; Rust, George; Dubois, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    From October 31, 2002 through November 2, 2002, the Second Annual Primary Care Conference was held, sponsored by the Morehouse School of Medicine's National Center for Primary Care and its Prevention Research Center. The conference was designed as a collaborative activity with the Atlanta Regional Health Forum; The Carter Center; Emory University's School of Medicine, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, and Rollins School of Public Health; Georgia Chapter of the American College of Physicians/American Society of Internal Medicine; Georgia Nurses Foundation; Southeastern Primary Care Consortium, Inc./Atlanta Area Health Education Center; St. Joseph's Mercy Care Services; United States Department of Health and Human Services: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Health and Human Services (Region IV); Health Resources and Services Administration; Office of Minority Health (Region IV); and Office on Women's Health (Region IV). The 2 and a half-day conference featured 5 plenary sessions and 3 tracks of medical education for primary care physicians and other healthcare providers. The tracks were categorized as: Track A: Adult Health; Track B: Public Health and Prevention; and Track C: Maternal/Child/Youth Health. Within each track, 6 working sessions were presented on topic areas including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental health, infectious disease, behavioral and social health, women's health, stroke, and asthma. A total of 18 working sessions took place and each working session included 3 presentations. Continuing medical education credits or continuing education units were granted to participants. In all, 485 individuals participated in the conference, with the majority of the participants from the southeastern United States. Of the attendees, 35% were physicians (MD); 13% were nurses (RN); 12% held master-level degrees; and 12% held other doctorate-level degrees.

  13. Optimizing the time of doxil injection to increase the drug retention in transplanted murine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojin You

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Shaojin You, Lian Zuo, Wei LiExperimental Cancer Therapeutic Laboratory and Histopathology Core, Atlanta Research and Educational Foundation (151F, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USAAbstract: Sex hormonal milieus during the female fertility cycle modulate the tumor vascular permeability of breast cancer. It has been proposed that the liposomal formulated doxorubicin (ie, Doxil, given at the menstrual/estrous stage with the predicted highest tumor vascular permeability, allows significantly increased drug retention in the breast tumor. In the current study, syngeneic murine 4T1 mammary tumors were established on the backs of female BALB/c mice and Doxil was administered at particular mouse estrous cycle stages. The results indicated that Doxil administration during certain times in the mouse estrous cycle was crucial for drug retention in 4T1 tumor tissues. Significantly higher drug concentrations were detected in the tumor tissues when Doxil was administered during the diestrus stage, as compared to when the drug injection was given at all other estrous stages. Our study also showed that the tumor-bearing mice exhibited nearly normal rhythmicity of the estrous cycle post drug injection, indicating the feasibility of continual injection of Doxil at the same estrous cycle stage. By using 4T1 cells cultured in vitro, we showed that progesterone (P4 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and the production of six tumor-derived cytokines, eg, sTNF-RI, CXCL-16, GM-CSF, MIP-1α, MIP-1γ, and Flt3-L. Some of these factors have been shown to be vascular modulators in diverse tissues. In this report, we demonstrated that the concentration of P4 in the plasma and/or estrous cycle stage of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice can be used to select the best time for administrating the liposomal anticancer drugs.Keywords: progesterone, menstrual cycle, mouse mammary tumor, Doxil, breast cancer therapy

  14. Screening for Elder Mistreatment among Older Adults Seeking Legal Assistance Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl M Strasser

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aging population is a rapidly growing demographic in the United States. Isolation, limited autonomy, and declining physical and mental health render many older adults vulnerable to elder mistreatment (EM. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of EM among a sample of older adults using legal assistance services in Atlanta, Georgia.Methods: Researchers administered surveys to consenting older adults (aged 60þ in 5 metro Atlanta community centers that hosted legal assistance information sessions as part of the Elderly Legal Assistance Program. The surveys screened for risk factors and prevalence of EM risk using valid and reliable measures and included additional questions regarding demographics characteristics and healthcare use behaviors.Results: Surveys were completed by 112 participants. Findings reveal that 32 (28.6% respondents met the criteria for elder abuse / neglect risk; 17 (15.2% respondents met criteria for depression; and 105 (93.7% had visited a healthcare provider during the past 6 months.Conclusion: The rates of EM risk in this sample were higher than those previously reported in research. Findings support continued examination of unique risks that may be present among older adults who may be possibly facing legal issues. Additionally, the reported frequency of healthcare visits among participants reveals a promising opportunity to examine development of a more widespread EM screening approach to be conducted in non-emergency settings. Interdisciplinary collaboration is required to inform screening approaches that account for complexities that EM cases present. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:309–315.

  15. Measured Whole-House Performance of TaC Studios Test Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T. [Southface Energy Institute, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Curtis, O. [Southface Energy Institute, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Stephenson, R. [Southface Energy Institute, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2013-12-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta-based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA, in the mixed humid climate. This home serves as a residence and home office for the firm's owners, as well as a demonstration of their design approach to potential and current clients. Southface believes the home demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low density spray foam insulation, glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements, and a high performance heating and cooling system. Construction quality and execution was a high priority for TaC Studios and was ensured by a third party review process. Post-construction testing showed that the project met stated goals for envelope performance, an air infiltration rate of 2.15 ACH50. The homeowners wished to further validate whole house energy savings through the project's involvement with Building America and this long-term monitoring effort. As a Building America test home, this home was evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and the efficiency and operation of the ground source heat pump and associated systems. Given that the home includes many non-typical end use loads including a home office, pool, landscape water feature, and other luxury features not accounted for in Building America modeling tools, these end uses were separately monitored to determine their impact on overall energy consumption.

  16. Measured Whole-House Performance of TaC Studios Test Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, T. [Partnership for Home Innovation (PHI), Upper Marlboro, MD (United States). Southface Energy Inst.; Curtis, O. [Partnership for Home Innovation (PHI), Upper Marlboro, MD (United States). Southface Energy Inst.; Stephenson, R. [Partnership for Home Innovation (PHI), Upper Marlboro, MD (United States). Southface Energy Inst.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta-based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA in the mixed humid climate. This home serves as a residence and home office for the firm's owners, as well as a demonstration of their design approach topotential and current clients. Southface believes the home demonstrates current best practices for the mixed-humid climate, including a building envelope featuring advanced air sealing details and low density spray foam insulation, glazing that exceeds ENERGY STAR requirements, and a high performance heating and cooling system. Construction quality and execution was a high priority for TaCStudios and was ensured by a third party review process. Post-construction testing showed that the project met stated goals for envelope performance, an air infiltration rate of 2.15 ACH50. The homeowners wished to further validate whole house energy savings through the project's involvement with Building America and this long-term monitoring effort. As a Building America test home, this homewas evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and the efficiency and operation of the ground source heat pump and associated systems. Given that the home includes many non-typical end use loads including a home office, pool, landscape water feature, and other luxury features not accounted for in Building America modeling tools, these end uses were separately monitored todetermine their impact on overall energy consumption.

  17. Managing Air in Olympic Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing W. Tian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century Olympic Agenda aims to align itself with the concept of sustainable development and has driven improved environmental quality in host cities, such as the Green Games in Sydney 2000 and the planned Beijing 2008 Games and in London 2012 as the Low Carbon Games. Air quality has long been a concern of Olympic mega-cities, although the air quality plans and strategies have often seemed short-lived and unsustainable in the long term. We have explored air quality data and air pollution control from seven Olympic cities: Mexico City, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Sydney and Athens and also Beijing and London which will host Olympic Games in near future. The study shows that despite a high altitude and air pollution problems, Mexico City had no clear environmental policy in place for the 1968 games. The characteristic smog of Los Angeles raised concerns about athletic performance at the Olympic Games of 1984, but there were limited efforts to tackle the ozone concentration during these games. The 1996 Atlanta Games represents a case where temporary public transport changes were used as a tactic to reduce air pollution. In Sydney a well planned sustainable strategy reduced air pollutants and CO2 emissions in 2000, but Athens' long efforts to improve air quality for the 2004 games were not wholly effective. Even where strategies proved successful the improvements in air quality seem short-lived. Current host cities Beijing and London are developing emission reduction plans. These have clear air quality objectives and are well intentioned. However, the improvements may be too narrow and may not be sustainable in the long term. Our analysis looks at the origins of success and failure and how more coherent improvements might be achieved and what would promote sustainable plans for air quality management at future games. The study illustrates the feedback between air pollution science and policy awareness.

  18. Barriers to cervical cancer screening in Mulanje, Malawi: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria K Fort

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Victoria K Fort1, Mary Sue Makin2, Aaron J Siegler1, Kevin Ault3, Roger Rochat11Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 2Mulanje Mission Hospital, Mulanje, Malawi; 3Emory University Medical School, Atlanta, Georgia, USABackground: In Malawi, cervical cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer among women, with an 80% mortality rate. The Mulanje Mission Hospital has offered free cervical cancer screening for eight years; however, patients primarily seek medical help for gynecologic complaints after the disease is inoperable.Methods: We investigated how women in rural Malawi make health-seeking decisions regarding cervical cancer screening using qualitative research methods. The study was conducted between May and August of 2009 in Mulanje, Malawi.Results: This study found that the primary cue to action for cervical cancer screening was symptoms of cervical cancer. Major barriers to seeking preventative screening included low knowledge levels, low perceived susceptibility and low perceived benefits from the service. Study participants did not view cervical cancer screening as critical health care. Interviews suggested that use of the service could increase if women are recruited while visiting the hospital for a different service.Conclusion: This study recommends that health care providers and health educators target aspects of perceived susceptibility among their patients, including knowledge levels and personal risk assessment. We believe that continued support and advertisement of cervical cancer screening programs along with innovative recruitment strategies will increase usage density and decrease unnecessary deaths from cervical cancer in Malawi.Keywords: cervical cancer, interviews, health care, Mulanje Mission Hospital

  19. The response of hydrophobic organics and potential toxicity in streams to urbanization of watersheds in six metropolitan areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, W.L.; Goodbred, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in streams along a gradient of urban land-use intensity in and around six metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh - Durham, North Carolina; and Denver - Fort Collins, Colorado, in 2003; and Dallas - Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee - Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Portland, Oregon, in 2004 to examine relations between percent urban land cover in watersheds and the occurrence, concentrations, and potential toxicity of hydrophobic compounds. Of the 142 endpoints measured in SPMD dialysates, 30 were significantly (alpha = 0.05) related to the percent of urban land cover in the watersheds in at least one metropolitan area. These 30 endpoints included the aggregated measures of the total number of compounds detected and relative toxicity (Microtox?? and P450RGS assays), in addition to the concentrations of 27 individual hydrophobic compounds. The number of compounds detected, P450RGS assay values, and the concentrations of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were significantly related to percent urban land cover in all six metropolitan areas. Pentachloroanisole, the most frequently detected compound, was significantly related to urban land cover in all metropolitan areas except Dallas - Fort Worth. Petrogenic PAHs and dibenzofurans were positively related to percent urban land cover in Atlanta, Raleigh - Durham, Denver, and Milwaukee - Green Bay. Results for other endpoints were much more variable. The number of endpoints significantly related to urban land cover ranged from 6 in Portland to 21 Raleigh-Durham. Based on differences in the number and suite of endpoints related to urban intensity, these results provide evidence of differences in factors governing source strength, transport, and/or fate of hydrophobic compounds in the six metropolitan areas studied. The most consistent and significant results were that bioavailable, aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists increase in streams as basins become

  20. Test of an improved gas engine-driven heat pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Domitrovic, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new generation of natural gas engine-driven heat pump (GEHP) was introduced to the marketplace recently. While the units installed have performed exceptionally well and earned rave reviews for comfort and savings on utility bills, the higher initial cost and relatively long payback time have affected the wide commercialization of this advanced technology. According to a study done for the southeastern US in the Atlanta metropolitan area, the annual operating cost of the GEHP is less than that of a baseline system consisting of a 92% efficiency gas furnace and a SEER 12 air conditioner. The estimated payback time is around 10 years to cover the difference in initial equipment price between the new and the baseline system. It has been projected that a liquid overfeed (LOF) recuperative cycle concept can simplify the hardware design of a GEHP, resulting in reduced cost and improved performance. Laboratory tests have shown that LOF would improve the energy efficiency of a vapor compression unit by 10%. In addition, LOF will reduce the compressor pressure ratio and thereby improve equipment reliability. Based on the assumed performance improvements and cost reduction, a simple payback calculation indicates LOF can reduce the payback time for an improved GEHP considerably in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Laboratory testing of an improved GEHP has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper reports on the equipment design modifications required to implement LOF and the results of performance tests at steady-state conditions. The preliminary cooling test results have indicated that the LOF in conjunction with orifice-type expander can be applied to GEHP for cost and performance enhancements. The improvements in energy efficiency will be dependent upon several controlling parameters including the proper refrigeration charge, the selected ambient temperature, and the system operating condition.

  1. The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV serodiscordance among male couples presenting for HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Wall, Kristin M; O'Hara, Brandon; Jones, Jeb; Barnes, Jasper; DiClemente, Ralph; Hoff, Colleen; Scales, Lamont; Salazar, Laura F; Sanchez, Travis; White, Darcy; Wingood, Gina; Allen, Susan; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, a substantial proportion of HIV transmissions among men who have sex with men (MSM) arise from main sex partners. Couples voluntary HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) is used in many parts of the world with male-female couples, but CHTC has historically not been available in the U.S. and few data exist about the extent of HIV serodiscordance among U.S. male couples. We tested partners in 95 Atlanta male couples (190 men) for HIV. Eligible men were in a relationship for ≥3 months and were not known to be HIV-positive. We calculated the prevalence of couples that were seroconcordant HIV-negative, seroconcordant HIV-positive, or HIV serodiscordant. We evaluated differences in the prevalence of HIV serodiscordance by several dyadic characteristics (e.g., duration of relationship, sexual agreements, and history of anal intercourse in the relationship). Overall, among 190 men tested for HIV, 11 % (n = 20) were newly identified as HIV-positive. Among the 95 couples, 81 % (n = 77) were concordant HIV-negative, 17 % (n = 16) were HIV serodiscordant, and 2 % (n = 2) were concordant HIV-positive. Serodiscordance was not significantly associated with any evaluated dyadic characteristic. The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV serodiscordance among male couples in Atlanta is high. Offering testing to male couples may attract men with a high HIV seropositivity rate to utilize testing services. Based on the global evidence base for CHTC with heterosexual couples and the current evidence of substantial undiagnosed HIV serodiscordance among U.S. MSM, we recommend scale-up of CHTC services for MSM, with ongoing evaluation of acceptability and couples' serostatus outcomes.

  2. Heat Shock Factor-1 and Nuclear Factor-kappaB Are Systemically Activated in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A O’Reilly

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Context :Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkappaB is a transcription factor for a wide range of proinflammatory mediators while heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1 transcribes stress proteins that protect against cellular damage. Both are attractive therapeutic targets, undergoing investigation in other acute inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis. Objective :To evaluate the role of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and HSF-1 in human acute pancreatitis and their relationship to cytokine/chemokine production, disease severity and outcome. Patients :Twenty-four patients with acute pancreatitis and 12 healthy controls. Main outcome measures :Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated. NF-kappaB and HSF-1 were measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor II and interleukin-8 were measured by ELISA. Acute physiology scores (APS, APACHE II scores and final Atlanta designations of severity were also determined. Results: Systemic NF-kappaB activation occurs in acute pancreatitis compared to healthy controls (P=0.004. However, there was no significant difference between those with mild and severe disease (P=0.685. Systemic activation of HSF-1 was observed in acute pancreatitis compared to healthy controls although this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.053. Activation, however, was greatest in those who had a final Atlanta designation of mild pancreatitis compared to those who had a severe attack of acute pancreatitis (P=0.036. Furthermore, HSF-1 was inversely correlated with acute physiology score (APS; r=-0.49, P=0.019 and APACHE II score (r=-0.47, P=0.026. Conclusions: Both NF-kappaB and HSF-1 are systemically activated in human acute pancreatitis. HSF-1 activation may protect against severity of pancreatitis

  3. Effects of antecedent land cover on physical, chemical, and biological responses to urbanization in streams across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, T. F.; Qian, S.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of urbanization on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of streams were assessed across gradients of urbanization in 9 metropolitan areas of the conterminous US (Boston, MA; Raleigh; NC, Birmingham, AL; Atlanta, GA; Milwaukee-Green Bay, WI; Denver, CO; Dallas-Fort Worth, TX; Salt Lake City, UT; and Portland, OR) as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program. Gradients of urbanization were established on the basis of a multimetric index of urban intensity that combined land cover, population, and road density. Simple regression models established that the condition of biological communities (e.g., invertebrate responses) showed statistically significant degradation as urbanization increased in six (Boston, Raleigh, Birmingham, Atlanta, Salt Lake, and Portland) of the nine metropolitan areas. Multiple regression models incorporating basin-scale land cover (e.g., forest, agricultural land) and environmental variables (e.g., water temperature, chemistry, hydrology) did not substantially improve the explanatory power of the regressions and could not explain differences in responses among metropolitan areas. Multilevel hierarchical models incorporating basin- and regional-scale predictors demonstrated that regional-scale climate (air temperature and precipitation) and antecedent land cover (i.e., land cover being converted to urban) predicted invertebrate responses to urbanization. The lack of identifiable urban responses for Milwaukee-Green Bay, Denver, and Dallas-Fort Worth were associated with high levels of antecedent agriculture (row crops and grazing) that degraded the biological communities and obscured the effects of urbanization. Urbanization was associated with increases in conductivity, nutrients, pesticides, and hydrologic variability. Levels of these variables at background sites were higher in regions with high antecedent agriculture; consequently, the effects of urbanization appeared to be

  4. Land Use and Land Cover Change, Urban Heat Island Phenomenon, and Health Implications: A Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    Land use and land cover maps of Atlanta Metropolitan Area in Georgia were produced from Landsat MSS and TM images for 1973,1979,1983,1987,1992, and 1997, spanning a period of 25 years. Dramatic changes in land use and land cover have occurred with loss of forest and cropland to urban use. In particular, low-density urban use, which includes largely residential use, has increased by over 119% between 1973 and 1997. These land use and land cover changes have drastically altered the land surface characteristics. An analysis of Landsat images revealed an increase in surface temperature and a decline in NDVI from 1973 to 1997. These changes have forced the development of a significant urban heat island effect and an increase in ground level ozone production to such an extent, that Atlanta has violated EPA's ozone level standard in recent years. The urban heat island initiated precipitation events that were identified between 1996 and 2000 tended to occur near high-density urban areas but outside the I-285 loop that traverses around the Central Business District, i.e. not in the inner city area, but some in close proximity to the highways. The health implications were investigated by comparing the spatial patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, the two ingredients that form ozone by reacting with sunlight, with those of rates of cardiovascular and chronic lower respiratory diseases. A clear core-periphery pattern was revealed for both VOC and NOx emissions, but the spatial pattern was more random in the cases of rates of cardiovascular and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Clearly, factors other than ozone pollution were involved in explaining the rates of these diseases. Further research is therefore needed to understand the health geography and its relationship to land use and land cover change as well as urban heat island effect. This paper illustrates the usefulness of a remote sensing approach for this purpose.

  5. Sex-specific relationships between adverse childhood experiences and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in five states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham TJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy J Cunningham,1 Earl S Ford,1 Janet B Croft,1 Melissa T Merrick,2 Italia V Rolle,3 Wayne H Giles1 1Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs before age 18 have been repeatedly associated with several chronic diseases in adulthood such as depression, heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and stroke. We examined sex-specific relationships between individual ACEs and the number of ACEs with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in the general population. Materials and methods: Data from 26,546 women and 19,015 men aged ≥18 years in five states of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed. We used log-linear regression to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the relationship of eight ACEs with COPD after adjustment for age group, race/ethnicity, marital status, educational attainment, employment, asthma history, health insurance coverage, and smoking status. Results: Some 63.8% of women and 62.2% of men reported ≥1 ACE. COPD was reported by 4.9% of women and 4.0% of men. In women, but not in men, there was a higher likelihood of COPD associated with verbal abuse (PR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.61, sexual abuse (PR =1.69, 95% CI: 1.36, 2.10, living with a substance abusing household member (PR =1.49, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.81, witnessing domestic violence (PR =1.40, 95% CI: 1.14, 1.72, and parental separation/divorce (PR =1.47, 95% CI: 1.21, 1.80 during childhood compared to those with no individual ACEs

  6. Herd immunity and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a quantitative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Michael; Barskey, Albert; Baughman, Wendy; Barker, Lawrence; Whitney, Cynthia G; Shaw, Kate M; Orenstein, Walter; Stephens, David S

    2007-07-20

    Invasive pneumococcal disease in older children and adults declined markedly after introduction in 2000 of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for young children. An empirical quantitative model was developed to estimate the herd (indirect) effects on the incidence of invasive disease among persons >or=5 years of age induced by vaccination of young children with 1, 2, or >or=3 doses of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Prevnar (PCV7), containing serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F. From 1994 to 2003, cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were prospectively identified in Georgia Health District-3 (eight metropolitan Atlanta counties) by Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs). From 2000 to 2003, vaccine coverage levels of PCV7 for children aged 19-35 months in Fulton and DeKalb counties (of Atlanta) were estimated from the National Immunization Survey (NIS). Based on incidence data and the estimated average number of doses received by 15 months of age, a Poisson regression model was fit, describing the trend in invasive pneumococcal disease in groups not targeted for vaccination (i.e., adults and older children) before and after the introduction of PCV7. Highly significant declines in all the serotypes contained in PCV7 in all unvaccinated populations (5-19, 20-39, 40-64, and >64 years) from 2000 to 2003 were found under the model. No significant change in incidence was seen from 1994 to 1999, indicating rates were stable prior to vaccine introduction. Among unvaccinated persons 5+ years of age, the modeled incidence of disease caused by PCV7 serotypes as a group dropped 38.4%, 62.0%, and 76.6% for 1, 2, and 3 doses, respectively, received on average by the population of children by the time they are 15 months of age. Incidence of serotypes 14 and 23F had consistent significant declines in all unvaccinated age groups. In contrast, the herd immunity effects on vaccine-related serotype 6A incidence were inconsistent. Increasing trends of non

  7. An Integrative Approach to Improving an Introductory Weather & Climate Course and Developing an Allied NASA Earth & Space Science Certificate Program for Pre-service Secondary Teachers (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.; Martin-Hansen, L.; Diem, J.; Elliott, W.

    2009-12-01

    An Atlanta-based partnership made up of leaders in science, education, and Georgia’s state-wide STEM Education Initiative are creating an enduring legacy of climate science education for pre-service and in-service teachers in Georgia as well as for underrepresented high school students who participate in an "Early College" program with Georgia State University (GSU). The core elements of our NASA-funded program are to infuse NASA global climate change resources and best pedagogical practice into a popular 4-credit lecture/lab course called “Introduction to Weather & Climate” (GEOG 1112) at GSU, and to establish a sustainable academic program for pre-service teachers in the College of Education called the NASA Earth & Space Science (ESS) Teacher Certificate. The NASA ESS Certificate will require candidates to accomplish the following as part of (or in addition to) standard degree and licensure requirements: 1. successfully complete a graduate section of “Introduction to Weather and Climate” (GEOG 7112), which requires lesson planning related to course content and engagement with GSU's new CO2 monitoring station whose research-quality data will provide unique hands-on opportunities for Metro Atlanta students and teachers; 2) complete an additional advanced course in climate change (GEOG 6784) plus elective hours in physical science disciplines (e.g. astronomy and physics); 3) serve as a lab teaching assistant for GEOG 1112 and a coach for a cadre of Carver Early College students who are taking the course; 4) make at least one of two teaching practica at a Georgia-based NASA Explorer School; and 5) participate or co-present in a week-long, residential, field-based, Summer Institute in Earth & Space Science intended to increase the interest, knowledge, and ability of in-service secondary science educators to fulfill climate-related standards in Earth Science and Earth Systems Science. We will evaluate, document, and disseminate (to the University System of

  8. A two-time-period comparison of the effects of ambient air pollution on outpatient visits for acute respiratory illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Amber Hughes; Edgerton, Eric S; Wyzga, Ron; Tolsma, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Concentrations of numerous ambient air pollutants have declined in recent years across the United States. Although it can be expected that reductions in air pollutants are associated with reductions in health effects, it is unclear whether this is actually the case. The purpose of this analysis was to compare the levels of and relationships between air pollutants and acute respiratory outpatient visits for two consecutive time periods totaling 53 mo. Air pollution data were collected at a centrally located monitor in Atlanta, GA, and include 24-hr averages of particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and its components; coarse PM (PM10-2.5); PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10); oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs); 8-hr maximum ozone (O3); and 1-hr maximum nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). In addition, several metals and fractions of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were investigated. Daily outpatient visit data were obtained from the electronic data warehouse of the Atlanta-based region of a nonprofit managed care organization. Poisson general linear modeling determined associations between daily levels of acute visits for four diagnosis groups (adult and child asthma, upper and lower respiratory infection) and air pollution measurements. Overall declining trends were observed in air pollutants and acute visits over the study period. Childhood asthma had the greatest number of significant associations with air pollutants, namely zinc and EC. The significant lag time between pollutant measurement and visit occurrence changed from 3-5 days in the first time period to 6-8 days in the later time period, but there was general consistency in several childhood asthma and pollutant associations over both time periods. The greatest evidence for a reduction in pollution being associated with an improvement in health response was for lower respiratory disease

  9. LA FACILITACIÓN DEFENSIVA A TRAVÉS DEL SAQUE EN EL VOLEIBOL FEMENINO DE ALTO NIVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oña

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    RESUMEN

    El presente estudio aporta soluciones en cuanto a la elección de trayectorias del saque en el voleibol femenino de alto nivel, por tratarse del elemento que, prioritariamente, dota de peculiaridad el rendimiento de las mujeres en este deporte y, por tanto uno de los elementos claves en la evolución del juego.
    Se tomó como población objeto de estudio a las jugadoras de los Juegos Olímpicos de Atlanta en 1996, último acontecimiento de la máxima relevancia en el voleibol internacional. Un total de doce equipos nacionales femeninos, confrontados en 42 encuentros, distribuidos en 146 sets. Para seleccionar la muestra se recurrió a 28sets de la competición femenina, de entre 13 encuentros, de los que se registraron 1824 casos de cambio de saque.
    Las variables tenidas en cuenta son las que representan valores relacionados con el rendimiento del equipo que recibe el saque, y las que describen las trayectorias seleccionadas por las sacadoras.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Voleibol femenino, saque, alto rendimiento, técnica.

     

    ABSTRACT

    This study provides solutions for the trajectories election of the serve in female volleyball of high level. This element endows women performance with peculiarity in this sport, and, therefore it's one key in the evolution of the game.
    As a sample to the survey, they took the players of the Olympic Games of Atlanta in 1996, the last internationall volleyball competition of the highest importance. They were twelve female national teams, confronted in 42 matches, and distributed in 146 sets. 28 sets of female competition were used, they were singled out from 13 matches of which 1824 cases of serve change were recorded.
    The variables kept in mind are those that represent values

  10. Deconvoluting Mixtures ofEmissions Sources to Investigate PM2.5's Ability to Generate Reactive Oxygen Species and its Associations with Cardiorespiratory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R. J.; Bates, J.; Abrams, J.; Verma, V.; Fang, T.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) inhalation can catalytically generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of the body's antioxidant capacity, leading to oxidative stress and ultimately adverse health. PM2.5 emissions from different sources vary widely in chemical composition, with varied effects on the body. Here, the ability of mixtures of different sources of PM2.5 to generate ROS and associations of this capability with acute health effects were investigated. A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay that integrates over different sources was used to quantify ROS generation potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in Atlanta from June 2012 - June 2013. PM2.5 source impacts, estimated using the Chemical Mass Balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles, were related to DTT activity using a linear regression model, which provided information on intrinsic DTT activity (i.e., toxicity) of each source. The model was then used to develop a time series of daily DTT activity over a ten-year period (1998-2010) for use in an epidemiologic study. Light-duty gasoline vehicles exhibited the highest intrinsic DTT activity, followed by biomass burning and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Biomass burning contributed the largest fraction to total DTT activity, followed by gasoline and diesel vehicles (45%, 20% and 14%, respectively). These results suggest the importance of aged oxygenated organic aerosols and metals in ROS generation. Epidemiologic analyses found significant associations between estimated DTT activity and emergency department visits for congestive heart failure and asthma/wheezing attacks in the 5-county Atlanta area. Estimated DTT activity was the only pollutant measure out of PM2.5, O3, and PM2.5 constituents elemental carbon and organic carbon) that exhibited a significant link to congestive heart failure. In two-pollutant models, DTT activity was significantly associated with asthma/wheeze and congestive heart failure while PM2

  11. Liposome bupivacaine for improvement in economic outcomes and opioid burden in GI surgery: IMPROVE Study pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen SM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen M Cohen,1 Jon D Vogel,2 Jorge E Marcet,3 Keith A Candiotti4 1Atlanta Colon and Rectal Surgery, PA, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2General Surgery Clinic, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Department of Surgery, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Leonard Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Postsurgical pain management remains a significant challenge. Liposome bupivacaine, as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen, has been shown to significantly reduce postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay (LOS, and hospitalization costs in gastrointestinal (GI surgery, compared with intravenous (IV opioid-based patient-controlled analgesia (PCA. Pooled results from open-label studies comparing a liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesic regimen with IV opioid PCA were analyzed. Patients (n=191 who underwent planned surgery and received study drug (IV opioid PCA, n=105; multimodal analgesia, n=86 were included. Liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesia compared with IV opioid PCA significantly reduced mean (standard deviation [SD] postsurgical opioid consumption (38 [55] mg versus [vs] 96 [85] mg; P<0.0001, postsurgical LOS (median 2.9 vs 4.3 days; P<0.0001, and mean hospitalization costs (US$8,271 vs US$10,726; P=0.0109. The multimodal analgesia group reported significantly fewer patients with opioid-related adverse events (AEs than the IV opioid PCA group (P=0.0027; there were no significant between-group differences in patient satisfaction scores at 30 days. A liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesic regimen was associated with significantly less opioid consumption, opioid-related AEs, and better health economic outcomes compared with an IV opioid PCA-based regimen in patients undergoing GI surgery. Study registration: This pooled analysis is based on data from Phase IV clinical trials registered on the US National

  12. Breaking down silos: engaging students to help fix the US health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy MA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathu A Kumarasamy,1 Fred P Sanfilippo1–3 1Emory–Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, 3Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Problem: The field of health care is becoming a team effort as patient care becomes increasingly complex and multifaceted. Despite the need for multidisciplinary education, there persists a lack of student engagement and collaboration among health care disciplines, which presents a growing concern as students join the workforce. Approach: In October 2013, the Emory–Georgia Tech Healthcare Innovation Program organized a student driven symposium entitled “US Healthcare: What's Broken and How to Fix It: The Student Perspective”. The symposium engaged students from multiple disciplines to work together in addressing problems associated with US health care delivery. The symposium was organized and carried out by a diverse group of student leaders from local institutions who adopted a multidisciplinary approach throughout the planning process. Outcomes: The innovative planning process leading up to the symposium revealed that many of the student-discipline groups lacked an understanding of one another's role in health care, and that students were interested in learning how to work together to leverage each other's profession. The symposium was widely attended and positively received by students and faculty from the Atlanta metropolitan area, and has since helped to promote interdepartmental collaboration and multidisciplinary education across institutions. Next steps: The student symposium will become an annual event and incorporate broader discipline representation, as well as a patient perspective. Proposals for additional institution-wide, multidisciplinary educational offerings are being addressed with the help of faculty and health care providers across the network

  13. Location, duration, and power; How Americans' driving habits and charging infrastructure inform vehicle-grid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearre, Nathaniel S.

    The substitution of electrical energy for gasoline as a transportation fuel is an initiative both with a long history, and one made both pressing and important in today's policy discussion by renewed interest in plug-in vehicles. The research presented in this dissertation attempts to inform the policy discussion for governments, for electric utilities, for the makers of electric cars, and for the industries developing and planning charging infrastructure. To that end, the impacts of variations to several possible system design parameters, on several metrics of evaluation, are assessed. The analysis is based on a dataset of vehicle trips collected by Georgia Institute of Technology, tracking almost 500 vehicles that commute to, from or within the Atlanta city center, comprising Atlanta `commuter-shed'. By assuming that this dataset of trips defines the desired travel behavior of urban and suburban American populations, the effects of travel electrification in personal vehicles can be assessed. Several significant and novel findings have emerged from this research. These include the conclusion that at-work charging is not necessarily the logical next step beyond home-charging, as it will in general add little to the substitutability of electric vehicles. In contrast, high power en-route charging, combined with modest power home charging is shown to be surprisingly effective, potentially requiring of EV drivers a total time spent at en-route recharging stations similar to that for liquid fueled cars. From the vehicle marketing perspective, a quantification of the hybrid household effect, wherein multi-vehicle households own one EV, showed that about a quarter of all households could adopt a vehicle with 80 miles of range with no changes to travel patterns. Of interest to grid management, this research showed an apparent maximum fleet-wide load from unregulated charging of about 1 kW per vehicle, regardless of EVSE power or EV battery size. This contrasts with a

  14. Systematic in-vitro evaluation of the NCI/NIH Developmental Therapeutics Program Approved Oncology Drug Set for the identification of a candidate drug repertoire for MLL-rearranged leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema KA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Kimberley A Hoeksema1, Aarthi Jayanthan1, Todd Cooper2, Lia Gore3, Tanya Trippett4, Jessica Boklan6, Robert J Arceci5, Aru Narendran11Division of Pediatric Oncology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's Hospital, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 4Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 5Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Despite significant progress made in the overall cure rate, the prognosis for relapsed and refractory malignancies in children remains extremely poor. Hence, there is an urgent need for studies that enable the timely selection of appropriate agents for Phase I clinical studies. The Pediatric Oncology Experimental Therapeutics Investigators' Consortium (POETIC is systematically evaluating libraries of known and novel compounds for activity against subsets of high-risk pediatric malignancies with defined molecular aberrations for future clinical development. In this report, we describe the in-vitro activity of a diverse panel of approved oncology drugs against MLL-rearranged pediatric leukemia cell lines. Agents in the Approved Oncology Drug Set II (National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Developmental Therapeutics Program were evaluated by in-vitro cytotoxicity assays in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia cell lines with MLL gene rearrangements. Validation studies were carried out with patient leukemia cells in culture. Comparative analysis for toxicity against nonmalignant cells was evaluated in normal bone marrow stromal cells and normal human lymphocytes. Results from this study show that 42 of the 89 agents tested have

  15. Fine-resolution Modeling of Urban-Energy Systems' Water Footprint in River Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManamay, R.; Surendran Nair, S.; Morton, A.; DeRolph, C.; Stewart, R.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the interplay between urbanization, energy production, and water resources is essential for ensuring sustainable population growth. In order to balance limited water supplies, competing users must account for their realized and virtual water footprint, i.e. the total direct and indirect amount of water used, respectively. Unfortunately, publicly reported US water use estimates are spatially coarse, temporally static, and completely ignore returns of water to rivers after use. These estimates are insufficient to account for the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of water budgets in urbanizing systems. Likewise, urbanizing areas are supported by competing sources of energy production, which also have heterogeneous water footprints. Hence, a fundamental challenge of planning for sustainable urban growth and decision-making across disparate policy sectors lies in characterizing inter-dependencies among urban systems, energy producers, and water resources. A modeling framework is presented that provides a novel approach to integrate urban-energy infrastructure into a spatial accounting network that accurately measures water footprints as changes in the quantity and quality of river flows. River networks (RNs), i.e. networks of branching tributaries nested within larger rivers, provide a spatial structure to measure water budgets by modeling hydrology and accounting for use and returns from urbanizing areas and energy producers. We quantify urban-energy water footprints for Atlanta, GA and Knoxville, TN (USA) based on changes in hydrology in RNs. Although water intakes providing supply to metropolitan areas were proximate to metropolitan areas, power plants contributing to energy demand in Knoxville and Atlanta, occurred 30 and 90km outside the metropolitan boundary, respectively. Direct water footprints from urban landcover primarily comprised smaller streams whereas indirect footprints from water supply reservoirs and energy producers included

  16. Orphan drugs for sickle vaso-occlusion: dawn of a new era of targeted treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dampier C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Carlton Dampier1,2 1Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, 2AFLAC Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: While an orphan disease in the USA, sickle cell disease (SCD, a group of genetic disorders of hemoglobin structure and function, is a major public health problem in much of the rest of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of SCD stems from the formation of sickle hemoglobin polymers that deform the erythrocyte into a characteristic sickle shape, the rapidity of which is regulated by its intracellular hemoglobin concentration. Subsequent vaso-occlusion is dependent on adhesion of sickled erythrocytes, and perhaps other cellular elements, including leucocytes and platelets, to abnormal vascular endothelium using a number of receptor–ligand pairs. This propensity for vaso-occlusion may be enhanced by altered vascular tone from excessive amounts of vaso-constrictive factors or diminished amounts of vasodilatory factors. Acute pain is the hallmark symptom caused by sickle polymer formation and subsequent vaso-occlusion, and is represented in the endpoints of most previous and current clinical trial designs. Numerous failures of prior investigational agents have frustrated clinicians and patients alike. Hydroxyurea is currently the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for SCD and reduces the frequency of vaso-occlusive complications in many individuals. A considerable therapeutic need remains as hydroxyurea usage is currently not approved for all types of SCD, is not always clinically effective, and requires frequent monitoring. Recent improvements in our understanding of SCD pathophysiology have generated many new therapeutic targets and associated investigational agents. For example, a number of more specific fetal hemoglobin inducers and several therapies to reduce sickle polymer formation are being tested in preclinical and early

  17. Size-resolved measurements of brown carbon in water and methanol extracts and estimates of their contribution to ambient fine-particle light absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Bergin, M.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Kotra, N.; Edgerton, E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Light absorbing organic carbon, often called brown carbon, has the potential to significantly contribute to the visible light-absorption budget, particularly at shorter wavelengths. Currently, the relative contributions of particulate brown carbon to light absorption, as well as the sources of brown carbon, are poorly understood. With this in mind size-resolved direct measurements of brown carbon were made at both urban (Atlanta), and rural (Yorkville) sites in Georgia. Measurements in Atlanta were made at both a representative urban site and a road-side site adjacent to a main highway. Fine particle absorption was measured with a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) and seven-wavelength Aethalometer, and brown carbon absorption was estimated based on Mie calculations using direct size-resolved measurements of chromophores in solvents. Size-resolved samples were collected using a cascade impactor and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and solution light-absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts. Methanol extracts were more light-absorbing than water extracts for all size ranges and wavelengths. Absorption refractive indices of the organic extracts were calculated from solution measurements for a range of wavelengths and used with Mie theory to predict the light absorption by fine particles comprised of these components, under the assumption that brown carbon and other aerosol components were externally mixed. For all three sites, chromophores were predominately in the accumulation mode with an aerodynamic mean diameter of 0.5 μm, an optically effective size range resulting in predicted particle light absorption being a factor of 2 higher than bulk solution absorption. Mie-predicted brown carbon absorption at 350 nm contributed a significant fraction (20 to 40%) relative to total light absorption, with the highest contributions at the rural site where organic to elemental carbon ratios were

  18. Size-resolved measurements of brown carbon and estimates of their contribution to ambient fine particle light absorption based on water and methanol extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Bergin, M.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Kotra, N.; Edgerton, E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-07-01

    Light absorbing organic carbon, often termed brown carbon, has the potential to significantly contribute to the visible light absorption budget, particularly at shorter wavelengths. Currently, the relative contributions of particulate brown carbon to light absorption, as well as the sources of brown carbon are poorly understood. With this in mind field measurements were made at both urban (Atlanta), and rural (Yorkville) sites in Georgia. Measurements in Atlanta were made at both a central site and a road side site adjacent to a main highway near the city center. Fine particle brown carbon optical absorption is estimated based on Mie calculations using direct size resolved measurements of chromophores in filter extracts. Size-resolved atmospheric aerosol samples were collected using a cascade impactor and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and solution light absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts. Methanol extracts were more light-absorbing than water extracts for all size ranges and wavelengths. Absorption refractive indices of the organic extracts were calculated from solution measurements for a range of wavelengths and used with Mie theory to predict the light absorption by fine particles comprised of these components, under the assumption that brown carbon and other aerosol components were externally mixed. For all three sites, chromophores were predominately in the accumulation mode with an aerodynamic mean diameter of 0.5 μm, an optically effective size range resulting in predicted particle light absorption being a factor of 2 higher than bulk solution absorption. Fine particle absorption was also measured with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) and seven-wavelength Aethalometer. Scattering-corrected aethalometer and MAAP absorption were in good agreement at 670 nm and Mie-estimated absorption based on size-resolved EC data were within 30% of these optical instruments. When applied

  19. Size-resolved measurements of brown carbon and estimates of their contribution to ambient fine particle light absorption based on water and methanol extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Light absorbing organic carbon, often termed brown carbon, has the potential to significantly contribute to the visible light absorption budget, particularly at shorter wavelengths. Currently, the relative contributions of particulate brown carbon to light absorption, as well as the sources of brown carbon are poorly understood. With this in mind field measurements were made at both urban (Atlanta, and rural (Yorkville sites in Georgia. Measurements in Atlanta were made at both a central site and a road side site adjacent to a main highway near the city center. Fine particle brown carbon optical absorption is estimated based on Mie calculations using direct size resolved measurements of chromophores in filter extracts. Size-resolved atmospheric aerosol samples were collected using a cascade impactor and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, and solution light absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts. Methanol extracts were more light-absorbing than water extracts for all size ranges and wavelengths. Absorption refractive indices of the organic extracts were calculated from solution measurements for a range of wavelengths and used with Mie theory to predict the light absorption by fine particles comprised of these components, under the assumption that brown carbon and other aerosol components were externally mixed. For all three sites, chromophores were predominately in the accumulation mode with an aerodynamic mean diameter of 0.5 μm, an optically effective size range resulting in predicted particle light absorption being a factor of 2 higher than bulk solution absorption. Fine particle absorption was also measured with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP and seven-wavelength Aethalometer. Scattering-corrected aethalometer and MAAP absorption were in good agreement at 670 nm and Mie-estimated absorption based on size-resolved EC data were within 30% of these optical instruments

  20. Interstitial diffuse radiance spectroscopy of gold nanocages and nanorods in bulk muscle tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabtchak S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Serge Grabtchak,1,2 Logan G Montgomery,1 Bo Pang,3,4 Yi Wang,4,5 Chao Zhang,6,7 Zhiyuan Li,6,7 Younan Xia,4,8 William M Whelan1,91Department of Physics, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada; 2Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Physics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4The Wallace H Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 5Key Laboratory of Green Synthesis and Applications, College of Chemistry, Chongqing Normal University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 6Laboratory of Optical Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7College of Physics and Optoelectronics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 8School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA; 9Atlantic Veterinary College, Charlottetown, PEI, CanadaAbstract: Radiance spectroscopy was applied to the interstitial detection of localized inclusions containing Au nanocages or nanorods with various concentrations embedded in porcine muscle phantoms. The radiance was quantified using a perturbation approach, which enabled the separation of contributions from the porcine phantom and the localized inclusion, with the inclusion serving as a perturbation probe of photon distributions in the turbid medium. Positioning the inclusion at various places in the phantom allowed for tracking of photons that originated from a light source, passed through the inclusion’s location, and reached a detector. The inclusions with high extinction coefficients were able to absorb nearly all photons in the range of 650–900 nm, leading to a spectrally flat radiance signal. This signal could be