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Sample records for athletics athletic training

  1. Fundamentals of sports training athlete-athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Bykova, M. S.; I.V. Gerasimov; Быкова, М. С.; ГЕРАСИМОВ И.В.

    2014-01-01

    Sport training currently is an important component of the system of preparation of the sportsman. It is a pedagogical process, which is based on application of physical exercises to improve functional capabilities of the athlete Спортивная тренировка в настоящее время является важной составной частью системы подготовки спортсмена. Она представляет собой педагогический процесс, который основан на использовании физических упражнений с целью совершенствования функциональных возможностей спорт...

  2. Perceptions of Sexual Harassment in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingles, René Revis; Smith, Yevonne

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe and analyze the experiences of ethnically diverse female certified athletic trainers (ATCs) in order to discern the perceived nature of sexual harassment in the athletic training profession. Design and Setting: Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used for a larger study; however, only the qualitative data are…

  3. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retaining athletic training students has been identified as problematic by approximately half of athletic training program (ATP) directors. It is unknown what ATP directors do to improve athletic training student retention. Objective: To identify initiatives that ATP directors use to improve the retention rates of athletic training…

  4. Teacher Certification Among Athletic Training Students

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Neil

    1995-01-01

    Researchers have reported that athletic training students who earn teacher certification enhance their job marketability. The purpose of this study was to determine the number of athletic training students who pursue teacher certification. A survey was mailed to the directors of the 78 NATA undergraduate programs in 1992. Data from the returned surveys showed that 177 of the 703 expected graduates in 1992 and 148 of the 640 graduates in 1991 pursued teacher certification. The most common teac...

  5. 1994 Entry-Level Athletic Training Salaries

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Crayton L.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, I examined salaries for entry-level positions in athletic training during the year 1994. An entry-level position was defined as a position to be filled with an athletic trainer certified by the NATA, with no full-time paid employment experience. According to the “Placement Vacancy Notice” (NATA, Dallas, TX) and “BYLINE” (Athletic Trainer Services, Inc, Mt Pleasant, MI), there were 432 entry-level vacancies in hospital/clinics, college/universities, and high school settings. A t...

  6. Undergraduate Athletic Training Education Program Directors' Perceptions of the Nature of Coupling with Intercollegiate Athletic Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiger, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    Some research exists relative to the personnel relationship between athletic training education programs (ATEPs) and intercollegiate athletic departments, yet little research has examined program directors' general perceptions of coupling or coupling related to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) standards of…

  7. Athletic Training Student Socialization Part I: Socializing Students in Undergraduate Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Professional socialization is a key process in the professional development of athletic training students. The published athletic training education research has focused on many perspectives regarding socialization; however, it has yet to investigate the program director's (PD's) opinion. Objective: To gain insights from the PD on methods…

  8. Program Director Perspectives on Athletic Training Student Motivation to Complete Their Professional Athletic Training Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Student motivation has been linked to persistence until graduation for athletic training students. There is little research, however on ways athletic training programs (ATPs) foster student motivation. Objective: To expand upon the existing literature regarding retention of students in ATPs, specifically examining the concept of student…

  9. Athletic Training Student Socialization Part II: Socializing the Professional Master's Athletic Training Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Professional socialization is a key process in the professional development of athletic training students. Literature has focused on many perspectives regarding socialization and has primarily focused on the undergraduate level. Objective: Gain insights from the program director at professional master's (PM) athletic training programs on…

  10. Sociocultural Learning Theory in Practice: Implications for Athletic Training Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Peer, Kimberly S.; McClendon, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To discuss cognitive and sociocultural learning theory literature related to athletic training instructional and evaluation strategies while providing support for the application of these practices in the didactic and clinical components of athletic training education programs.

  11. Somatotype, training and performance in Ironman athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Michel; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Clarys, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the physiques of Ironman athletes and the relationship between Ironman's performance, training and somatotype. A total of 165 male and 22 female competitors of the Ironman Switzerland volunteered in this study. Ten anthropometric dimensions were measured, and 12 training and history variables were recorded with a questionnaire. The variables were compared with the race performance. The somatotype was a strong predictor of Ironman performance (R=0.535; R(2)=0.286; sign. p<0.001) in male athletes. The endomorphy component was the most substantial predictor. Reductions in endomorphy by one standard deviation as well as an increased ectomorphy value by one standard deviation lead to significant and substantial improvement in Ironman performance (28.1 and 29.8 minutes, respectively). An ideal somatotype of 1.7-4.9-2.8 could be established. Age and quantitative training effort were not significant predictors on Ironman performance. In female athletes, no relationship between somatotype, training and performance was found. The somatotype of a male athlete defines for 28.6% variance in Ironman performance. Athletes not having an ideal somatotype of 1.7-4.9-2.8 could improve their performance by altering their somatotype. Lower rates in endomorphy, as well as higher rates in ectomorphy, resulted in a significant better race performance. The impact of somatotype was the most distinguished on the run discipline and had a much greater impact on the total race time than the quantitative training effort. These findings could not be found in female athletes. PMID:23834510

  12. Peer-Assisted Learning in the Athletic Training Clinical Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Henning, Jolene M.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Jones, James

    2006-01-01

    Context: Athletic training educators often anecdotally suggest that athletic training students enhance their learning by teaching their peers. However, peer-assisted learning (PAL) has not been examined within athletic training education in order to provide evidence for its current use or as a pedagogic tool.

  13. Self Reported Perceptions of Physical Demands on Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Jeffrey K.; Babcock, Garth; Little, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Context: According to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Standards for the Accreditation of Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs, athletic training students (ATSs) must complete clinical experiences that provide opportunities to integrate cognitive function, psychomotor skills, and affective…

  14. 1994 entry-level athletic training salaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C L

    1996-01-01

    In this study, I examined salaries for entry-level positions in athletic training during the year 1994. An entry-level position was defined as a position to be filled with an athletic trainer certified by the NATA, with no full-time paid employment experience. According to the "Placement Vacancy Notice" (NATA, Dallas, TX) and "BYLINE" (Athletic Trainer Services, Inc, Mt Pleasant, MI), there were 432 entry-level vacancies in hospital/clinics, college/universities, and high school settings. A total of 271 surveys (63%) were returned. Overall, beginning salaries for entry-level athletic training positions were $23,228 (+/-$3,177) for a bachelor's degree and $25,362 (+/-$3,883) for a master's degree. A stipend ($4,216 +/- $2,039) was included in 86% of the high school positions. The term of contract for high school was usually a 10-month position (10.0 +/- .9 months), hospital/clinic, 12-months (11.7 +/- .7 months), while the college/university varied from 9 to 12 months (10.5 +/- 1.2 months). Also included in the study was fringe benefit information: pension (other than Social Security), life, medical, dental, and vision insurance. Continued studies are recommended to establish salary norms and trends for entry-level positions so that athletic trainers will understand what monetary compensation to expect for their services. PMID:16558367

  15. Self-Funding a Postprofessional Athletic Training Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherington, Jefferson J.; Pecha, Forrest Q.; Homaechevarria, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Context: Postprofessional athletic training residencies (PP-ATRs) are formal educational programs that provide advanced professional preparation for an athletic trainer. These programs are intended to provide clinical and didactic education in a focused area of clinical practice. Identifying and procuring funding to support athletic training…

  16. Leadership and Management: Techniques and Principles for Athletic Training

    OpenAIRE

    Nellis, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    Leadership and management have become topics of recent interest in athletic training. These skills are distinct from each other and are vital to a successful and efficient athletic training room. Leadership is an influence relationship, while management is an authority relationship. Leadership is concerned with knowing yourself, your staff, your profession, and how to apply people skills. Management is concerned with organization, communication, and the development of your athletic training f...

  17. Sociocultural Learning Theory in Practice: Implications for Athletic Training Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S; McClendon, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss cognitive and sociocultural learning theory literature related to athletic training instructional and evaluation strategies while providing support for the application of these practices in the didactic and clinical components of athletic training education programs. DATA SOURCES: We searched Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Education Abstracts from 1975-2001 using the key words social cognitive, sociocultural learning theory, constructivism, and athletic training education. Current literature in the fields of educational psychology and athletic training education provides the foundation for applying theory to practice with specific emphasis on the theoretic framework and application of sociocultural learning theory strategies in athletic training education. DATA SYNTHESIS: Athletic training educators must have a strong fundamental knowledge of learning theory and a commitment to incorporate theory into educational practice. We integrate literature from both fields to generate practical strategies for using sociocultural learning theory in athletic training education. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Social cognitive and sociocultural learning theory advocates a constructive, self-regulated, and goal-oriented environment with the student at the center of the educational process. Although a shift exists in athletic training education toward more active instructional strategies with the implementation of competency-based education, many educational environments are still dominated by traditional didactic instructional methods promoting student passivity. As athletic training education programs strive to increase accountability, educators in the field must critically analyze teaching and evaluation methods and integrate new material to ensure that learning is maximized. PMID:12937534

  18. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Master's Athletic Training Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Many professional master's athletic training program directors believe retention is a problem facing athletic training education. However, it remains unknown what steps, if any, are taken to improve retention. Objective: To inquire with program directors about their respective methods and interventions aimed at increasing retention rates.…

  19. The Use of Cloud Technology in Athletic Training Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkey, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    As technology advances and becomes more portable, athletic training educators (ATEs) have many options available to them. Whether attempting to streamline efforts in courses, or operate a more efficient athletic training education program, portable technology is becoming an important tool that will assist the ATE. One tool that allows more…

  20. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning on Athletic Training Psychomotor Skill Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Emily; Martin, Malissa; Cuppett, Micki; Lebsack, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Context: Instruction of psychomotor skills is an important component of athletic training education. Accommodating the varied learning abilities and preferences of athletic training students can be challenging for an instructor initiating skill acquisition in a traditional face-to-face (F2F) environment. Video instruction available on mobile…

  1. A Nationwide Learning-Style Assessment of Undergraduate Athletic Training Students in CAAHEP-Accredited Athletic Training Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Stradley, Stephanie L.; Buckley, Bernadette D.; Kaminski, Thomas W.; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Fleming, David; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To identify the learning styles and preferred environmental characteristics of undergraduate athletic training students in Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited athletic training education programs and to determine if learning-style differences existed among geographic regions of the country.

  2. Mental Training for the Distance Athlete: "The Running Values Auction"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Deborah E.; Phillips, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Coaches and sports psychologists often say that it is the mind that controls the body, and that once a race begins, it is 90 percent mental and 10 percent physical training. Teaching young athletes to use mental strategies is a skill they will continue to use throughout their athletic career, and best of all, throughout their everyday lives, even…

  3. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Training Patterns in Junior Elite Orienteering Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Roos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings about the relation between musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns in orienteering athletes are sparse. Therefore, the musculoskeletal injuries and training patterns of 31 Swiss elite orienteering athletes aged 18-19 years were analyzed in a retrospective study. Individual training diaries and medical records were used to assess training data and injury history, respectively. Group comparisons and a multiple linear regression (MLR were performed for statistical analysis. The junior elite orienteering athletes performed 7.38 ± 2.00 training sessions weekly, with a total duration of 455.75 ± 98.22 minutes. An injury incidence rate (IIR of 2.18 ± 2.13 injuries per 1000 hours of training was observed. The lower extremity was affected in 93% of all injuries, and the knee (33% was the most commonly injured location. The MLR revealed that gender and six training variables explained 60% of the variance in the injury severity index in this study. Supported by the low IIR in the observed age group, the training protocol of the junior elite orienteering athletes was generally adequate. In comparison to elite track, marathon, and orienteering athletes, the junior elite athletes performed less high-intensity interval training (HIIT. However, more frequent HIIT seems to be a protective factor against injuries.

  4. The Olympic Training Center: Helping Athletes Improve Their Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBenedette, V

    1988-07-01

    The Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs offers a variety of programs to help American athletes optimize their performance. Research in biomechanics and exercise physiology may pay off at the 1988 Summer Games. PMID:27403833

  5. Use of Computer-Based Instruction in Athletic Training Education

    OpenAIRE

    Fincher, A. Louise; Wright, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    Computer-based instruction is being widely used in the education programs of many allied health professions. However, there has been little, if any, documentation of computer-based instruction use in athletic training education. The primary purpose of this study was to determine what percentage of undergraduate and graduate NATA-approved athletic training education programs are using some form of computer-based instruction (ie, computer-assisted instruction or interactive video). We also addr...

  6. Study on Physical Training and Nutritional Support of Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Yuhua Wu; Zhijing Liu

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces the concepts of nutritional support and methods of physical training in detail. Finally, it summarizes the relationship between physical training and nutritional support. Physical training is inseparable from energy supply and the source of sport energy is from nutritional support. Various nutrition supplies is closely related to physical recovery of athletes.

  7. Study on Physical Training and Nutritional Support of Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the concepts of nutritional support and methods of physical training in detail. Finally, it summarizes the relationship between physical training and nutritional support. Physical training is inseparable from energy supply and the source of sport energy is from nutritional support. Various nutrition supplies is closely related to physical recovery of athletes.

  8. Neuromuscular adaptations to 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Meyland, Jacob; Raffalt, Peter C;

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 4 weeks of intensive drop jump training in well-trained athletes on jumping performance and underlying changes in biomechanics and neuromuscular adaptations. Nine well-trained athletes at high national competition level within sprinting and jumping disciplines...... performance also in well-trained athletes without concomitant changes in muscle strength. It is suggested that the behavioral improvement is primarily due to neural factors regulating the activation pattern controlling the drop jump movement....

  9. Effects of Resistance Training in Youth Athletes on Muscular Fitness and Athletic Performance: A Conceptual Model for Long-Term Athlete Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eGranacher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the stages of long-term athlete development (LTAD, resistance training (RT is an important means for (i stimulating athletic development, (ii tolerating the demands of long-term training and competition, and (iii inducing long-term health promoting effects that are robust over time and track into adulthood. However, there is a gap in the literature with regards to optimal RT methods during LTAD and how RT is linked to biological age.Thus, the aims of this scoping review were (i to describe and discuss the effects of RT on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes, (ii to introduce a conceptual model on how to appropriately implement different types of RT within LTAD stages, and (iii to identify research gaps from the existing literature by deducing implications for future research.In general, RT produced small-to-moderate effects on muscular fitness and athletic performance in youth athletes with muscular strength showing the largest improvement. Free weight, complex, and plyometric training appear to be well-suited to improve muscular fitness and athletic performance. In addition, balance training appears to be an important preparatory (facilitating training program during all stages of LTAD but particularly during the early stages. As youth athletes become more mature, specificity and intensity of RT methods increase. This scoping review identified research gaps that are summarized in the following and that should be addressed in future studies: (i to elucidate the influence of gender and biological age on the adaptive potential following RT in youth athletes (especially in females, (ii to describe RT protocols in more detail (i.e., always report stress and strain-based parameters, and (iii to examine neuromuscular and tendomuscular adaptations following RT in youth athletes.

  10. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  11. Athletic Training Students in the College/ University Setting and the Scope of Clinical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Noble, Gary L; Pipkin, Jennifer B

    2006-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs must provide the proper type and amount of clinical supervision in order for athletic training students to obtain appropriate clinical education and to meet Board of Certification examination requirements.

  12. Athlete's Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athlete's foot is a common infection caused by a fungus. It most often affects the space between the toes. ... skin between your toes. You can get athlete's foot from damp surfaces, such as showers, swimming pools, ...

  13. The Socialization of First-Time Athletic Training Education Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesselman, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Starting in 2004 athletic training students had to graduate from accredited athletic training education programs to become certified. Institutions had to accredit their athletic training education programs to continue offering students the opportunity to become certified. These institutions needed to transition current employees or hire new…

  14. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  15. Promoting Athletic Training through a General Education Course in Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie; Heinerichs, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Context: A general education course taught by athletic training education faculty has the potential to expose the entire student body to the athletic training profession in a unique way while also meeting requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Objective: To introduce a detailed case study of a general…

  16. Online Assessment of Athletic Training Education Outcomes and Program Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. David Carr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of the Online Assessment of Athletic Training Education system (OAATE, a tool for assessing student achievement in the knowledge domains necessary for certification as an athletic trainer. The system also assesses students' satisfaction with important dimensions of their individual degree programs. By making use of current database and communication technologies, we have developed a system that addresses important, unmet needs in the field of Athletic Training education. The design of the system makes it a dynamic, easily extensible tool that could be applied in a wide variety of education domains beyond its current setting. In addition, because of its Internet-based delivery system, the tool may be widely-used throughout the world, with benefits accruing to students, program instructors and administrators, and researchers in the field of education. Keywords: Education Assessment, Database, Information/Communication Technologies, Online Assessment.

  17. Financial Resources for Conducting Athletic Training Programs in the Collegiate and High School Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, James M

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of resources to athletic training programs varies greatly, depending on the size and scope of the athletic program. No research has been found that assesses the differences in dollars allocated within various athletic training settings or assesses whether the different program levels allocate similar proportions of their resources to like categories of expenditures. In this study, I assessed the financial resources available to athletic training programs at major football NCA...

  18. Archetypal Athletes

    CERN Document Server

    Eugster, Manuel J A

    2011-01-01

    Discussions on outstanding---positively and/or negatively---athletes are common practice. The rapidly grown amount of collected sports data now allow to support such discussions with state of the art statistical methodology. Given a (multivariate) data set with collected data of athletes within a specific sport, outstanding athletes are values on the data set boundary. In the present paper we propose archetypal analysis to compute these extreme values. The so-called archetypes, i.e., archetypal athletes, approximate the observations as convex combinations. We interpret the archetypal athletes and their characteristics, and, furthermore, the composition of all athletes based on the archetypal athletes. The application of archetypal analysis is demonstrated on basketball statistics and soccer skill ratings.

  19. Descriptive Qualities of Athletic Training Education Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E.; Judd, Michael R.; Colandreo, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Limited literature explores professional preparation of program directors (PD) to lead an athletic training education program (ATEP). Objective: To explore challenges, effectiveness, leadership, and PD role selection. Design: Descriptive and qualitative exploratory email survey. Setting: Educational. Participants: Emails were sent to 345…

  20. Critical-Thinking Predisposition Among Undergraduate Athletic Training Students

    OpenAIRE

    Leaver-Dunn, Deidre; Harrelson, Gary L.; Martin, Malissa; Wyatt, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the tendency of undergraduate athletic training students to think critically, to assess their likelihood of using specific components of critical thinking, and to study the effect of selected demographic and educational variables on critical-thinking tendencies in this sample of students.

  1. Identifying the Current Program Development Trends for Accredited Undergraduate Athletic Training Educational Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kirk W

    2001-01-01

    Identifying The Current Program Development Trends For Accredited Undergraduate Athletic Training Educational Programs by Kirk W. Brown Committee Chair Dr. George Graham Department of Teaching and Learning Health and Physical Education (ABSTRACT) Athletic training is an allied healthcare profession which at the present time offers two routes for certification. Students can sit for the National Athletic Trainers Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) through succ...

  2. Factors Influencing Senior Athletic Training Students' Preparedness to Enter the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs must provide the student with opportunities to learn the roles and responsibilities of the athletic trainer. Objective: Investigate factors that help prepare the athletic training student (ATS) to successfully enter the workplace upon graduation from her undergraduate program. Design: Exploratory…

  3. Do olympic athletes train as in the Paleolithic era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullosa, Daniel A; Abreu, Laurinda; Varela-Sanz, Adrián; Mujika, Iñigo

    2013-10-01

    Every 4 years, approximately 10,000 athletes participate in the Olympic Games. These athletes have dedicated several years of physical training to achieve the best possible performance on a given day. Their preparation has been supported by expert coaches and an army of sport scientists, whose overall responsibility is to ensure that the athletes are in peak condition for their event. Although every athlete prepares specifically for the unique physiological challenges of their event, all athletes have one common characteristic: they are Homo sapiens. They share a unique genome, which is the result of evolutionary forces beyond their individual control. Although studies on the influence of different genetic polymorphisms on selected athletic events have been proven to be of limited utility, a body of evidence--from molecular biology to whole-body measures--suggests that training adaptations are enhanced when the stimulus closely resembles the activity pattern of human ancestors. Because genetic evolutionary changes occur slowly in Homo sapiens, and the traditional physical activity and dietary patterns of Homo sapiens have undergone rapid and dramatic changes in previous centuries, we propose that modern humans are physiologically better adapted to training modes and nutritional strategies similar to the ones that their hominid ancestors evolved on, rather than those supported by modern societies. Such an ancestral pattern was mainly characterized by the prevalence of daily bouts of prolonged, low-intensity, aerobic-based activities interspersed with periodic, short-duration, high-intensity bursts of activity. On some occasions, such activity patterns were undertaken with low carbohydrate availability. Specific activities that enhanced strength and power were typically performed after aerobic activities. We present scientific evidence to support the appropriateness of this model, and we propose that future studies should address this hypothesis in a multitude of

  4. Popularity of hypoxic training methods for endurance-based professional and amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Herms, J; Julià-Sánchez, S; Hamlin, M J; Corbi, F; Pagès, T; Viscor, G

    2015-05-01

    Scientific debate continues into whether hypoxic training has any performance benefit for athletes, and although this type of training seems popular, to our knowledge little empirical evidence on its popularity with endurance-based athletes exists. To quantify the usage of hypoxic training in endurance-based athletes we asked 203 athletes (amateur = 108, professional = 95) to complete a 17-question survey during 2013-2014 season. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes were 4.5 times (3.0-6.8, odds ratio, 95% confidence limits) more likely to undertake hypoxic training. Live-high train-low was the most popular hypoxic training protocol for athletes (52% professional and 80% amateur) with live-high train-high also used (38% professional, 20% amateur). Compared to amateurs, professional athletes tended to use evidence-based hypoxic training methods, seek advice on hypoxic training from reliable sources and were generally more realistic about the potential performance gains as a result of hypoxic training. Almost one third (25-30%) of all athletes suffered illness during their hypoxic training. Compared to amateurs, professional athletes are more likely to undertake hypoxic training and tend to follow current scientific guidelines. Attenuation of the ill effects that occur during hypoxic training may be accomplished if athletes give more attention to monitoring stress and training levels.

  5. Development of an Evidence-Based Sport Psychological Training Program for Young Elite Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikman, Johan Michael

    Sport psychological training seems to be a viable way of facilitating development and performance for adult athletes, and even though sport psychological training for young athletes is less investigated, research indicates that talented athletes can benefit from sport psychological training as well....... The aim of this thesis is to review and add to the current knowledge on sport psychologicaltraining for young elite athletes, and to investigate sport psychological interventions for young elite athletes. This will aid the development of sport psychological training programs for young elite athletes.......This thesis investigates sport psychological training for young elite athletes through two approaches. First, three reviews are performed: a review of psychological skills and characteristics needed for successful talent development, a review of current talent development theories and models, and a review...

  6. Science and Practice of Coaching a Strength Training Program for Novice and Intermediate-Level Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Addresses various aspects of the athletic coaching process in strength training, including: teaching and coaching exercises to novice and intermediate level athletes (typical high school and younger college aged athletes); technical analysis and modification of student technique; student motivation; goal setting; reinforcement; and the overall…

  7. Six Weeks of Core Stability Training Improves Landing Kinetics Among Female Capoeira Athletes: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo Simone; Cohen Daniel; Hayes Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training...

  8. Features of the technical training athletes with hearing impaired in various sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurtyk D.V.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It was analysed scientific-methodical and specialized literature on adaptive sports: table tennis, basketball, judo, skiing. It is conducted interviews with leading coaches working in the Deaflympic sport. Monitor the training process of elite athletes with hearing impairments, specializing in ski racing. Found that for technical training of athletes use the principle of learning the exercises and improvement from simple to complex with the rote. It was shown the necessity of attracting able-bodied athletes in the training process deflimpiytsev to optimize their technical training. The data obtained allow us to determine the direction of improving the technical skills of this category of athletes.

  9. Teen Athlete Training- No Mean Feat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    “1 really admire Li Xiaepeng.”says 14-year-old Yang Rui fervently and with a rapt smile, despite the pain of his ankle injury. yang, a member of the Chinese National Gymnastic Team, injured his ankle a few days ago while training, Until he recovers he must be content to sit on a bench in the SGAS Training Bureau's new gymnasium and watch his leammates train.

  10. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  11. Epidemiology of training injuries in amateur taekwondo athletes: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lystad, R P; Graham, P L; Poulos, R G

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and describe the pattern and severity of training injuries in taekwondo, and to compare pattern and severity of training injuries with competition injuries. One hundred and fifty-two active Australian amateur taekwondo athletes, aged 12 years or over, completed an online survey comprising questions on training exposure and injury history over the preceding 12 months. The main outcome measures were: overall injury incidence rate per athlete-year; training injury incidence rate per athlete-year, per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and per 1000 athlete-hours of training; injury severity; and injury proportions by anatomical region and by type of injury. Injury incidence rates were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using standard methods, while injury proportions were compared using Fisher's exact test. The vast majority (81.5%) of taekwondo injuries in an average athlete-year occurred during training. The training injury incidence rate was estimated to be 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4, 1.9) per athlete-year, 11.8 (95% CI: 10.4, 13.4) per 1000 athlete-training-sessions, and 7.0 (95% CI: 6.1, 7.9) per 1000 athlete-hours of training. Among athletes with five or fewer injuries, the severity and injury pattern of training injuries were, by and large, the same as for competition injuries. Approximately sixty percent (60.3%) of training injuries required treatment by a health professional. Considering the burden of training injuries exceeds that of competition injuries, taekwondo governing bodies and stakeholders are encouraged to devote more efforts towards the identification of risk factors for, and prevention of, training injuries in the sport of taekwondo.

  12. The Nature of Coupling with Intercollegiate Athletic Departments: Undergraduate Athletic Training Education Program Directors' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiger, Trevor C.; Card, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Coupling theory, based on a tight-loose continuum, describes the nature of a connection, relationship, or interaction between entities. Understanding the nature of an ATEP's relationship with intercollegiate athletic departments is important to their growth and responsiveness to environmental change. Objective: To determine program…

  13. Perceptions of Athletic Training Education Program Directors on Their Students' Persistence and Departure Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    The athletic training profession is in the midst of a large increase in demand for health care professionals for the physically active. In order to meet demand, directors of athletic training education programs (ATEPs) are challenged with providing sufficient graduates. There has been a large increase in ATEPs nationwide since educational reform…

  14. Engagement Theory in Action: An Investigation of Athletic Training Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the use of good practice indicators by athletic training program directors and to provide a theoretical framework using engagement theory, a learner-centered process focusing on program improvement through continuous planning and evaluation, as a foundation for implementing good practices in athletic training education…

  15. Program Directors' Perceptions of Programmatic Attributes Contributing to Athletic Training Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Graduates of athletic training programs (ATPs) have identified factors contributing to their persistence through professional education. However, program directors have yet to elaborate on programmatic attributes that might contribute to athletic training student retention in their respective ATPs. Objective: To determine program…

  16. Program Directors' Perceptions of Reasons Professional Master's Athletic Training Students Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Student retention is a key issue in higher education. With the increasing number of professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs), understanding student retention is necessary to maintain viable programs. Objective: Explore program directors' perceptions of the reasons athletic training students persist and depart from PM…

  17. Using a Web-Based Database to Record and Monitor Athletic Training Students' Clinical Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirk W.; Williams, Lisa; Janicki, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to introduce a documentation recording system employing the Microsoft Structured Query Language (MS-SQL) database used by the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) for recording and monitoring of athletic training student (ATS) clinical experiences and hours. Background: Monitoring ATSs clinical…

  18. A Mandala: A Diagram of the Clinical Education Experience in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohous, Steve; West, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to present the practical use of a Mandala that: 1) provides opportunities for athletic training students to explore, reflect on and appreciate their clinical experiences; 2) provides educators with a model to understand and value athletic training student experiences; 3) organizes and captures factors and…

  19. Preferred Learning Styles of Professional Undergraduate and Graduate Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Sarah; Hansen, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recognizing the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students will equip educators to more effectively improve their teaching methods and optimize student learning. Objective: To determine the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students…

  20. Oxidative status evaluation in elite karate athletes during training process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Snežana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Oxidative stress is a state of disturbed balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS on the one hand, and antioxidative defense on the other. As a result of oxidative stress we have irreversible changes in cell function leading to pathological tissue changes, development of many diseases and fast aging process. Increased consumption of oxygen during exercise could be the cause of oxidative stress. The aim of the study was to establish oxidative status of elite karate athletes in the state of rest and after the loading, monitoring the parameters of oxidative stress and components of antioxidative defense in a treaining process. Methods. During training process, a group of 30 elite karate athletes was included in the study of prevalence. They were males, from 16 to 30 years of age. The examination was conducted both in resting condition and after the loading. Oxidative status was determined by the level of superoxide anion radical (O2-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as prooxidants, and enzymes of the antioxidant defanse system: superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT. Results. There was a homogenous group of young athletes of normal weight and fats percentage. A significant decrease of O·2- after the load was founded, while the levels of H2O2 was significantly increased. Activity of SOD was not significantly changed after exsercise while that of CAT was significantly increased. Conclusion. In the long run a programmed physical exercise does not lead to oxidative stress, but an excessive physical load may cause its occurrence.

  1. Voluntary dehydration and cognitive performance in trained college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'anci, Kristen E; Vibhakar, Arjun; Kanter, Jordan H; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2009-08-01

    Cognitive and mood decrements resulting from mild dehydration and glucose consumption were studied. Men and women (total N = 54; M age = 19.8 yr., SD = 1.2) were recruited from college athletic teams. Euhydration or dehydration was achieved by athletes completing team practices with or without water replacement. Dehydration was associated with higher thirst and negative mood ratings as well as better Digit Span performance. Participants showed better Vigilance Attention with euhydration. Hydration status and athlete's sex interacted with performance on Choice Reaction Time and Vigilance Attention. In a second study, half of the athletes received glucose prior to cognitive testing. Results for negative mood and thirst ratings were similar, but for cognitive performance the results were mixed. Effects of glucose on cognition were independent of dehydration.

  2. Employment Characteristics, Educational Histories, and Pedagogical Training of Educators in CAATE-Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    Context: With the rapid expansion of ATEPs in the last decade, the demand for doctoral-trained athletic training educators has increased exponentially. As more athletic training educators enter higher education, it is important to fully understand how well prepared these educators are for life in academe. Objective: To describe employment…

  3. Athletics, Athletic Leadership, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between athletics, athletic leadership, and academic achievement. This is likely to be a tricky issue as athletes and athletic leaders are not likely to be a random group of students. To address this issue I control for school fixed effects and instrument the endogenous variables with height. I find that…

  4. Genetics of athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Elaine A; Huson, Heather J; Ostrander, Gary K

    2009-01-01

    Performance enhancing polymorphisms (PEPs) are examples of natural genetic variation that affect the outcome of athletic challenges. Elite athletes, and what separates them from the average competitor, have been the subjects of discussion and debate for decades. While training, diet, and mental fitness are all clearly important contributors to achieving athletic success, the fact that individuals reaching the pinnacle of their chosen sports often share both physical and physiological attributes suggests a role for genetics. That multiple members of a family often participate in highly competitive events, such as the Olympics, further supports this argument. In this review, we discuss what is known regarding the genes and gene families, including the mitochondrial genome, that are believed to play a role in human athletic performance. Where possible, we describe the physiological impact of the critical gene variants and consider predictions about other potentially important genes. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings on the future for competitive athletics. PMID:19630564

  5. Stylistic Learning Differences Between Undergraduate Athletic Training Students and Educators: Gregorc Mind Styles

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Trenton E.; Caswell, Shane V.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Learning theory and pedagogic research are unfamiliar to many educators trained in the sciences. Athletic training educators must learn to appreciate the theoretic and practical value of pedagogic research, including learning styles.

  6. Effects of Stress Inoculation Training on Athletes' Postsurgical Pain and Rehabilitation after Orthopedic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael J.; Berger, R. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Tested the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (stress inoculation training; SIT) for postsurgical anxiety, pain and physical rehabilitation in injured athletes. Sixty male athletes who underwent arthroscopic surgery for miniscus injury in one knee were randomly assigned to either treatment (SIT and physical therapy) or control…

  7. An Assessment of Post-Professional Athletic Training Students' Critical Thinking Skills and Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Jessica Marie

    2013-01-01

    The need for outcome measures in critical thinking skills and dispositions for post-professional athletic training programs (PPATPs) is significant. It has been suggested that athletic trainers who are competent and disposed towards thinking critically will be successful in the profession. The purpose of this study is to assess critical thinking…

  8. Acute hypoxic exercise does not alter post-exercise iron metabolism in moderately trained endurance athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govus, A.D.; Abbiss, C.R.; Garvican-Lewis, L.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Laarakkers, C.M.; Gore, C.J.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured the influence of acute hypoxic exercise on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepcidin, and iron biomarkers in athletes. METHODS: In a repeated measures design, 13 moderately trained endurance athletes performed 5 x 4 min intervals at 90 % of their peak oxygen consumption velocity (v

  9. Research on Athletic Training and Nutritional Supplement of Sugar and Protein in Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Mi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The research has the significance of revealing that the human being originates from the sports and develops with the sports, the human being is closely related with the sports. Through exercise, the energy is consumed, but at same time, the health is enhanced. For professional athletic training, the energy replacement shall be made in a scientific, careful and comprehensive way. Through supplement of nutritional ingredients such as sugar and protein etc., in diet, the human metabolism will be enhanced and the cardio-pulmonary function can be improved. Therefore, how to realize the most effective athletic training and energy supplement is an important subject for long term study. By means of the methods such as documentary analysis, data comparison and case analysis etc., the issues existing in athletic training and supplement of sugar and protein in diet are studied, so as to realize the best athletic training and nutritional supplement. The research conclusion lies in that the athletic training and nutritional supplement of sugar and protein in diet not only make the athletes recover and improve their energy, but also play an active guaranteeing role for athletic training.

  10. Sensorimotor Learning in a Computerized Athletic Training Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasich, Kristina; Ramger, Ben; Holton, Laura; Wang, Lingling; Mitroff, Stephen R; Gregory Appelbaum, L

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor abilities are crucial for performance in athletic, military, and other occupational activities, and there is great interest in understanding learning in these skills. Here, behavioral performance was measured over three days as twenty-seven participants practiced multiple sessions on the Nike SPARQ Sensory Station (Nike, Inc., Beaverton, Oregon), a computerized visual and motor assessment battery. Wrist-worn actigraphy was recorded to monitor sleep-wake cycles. Significant learning was observed in tasks with high visuomotor control demands but not in tasks of visual sensitivity. Learning was primarily linear, with up to 60% improvement, but did not relate to sleep quality in this normal-sleeping population. These results demonstrate differences in the rate and capacity for learning across perceptual and motor domains, indicating potential targets for sensorimotor training interventions. PMID:27254262

  11. Altitude training causes haematological fluctuations with relevance for the Athlete Biological Passport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Lundby, Carsten; Lundby, Anne Kristine;

    2015-01-01

    The impact of altitude training on haematological parameters and the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) was evaluated in international-level elite athletes. One group of swimmers lived high and trained high (LHTH, n = 10) for three to four weeks at 2130 m or higher whereas a control group (n = 10...... the ABPS threshold at day +14. In the control group, no values exceeded the individual ABP reference range. In conclusion, LHTH induces haematological changes in Olympic-level elite athletes which can exceed the individually generated references in the ABP. Training at altitude should be considered...

  12. Noninvasive evaluation of world class athletes engaged in different modes of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, A G; Adams, T D; Yanowitz, F G; Ridges, J D; Orsmond, G; Nelson, A G

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated by noninvasive methods the cardiac structure and functional characteristics of world class athletes participating in different types of training programs. Fourteen subjects, including 4 strength-trained (discus and shot put), 4 endurance-trained (long distance runners), 4 decathlon-trained (strength and endurance), 2 wheelchair athletes and 31 college-age control subjects were evaluated using electrocardiography, M-mode echocardiography and maximal oxygen consumption. M-mode echocardiography measurements of left ventricular structure and function were compared before and after normalization for lean body weight. As expected, endurance athletes had greater maximal O2 consumption than the other groups (p less than 0.05). Before normalization for lean body weight, there were no significant differences in end-diastolic dimensions. After normalization, the endurance, wheelchair and control subjects had end-diastolic dimensions larger than those of strength athletes. Strength athletes appeared to have a much larger posterior wall and septal thickness than all groups except the decathlon athletes. However, when normalized, there was no difference among any of the groups. Previous investigators have attempted to determine "normalcy" of cardiac hypertrophy by looking at the ratio of left ventricular wall thickness to left ventricular radius. In the present study, the thickness to radius ratio in strength athletes was 33% greater than that in endurance athletes. It appears that the left ventricular wall thickness in the strength athletes occurred without a concomitant increase in left ventricular radius and that the left ventricular hypertrophy of world class athletes is related to the total increase in lean body weight. However, ventricular dimensions may be related more to the type of overload experienced. PMID:2913737

  13. Electrocardiographic specificities in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazić Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of electrocardiogram in athletes as a routine screening method for diagnosing potentially dangerous cardiovascular diseases is still an issue of debate. According to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology, the recording of electrocardiogram is necessary in all athletes as a screening method, whereas the guidelines of the American Heart Association do not necessitate an electrocardiogram as a screening method and they insist on detailed personal and family history and clinical examination. Classification of electrocardiogram changes in athletes. According to the classification of the European Society of Cardiology, electrocardiogram changes in athletes are divided into two groups: a usual (physiological that are connected with training; b unusual (potentially clinically relevant that are not connected with training. Sudden cardiac death in athletes. The most frequent causes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital coronary artery anomalies, while others may be found only sporadically at autopsy. Physiological electrocardiogram changes are frequent in asymptomatic athletes and they do not require further assessment. They include sinus bradycardia, atrioventricular blocks of I and II degree - Wenkebach, isolated increased QRS voltage, incomplete right bundle branch block and early repolarization. Potentially pathological electrocardiogram changes in athletes are not frequent but they are alarming and they urge further assessment to diagnose the underlying cardiovascular disease as well as the prevention of sudden cardiac death. They include: T wave inversion, ST segment depression, complete right or left bundle branch block, atrial pre-excitation syndrome-WPW, long QT interval, short QT interval, Brugada like electrocardiogram finding. Conclusion. Introduction of electrocardiogram recording into the screening protocol in athletes increases the sensitivity of evaluation and may help to discover

  14. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of and Academic Preparation in the Use of Psychological Skills in Sport Injury Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.; Hamson-Utley, J. Jordan; Antoine, Beth; Knutson, Rebecca; Thomae, Jeffrey; Hoenig, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Context: Injured athletes rely on athletic trainers to assist them when recovering from injury. Over the last 20 years, the use of psychological skills to speed recovery has become increasingly popular. Objective: Explore athletic training students' perceptions of the importance and effectiveness of psychological skills in the rehabilitation of…

  15. Fluid Balance During Training in Elite Young Athletes of Different Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutis, Giannis; Kavouras, Stavros A; Angelopoulou, Athanasia; Skoulariki, Chara; Bismpikou, Stefani; Mourtakos, Stamatis; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-12-01

    Although there are many studies demonstrating a high percentage of adult athletes who start exercise in suboptimal hydration state, limited data concerning hydration levels in athletic youth exist. The purpose of this study was to identify the hydration status of elite young athletes of different sports, during a typical day of training. Fifty-nine young elite male athletes from different sports (basketball, gymnastics, swimming, running, and canoeing) participated in the study (age: 15.2 ± 1.3 years; years of training: 7.7 ± 2.0). Hydration status was assessed in the morning, before and immediately after practice. Data collection took place at the same time of the day, with mean environmental temperature and humidity at the time of the measurements at 27.6 ± 0.9° C and 58 ± 8%, respectively. All athletes trained for approximately 90 minutes, and they were consuming fluids ad libitum throughout their practice. Over 89% of the athletes were hypohydrated (urine specific gravity [USG] ≥1.020 mg·dl) based on their first morning urine sample. Pretraining urine samples revealed that 76.3% of the athletes were hypohydrated, whereas a significant high percent remained hypohydrated even after training according to USG values ≥1.020 mg·dl (74.5%) and urine color scale: 5-6 (76.3%). Mean body weight loss during training was -1.1 ± 0.07%. We concluded that the prevalence of hypohydration among elite young athletes is very high, as indicated by the USG and urine color values. The majority of the athletes was hypohydrated throughout the day and dehydrated even more during practice despite fluid availability.

  16. High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency among elite Spanish athletes: the importance of outdoor training adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara Valtueña

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The discovery of vitamin D muscle receptors in the last few years suggested a significant role in muscle tissue, pointing out athletes as a special group. Specific data are scarce. Aim: The main aim of the current paper was to provide, for the first time, comparable data about vitamin D status in elite Spanish athletes by sport, age, season and training environment. Methods: Four hundred and eight elite athletes with a mean age of 22.8 ± 8.4 years were recruited from the High-performance sport centre in Barcelona for this cross-sectional study. Athletes from 34 different sports modalities were analysed. Data were available for vitamin D status, training environment, seasonality and number of medical visits. All data were analysed using SPSS version 18.0. Results: Mean 25(OHD of all athletes was 56.7 ± 23.4 nmol/L. Approximately 82% of the athletes were below the optimal levels, (< 75nmol/l, 45% had moderate deficient levels (< 50 nmol/L and 6% had severe deficiency (< 27.5 nmol/L. We have observed a steady increase in 25(OHD concentrations with increasing age (p < 0.01 Highest levels were observed in those subjects training outdoors compared with those training indoor (p<0.01. Differences between sport modalities were observed. Even during summer, 87% of the athletes had insufficient 25(OHD concentrations. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency among elite Spanish athletes. Outdoor training could ensure vitamin D sufficiency and differences between sports modalities should be taken into account for future research. The results contribute to identify the need of optimizing vitamin D status across athletes.

  17. Spondyloptosis in athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, Ana Paula Luppino; Abreu, Andressa Silva; Seguro, Luciana Parente Costa; Guedes, Lissiane Karine Noronha; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Pinto, Ana Lucia de Sá

    2014-01-01

    The adolescent athletes are at greater risk of low back pain and structural spine injuries. Spondylolysis is responsible for the majority of back pain cases in young athletes, rarely occurring in adults. We report a case of a 13-year-old judo female athlete, who came to our service with 5 months of progressive low back pain during training which was initially attributed to mechanical causes, without any further investigation by imaging methods. At admission, the patient had lumbar deformity, antalgic posture and bilaterally positive unipodalic lumbar hyperextension maneuver. After a research which showed spondyloptosis, the patient underwent surgery. In this article, we discuss, based on this case report, the diagnostic approach to low back pain in young athletes, since the complaint of chronic back pain can be a marker of a structural lesion that may be permanent and bring irreversible functional loss. PMID:25054602

  18. Citius, Altius, Fortius: beneficial effects of resistance training for young athletes: Narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Lloyd, Rhodri S; MacDonald, James; Myer, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The motto of the Olympic Games is Citius, Altius, Fortius which is Latin for 'Faster, Higher, Stronger'. It is a clarion call to all competitors, including the youngest, to engage in training strategies that prepare athletes to be the best in the world. Existing research indicates that various forms of resistance training can elicit performance improvements in young athletes. Stronger young athletes will be better prepared to learn complex movements, master sport tactics, and sustain the demands of training and competition. An integrative training programme grounded in resistance training and motor skill development can optimise a young athlete's potential to maximise their athletic and sporting performance, while reducing the risk of a sports-related injury. Resistance training may be especially important for modern-day young athletes who are more likely to specialise in one sport at an early age at the expense of enhancing general physical fitness and learning diversified sport skills. Structured interventions that include qualified instruction; targeted movement practice; and strength and conditioning activities that are developmentally appropriate, progressive and technique driven are needed to attain a level of athleticism that is consistent with the Olympic motto. PMID:26089321

  19. Citius, Altius, Fortius: beneficial effects of resistance training for young athletes: Narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Lloyd, Rhodri S; MacDonald, James; Myer, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The motto of the Olympic Games is Citius, Altius, Fortius which is Latin for 'Faster, Higher, Stronger'. It is a clarion call to all competitors, including the youngest, to engage in training strategies that prepare athletes to be the best in the world. Existing research indicates that various forms of resistance training can elicit performance improvements in young athletes. Stronger young athletes will be better prepared to learn complex movements, master sport tactics, and sustain the demands of training and competition. An integrative training programme grounded in resistance training and motor skill development can optimise a young athlete's potential to maximise their athletic and sporting performance, while reducing the risk of a sports-related injury. Resistance training may be especially important for modern-day young athletes who are more likely to specialise in one sport at an early age at the expense of enhancing general physical fitness and learning diversified sport skills. Structured interventions that include qualified instruction; targeted movement practice; and strength and conditioning activities that are developmentally appropriate, progressive and technique driven are needed to attain a level of athleticism that is consistent with the Olympic motto.

  20. Athletic Training Students' Perception of Significant Clinical Instructor Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Carlen; Martin, Malissa

    2010-01-01

    Context: Characteristics of a model clinical instructor (CI) continue to be defined. However, certain characteristics are still unknown. Objective: To more fully define and describe quality clinical instruction by examining the impact of employment status, years of experience as a certified athletic trainer (AT), and employment setting on athletic…

  1. Comparative analysis of the effectiveness of different training programs for athletes of high qualification, specializing in rowing

    OpenAIRE

    Miftahutdinova, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the efficiency of different programs of training sessions to improve operational preparedness qualified athletes who specialize in rowing. Materials and Methods: the study included 10 athletes craftsmanship that are part of the national team of Ukraine rowing. To assess the functional training using computer program "SHVSM" and submaximal test PWC170. Results are content authoring program training sessions to improve functional training highly skilled athletes who special...

  2. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed. PMID:21184023

  3. Leadership in athletic training: implications for practice and education in allied health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Leadership behaviors are an important aspect of athletic training and are needed within all allied health care disciples. A two-phase, exploratory, non-experimental research study using a Delphi technique and a randomly selected sample of athletic trainers (n = 161) was conducted to determine leadership competencies perceived to be important for athletic training practice and education. The Delphi technique (phase one) resulted in the Leadership Development in Athletic Training instrument (LDAT). In the national survey (phase two), respondents used the LDAT to rate the importance of leadership competencies for athletic training practice and for athletic training education. Coefficient alphas ranged from α = 0.83 to 0.97 and provided satisfactory estimates of internal consistency. Concurrent, construct, and convergent validity were established. Forty-nine leadership competencies were rated important for practice and 48 for education (M = 1.5, p ≤ 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis revealed that leadership competencies were organized by four constructs (with six emphases): 1) personality characteristics, 2) diagnosing context and people skills, 3) communication and initiative, and 4) strategic thinking. Repeated measures ANOVA with Sidak post-hoc adjustments indicated each leadership construct significantly increased in importance as the level of the ATEP progressed.

  4. Aortic root size and prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee Bigi, Mohammad Ali; Aslani, Amir

    2007-08-01

    Athletes involved in mainly static or isometric exercise (e.g., weight lifting, power lifting, and bodybuilding) develop pressure overloads due to the high systemic arterial pressure found in this type of exercise. It is hypothesized that chronically elevated aortic wall tension in strength-trained athletes is associated with aortic dilatation and regurgitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate aortic root size and the prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength-trained athletes. The cohort included 100 male athletes (mean age 22.1 +/- 3.6 years; all were finalists or medalists in the country) and 128 healthy age- and height-matched subjects (the control group). Aortic root diameters at end-diastole were measured at 4 locations: (1) the aortic annulus, (2) the sinuses of Valsalva, (3) the sinotubular junction, and (4) the maximal diameter of the proximal ascending aorta. Aortic root diameters at all levels were significantly greater in the strength-trained athletes (p 18 and 36 and 54 months), progressive enlargement was found at all aortic diameters. In conclusion, aortic root diameters in all segments of the aortic root were significantly greater in elite strength-trained athletes compared with an age- and height-matched population.

  5. Athletic Apparel Industry Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE; TAN; NAFISUL; ISLAM; MILAN; MITRASINOVIC

    2015-01-01

    Industry Overview The athletic apparel industry is the fastest growing segment of global clothing industry differentiated by offering high quality athletic apparel made of technically advanced fabrics.The athletic apparel is made for a variety of sports and physical activities for children,men and women and enhances comfort and performance of athletes.The industry consists of companies that design and market

  6. Oxidative stress and antioxidant status response of handball athletes: implications for sport training monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Campoio, Thais Regina; Guerra, Beatriz Alves; Otton, Rosemari

    2013-10-01

    The chronic exposure to regular exercise training seems to improve antioxidant defense systems. However, the intense physical training imposed on elite athletes may lead to overtraining associated with oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of different training loads and competition on oxidative stress, biochemical parameters and antioxidant enzymatic defense in handball athletes during 6-months of monitoring. Ten male elite handball athletes were recruited to the study. Blood samples were collected four times every six weeks throughout the season. During most intense periods of training and competitions there were significant changes in plasma indices of oxidative stress (increased TBARS and decreased thiols). Conversely, chronic adaptations to exercise training demonstrated a significant protective effect against oxidative stress in erythrocyte (decrease in TBARs and carbonyl group levels). Erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly increased, suggesting a training-induced antioxidant adaptation. Biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage were significantly increased during high-intensity training period (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase). No significant changes were observed in plasma IL-6, TNF-α and uric acid, whereas a significant reduction was found in the IL-1β concentration and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers can change throughout the season in competitive athletes, reflecting the physical stress and muscle damage that occurs as the result of competitive handball training. In addition, these biochemical measurements can be applied in the physiological follow-up of athletes.

  7. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  8. Special physical preparation of athletes in motor sport during testing methods basic training level of preparedness for competitive athlete load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednychenko M.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish the reasons for the high fatigue pilots during passage race course. Material : the study involved athletes and race car drivers depending on the rank of the competition. The total number surveyed was 140 people. Results : in vitro studies have established a pattern of growth of errors in the evaluation of the available jobs at different levels of fatigue. This asymmetry observed in the haptic display and reflex mean arterial pressure when simultaneous registration on the left and right side body. After the competition and training at a special physical training were examined 36 athletes. Comparison of the results display asymmetry haptic reflex and mean arterial pressure showed reliable changes in the resistance of the organism to a specific exertion racers. Conclusions : the optimal load is characterized by indicators of coordination and reflex reaction haptic mean arterial pressure. These indicators do not go beyond the norms of its symmetrical appearance. This characterizes a uniform and sufficient blood supply body during the execution of competitive and training load.

  9. Effect of heavy training in contact sports on MRI findings in the pubic region of asymptomatic competitive athletes compared with non-athlete controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow edema (BME) at the pubic symphysis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is usually associated with groin pain and stress injury of the pubic bone. Little is known of the pubic MR imaging findings of asymptomatic heavy training athletes in contact sports. Pelvic MRI of male asymptomatic soccer (n = 10), ice hockey (n = 10), bandy (n = 10) and female floor-ball players (n = 10) were compared with non-athlete controls (10 males, 10 females) without groin pain to analyse the presence of BME (on a four-point scale). To study the possible changes of BME directly following heavy physical activity, 10 bandy players underwent MRI before and immediately after a 2-h training session. Magnetic resonance imaging showed minimal BME (grade 1) at the pubic symphysis in 19 of the 40 athletes (48%). Two soccer and 2 ice hockey players (20%) had moderate grade 2 pubic edema, but severe grade 3 BME findings were not found. Also 10 out of 20 (50%) of controls had grade 1 BME. The extent of increased signal was equally distributed in the asymptomatic athletes of different contact sports and controls. A heavy 2-h training session did not cause any enhanced signal at the pubic symphysis. This study indicates that the presence of grade 1 pubic BME was a frequent finding in contact sports and comparable to that in non-athletes. Grade 2 BME was found only in asymptomatic athletes undergoing heavy training. (orig.)

  10. Effect of heavy training in contact sports on MRI findings in the pubic region of asymptomatic competitive athletes compared with non-athlete controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paajanen, Hannu [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Kuopio (Finland); Hermunen, Heikki; Karonen, Jari [Central Hospital of Mikkeli, Department of Radiology, Mikkeli (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Bone marrow edema (BME) at the pubic symphysis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is usually associated with groin pain and stress injury of the pubic bone. Little is known of the pubic MR imaging findings of asymptomatic heavy training athletes in contact sports. Pelvic MRI of male asymptomatic soccer (n = 10), ice hockey (n = 10), bandy (n = 10) and female floor-ball players (n = 10) were compared with non-athlete controls (10 males, 10 females) without groin pain to analyse the presence of BME (on a four-point scale). To study the possible changes of BME directly following heavy physical activity, 10 bandy players underwent MRI before and immediately after a 2-h training session. Magnetic resonance imaging showed minimal BME (grade 1) at the pubic symphysis in 19 of the 40 athletes (48%). Two soccer and 2 ice hockey players (20%) had moderate grade 2 pubic edema, but severe grade 3 BME findings were not found. Also 10 out of 20 (50%) of controls had grade 1 BME. The extent of increased signal was equally distributed in the asymptomatic athletes of different contact sports and controls. A heavy 2-h training session did not cause any enhanced signal at the pubic symphysis. This study indicates that the presence of grade 1 pubic BME was a frequent finding in contact sports and comparable to that in non-athletes. Grade 2 BME was found only in asymptomatic athletes undergoing heavy training. (orig.)

  11. The Research on Biochemical Indexes of Athletes after Taking Nutritional Supplements during Winter Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Pan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper takes hemoglobin and blood urea as the indexes of biochemical monitoring and accordingly supplying sports nutritional supplements into them at the same time, the effect on exercise capacity and the changes in biochemical indicators in different training stages will be observed in this research. The quality of winter training determines the motion states of athletes in the next year. However, the poor weather condition and the large amount of training will lead to the accumulation of fatigue, affecting the training status of athletes seriously. Therefore, it is essential to monitor their biochemical indicators and supply them with special nutrition. In order to ensure the completion of a large load of training for athletes, it is far enough to supplement the nutrients just by food, some special powerful nutrition are also needed in a scientific way.

  12. Application of Serum CK and BUN Determination in Monitoring Pre-Competition Training of Badminton Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yun

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of serum creatine kinase (CK) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in monitoring pre-competition training of badminton athletes, the pre-competition training load of 20 badminton athletes was studied, and serum CK and BUN were determined before, immediate and next morning after training. The results showed that after intensive training for one week, serum CK levels were significantly increased by 57.53 mmol/L (P<0.05). After regulation of the training intensity, average serum CK levels were increased by 21.79 mmol/L (P<0.05). BUN contents were increased by 0.83 mmol/L on average with the difference being not significant (P>0.05). After intermittent training, there was significant difference in the average increased levels of serum CK in athletes (P<0.05). There was significant difference before and after regulation of training (P<0.05). The increased levels of BUN were 0.78 mmol/L without significant difference (P>0.05). It was concluded that serum CK was one of the biochemical indicators monitoring the training load sensitivity of badminton athletes, but BUN was of little value in monitoring the training load. Both serum CK and BUN recovered slowly after one-week intensive training and intermittent training, suggesting the metabolic mechanism of human body in training needs further study.

  13. Athletic Training Educators' Pedagogical Strategies for Preparing Students to Address Sudden Death in Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Educational training programs both impart knowledge and allow students to practice skills to gain clinical competence. Objective: Understand the educational training provided to athletic training students regarding sudden death in sport beyond exertional heat stroke. Design: An exploratory, qualitative study using telephone interviews and…

  14. Monitoring Hydration Status Pre- and Post-Training among University Athletes Using Urine Color and Weight Loss Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Marquitta C.; Salandy, Sinead T.; Beckford, Safiya E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hydration status pre- and post-training among university athletes using urine color and weight loss as indicators. Participants: Participants were 52 university athletes training for campus games in a developing country. Methods: Pre- and post-training urine specimens were compared with a standard urine color scale.…

  15. The Effect of High-Fidelity Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Simulation on Athletic Training Student Knowledge, Confidence, Emotions, and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivener, Kristin Ann; Gloe, Donna Sue

    2015-01-01

    Context: High-fidelity simulation is widely used in healthcare for the training and professional education of students though literature of its application to athletic training education remains sparse. Objective: This research attempts to address a wide-range of data. This includes athletic training student knowledge acquisition from…

  16. Impact of intense training and rapid weight changes on salivary parameters in elite female Taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M-L; Ko, M-H; Chang, C-K; Chou, K-M; Fang, S-H

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the cumulative effects of prolonged intensive training with or without rapid weight changes (RWC) on salivary parameters of elite female Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. Ten elite female Taiwanese TKD athletes (ages: 21.3 ± 1.2 years of age, Ht 164.4 ± 5.6 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. Resting saliva samples were collected at 28-, 14-, 7-, and 1 day before and 1-, 7-, 21 days after a national competition. The levels of salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA), cortisol, and lactoferrin were measured. In analyzing the anthropometric data, we found that a significant proportion (50%) of elite female TKD athletes had RWC shortly before and after a national competition. The participants were allocated either to the RWC or to the non-RWC group according to their weight change profiles. Our results showed that levels of sIgA and cortisol of athletes with RWC were significantly modulated during the study period. However, athletes without RWC only showed reduced lactoferrin after competition. The results presented here demonstrate that intensive training in combination with RWC affects the mucosal immunity and disrupts the cortisol stress response of elite female TKD athletes.

  17. Oxidative stress biomarker monitoring in elite women volleyball athletes during a 6-week training period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović, Jelena; Dopsaj, Violeta; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Vujović, Ana; Stefanović, Aleksandra; Nešić, Goran

    2011-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (a) if reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) are a reliable parameter for monitoring oxidative stress in athletes alone or in association with other parameters of oxidative stress and depending on whether antioxidant supplements are taken or not; (b) the level of oxidative stress in athletes before the competition season; and (c) if oxidative status could be improved in volleyball athletes. Sixteen women athletes (supplemented group) received an antioxidant cocktail containing vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc gluconate, and selenium as a dietary supplement during a 6-week training period, whereas 12 of them (control group) received no dietary supplement. Blood samples were taken before and after the training period. The following parameters were measured: ROMs, superoxide anion (O2⁻₂), malondialdehyde (MDA), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), biological antioxidative potential (BAP), paraoxonase activity toward paraoxon (POase) and diazoxon (DZOase), superoxide dismutase(SOD), total sulfydryl group concentration (SH groups), and lipid status. Reactive oxygen metabolites were taken as the dependent variable and MDA, O2⁻₂, AOPP, and LOOH as independent variables. In the group of athletes who have received supplementation, linear regression analysis revealed that the implemented model had a lower influence on dROMs (70.4 vs. 27.9%) after the training period. The general linear model showed significant differences between parameters before and after training/supplementation (Wilks' lambda = 0.074, F = 11.76, p level, significant increases in ROM levels (p stress was reduced in athletes who received supplements. During the precompetition training period, treatment with dietary supplements prevented the depletion of antioxidative defense in volleyball athletes.

  18. Incidence of exercise-induced asthma in adolescent athletes under different training and environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulou, Maria P; Kokaridas, Dimitrios G; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi F; Karadonas, Michalis I; Fotiadou, Eleni G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if there were differences in the incidence of exercise-induced bronchospasm between athletes in different sports, which take place under different environmental conditions such as open places, closed courses, and swimming pools with similar exercise intensity (football, basketball, water polo) using the free running test. The study included 90 adolescents (3 groups of 30) aged 14-18 years recruited from academies in northern Greece. All the participants were initially subjected to (a) a clinical examination and cardiorespiratory assessment by a physician and (b) free running test of a 6-minute duration and measurement with a microspirometer of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁). Only the participants who had measured a decrease in FEV₁ ≥ 10% were reevaluated with the microspirometer during a training session. The examination of all the participants during the free running test showed that 22 athletes, that is, 9, 8, and 5 of football, basketball, and water polo athletes, respectively, demonstrated an FEV₁ ≥ 10 drop. Reevaluation of the 22 participants during training showed that 5 out 9 (55%) football athletes, 4 out of 8 basketball athletes (50%), and none of the 5 athletes of the water polo team displayed a drop of FEV₁ ≥ 10%. Despite the absence of any significant statistical differences between the 3 groups, the analysis of variances did show a trend of a lower incidence of EIA in the water polo athletes. It was found that a football or basketball game can induce EIA in young athletes but to a lesser degree than the free running test can induce. The water polo can be a safer sport even for participants with a medical history of asthma or allergies. PMID:21912293

  19. Nutrition for the pediatric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Viswanath B; Goulopoulou, Styliani

    2004-08-01

    A paucity of literature exists with regard to research on nutrition for the pediatric athlete. This lack of research makes the development of specific nutritional recommendations for young athletes problematic. This issue is made difficult by the macro- and micronutrient intake required for growth and development in conjunction with that required for sports. Exogenous carbohydrate drinks could be considered for the young athlete engaged in both endurance exercise and high-intensity exercise. Monitoring of the energy intake during resistance training in the pediatric athlete needs to be considered, as there is evidence to suggest that energy deficits may occur. If decrements in exercise performance are noted, then serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations should be monitored, as nonanemic iron deficiency is prevalent in the pediatric athlete. The pediatric athlete exercising in the heat is susceptible to voluntary dehydration and evidence exists to suggest that a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink will abolish this phenomenon.

  20. The effectiveness of resisted jump training on the VertiMax in high school athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Rhea, Matthew R.; Peterson, M.D.; Lunt, K. T.; Naclerio Ayllón, Fernando José

    2008-01-01

    Resisted jumping devices and resisted plyometric training have become more common in recent years. The effectiveness of such training has yet to be determined among high school athletes. Sixty-four high school athletes (50 boys and 14 girls) from a variety of sports were divided into 2 groups and participated in a training intervention that differed only by the use of the VertiMax jump trainer in 1 group. Lower-body power was tested before and after the intervention and compared statistically...

  1. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Orava, S.; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E.

    1981-01-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most ty...

  2. Selection and Evaluation Guidelines for Clinical Education Settings in Athletic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Laurent, Tim

    2001-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and test standards and associated criteria for the selection and evaluation of a clinical education setting in athletic training. DESIGN AND SETTING: A previously validated set of 20 standards for physical therapy clinical education settings, the associated criteria, and 2 related evaluation forms were systematically judged, revised, and adapted through a survey process. SUBJECTS: Program directors, clinical instructors, and students involved with athletic training clinical education from 28 athletic training education programs approved by the National Athletic Trainers' Association or accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. MEASUREMENTS: We tabulated respondents' critiques and ratings by type of respondent. Items were judged as to whether they were relevant, practical, and suggestive of high-quality clinical education settings. RESULTS: We accepted a final set of 12 standards and 31 associated criteria to measure these standards. The student form lists 23 criteria relevant to these accepted standards. The accepted standards include the following: learning environment, program planning, ethical standards, administrative support, and Setting Coordinator of Clinical Education. CONCLUSIONS: The 12 standards, criteria, and related forms developed in this research project should be used as guidelines rather than as minimal requirements. They could be helpful in forming an impression not only about a particular clinical setting but also about the requirements of clinical education in general. Further research should include evaluating and comparing perceptions between sexes and among ethnic groups concerning their clinical education experiences. Also, standards and criteria for clinical instruction in athletic training should be systematically developed.

  3. Selection and Evaluation Guidelines for Clinical Education Settings in Athletic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Laurent, Tim

    2001-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and test standards and associated criteria for the selection and evaluation of a clinical education setting in athletic training. DESIGN AND SETTING: A previously validated set of 20 standards for physical therapy clinical education settings, the associated criteria, and 2 related evaluation forms were systematically judged, revised, and adapted through a survey process. SUBJECTS: Program directors, clinical instructors, and students involved with athletic training clinical education from 28 athletic training education programs approved by the National Athletic Trainers' Association or accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs. MEASUREMENTS: We tabulated respondents' critiques and ratings by type of respondent. Items were judged as to whether they were relevant, practical, and suggestive of high-quality clinical education settings. RESULTS: We accepted a final set of 12 standards and 31 associated criteria to measure these standards. The student form lists 23 criteria relevant to these accepted standards. The accepted standards include the following: learning environment, program planning, ethical standards, administrative support, and Setting Coordinator of Clinical Education. CONCLUSIONS: The 12 standards, criteria, and related forms developed in this research project should be used as guidelines rather than as minimal requirements. They could be helpful in forming an impression not only about a particular clinical setting but also about the requirements of clinical education in general. Further research should include evaluating and comparing perceptions between sexes and among ethnic groups concerning their clinical education experiences. Also, standards and criteria for clinical instruction in athletic training should be systematically developed. PMID:12937517

  4. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  5. Features power ectomorphs athletes are engaged in bodybuilding in transition training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Dzhym

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop and study the diet of athletes engaged in bodybuilding ectomorphs in transition training considering the restoration of lean body mass and functional state of an athlete Material and Methods: the study involved 18 athletes engaged in bodybuilding ectomorphs included in the national team in the Kharkiv region bodybuilding. Methods were used: the theoretical method and summarize the literature, pedagogical supervision, pedagogical experiment, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: comparative characteristics of the diet have been developed for athletes ectomorphs engaged on bodybuilding to increase muscle weight. It was divided the athletes into two experimental groups: the first EG used a balanced diet that made protein 2 grams per 1 kilogram of body weight and carbohydrates 4–5 g•kg–1 in the second EG was protein 3 grams per 1 kilogram of body weight, and carbohydrate 6 grams kg. Second EG diet consists of 6 single meal and is about 2800–3500 calories per day. Conclusions: on the basis of research by the author offered the optimal diet for athletes ektomorfiv second experimental group engaged in bodybuilding.

  6. Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load.

  7. Training adaptation and heart rate variability in elite endurance athletes: opening the door to effective monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plews, Daniel J; Laursen, Paul B; Stanley, Jamie; Kilding, Andrew E; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is often considered a convenient non-invasive assessment tool for monitoring individual adaptation to training. Decreases and increases in vagal-derived indices of HRV have been suggested to indicate negative and positive adaptations, respectively, to endurance training regimens. However, much of the research in this area has involved recreational and well-trained athletes, with the small number of studies conducted in elite athletes revealing equivocal outcomes. For example, in elite athletes, studies have revealed both increases and decreases in HRV to be associated with negative adaptation. Additionally, signs of positive adaptation, such as increases in cardiorespiratory fitness, have been observed with atypical concomitant decreases in HRV. As such, practical ways by which HRV can be used to monitor training status in elites are yet to be established. This article addresses the current literature that has assessed changes in HRV in response to training loads and the likely positive and negative adaptations shown. We reveal limitations with respect to how the measurement of HRV has been interpreted to assess positive and negative adaptation to endurance training regimens and subsequent physical performance. We offer solutions to some of the methodological issues associated with using HRV as a day-to-day monitoring tool. These include the use of appropriate averaging techniques, and the use of specific HRV indices to overcome the issue of HRV saturation in elite athletes (i.e., reductions in HRV despite decreases in resting heart rate). Finally, we provide examples in Olympic and World Champion athletes showing how these indices can be practically applied to assess training status and readiness to perform in the period leading up to a pinnacle event. The paper reveals how longitudinal HRV monitoring in elites is required to understand their unique individual HRV fingerprint. For the first time, we demonstrate how

  8. Rationale and Resources for Teaching the Mathematical Modeling of Athletic Training and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David C.; Skiba, Philip F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of professions rely on exercise prescription to improve health or athletic performance, including coaching, fitness/personal training, rehabilitation, and exercise physiology. It is therefore advisable that the professionals involved learn the various tools available for designing effective training programs. Mathematical modeling of…

  9. A systematic review on heart-rate recovery to monitor changes in training status in athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Lamberts, R.P.; Kallen, V.L.; Jin, A.; Van Meeteren, N.L.U.

    2012-01-01

    Heart-rate recovery (HRR) has been proposed as a marker of autonomic function and training status in athletes. The authors performed a systematic review of studies that examined HRR after training. Five cross-sectional studies and 8 studies investigating changes over time (longitudinal) met our crit

  10. Motivation and well-being among elite junior athletes : the role of challenge during training

    OpenAIRE

    Tyssen, Oddvar Jordheim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine motivation, positive emotions and challenge in groups of elite junior athletes. Results are discussed in terms of self-determination theory and the functional well-being approach. Men and female elite junior athletes (N=211) aged 15-19 years completed a series of online questionnaires. Results revealed that a) older athletes reported higher levels of extrinsic motivation than younger athletes, b) younger athletes reported higher levels of both eudai...

  11. Predictors of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Elite Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toennesen, Louise L; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Pedersen, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Elite athletes frequently experience asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We aimed to investigate predictors of airway pathophysiology in a group of unselected elite summer-sport athletes, training for the summer 2008 Olympic Games, including markers of airway inflammation...

  12. Heart Rate Recovery in Decision Support for High Performance Athlete Training Schedules

    OpenAIRE

    Cornforth, David J.; Dean Robinson; Ian Spence; Herbert Jelinek

    2014-01-01

    This work investigated the suitability of a new tool for decision support in training programs of high performance athletes. The aim of this study was to find a reliable and robust measure of the fitness of an athlete for use as a tool for adjusting training schedules. We examined the use of heart rate recovery percentage (HRr%) for this purpose, using a two-phased approach. Phase 1 consisted of testing the suitability of HRr% as a measure of aerobic fitness, using a modified running test spe...

  13. Sport Opportunities for Athletes with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This series outlines sport opportunities for athletes with disabilities. Included are articles discussing sports for athletes with cerebral palsy, deaf athletes, blind athletes, wheelchair bound athletes, amputee athletes, as well as a discussion of the Special Olympics. (JMK)

  14. Nutrition and athletic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002458.htm Nutrition and athletic performance To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nutrition can help enhance athletic performance. An active lifestyle ...

  15. Nutrition and athletic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition can help enhance athletic performance. An active lifestyle and exercise routine, along with eating well, is ... al. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Nutrition and athletic performance. Med Sci Sports Exerc . 2009 ...

  16. Bibliography on Collegiate Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Denise; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A bibliography on collegiate athletics with approximately 400 items is presented. Topics include: sports administration, sports histories, women's athletics, physical education, problems and scandals, sports organizations, sports and health, and references on many specific sports, especially football. (JMD)

  17. Effects of strength training on endurance capacity in top-level endurance athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, P; Andersen, J L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of concurrent strength (S) and endurance (E) training on adaptive changes in aerobic capacity, endurance performance, maximal muscle strength and muscle morphology is equivocal. Some data suggest an attenuated cardiovascular and musculoskeletal response to combined E and S training......, while other data show unimpaired or even superior adaptation compared with either training regime alone. However, the effect of concurrent S and E training only rarely has been examined in top-level endurance athletes. This review describes the effect of concurrent SE training on short-term and long......-term endurance performance in endurance-trained subjects, ranging from moderately trained individuals to elite top-level athletes. It is concluded that strength training can lead to enhanced long-term (>30 min) and short-term (...

  18. Speed endurance training is a powerful stimulus for physiological adaptations and performance improvements of athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaia, F. M.; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-01-01

    the oxidative capacity and improve intense short-duration/repeated high-intensity exercise performance lasting 30 s to 4 min, as it occurs in a number of sports. When combined with a basic volume of training including some aerobic high-intensity sessions, speed endurance training is also useful in enhancing...... performance during longer events, e.g. 40 K cycling and 10 K running. Athletes in team sports involving intense exercise actions and endurance aspects can also benefit from performing speed endurance training. These improvements don't appear to depend on changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), muscle......The present article reviews the physiological and performance effects of speed endurance training consisting of exercise bouts at near maximal intensities in already trained subjects. Despite a reduction in training volume, speed endurance training of endurance-trained athletes can maintain...

  19. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  20. The Student Athlete Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayles, Joy Gaston

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, the literature on the experiences of collegiate student athletes was rather scarce. Since that time the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has passed several eligibility rules to address concerns about the academic performance and the overall experience of student athletes on college campuses. As such, the…

  1. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...

  2. Women in Athletic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sandra L.; Gilmour, Suzanne L.; Kinsella, Mary P.

    2005-01-01

    Despite significant increased participation opportunities for girls and women in sport following the passage of Title IX, women remain underrepresented in athletic leadership roles. Thirty eight female and 158 male high school athletic directors responded to a 19-item Athletic Director Survey (ADS) designed to elicit information on the following:…

  3. Comparative analysis of the effectiveness of different training programs for athletes of high qualification, specializing in rowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Miftahutdinova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the efficiency of different programs of training sessions to improve operational preparedness qualified athletes who specialize in rowing. Materials and Methods: the study included 10 athletes craftsmanship that are part of the national team of Ukraine rowing. To assess the functional training using computer program "SHVSM" and submaximal test PWC170. Results are content authoring program training sessions to improve functional training highly skilled athletes who specialize in rowing and academic results its experimental verification. Conclusions: the experiment confirmed a higher efficiency of the program of training sessions for rowing-sportsmen team Ukraine compared with the program, which is traditionally used, as evidenced by the survey.

  4. Atrial remodeling, autonomic tone, and lifetime training hours in nonelite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Matthias; Roten, Laurent; Tanner, Hildegard; Wilhelm, Ilca; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Saner, Hugo

    2011-08-15

    Endurance athletes have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) at 40 to 50 years of age. Signal-averaged P-wave analysis has been used for identifying patients at risk for AF. We evaluated the impact of lifetime training hours on signal-averaged P-wave duration and modifying factors. Nonelite men athletes scheduled to participate in the 2010 Grand Prix of Bern, a 10-mile race, were invited. Four hundred ninety-two marathon and nonmarathon runners applied for participation, 70 were randomly selected, and 60 entered the final analysis. Subjects were stratified according to their lifetime training hours (average endurance and strength training hours per week × 52 × training years) in low (4,500 hours) training groups. Mean age was 42 ± 7 years. From low to high training groups signal-averaged P-wave duration increased from 131 ± 6 to 142 ± 13 ms (p = 0.026), and left atrial volume increased from 24.8 ± 4.6 to 33.1 ± 6.2 ml/m(2) (p = 0.001). Parasympathetic tone expressed as root of the mean squared differences of successive normal-to-normal intervals increased from 34 ± 13 to 47 ± 16 ms (p = 0.002), and premature atrial contractions increased from 6.1 ± 7.4 to 10.8 ± 7.7 per 24 hours (p = 0.026). Left ventricular mass increased from 100.7 ± 9.0 to 117.1 ± 18.2 g/m(2) (p = 0.002). Left ventricular systolic and diastolic function and blood pressure at rest were normal in all athletes and showed no differences among training groups. Four athletes (6.7%) had a history of paroxysmal AF, as did 1 athlete in the medium training group and 3 athletes in the high training group (p = 0.252). In conclusion, in nonelite men athletes lifetime training hours are associated with prolongation of signal-averaged P-wave duration and an increase in left atrial volume. The altered left atrial substrate may facilitate occurrence of AF. Increased vagal tone and atrial ectopy may serve as modifying and triggering factors. PMID:21658663

  5. Amphetamine margin in sports. [Effects on performance of highly trained athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1980-01-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seems clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both man and rat. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogues of such performance have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  6. Comparison of Non-Invasive Individual Monitoring of the Training and Health of Athletes with Commercially Available Wearable Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düking, Peter; Hotho, Andreas; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Fuss, Franz Konstantin; Sperlich, Billy

    2016-01-01

    Athletes adapt their training daily to optimize performance, as well as avoid fatigue, overtraining and other undesirable effects on their health. To optimize training load, each athlete must take his/her own personal objective and subjective characteristics into consideration and an increasing number of wearable technologies (wearables) provide convenient monitoring of various parameters. Accordingly, it is important to help athletes decide which parameters are of primary interest and which wearables can monitor these parameters most effectively. Here, we discuss the wearable technologies available for non-invasive monitoring of various parameters concerning an athlete's training and health. On the basis of these considerations, we suggest directions for future development. Furthermore, we propose that a combination of several wearables is most effective for accessing all relevant parameters, disturbing the athlete as little as possible, and optimizing performance and promoting health.

  7. Help-Seeking Behaviors among Athletic Training Students in the Clinical Education Setting: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mikiko Aoyagi; Freesemann, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Help-seeking is an important self-regulating and proactive strategy that prepares students to be successful learners. It is particularly important in the clinical education setting, in which students must actively engage in learning. Objective: To determine both the type of help-seeking behaviors used by athletic training students in the…

  8. Perceptions of the Benefits to Using a Secondary Admissions Process in Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Some athletic training program (ATP) directors use direct admit, where students are admitted into the ATP directly out of high school. Other ATP directors admit students into the program after a set time period on campus through a secondary admissions process. It remains unknown why ATP directors use various admissions practices.…

  9. Strategies for Highly Effective Athletic Training Education Program Directors: A Practical Approach to Interdependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Following "Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" by Stephen Covey, this article seeks to communicate effective strategies for athletic training education Program Directors (PDs) to follow. Commentary of Covey's work and practical strategies to integrate them into PD practice and responsibilities are provided. Background: Due to a lack…

  10. Athletes in Motion: Training for the Olympic Games with Mind and Body: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerleider, Steven

    Two case studies illustrate the Fine-Tuning Effect and its benefit to participants in athletic competition. The Fine-Tuning Effect is the sharpening of psychological processes that enable physical skills to be expressed in a maximum fashion. Such techniques as muscle relaxation, visual imagery, guided fantasy, autogenic training, and meditation…

  11. Exploring Senior Level Athletic Training Students' Perceptions on Burnout and Work-Life Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jessica L.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The professional socialization process enables athletic training students (ATSs) to gain insights into behaviors, values, and attitudes that characterize their chosen profession. However, the process often focuses on skill development over professional issues. ATSs may be exposed to burnout and work-life conflict, which may impact their…

  12. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  13. Learning Style Preferences of Undergraduate Dietetics, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meredith G.; Hansen, Pamela; Rhee, Yeong; Brundt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the preferred learning style (LS) of college students and compared LS preferences among students majoring in Dietetics, Exercise Science, and Athletic Training. LS questionnaires were distributed to students (N = 693, mean age 20.5 ± 1.7) enrolled in health science courses at three Midwestern universities. Most students…

  14. The Delphi Method: An Approach for Facilitating Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A.; Bulger, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The growing importance of evidence based practice in athletic training is necessitating academics and clinicians to be able to make judgments about the quality or lack of the body of research evidence and peer-reviewed standards pertaining to clinical questions. To assist in the judgment process, consensus methods, namely brainstorming,…

  15. Achievement Goal Orientation for Athletic Training Education: Preparing for Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This review of literature presents the theoretical framework of goal orientation and student achievement from a pedagogical perspective while providing practical applications and implications for integrating goal orientation into athletic training education programs. Data Sources: Selected literature derived from EBSCO, Education…

  16. The Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Knowledge and Behavior to Provide Culturally Competent Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nynas, Suzette Marie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Culturally competent knowledge and skills are critical for all healthcare professionals to possess in order to provide the most appropriate health care for their patients and clients. Objective: To investigate athletic training students' knowledge of culture and cultural differences, to assess the practice of culturally competent care,…

  17. Standardized Patient Encounters Improved Athletic Training Students' Confidence in Clinical Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Researchers have reported that interacting with standardized patients (SPs) is a worthwhile and realistic experience for athletic training (AT) students. These encounters enhance students' interviewing skills, confidence as a clinician, clinical skill development, and interpersonal communication. Objective: To determine how SP encounters…

  18. Approach to the Underperforming Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Mary L; Weiss Kelly, Amanda K

    2016-03-01

    Children and adolescents who participate in intense sports training may face physical and psychologic stresses. The pediatric health care provider can play an important role in monitoring an athlete's preparation by obtaining a proper sports history, assessing sleep hygiene, discussing nutrition and hydration guidelines, and evaluating physiologic causes of fatigue. Educating parents and athletes on the potential risks of high-intensity training, inadequate rest and sleep, and a poor diet may improve the athlete's performance and prevent symptoms of overtraining syndrome. Infectious mononucleosis must also be considered a cause of fatigue among adolescents. The signs and symptoms of overtraining and burnout are discussed in this article. PMID:27031317

  19. The Research on Biochemical Indexes of Athletes after Taking Nutritional Supplements during Winter Training

    OpenAIRE

    Liping Pan

    2015-01-01

    The paper takes hemoglobin and blood urea as the indexes of biochemical monitoring and accordingly supplying sports nutritional supplements into them at the same time, the effect on exercise capacity and the changes in biochemical indicators in different training stages will be observed in this research. The quality of winter training determines the motion states of athletes in the next year. However, the poor weather condition and the large amount of training will lead to the accumulation of...

  20. Effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training on maximal strength and power in trained athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ataee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accommodation resistance is a training technique that may improve strength and power gains beyond those achieved by traditional free weights. In this method, chains are either added on a free-weight bar and combined with traditional plates or added to the bar as the entire load. Purpose. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness of accommodation and constant resistance training methods during a four-week period on maximal strength and power in trained athletes. Methods. This study was comprised of 24 trained athletes, including 16 trained males [8 Wushu athletes (Kung-Fu and 8 wrestlers, age: 20.5 ± 2.00 yrs. old]. Participants were initially tested on weight, body circumference, fat percent, upper and lower body maximal strength, determined by the 1-repetition maximum (1RM test, which determines the greatest amount of weight a person can successfully lift, and upper and lower body power. Participants were equally randomized to either accommodation or constant resistance training groups. Both groups underwent resistance training for a four-week period that consisted of three sessions per week. Multivariate repeated-measures analyses of variance of the data were used to verify significant differences in strength and power between groups. The modified Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the obtained results in pre-, mid-, and post test. Results. In the accommodation resistance group, there was a significant difference in lower body maximal strength compared to the constant group (163.12 ± 18.82 kg in the accommodation group vs. 142.25 ± 20.04 kg in the constant group, P = 0.04. No significant differences were found in upper body power, lower body power, and upper body maximal strength between the two groups (P > 0.05. Conclusion. Although there was only a significant difference in lower body maximal strength between groups, accommodation resistance training may induce a physiological training response by improving

  1. Speed endurance training is a powerful stimulus for physiological adaptations and performance improvements of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaia, F M; Bangsbo, J

    2010-10-01

    The present article reviews the physiological and performance effects of speed endurance training consisting of exercise bouts at near maximal intensities in already trained subjects. Despite a reduction in training volume, speed endurance training of endurance-trained athletes can maintain the oxidative capacity and improve intense short-duration/repeated high-intensity exercise performance lasting 30 s to 4 min, as it occurs in a number of sports. When combined with a basic volume of training including some aerobic high-intensity sessions, speed endurance training is also useful in enhancing performance during longer events, e.g. 40 K cycling and 10 K running. Athletes in team sports involving intense exercise actions and endurance aspects can also benefit from performing speed endurance training. These improvements don't appear to depend on changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), muscle substrate levels, glycolytic and oxidative enzymes activity, and membrane transport proteins involved in pH regulation. Instead they appear to be related to a reduced energy expenditure during submaximal exercise and a higher expression of muscle Na(+) ,K(+) pump α-subunits, which via a higher Na(+) ,K(+) pump activity during exercise may delay fatigue development during intense exercise. In conclusion, athletes from disciplines involving periods of intense exercise can benefit from the inclusion of speed endurance sessions in their training programs.

  2. Six weeks of core stability training improves landing kinetics among female capoeira athletes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Simone; Cohen, Daniel; Hayes, Lawrence

    2015-03-29

    Core stability training (CST) has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively) volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [ploading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [ploading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N·NBW·s-1 respectively [ploading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week 0 and week 6 (p=0.528, p=0.261, and p=0.877, respectively). This study provides evidence that trunk dominant core stability training improves landing kinetics without improving jump height, and may reduce lower extremity injury risk in female athletes. PMID:25964807

  3. Six Weeks of Core Stability Training Improves Landing Kinetics Among Female Capoeira Athletes: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araujo Simone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Core stability training (CST has increased in popularity among athletes and the general fitness population despite limited evidence CST programmes alone lead to improved athletic performance. In female athletes, neuromuscular training combining balance training and trunk and hip/pelvis dominant CST is suggested to reduce injury risk, and specifically peak vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF in a drop jump landing task. However, the isolated effect of trunk dominant core stability training on vGRF during landing in female athletes had not been evaluated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate landing kinetics during a drop jump test following a CST intervention in female capoeira athletes. After giving their informed written consent, sixteen female capoeira athletes (mean ± SD age, stature, and body mass of 27.3 ± 3.7 years, 165.0 ± 4.0 cm, and 59.7 ± 6.3 kg, respectively volunteered to participate in the training program which consisted of static and dynamic CST sessions, three times per week for six weeks. The repeated measures T-test revealed participants significantly reduced relative vGRF from pre- to post-intervention for the first (3.40 ± 0.78 vs. 2.85 ± 0.52 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.05, effect size = 0.60], and second landing phase (5.09 ± 1.17 vs. 3.02 ± 0.41 N·NBW-1, respectively [p<0.001, effect size = 0.87]. The average loading rate was reduced from pre- to post-intervention during the second landing phase (30.96 ± 18.84 vs. 12.06 ± 9.83 N·NBW·s-1, respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.68]. The peak loading rate was reduced from pre- to postintervention during the first (220.26 ± 111.51 vs. 120.27 ± 64.57 N· NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.64], and second (99.52 ± 54.98 vs. 44.71 ± 30.34 N· NBW·s-1 respectively [p<0.01, effect size = 0.70] landing phase. Body weight, average loading rate during the first landing phase, and jump height were not significantly different between week

  4. Metabolomic investigation into variation of endogenous metabolites in professional athletes subject to strength-endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bei; A, Jiye; Wang, Guangji; Lu, Huali; Huang, Xiaoping; Liu, Yi; Zha, Weibin; Hao, Haiping; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Linsheng; Gu, Shenghua; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Jianguo

    2009-02-01

    Strength-endurance type of sport can lead to modification of human beings' physiological status. The present study aimed to investigate the alteration of metabolic phenotype or biochemical compositions in professional athletes induced by long-term training by means of a novel systematic tool, metabolomics. Resting venous blood samples of junior and senior male rowers were obtained before and after 1-wk and 2-wk training. Venous blood from healthy male volunteers as control was also sampled at rest. Endogenous metabolites in serum were profiled by GC/TOF-MS and multivariate statistical technique, i.e., principal component analysis (PCA), and partial least squares projection to latent structures and discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to process the data. Significant metabolomic difference was observed between the professional athletes and control subjects. Long-term strength and endurance training induced distinct separation between athletes of different exercise seniority, and training stage-related trajectory of the two groups of athletes was clearly shown along with training time. However, most of these variations were not observed by common biochemical parameters, such as hemoglobin, testosterone, and creatine kinase. The identified metabolites contributing to the classification included alanine, lactate, beta-d-methylglucopyranoside, pyroglutamic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, citric acid, free fatty acids, valine, glutamine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and so on, which were involved in glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism. These findings suggest that metabolomics is a promising and potential tool to profile serum of professional athletes, make a deep insight into physiological states, and clarify the disorders induced by strength-endurance physical exercise. PMID:19036890

  5. Organisational and methodological aspects of experimental training programs for athletes lightweights in academic rowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelchenko E.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: develop an experimental training program for lightweight rowers in academic rowing. Material: the study involved 27 qualified athletes who are engaged in academic rowing over 6 years, age 19-22 years, with sports qualifications KMS and MS. To better design the training program was conducted to study this physical condition of athletes also took into account the opinion of the leading coaches in academic rowing that are engaged with lightweight rowers. Results: as a result of an experimental study was designed training program in academic rowing. Conclusions: Experimental training program rowing provided its use for a year and was designed in the form of blocks and aims to developing and improving endurance (speed and power, strength and maximum strength. The experimental technique that was used in the training process, was designed with the preparation phase and plan on mesocycles and microcycle.

  6. THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALIST IN THE MENTAL TRAINING OF PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drosescu P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The achievements of professional athlete should be supported by an inter-disciplinary team; aside from the main actors (athlete and coach, it is also necessary to have the involvement of: a sports medicine specialist, a massage therapist, a physical trainer, a psychologist, a nutritionist, a medical assistant and a manager. For financial reasons, this technical staff is not found alongside professional athletes (at least in Romania, thus most of the times the tasks are being handled by the coach, sports medicine specialist or massage therapist. The Sports Medicine specialist, through the training they have received, can bring a contribution to the psychological training of athletes – within certain limits and without interfering with the area of Psychology if they do not have training in this area. In the present article, we wish to present a few of the possibilities available to the Sports Medicine specialist and the ways this can be accomplished. The information presented here is the result of the author’s 15 years’ experience in this field.

  7. Salivary hormones response to preparation and pre-competitive training of world-class level athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël eGuilhem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the response of salivary hormones of track and field athletes induced by preparation and pre-competitive training periods in an attempt to comment on the physiological effects consistent with the responses of each of the proteins measured. Salivary testosterone, cortisol, alpha-amylase, immunoglobulin A, chromogranin A, blood creatine kinase activity and profile of mood state were assessed at rest in 24 world-class level athletes during preparation (3 times in 3 months and pre-competitive (5 times in 5 weeks training periods. Total mood disturbance and fatigue perception were reduced, while immunoglobulin A (+61% and creatine kinase activity (+43% increased, and chromogranin A decreased (-27% during pre-competitive compared to preparation period. A significant increase in salivary testosterone (+9 to +15% and a decrease in testosterone/cortisol ratio were associated with a progressive reduction in training load during pre-competitive period (P < 0.05. None of the psycho-physiological parameters were significantly correlated to training load during the pre-competitive period. Results showed a lower adrenocortical response and autonomic activity, and an improvement of immunity status, in response to the reduction in training load and fatigue, without significant correlations of salivary hormones with training load. Our findings suggest that saliva composition is sensitive to training contents (season period but could not be related to workload resulting from track and field athletics training.

  8. Heart Rate Recovery in Decision Support for High Performance Athlete Training Schedules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Cornforth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the suitability of a new tool for decision support in training programs of high performance athletes. The aim of this study was to find a reliable and robust measure of the fitness of an athlete for use as a tool for adjusting training schedules. We examined the use of heart rate recovery percentage (HRr% for this purpose, using a two-phased approach. Phase 1 consisted of testing the suitability of HRr% as a measure of aerobic fitness, using a modified running test specifically designed for high-performance team running sports such as football. Phase 2 was conducted over a 12-week training program with two different training loads. HRr% measured aerobic fitness and a running time-trial measured performance. Consecutive measures of HRr% during phase 1 indicated a Pearson’s r of 0.92, suggesting a robust measure of aerobic fitness. During phase 2, HRr% reflected the training load and significantly increased when the training load was reduced between weeks 4 to 5. This work shows that HRr% is a robust indicator of aerobic fitness and provides an on-the-spot index that is useful for training load adjustment of elite-performance athletes.

  9. Acceptance of isotonic and hypotonic rehydrating beverages by athletes during training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décombaz, J; Gmünder, B; Daget, N; Munoz-Box, R; Howald, H

    1992-01-01

    This study compared the acceptance of two beverages (5% carbohydrate) of distinct osmolarities (hypotonic, 180 mOsm/kg and isotonic, 295 mOsm/kg) during the usual training practice of 97 athletes. A quantitative sensory profile by independent tasters ensured that organoleptic recognition would be unlikely during the tests. Each drink was consumed ad libitum during 3 different training sessions, at home. At each session, a subjective appreciation of hedonic and post-ingestive physiological effects (6 criteria) was obtained by means of a questionnaire. At the end of the experiment, the athletes were asked to express a preference for one of the "six" drinks. More athletes (blindly) chose the isotonic compared to the hypotonic drink (p = 0.03). This difference was not due intrinsically to the drinks, which the subjects were unable to distinguish on any of the criteria, but was related to certain aspects of the consumer's characteristics. Both groups had different drinking practices: the subjects choosing the isotonic beverage drank less before (p = 0.001) and more during (p = 0.013) the exercise. Age, sex, dimensions or type of physical activity (i.e. endurance vs speed/strength disciplines) were unrelated to the preference, except perhaps the duration of habitual exercise (p less than 0.05). We concluded that athletes, although unable to distinguish a hypotonic from an isotonic drink, may have specific habits and/or personal characteristics prompting them to favour one of them.

  10. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    functional training advises can be made. Thus, more than a review in the traditional context this review should be viewed upon as an attempt to bring sports-physiologists and coaches or others working directly with the athletes together for a mutual discussion on how recently acquired physiological knowledge...... of the muscle and finally how will this affect the performance of the athlete. In addition, the review will deal with muscle hypertrophy and how it develops with strength training. Overall, it is not the purpose of this review to give a comprehensive up-date of the area, but to pin-point a few issues from which...

  11. Students' inclusion to the value of physical culture during the process of athletic training.

    OpenAIRE

    Sychov S.O.

    2011-01-01

    Means and methods of students' inclusion to the value of physical culture, during the process of athletic training on the classes of physical education are opened in this article. 52 students took part in research. It is developed the recommendation for the application of pedagogical conditions of use in the expressway strength and strength training, ability to determine dosing load for students with different level of physical background, methods of power properties development both for boys...

  12. EFFECTS OF ELECTROSTIMULATION AND PLYOMETRIC TRAINING PROGRAM COMBINATION ON JUMP HEIGHT IN TEENAGE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J. Martínez-López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of eight- week (2 days/week training periods of plyometric exercises (PT and neuromuscular electrostimulation (EMS on jump height in young athletes. Squat jump (SJ, counter movement jump (CMJ and drop jump (DJ were performed to assess the effects of the training protocols 98 athletes (100 & 200m and 100m & 110m hurdles voluntarily took part in this study, 51 males (52% and 47 females (48%, 17.91 ± 1.42 years old, and 5.16 ± 2.56 years of training experience. The participants were randomly assigned to four different groups according to the frequency and the timing of the stimulation. Analysis of covariance was used to analyze the effects of every training program on jump height. Our findings suggest that compared to control (Plyometrics (PT only, the combination of 150Hz EMS + PT simultaneously combined in an 8 week (2days/week training program, we could observe significant jump height improvements in the different types of strength: explosive, explosive-elastic, and explosive-elastic-reactive. The combination of PT after < 85 Hz EMS did not show any jump height significant increase in sprinters. In conclusion, an eight week training program (with just two days per week of EMS combined with plyometric exercises has proven useful for the improvement of every kind of vertical jump ability required for sprint and hurdles disciplines in teenage athletes

  13. YOUNG ATHLETES' MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Moreno Murcia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between motivational characteristics and dispositional flow. In order to accomplish this goal, motivational profiles emerging from key constructs within Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory were related to the dispositional flow measures. A sample of 413 young athletes (Age range 12 to 16 years completed the PMCSQ-2, POSQ, SMS and DFS measures. Cluster analysis results revealed three profiles: a "self-determined profile" characterised by higher scores on the task-involving climate perception and on the task orientation; a "non-self-determined profile", characterised by higher scores on ego-involving climate perception and ego orientation; and a "low self-determined and low non-self-determined profile" which had the lowest dispositional flow. No meaningful differences were found between the "self-determined profile" and the "non-self-determined profile" in dispositional flow. The "self-determined profile" was more commonly associated with females, athletes practising individual sports and those training more than three days a week. The "non-self-determined profile" was more customary of males and athletes practising team sports as well as those training just two or three days a week

  14. Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Christopher J.

    Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

  15. Vegetarian athletes: Special requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Ongan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetarian diets have been mentioned on having long and short term beneficial effects while they are important parts of the Western countries. Vegetarians are not homogeneous groups and subjects are motivated to be on a vegetarian diet because of culturel and regional reasons, ethical concerns including animal rights, health parameters and environmental situations. And these reasons differ from vegetarian and omnivour athletes. Athletes, especially endurance ones (sprinters, cyclists, triathlon athletes, …, eat vegetarian diets in order to meet increasing requirements of carbohydrate and manage their weight status. A healthily well planned vegetarian diet positively affect some parameters related with performance of the athlete. However in a diet based on vegetable, herbs and high fiber, inadequate energy intake should be avoided. Although many vegetarian athletes are warned about consuming high amounts of protein, athletes take less protein than omnivour ones. Therefore, vegetarians should increase dietary protein quality by mixing different foods such as legumes and cereals. Vegetarian athletes who avoid eating animal based foods are at risk of having inadequate energy, fat (essential fatty acids, vitamins B12, B2, D and calcium, iron and zinc. In this review, contribution of vegetarian diets on purpose of healthy eating and optimal athletic performance and nutritional strategies for vegetarian athletes were discussed.

  16. High Training Volumes are Associated with a Low Number of Self-Reported Sick Days in Elite Endurance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson, Sandra; Nordebo, Kristina; Malm, Christer

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that high exercise loads increase the risk of infection, most frequently reported as upper respiratory tract infections, by suppressing the immune system. Most athletes will not train when experiencing sickness due to the fear of health complications. However, high training volumes are incompatible with high rates of non-training days, regardless of the cause. The purpose of this observational study was to examine the relationship between self-reported, exercise-constraining days of sickness (days when the athlete decided not to train due to symptoms of disease, either self-reported or by a physician) and the volumes of exercise training in elite endurance athletes by analyzing data from training logs kept for several years. The subjects included 11 elite endurance athletes (8 male, 3 female) competing at national and international levels in cross-country skiing, biathlon and long-distance running. Training logs available from these 11 subjects added to a total of 61 training years. The number of training hours per year (462, 79-856; median, range) was significantly and negatively correlated to the reported number of days not training due to sickness (15, 0-164) by a 3(rd) degree polynomial regression (R(2) = 0.48, F ratio = 18, p athletes can achieve high training volumes only if they also experience few sick-days. Key pointsTop level performance demands high training volumes and intensities, which may compromise immune function.Elite athletes must have an immune system capable of intact function also when under sever physiological and psychological stress.Elite performance, especially in endurance sports, is therefore incompatible with a high rate of infections.A negative correlation between infections and exercise training load among elite athletes is consequently observed - the less sick you are the more you can train.

  17. The young female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Michal; Weiss, Ram

    2009-12-01

    Participation of adolescents and young women in strenuous sports activity may lead to various metabolic and psychological derangements of clinical relevance to the endocrinologist. The most common manifestations encountered in practice are primary and secondary amenorrhea, reduced bone mineral density and eating disorders. The occurrence of all three together has been named "the athletic triad". The underlying hormonal drivers that lead to some of these manifestations are the reduced leptin level as well as the persistent low grade stress response commonly observed in such females. "Exercise-related female reproductive dysfunction" (ERFRD), can possibly include short-term (infertility) and long-term (osteoporosis) consequences. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, a manifestation of ERFRD in adolescence, is an integrated response to the combination of excessive physical and emotional stress, exercise, and/or reduced food intake characterized by decreased endogenous GNRH secretion. The primary aim of treating these athletes should be the prevention of the development of any component of the triad as well as the whole complex by educating athletes, trainers, parents and health care professionals about proper nutrition and safe training. The long term prognosis is good. However, significant long term morbidity may affect these young women later in life. PMID:20118893

  18. The reproductive system function at women athletes are training by lifting and taekwondo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekhanevich O.B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of investigation is studying the character and leading mechanisms of reproductive system pathology at women athletes are training by lifting and taekwondo. The object of research was the medical control at women are training in lifting and taekwondo. The results of the research have shown that the physical and psychoemotional overexertion with restriction of eating lead to adrenocorticotropic horomon considerable quantity emission which stimulates suprarenal glands and cause the development of hyperanrogenemy and ovaries functions depression. The athletes have more frequent menstrual cycle disturbances such as opsomenorrhea, oligomenorrhea and algodysmenorrhea. Typically there are changes of indices of physical development, appearance the symptoms of psychological masculinithation, hirsutism and secondary ovaries disturbance.

  19. Comparison of non-invasive individual monitoring of the training and health of athletes with commercially available wearable technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eDüking

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Athletes adapt their training daily to optimize performance, as well as avoid fatigue, overtraining and other undesirable effects on their health. To optimize training load, each athlete must take his/her own personal objective and subjective characteristics into consideration and an increasing number of wearable technologies (wearables provide convenient monitoring of various parameters. Accordingly, it is important to help athletes decide which parameters are of primary interest and which wearables can monitor these parameters most effectively. Here, we discuss the wearable technologies available for non-invasive monitoring of various parameters concerning an athlete’s training and health. On the basis of these considerations, we suggest directions for future development. Furthermore, we propose that a combination of several wearables is most effective for accessing all relevant parameters, disturbing the athlete as little as possible, and optimizing performance and promoting health.

  20. High Training Volumes are Associated with a Low Number of Self-Reported Sick Days in Elite Endurance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mårtensson, Kristina Nordebo, Christer Malm

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that high exercise loads increase the risk of infection, most frequently reported as upper respiratory tract infections, by suppressing the immune system. Most athletes will not train when experiencing sickness due to the fear of health complications. However, high training volumes are incompatible with high rates of non-training days, regardless of the cause. The purpose of this observational study was to examine the relationship between self-reported, exercise-constraining days of sickness (days when the athlete decided not to train due to symptoms of disease, either self-reported or by a physician and the volumes of exercise training in elite endurance athletes by analyzing data from training logs kept for several years. The subjects included 11 elite endurance athletes (8 male, 3 female competing at national and international levels in cross-country skiing, biathlon and long-distance running. Training logs available from these 11 subjects added to a total of 61 training years. The number of training hours per year (462, 79-856; median, range was significantly and negatively correlated to the reported number of days not training due to sickness (15, 0-164 by a 3rd degree polynomial regression (R2 = 0.48, F ratio = 18, p < 0.0001. We conclude that elite endurance athletes can achieve high training volumes only if they also experience few sick-days.

  1. Exertion injuries in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orava, S; Hulkko, A; Jormakka, E

    1981-12-01

    Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most typical injuries in the series, and the chronic medical tibial syndrome was the injury that needed surgical treatment most frequently. Overuse injuries seem to differ very little from each other in the events included in this survey. PMID:6797496

  2. A comparison of traditional and block periodized strength training programs in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Sandro; Hoffman, Jay R; Merni, Franco; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 2 different periodization models in strength and power athletes. Twenty-four experienced resistance trained men were randomly assigned to either a block periodization training program (BP; age = 24.2 ± 3.1 years, body mass = 78.5 ± 11.0 kg, height = 177.6 ± 4.9 cm) or to a traditional periodization program (TP; age = 26.2 ± 6.0 years, body mass = 80.5 ± 13.3 kg, height = 179.2 ± 4.6). Participants in both training programs performed 4 training sessions per week. Each training program consisted of the same exercises and same volume of training (total resistance lifted per session). The difference between the groups was in the manipulation of training intensity within each training phase. Strength and power testing occurred before training (PRE) and after 15 weeks (POST) of training. Magnitude-based inferences were used to compare strength and power performance between the groups. Participants in BP were more likely (79.8%) to increase the area under the force-power curve than TP. Participants in BP also demonstrated a likely positive (92.76%) decrease in the load corresponding to maximal power at the bench press compared with TP group, and a possible improvement (∼60%) in maximal strength and power in the bench press. No significant changes were noted between groups in lower-body strength or jump power performance after the 15-week training period. Results of this study indicate that BP may enhance upper-body power expression to a greater extent than TP with equal volume; however, no differences were detected for lower-body performance and body composition measures. PMID:24476775

  3. Real-time assessment and neuromuscular training feedback techniques to prevent ACL injury in female athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Myer, Gregory D.; BRENT, JENSEN L.; Ford, Kevin R.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2011-01-01

    Some athletes may be more susceptible to at-risk knee positions during sports activities, but the underlying causes are not clearly defined. This manuscripts synthesizes in vivo, in vitro and in-silica (computer simulated) data to delineate likely risk factors to the mechanism(s) of non-contact ACL injuries. From these identified risk factors, we will discuss newly developed real-time screening techniques that can be used in training sessions to identify modifiable risk factors. Techniques pr...

  4. Determinants of time trial performance and maximal incremental exercise in highly trained endurance athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert Acton; Rasmussen, Peter; Siebenmann, Christoph;

    2011-01-01

    Human endurance performance can be predicted from maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)), lactate threshold, and exercise efficiency. These physiologic parameters, however, are not wholly exclusive from one another and their interplay is complex. Accordingly, we sought to identify more specific...... measurements explaining the range of performance among athletes. Out of 150 separate variables we identified 10 principal factors responsible for hematological, cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and neurologic variation in 16 highly trained cyclists. These principal factors were then correlated...

  5. The effect of exercise training on left ventricular function in young elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Luca Alessio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular training, in particular endurance exercise, induces structural myocardial adaptation, so-called "athlete's heart". In addition to the 2D standard echo parameters, assessment of myocardial function is currently possible by deformation parameters (strain, rotation and twist. Aim of study is to assess the role of rotation and twist parameters for better characterize the heart performance in trained elite young athletes from different kind of sports. Eventually, verify early on any possible impact due to the regular sport activity not revealed by the standard parameters. Methods 50 young athletes (16 cyclists, 17 soccer players, 17 basket players regularly trained at least three times a week for at least 9 months a year and 10 young controls (mean age 18.5 ± 0.5 years were evaluated either by to 2D echocardiography or by a Speckle Tracking (ST multi-layer approach to calculate Left Ventricle (LV endocardial and epicardial rotation, twist, circumferential strain (CS and longitudinal strain (LS. Data were compared by ANOVA test. Results All the found values were within the normal range. Left Ventricle Diastolic Diameter (LVDD 51.7 ± 2.6 mm, Cardiac Mass index (CMi 114.5 ± 18.5 g/m2, epi-CS, epi-LS, epicardial apex rotation and the Endo/Epi twist were significantly higher only in cyclists. In all the groups, a physiological difference of the Endo/Epi basal circumferential strain and twist values have been found. A weak but not significant relationship between the Endo and twist values and LVDD (r2 = 0.44, p = .005 and CMi was also reported in cyclists. Conclusions Progressive increase of apical LV twist may represent an important component of myocardial remodelling. This aspect is particularly evident in the young cyclists group where the CMi and the LVDD are higher. ST multilayer approach completes the LV performance evaluation in young trained athletes showing values similar to adults.

  6. Peripheral signals of energy homeostasis as possible markers of training stress in athletes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Jürimäe, Toivo; Mangus, Brent; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2011-03-01

    The importance of physical exercise in regulating energy balance and ultimately body mass is widely recognized. There have been several investigative efforts in describing the regulation of the energy homeostasis. Important in this regulatory system is the existence of several peripheral signals that communicate the status of body energy stores to the hypothalamus including leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α--different cytokines and other peptides that affect energy homeostasis. In certain circumstances, all these peripheral signals may be used to reveal the condition of the athlete as the result of several months of prolonged exercise training. These hormone and cytokine concentrations characterize a physical stress condition in which different hormone and cytokine responses are apparently linked to changes in physical performance. The possibility to use these peripheral signals as markers of training stress (and possible overreaching/overtraining) in elite athletes should be considered. These measured hormone and cytokine levels could also be used to characterize the physical stress of single exercise session, as the hormone and cytokine response to exercise may actually be a response to the concurrent energy deficit. In summary, different peripheral signals of energy homeostasis may be sensitive to changes in specific training stress and may be useful for predicting the onset of possible overreaching/overtraining in athletes.

  7. Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... periods Learn more about healthy eating habits and healthy lifestyle choices Other Organizations Female Athlete Triad Coalition Questions to Ask Your Doctor ... female athlete triad? How do I strike a balance between my desire to be healthy and my desire to win? Could there be ...

  8. Salt, Water, and Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan J.

    Good nutrition for athletes demands plenty of water, since water is essential to such vital functions as muscle reactions. Dehydration can result from jet travel as well as from exercise and heat, making it a danger to traveling athletic teams. To avoid dehydration, water needs should be monitored by frequent weighing, and a clean water supply…

  9. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  10. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25248600

  11. The Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Roberta Trattner; Thompson, Ron A.

    2004-01-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a syndrome of the interrelated components of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Sometimes inadvertently, but more often by willful dietary restriction, many female athletes do not ingest sufficient calories to adequately fuel their physical or sport activities, which can disrupt menstrual functioning,…

  12. Panhellenic athletics at Olympia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Heine

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses Olympia as a panhellenic venue for athletics and the city-state interaction which took place at the sanctuary......The paper discusses Olympia as a panhellenic venue for athletics and the city-state interaction which took place at the sanctuary...

  13. Water and playing facilities as a factor increasing the efficiency of educational and training process of young athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnikova N.S.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is shown the role of water-game activities to enhance the efficiency of teaching and training process for athletes 10-16 years in the preparatory period and their effects on young athletes. It is proposed a set of exercises and games in the water for a sprinter. The basis of systems put different games, relay races, dynamic and static exercises, exercises on the recovery. Proved that the water-play classes young athletes develop harmoniously reinforce the emotional and physiological quality, improve health and increase the intellectual level.

  14. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Hillman, Susan K.; Montain, Scott J.; Reiff, Ralph V.; Rich, Brent S. E.; Roberts, William O.; Stone, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers Association for optimizing the fluid replacement practices of athletes, explaining that dehydration can compromise athletic performance and increase the risk of exertional heat injury. Athletes must be educated about the risks of dehydration and overhydration. They must learn fluid…

  15. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  16. Female athlete triad update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Katherine A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2007-01-01

    The passage of Title IX legislation in 1972 provided enormous opportunities for women to reap the benefits of sports participation. For most female athletes, sports participation is a positive experience, providing improved physical fitness, enhanced self-esteem, and better physical and mental health. Nonetheless, for a few female athletes, the desire for athletic success combined with the pressure to achieve a prescribed body weight may lead to the development of a triad of medical disorders including disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density (BMD)--known collectively as the female athlete triad. Alone or in combination, the disorders of the triad can have a negative impact on health and impair athletic performance.

  17. Effects of whole body vibration training on muscle strength and sprint performance in sprint-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delecluse, C; Roelants, M; Diels, R; Koninckx, E; Verschueren, S

    2005-10-01

    Despite the expanding use of Whole Body Vibration training among athletes, it is not known whether adding Whole Body Vibration training to the conventional training of sprint-trained athletes will improve speed-strength performance. Twenty experienced sprint-trained athletes (13 male symbol, 7 female symbol, 17-30 years old) were randomly assigned to a Whole Body Vibration group (n=10: 6 male symbol and 4 female symbol) or a Control group (n=10: 7 male symbol, 3 female symbol). During a 5-week experimental period all subjects continued their conventional training program, but the subjects of the Whole Body Vibration group additionally performed three times weekly a Whole Body Vibration training prior to their conventional training program. The Whole Body Vibration program consisted of unloaded static and dynamic leg exercises on a vibration platform (35-40 Hz, 1.7-2.5 mm, Power Plate). Pre and post isometric and dynamic (100 degrees/s) knee-extensor and -flexor strength and knee-extension velocity at fixed resistances were measured by means of a motor-driven dynamometer (Rev 9000, Technogym). Vertical jump performance was measured by means of a contact mat. Force-time characteristics of the start action were assessed using a load cell mounted on each starting block. Sprint running velocity was recorded by means of a laser system. Isometric and dynamic knee-extensor and knee-flexor strength were unaffected (p>0.05) in the Whole Body Vibration group and the Control group. As well, knee-extension velocity remained unchanged (p>0.05). The duration of the start action, the resulting start velocity, start acceleration, and sprint running velocity did not change (>0.05) in either group. In conclusion, this specific Whole Body Vibration protocol of 5 weeks had no surplus value upon the conventional training program to improve speed-strength performance in sprint-trained athletes. PMID:16158372

  18. Features of development of coordination abilities features of athletes in sports aerobics in initial training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodrenkova I.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop theoretically and experimentally justify the methodology of development of coordination abilities of athletes aged 7-9 years involved in sports aerobics. Material : the study involved 20 participants (7-9 years. 8 athletes performed the test tasks. The choice of tests carried out on the basis of the analysis of the dominant motor mode competition exercises. Results : It was found that the coordination abilities are necessary in the development of speed, density, and the number of running technical elements. With more than a significant increase in performance test tasks that characterize: musicality, coordination, dynamic balance. The basic tools, methods, techniques, and requirements for the exercises. The level of development of coordination abilities. Conclusions : the author's method of development of coordination abilities include: rational choice of means and methods of training impact on their similarities and differences with the target competitive activity.

  19. Effects of Meridian Scraping on Immune Function and Athletic Ability in Endurance Training Rats

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    Ronghua Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study-To investigate the effects of meridian scraping on immune function and athletic ability in endurance training rats. Materials and methods-Twenty four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to non-training group (A, training control group (B or meridian scraping and training group (C. Rats in groups B and C were loaded with incremental endurance training for 7 weeks and body weight, indices of immune organs, levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, IL-6, &beta-endorphin and time to strength exhaustion of rats in running plate on the first day of the 8th week, were measured. Results-Meridian scraping effectively modulated the changes in body weight and immune function induced by endurance training. Meridian scraping treatment also inhibited the training-induced decrease of serum IgG, but increased serum IL-6 and &beta -endorphin levels and prolonged the time to strength exhaustion. Conclusions-Meridian scraping increased the athletic ability of rats in endurance training, delayed the occurrence of sports fatigue and improved immune function.

  20. Changes in Endurance Performance in Young Athletes During Two Training Seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tota Łukasz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in endurance performance in young runners (females and males during two training seasons. It involved 19 male and 16 female athletes aged 15-17 specializing in track-and-field middle and long distances runs. The following parameters were measured three times during the training season: maximal oxygen uptake, running economy, and the level of the second ventilatory threshold. Training volume and intensity during each season were analyzed within an 8-week period prior to the exercise tests. The volume and intensity of training at various stages of preparation in both seasons were similar. During the first year of observation, significant improvements in relative volume of maximal oxygen uptake were reported both in female and male athletes. During the second training season, it was found that running economy improved both in women and men, with no changes in maximal oxygen uptake. The same (in terms of volume and intensity endurance training carried out with young runners during two consecutive training seasons can result in different training effects.

  1. CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Montfort-Steiger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes

  2. Short-term effects of proprioceptive training with unstable platform on athletes' stabilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Franco, Natalia; Martínez-López, Emilio J; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Osuna-Pérez, M Catalina; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the short-term stabilometric effects of proprioceptive training in athletes by using a BOSU ball and a Swiss ball as unstable platforms. Thirty-seven athletes from a variety of disciplines were divided into a control group (n = 17) and an experimental group (n = 20). Both performed a warm-up, and in addition, the experimental group carried out a proprioceptive exercise session after the warm-up. Proprioceptive exercise session consisted of six 25-minute exercise sessions with the BOSU ball and the Swiss ball as unstable platforms. Bipedal stabilometry was assessed before the training session (M0), immediately after training (M1), 30 minutes later (M2), 1 hour after training (M3), 6 hours after training (M4), and 24 hours after training (M5). Analysis of variance (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences immediately after training (M1) in speed (p = 0.022) and length covered by the center of pressure (p = 0.021) in the experimental group. These differences were even more acute 6 hours later (M4; p = 0.021). In fact, the same group exhibited significant differences in mediolateral position after 30 minutes (M2; p = 0.001) compared with the baseline measure and the control group. Apart from these, no other significant differences were found. A proprioceptive exercise session using a BOSU ball and a Swiss ball as unstable platforms induced short-term negative effects on the stabilometry of athletes. Likewise, an immediate trend to improvement was apparent in the stabilometry of the control group after the warm-up.

  3. Differential neuromuscular training effects onACL injury risk factors in"high-risk" versus "low-risk" athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Kevin R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromuscular training may reduce risk factors that contribute to ACL injury incidence in female athletes. Multi-component, ACL injury prevention training programs can be time and labor intensive, which may ultimately limit training program utilization or compliance. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of neuromuscular training on those classified as "high-risk" compared to those classified as "low-risk." The hypothesis was that high-risk athletes would decrease knee abduction moments while low-risk and control athletes would not show measurable changes. Methods Eighteen high school female athletes participated in neuromuscular training 3×/week over a 7-week period. Knee kinematics and kinetics were measured during a drop vertical jump (DVJ test at pre/post training. External knee abduction moments were calculated using inverse dynamics. Logistic regression indicated maximal sensitivity and specificity for prediction of ACL injury risk using external knee abduction (25.25 Nm cutoff during a DVJ. Based on these data, 12 study subjects (and 4 controls were grouped into the high-risk (knee abduction moment >25.25 Nm and 6 subjects (and 7 controls were grouped into the low-risk (knee abduction Results Athletes classified as high-risk decreased their knee abduction moments by 13% following training (Dominant pre: 39.9 ± 15.8 Nm to 34.6 ± 9.6 Nm; Non-dominant pre: 37.1 ± 9.2 to 32.4 ± 10.7 Nm; p = 0.033 training X risk factor interaction. Athletes grouped into the low-risk category did not change their abduction moments following training (p > 0.05. Control subjects classified as either high or low-risk also did not significantly change from pre to post-testing. Conclusion These results indicate that "high-risk" female athletes decreased the magnitude of the previously identified risk factor to ACL injury following neuromuscular training. However, the mean values for the high-risk subjects were not reduced to

  4. Aerobic Fitness for Young Athletes: Combining Game-based and High-intensity Interval Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C B; Kinugasa, T; Gill, N; Kilding, A E

    2015-11-01

    This study compared the effect of game-based training (GT) vs. a mix of game-based training and high-intensity interval training (MT) on physical performance characteristics. 26 young athletes (13.9±0.3 years) were assigned to either GT (n=13) or MT (n=13) for 6 weeks. Game-based training consisted of 2×8-11 min 3 vs. 3 'bucketball' SSGs separated by 3 min of passive rest twice per week, while MT consisted of one SSGs session and one high-intensity session of 15 s runs at 90-95% of the speed reached at the end of the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (VIFT) interspersed with 15 s passive recovery. Peak oxygen uptake (V˙ O2peak), VIFT, jump height, and speed were assessed pre- and post-training. Following training, V˙ O2peak (5.5±3.3%; ES=large) improved after MT, whereas VIFT improved after MT (6.6±3.2%; ES, large) and GT (4.2±5.5%, ES=small). 5-m sprint improved after GT (ES=small), while 20 m sprint and jump height were unchanged. In conclusion, while MT and GT were both effective at increasing performance parameters, greater effects were seen following MT. Therefore, MT should be considered as the preferred training method for improving aerobic power in young athletes.

  5. Cardiac size of high-volume resistance trained female athletes: shaping the body but not the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venckunas, T; Simonavicius, J; Marcinkeviciene, J E

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Exercise training, besides many health benefits, may result in cardiac remodelling which is dependent on the type and amount of exercise performed. It is not clear, however, whether significant adaptation in cardiac structure is possible in females undergoing resistance type of exercise training. Rigorous high volume training of most muscle groups emphasising resistance exercises are being undertaken by athletes of some aesthetic sports such as female fitness (light bodybuilding). The impact of this type of training on cardiac adaptation has not been investigated until now. The aim of the current study was to disclose the effect of high volume resistance training on cardiac structure and function. Methods 11 top-level female fitness athletes and 20 sedentary age-matched controls were recruited to undergo two-dimensional echocardiography. Results Cardiac structure did not differ between elite female fitness athletes and controls (p > 0.05), and fitness athletes had a tendency for a smaller (p = 0.07) left ventricular (LV) mass indexed to lean body mass. Doppler diastolic function index (E/A ratio) and LV ejection fraction were similar between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Elite female fitness athletes have normal cardiac size and function that do not differ from matched sedentary controls. Consequently, as high volume resistance training has no easily observable effect on adaptation of cardiac structure, when cardiac hypertrophy is present in young resistance-trained lean female, other reasons such as inherited cardiac disease are to be considered carefully. PMID:27030632

  6. Cardiac size of high-volume resistance trained female athletes: shaping the body but not the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venckunas, T; Simonavicius, J; Marcinkeviciene, J E

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Exercise training, besides many health benefits, may result in cardiac remodelling which is dependent on the type and amount of exercise performed. It is not clear, however, whether significant adaptation in cardiac structure is possible in females undergoing resistance type of exercise training. Rigorous high volume training of most muscle groups emphasising resistance exercises are being undertaken by athletes of some aesthetic sports such as female fitness (light bodybuilding). The impact of this type of training on cardiac adaptation has not been investigated until now. The aim of the current study was to disclose the effect of high volume resistance training on cardiac structure and function. Methods 11 top-level female fitness athletes and 20 sedentary age-matched controls were recruited to undergo two-dimensional echocardiography. Results Cardiac structure did not differ between elite female fitness athletes and controls (p > 0.05), and fitness athletes had a tendency for a smaller (p = 0.07) left ventricular (LV) mass indexed to lean body mass. Doppler diastolic function index (E/A ratio) and LV ejection fraction were similar between the groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Elite female fitness athletes have normal cardiac size and function that do not differ from matched sedentary controls. Consequently, as high volume resistance training has no easily observable effect on adaptation of cardiac structure, when cardiac hypertrophy is present in young resistance-trained lean female, other reasons such as inherited cardiac disease are to be considered carefully.

  7. Strenght training and anabolic steroids : a comparative study of the trapezius, a shoulder muscle and the vastus lateralis, a thigh muscle, of strength trained athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Strength training is widely used to increase performance in sports with high physical demands. The use of drugs such as anabolic steroids among athletes is a wellknown phenomenon, and the effects of these drugs on physical performance documented. The studies presented in this thesis focused on the mechanisms of muscle fiber hypertrophy in the vastus lateralis and the trapezius muscles of strength trained elite athletes. The main hypothesis was that the muscle adaptations to strength training ...

  8. The deaf athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Trish; Weber, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing athletes have few documented related medical problems. Hearing loss has multiple causes. A portion of those with a hearing loss consider themselves part of the Deaf community, a community with a unique language and culture. Athletes may have assistive devices to enhance their ability to perceive auditory cues, whereas in deaf sport competitions, common auditory cues may be made visible. There are athletic organizations whose missions are to provide a sport and social venue specific to the deaf population. Having a better understanding and appreciation of the Deaf community will help sports medicine physicians to work more effectively with this population.

  9. Technical training of qualified athletes , specializing in the high jump with a running start, with additional funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusarevich A.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To improve the process of technical training of qualified athletes, specializing in the high jump with a running start on the basis of additional funds. Material : The study involved 12 athletes qualified I sports category and candidate masters age 18-20 years. Number of attempts varied from 12-15, depending on the degree of fatigue study. Determined the effect of electrical stimulation on muscle groups leading the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the runway and repulsion, as well as athletic performance. Results : It was established that the integrated use of electrical stimulation affects more effectively to improve the biomechanical characteristics of high jump and effectiveness than using electrical stimulation during takeoff and repulsion separately. Conclusions : On the basis of the experimental data we can recommend the use of complex electrical, as an additional means for improving technical skills and improve performance athletes qualified.

  10. Stress fractures in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orava, S; Jormakka, E; Hulkko, A

    1981-01-01

    In a series of 16 cases of stress fractures in 15-year-old and younger athletes 8 fractures occurred in boys and 8 in girls. There were no differences between the sexes in the athletes' training habits. Ten of the fractures were located at the tibia, seven at its upper third and three at the lower part of the bone. Three fractures were found in the fibula, in the metatarsal bones two stress fractures and in the femur one stress fracture. Most stress fractures were caused by endurance type sports. The daily training distances were not particularly high at the time of the onset of the symptoms. In most cases the diagnosis was based on a radiological evaluation. A sufficiently long pause from all athletic activity was enough treatment. Stress fractures in children are very uncommon. PMID:7295000

  11. Discussion on the Scientific Paradigm of Modern Athletic Training%试论运动训练科学范式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸葛伟民

    2009-01-01

    With the athletic lever becoming closer and closer between the players, one distinctive characteristic of the contemporary international sports competition is increasingly cruel and fierce. The only choice for contemporary athletic training wants to rapid raise training lever and wins the finally game is to obtain the maximum supports of the science and technology. Based on the basis of Isaac Newton's physics, the scientific paradigm of modern athletic training is belong to the simplify paradigm. It has been one of the most important powers that promote the international athletic training development. But, due to the weak points on itself which the athletic training scientific paradigm has and can not be overcome by itself, so it is very difficult to solve the problems of contemporary athletic training using the simplify scientific paradigm. With the prosperous of complexity science since 1980s, the scientific simplify paradigm has been strongly criticized and smashed. Th nain target of the essay is to comb the historical de-velopment locus of athletic training and describe the forming process of the modern athletic training scientific paradigm. Finally the essay puts forward the urgency to realize full conver-sion from simplify scientific paradigm of Modern Athletic Training to complexity scientific par-adigm.%当代国际体育竞技的特征是运动员水平越来越接近、比赛越来越激烈,而如何得到科学技术的最大"帮助"是当代运动训练的惟一选择.近代运动训练科学范式是建立在以牛顿力学为基础的简单性范式基础上的,它对加深人类对运动训练本质的认识产生了积极的作用.但是,20世纪80年代以来,随着复杂性科学的兴起,传统运动训练科学范式日益显示出其自身难以逾越的局限性.通过对近代运动训练科学范式形成的历史过程进行梳理,对其所面临的困境进行论述,提出实现运动训练科学范式从简单性向复杂性转化的迫切性.

  12. Impact of aerobic and anaerobic exercise training on oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Kwak, Yi-Sub

    2016-04-01

    Exercise mediates an excessive free radical production leading to oxidative stress (OS). The body has natural antioxidant systems that help decrease OS, and these systems may be enhanced with exercise training. However, only a few studies have investigated the differences in resting OS and antioxidant capacity (AOC) between aerobically trained athletes (ET), anaerobically trained athletes (RT), and untrained individuals (UT). Therefore, this study sought to investigate the resting and postexercise OS and AOC in ET, RT, and UT. Sixty healthy young males (26.6±0.8 yr) participated in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups, ET, RT, and UT by distinct training background. Resting plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls (PC) were not significantly different in ET, RT, and UT. However, MDA and PC were significantly increased following a graded exercise test (GXT) in UT but not in ET and RT. Resting total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels and TAC were not different in ET, RT, and UT. Interestingly, TAC levels significantly decreased after the GXT in all groups. Additionally, UT showed lower post-exercise TAC levels compared to ET and RT. These results showed that ET, RT, and UT have similar OS and AOC at rest. However, both ET and RT have greater AOC against exercise mediated OS compared to UT. These findings may explain, at least in part, why both aerobic and anaerobic types of exercise training improve redox balance. However, it appears there is no specific exercise type effect in terms of redox balance. PMID:27162773

  13. Impact of aerobic and anaerobic exercise training on oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Kwak, Yi-Sub

    2016-04-01

    Exercise mediates an excessive free radical production leading to oxidative stress (OS). The body has natural antioxidant systems that help decrease OS, and these systems may be enhanced with exercise training. However, only a few studies have investigated the differences in resting OS and antioxidant capacity (AOC) between aerobically trained athletes (ET), anaerobically trained athletes (RT), and untrained individuals (UT). Therefore, this study sought to investigate the resting and postexercise OS and AOC in ET, RT, and UT. Sixty healthy young males (26.6±0.8 yr) participated in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups, ET, RT, and UT by distinct training background. Resting plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls (PC) were not significantly different in ET, RT, and UT. However, MDA and PC were significantly increased following a graded exercise test (GXT) in UT but not in ET and RT. Resting total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels and TAC were not different in ET, RT, and UT. Interestingly, TAC levels significantly decreased after the GXT in all groups. Additionally, UT showed lower post-exercise TAC levels compared to ET and RT. These results showed that ET, RT, and UT have similar OS and AOC at rest. However, both ET and RT have greater AOC against exercise mediated OS compared to UT. These findings may explain, at least in part, why both aerobic and anaerobic types of exercise training improve redox balance. However, it appears there is no specific exercise type effect in terms of redox balance.

  14. Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pediatricians and adolescent medicine specialists, sports medicine doctors, nutritionists and dietitians, and mental health specialists can all ... granola bars, and fruit. Visit a dietitian or nutritionist who works with teen athletes. He or she ...

  15. NUTRIONAL NEEDS OF ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Pandey

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim – is to provide a comprehensive information regarding the nutritional needs of athletes, followed by female athletes who have a higher necessity for Iron. Sports and nutrition are directly related to each other. Taking into consideration the fact that sports person need more energy to carry out their sporting activity effectively, it becomes of prime importance to take care for sports performance. Athletes must supposedly eat the perfect ratio of Protein, carbohydrate and fat at each meal and snack to control the hormonal systems and thus reach their maximum performance and ideal weight .The carbohydrate/protein/fat ratio of the 40-30-30 diet allegedly maintains the proper balance between the hormones insulin and glucagon. The present review focuses on the intake for a wholesome nutrient and well balanced diet for better performance among male as well as female athletes.

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... manipulate salary data through various categories... AT Halloween Costume Idea Last year we conducted a contest to ... Privacy Policy About Contact NATA Careers Feedback © 2016 National Athletic Trainers' Association. All Rights Reserved, Worldwide. DO ...

  17. The Athlete Within

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Olympians to be memorialized as works of art in oil painting exhibition 0lympic medallists, having already reached the pinnacle of popular acclaim through their athletic feats as seen on TV screens world wide, are

  18. Vegetarian athletes: Special requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Ongan, Dilek; ERSOY, Gülgün

    2012-01-01

    Vegetarian diets have been mentioned on having long and short term beneficial effects while they are important parts of the Western countries. Vegetarians are not homogeneous groups and subjects are motivated to be on a vegetarian diet because of culturel and regional reasons, ethical concerns including animal rights, health parameters and environmental situations. And these reasons differ from vegetarian and omnivour athletes. Athletes, especially endurance ones (sprinters, cyclists, triathl...

  19. The intensity distribution among well-trained and elite endurance athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Leonhard Stöggl

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have retrospectively analyzed the training intensity distribution (TID of nationally and internationally competitive athletes in different endurance disciplines to determine the optimal volume and intensity for maximal adaptation. The majority of studies present a pyramidal TID with a high proportion of high volume, low intensity training (HVLIT. World-class athletes appear to adopt a so-called polarized TID (i.e. significant % of HVLIT and high-intensity training, rather than a pyramidal or threshold (THR TID. In contrast to the pyramidal TID, emerging prospective randomized controlled studies have demonstrated superior responses of variables related to endurance when applying a polarized TID in well-trained and recreational individuals. The aims of the present review are to: 1 summarize the main responses of retrospective and prospective studies exploring TID; 2 provide a systematic overview on TIDs during preparation, pre-competition, and competition phases in different endurance disciplines and performance levels; 3 address whether one TID has demonstrated greater efficacy than another; and 4 highlight research gaps in an effort to direct future scientific studies.

  20. Attention and Reaction Time in Shotokan Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António VencesBrito

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the attention capacity and the reaction time in Portuguese karate Shotokan athletes. Participated 96 Shotokan athletes from the Portuguese Karate Association. We physically characterized the sample (weight, height, body mass index, and body fat mass percentage and evaluated Simple Reaction Time (TRS, Choice Reaction Time (TRE, Decision Time (TD and the Distributed Attention (AD. Data was analyzed according to athletes’ group age (15 to 19 yr, 20 to 35 yr and more than 35 yr, level of graduation (9th to 4th kyu, 3rd to 1st kyu, DAN and by gender (male and female. Male athletes present significant differences from female athletes in height, weight, years of practice and body fat mass. In relation to TRS all groups tend to a value near to 300 ms without significant differences among them, but the TRE and the TD are significantly higher in the Dan athletes and in the +35 yrs athletes than in the other groups. On the other hand the Dan and +35 yrs athletes tend to do less mistakes. Gender does not influence significantly the reaction time in the Shotokan karate athletes, but it seems that women tend to have smaller reaction times than men. Athletes with more years of practice and more graduation need more time to reply to the stimulus than the other athletes, but they tend to do fewer mistakes on their choices than other subjects. As for distributed attention, no significant differences were found in function of the athlete graduation, nor in function of gender. However, for distributed attention, we found statistical significant differences in function of the age, with the oldest athletes presenting lower levels of distributed attention. Our results seem to show that is necessary to do some modifications in the training process of Portuguese Shotokan karate athletes.

  1. Asthma in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-06-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes have been shown to have a different distribution of airway inflammation and unequal response to bronchial provocative test. Elite athletes display signs of exercise-induced symptoms, for example, nonasthmatic inspiratory wheeze, vocal cord dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmias, which could limit their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic β2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed. PMID:21702657

  2. Stress fractures in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulkko, A; Orava, S

    1987-06-01

    During the 14-year period of 1971-1985, 368 stress fractures in 324 athletes were treated. The series contained 268 fractures in males and 100 fractures in females; 32 fractures occurred in children (less than 16 years), 117 in adolescents (16-19 years), and 219 in adults. Forty-six fractures were incurred by athletes at an international level, 274 by athletes at a national or district level and 48 by recreational athletes. Of the total cases, 72% occurred to runners and a further 12% to athletes in other sports after running exercises. The distribution of the stress fractures by site was: tibia 182, metatarsal bones 73, fibula 44, big toe sesamoid bones 15, femoral shaft 14, femoral neck 9, tarsal navicular 9, pelvis 7, olecranon 5 and other bones 10. Of the total fractures, 342 were treated conservatively and 26 fractures required surgical treatment. The operative indication was dislocation in 5 cases and delayed union/nonunion in 21 cases. The sites most often affected by delayed union were: anterior midtibia, sesamoid bones of the big toe, base of the fifth metatarsal, olecranon, and tarsal navicular. The athletes at an international level experienced the greatest risk of multiple separate fractures, protracted healing, or fractures requiring surgery. PMID:3623785

  3. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001), indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001) and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022). Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001). The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01). Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01). Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with increased immune

  4. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    Full Text Available Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany. During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001, indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001 and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022. Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001. The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01. Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01. Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with

  5. Methodic of coordination’s perfection of junior taekwondo athletes at stage of pre-basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashkov I.N.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: experimental substantiation of effectiveness of coordination training methodic of junior taekwondo athletes at stage of pre-basic training. Material: in the research 30 taekwondo athletes of 12-14 yrs age, who composed control and experimental groups, participated. Results: we determined means and methods of training of taekwondo athletes coordination abilities. Correlation of exercises for sense of space, muscular sense, sense of time took from 15 to 25% of total time of training. During 5 seconds’ work quantity of repetitions was from 8 to 12-15 times. Rest pauses between exercises were from 1 to 1-2 minutes. The offered methodic facilitated improvement of coordination fitness indicators of taekwondo athletes: keeping of static balance with open eyes - by 5.08 % and with closed eyes - by 5.63 %; Romberg’s test on left foot - by 11,4% and on tight - by 8.22%; response of choice - by 15.9%; high jump from the spot - by 11.39%; shuttle run - by 5.8%. Conclusions: in the process of perfection of taekwondo athletes coordination it is necessary to solve the following tasks: master more and more complex coordination structures of motor tasks; master quick re-switching of motor functioning, depending on change of situation; improve accuracy of required motor actions; develop stability of space orientation.

  6. The construction of the training process highly skilled athletes in soccer and field hockey in the annual cycle of training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostyukevych V.M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study - to justify the theoretical and methodological principles and concepts of the training process of building highly skilled athletes in soccer and field hockey in the annual cycle of training. The results . Calculate the ratio of training loads of different orientation in the annual cycle of training. Means of producing football players in the annual training cycle is as follows: non-specific (general training exercise - 45.6%, specific - 54.4% (special training exercise - 4.1% subsidiary - 22, 7%, competitive - 27.6% . Means of producing players in the annual training cycle is as follows: non-specific (general training exercise - 49.0%, specific - 51.0% (special training - 2.3% subsidiary - 26.1%, competitive exercise - 22.0% .

  7. Individual, Programmatic, and Institutional Influences on Undergraduate Athletic Training Students' Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volberding, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine factors that influence an undergraduate athletic training student's (ATS) level of cultural competence (CC). Utilizing a CC score derived from a student survey, one-way ANOVAs to identify differences in CC scores by gender, race, and year in school and three separate correlation analyses (all students, Caucasian Students, Students of Color) to identify the relationship between CC and variables were performed. Only eight variables in the Students of Color model were significant. This suggests that race may impact factors that influence an ATS CC and could assist educators to recognize uncontrollable factors may influence students' CC. PMID:26817171

  8. COMPOSITION OF THE ATHLETES DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Salaj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available  Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with many of research papers published annually. However, designing the most suitable sports diet is very difficult. It must be given to the type of training, its duration and intensity, the age and sex of the athlete and also for overall health. The aim of this article is to summarize knowledges about sports nutrition, especially intake of carbohydrates, proteins, fats and dietary supplements and their influence on the performance and recovery of the athlete.doi:10.5219/126 

  9. [The influence of vibration training in combination with general magnetotherapy on dynamics of performance efficiency in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, A A; Volchkova, O A; Voronitskiĭ, N E

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of a combined treatment including vibrostimulation and magnetotherapy on the working capacity of athletes. Participants of the study were 8 male judo wrestlers. It was shown that implementation of a specialized training program comprising seances of vibration loading and general magnetotherapy 40 and 60 min in duration respectively during 3 consecutive days produced marked beneficial effect on the hormonal status of the athletes. Specifically, the three-day long treatment resulted in a significant increase of blood cortisol and testosterone levels considered to be an objective sign of improved performance parameters in athletes engaged in strength and speed sports. The optimal length of vibration training during 3 days of specialized training is estimated at 20 to 40 minutes supplemented by general magnetotherapy for 60 minutes. PMID:21328901

  10. Limb skeletal muscle adaptation in athletes after training at altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizuno, M; Juel, C; Bro-Rasmussen, Thomas;

    1990-01-01

    Morphological and biochemical characteristics of biopsies obtained from gastrocnemius (GAS) and triceps brachii muscle (TRI), as well as maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) and O2 deficit, were determined in 10 well-trained cross-country skiers before and after a 2-wk stay (2,100 m above sea level) and t...

  11. Point rating system as the training monitoring basis of the athletes of the national pickedwrestling team of MGSU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkov Aleksandr Yur'evich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the point rating system for the students-athletes of the Department of Sport Development in Wrestling, which used various indicators of the wrestlers all-around training. The training is divided into a number of modules: speed qualities and endurance; speed-strength quality and flexibility; technical training; functional training; agility and coordination; theoretical training; personal characteristics, moral, strongwilled preparation and self-preparation.Each module corresponds to a certain number of points: from 0 to 20,from 0 to 15,from 0 to 10,from 0 to 5.Using the proposed point rating system evaluation for the students-athletes in wrestling, the training level of the athletes in each of the modules is determined. The range of point values, corresponding to the maximum form are 90—100 points ("excellent".Evaluation of the "good" range is 70—89 points, "satisfactory" — 50—69 points, disappointing — from 0 to 49 points.The authors offer the comparative analysis of the dynamics of high-speed performance and endurance, speed-strength qualities, functional training, agility and coordination, theoretical training and personal qualities of the academic team in wrestling during the summer and training camp of 2013.The objective information, obtained from the routine tests of physical, psychological and functional status of an athlete, the major indicators of his physical fitness, gives the opportunity to effectively manage the training process improvement of the athletes, ensures the steady increase of sportsmanship.The research results of the functional training and the physical qualities of studentsathletes during the preparatory stage of the training help to make the necessary adjustments in time and to bring the wrestlers to the top form till the main student competition.

  12. Effectiveness of active physical training as treatment for long-standing adductor-related groin pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, P; Uhrskou, P; Ulnits, L;

    1999-01-01

    Groin pain is common among athletes. A major cause of long-standing problems is adductor-related groin pain. The purpose of this randomised clinical trial was to compare an active training programme (AT) with a physiotherapy treatment without active training (PT) in the treatment of adductor-rela...

  13. Plasma levels of trace elements and exercise induced stress hormones in well-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Ansón, Miguel; López-Colón, José L; Escanero, Jesús F

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the variation and relationship of several trace elements, metabolic substrates and stress hormones activated by exercise during incremental exercise. Seventeen well-trained endurance athletes performed a cycle ergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W kg(-1), the workload was increased by 0.5 W kg(-1) every 10 min until exhaustion. Prior diet, activity patterns, and levels of exercise training were controlled, and tests timed to minimize variations due to the circadian rhythm. Oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration, plasma ions (Zn, Se, Mn and Co), serum glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and several hormones were measured at rest, at the end of each stage and 3, 5 and 7 min post-exercise. Urine specific gravity was measured before and after the test, and participants drank water ad libitum. Significant differences were found in plasma Zn and Se levels as a function of exercise intensity. Zn was significantly correlated with epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol (r = 0.884, P levels were associated with insulin or glucagon, and neither Mn nor Co levels were associated with any of the hormones or substrate metabolites studied. Further, while Zn levels were found to be associated only with lactate, plasma Se was significantly correlated with lactate and glucose (respectively for Zn: r = 0.891, P stress hormones variations induced by exercise along different submaximal intensities in well-hydrated well-trained endurance athletes.

  14. Point rating system as the training monitoring basis of the athletes of the national pickedwrestling team of MGSU

    OpenAIRE

    Barkov Aleksandr Yur'evich

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the point rating system for the students-athletes of the Department of Sport Development in Wrestling, which used various indicators of the wrestlers all-around training. The training is divided into a number of modules: speed qualities and endurance; speed-strength quality and flexibility; technical training; functional training; agility and coordination; theoretical training; personal characteristics, moral, strongwilled preparation and self-preparation.Each module corr...

  15. Reducing knee and anterior cruciate ligament injuries among female athletes: a systematic review of neuromuscular training interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R

    2005-01-01

    There is evidence that neuromuscular training not only decreases the potential biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury, but also decreases knee and, specifically, ACL injury incidence in female athletes. Five of the six interventions in this systematic review demonstrated significant effects on overall knee or ACL injury rates. It appears that plyometric power, biomechanics and technique, strength, balance, and core stability training can induce neuromuscular changes and potential injury prevention effects in female athletes. However, it is unknown which of these components is most effective or whether the effects are combinatorial. Future research should assess the relative efficacy of these interventions alone and in combination to achieve the optimal effect in the most efficient manner possible. Selective combination of neuromuscular training components may provide additive effects, further reducing the risk of ACL injuries in female athletes. Additional research directions include the assessment of relative injury risk using mass neuromuscular screening, the development of more specific injury prevention protocols targeted toward high-risk athletes, and the determination of when these interventions should be implemented. It may be that prepubertal or early pubertal female athletes may have the potential to achieve optimal biomechanical changes and the greatest chance of injury-free sports participation throughout their careers. PMID:15742602

  16. Creatine and the Male Adolescent Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Shauna; Eyers, Christina; Cappaert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    As the level of competition in youth sports increases, so does athletes' vulnerability to experimenting with performance-enhancing aids (PEAs) at alarmingly young ages. One of the more commonly used PEAs is a supplement called creatine, which has the ability to generate muscular energy, allowing athletes to train at higher intensities for longer…

  17. "The Student Athlete": Too Little, Too Late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Ewald B.

    1982-01-01

    There are vast differences in life experiences and advantages for all college students, not just student athletes; to shunt off the super athlete lacking minimum skills into a second-rate educational training is inexcusable. Institutions that have "turned professional" have become football franchises dabbling in education. (MLW)

  18. Effects of oral sodium supplementation on indices of thermoregulation in trained, endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earhart, Elizabeth L; Weiss, Edward P; Rahman, Rabia; Kelly, Patrick V

    2015-03-01

    Guidelines recommend the consumption of sodium during exercise to replace losses in sweat; however, the effects of sodium on thermoregulation are less clear. To determine the effects of high-dose sodium supplementation on indices of thermoregulation and related outcomes, 11 endurance athletes participated in a double-blind, randomized-sequence, crossover study in which they underwent 2-hrs of endurance exercise at 60% heart rate reserve with 1800 mg of sodium supplementation (SS) during one trial and placebo (PL) during the other trial. A progressive intensity time-to-exhaustion test was performed after the 2-hr steady state exercise as an assessment of exercise performance. Sweat rate was calculated from changes in body weight, accounting for fluid intake and urinary losses. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and heat stress were assessed using verbal numeric scales. Cardiovascular drift was determined from the rise in HR during the 2-hr steady state exercise test. Skin temperature was measured with an infrared thermometer. Dehydration occurred in both SS and PL trials, as evidenced by substantial weight loss (2.03 ± 0.43% and 2.27 ± 0.70%, respectively; p = 0.261 between trials). Sweat rate was 1015.53 ± 239.10 ml·hr(-1) during the SS trial and 1053.60±278.24 ml/hr during the PL trial, with no difference between trials (p = 0.459). Heat stress ratings indicated moderate heat stress ("warm/hot" ratings) but were not different between trials (p = 0.825). Time to exhaustion during the SS trial was 6.88 ± 3.88 minutes and during the PL trial averaged 6.96 ± 3.61 minutes, but did not differ between trials (p = 0.919). Cardiovascular drift, skin temperature, and RPE did not differ between trials (all p > 0.05). High-dose sodium supplementation does not appear to impact thermoregulation, cardiovascular drift, or physical performance in trained, endurance athletes. However, in light of the possibility that high sodium intakes might have other adverse effects

  19. 谈冰球运动员的身体训练%Talking about physical training of ice hockey athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宿宏斌

    2013-01-01

    The physical training is in the process of movement, using a variety of physical exercise, to effectively influence the changes of athlete's body shape, so as to improve athlete's physical health, improve organism function and development of sports training.%身体训练是指在运动过程中,运用各种身体练习,有效地影响运动员身体形态的变化,从而增进运动员身体健康,提高有机体机能和发展运动素质的训练。

  20. Acute antioxidant supplementation improves endurance performance in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, David J; Dank, Steven; Coupland, Rory; Midgley, Adrian; Spence, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the acute effects of a single dose of an antioxidant (AO; Lactaway® containing pycnogenol) on time to fatigue (TTF). Nine trained cyclists [mean ± SD age 35 ± 10 yrs; body mass 71.6 ± 10.2 kg; VO2 peak 63 ± 11 ml/kg/min] performed on two separate occasions a continuous protocol of 5 min at 50% of peak power output (PPO), 8 min at 70% of PPO, and then cycled to fatigue at 95% PPO. Four hours prior to the exercise protocol, the subjects consumed the supplement or a placebo (counterbalanced, double blind protocol). Cyclists, on average, rode for 80 s more in the Lactaway trial than they did in the placebo trial. There was considerable evidence (chances ≥94.5%) for substantial positive treatment effects for TTF and the other performance-related variables (excluding [BLa] at 95% PPO). Other studies are necessary to confirm these results and identify the mechanisms underlying the observed effects. PMID:22242733

  1. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Barbara; Geiger, Daniela; Schauer, Markus; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany). During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (pcognitive processes. PMID:27124720

  2. Contemporary Issues in Protein Requirements and Consumption for Resistance Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jacob

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years an explosion of research papers concerning protein consumption has been published. The need to consolidate this information has become critical from both practical and future research standpoints. For this reason, the following paper presents an in depth analysis of contemporary issues in protein requirements and consumption for resistance trained athletes. Specifically, the paper covers: 1. protein requirements for resistance trained athletes; 2. the effect of the digestion rate of protein on muscular protein balance; 3. the optimal timing of protein intake relative to exercise; 4. the optimal pattern of protein ingestion, relative to how an individual should consume their protein throughout a 24 hour period, and what sources are utilized during this time frame; 5. protein composition and its interaction with measures of protein balance and strength performance; 6. the combination of protein and carbohydrates on plasma insulin levels and protein balance; 7. the efficacy of protein supplements and whole food protein sources. Our goal is to provide the reader with practical information in optimizing protein intake as well as for provision of sound advice to their clients. Finally, special care was taken to provide future research implications.

  3. Causes of Death in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Khodasevich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature survey, concerning the causes of death in athletes, contains traumas, doping and cardiac pathology. The article presents clinicopathologic characteristics of different forms of cardiac pathologies, causing sudden death in athletes.

  4. Drug abuse in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon CL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. Keywords: doping, athletes, steroids, drug abuse, mental illness

  5. Athletes who train on unstable compared to stable surfaces exhibit unique postural control strategies in response to balance perturbations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.S. Blaise Williams III; Nicholas G. Murray; Douglas W. Powell

    2016-01-01

    Background: Athletes have been shown to exhibit better balance compared to non-athletes (NON). However, few studies have investigated how the surface on which athletes train affects the strategies adopted to maintain balance. Two distinct athlete groups who experience different types of sport-specific balance training are stable surface athletes (SSA) such as basketball players and those who train on unstable surfaces (USA) such as surfers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training surface on dynamic balance in athletes compared to NON. Methods: Eight NON, eight SSA, and eight USA performed five 20-s trials in each of five experimental conditions including a static condition and four dynamic conditions in which the support surface translated in the anteroposterior (AP) or mediolateral (ML) planes using positive or negative feedback paradigms. Approximate entropy (ApEn) and root mean square distance (RMS) of the center of pressure (CoP) were calculated for the AP and ML directions. Four 3 × 5 (group × condition) repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine significant effects of group and condition on variables of interest. Results: USA exhibited smaller ApEn values than SSA in the AP signals while no significant differences were observed in the ML CoP signals. Generally, the negative feedback conditions were associated with significantly greater RMS values than the positive feedback conditions. Conclusion: USA exhibit unique postural strategies compared to SSA. These unique strategies seemingly exhibit a direction-specific attribute and may be associated with divergent motor control strategies.

  6. Nutritional considerations for vegetarian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan I; Rideout, Candice A

    2004-01-01

    With the growing interest in the potential health benefits of plant-based diets, it is relevant to consider whether vegetarian dietary practices could influence athletic performance. Accordingly, this review examines whether nutrients that may differ between vegetarian and omnivorous diets could affect physical performance. We also describe recent studies that attempt to assess the effects of a vegetarian diet on performance and comment on other nutritional aspects of vegetarianism of relevance to athletes. Although well-controlled long-term studies assessing the effects of vegetarian diets on athletes have not been conducted, the following observations can be made: 1) well-planned, appropriately supplemented vegetarian diets appear to effectively support athletic performance; 2) provided protein intakes are adequate to meet needs for total nitrogen and the essential amino acids, plant and animal protein sources appear to provide equivalent support to athletic training and performance; 3) vegetarians (particularly women) are at increased risk for non-anemic iron deficiency, which may limit endurance performance; and 4) as a group, vegetarians have lower mean muscle creatine concentrations than do omnivores, and this may affect supramaximal exercise performance. Because their initial muscle creatine concentrations are lower, vegetarians are likely to experience greater performance increments after creatine loading in activities that rely on the adenosine triphosphate/phosphocreatine system. 5) Coaches and trainers should be aware that some athletes may adopt a vegetarian diet as a strategy for weight control. Accordingly, the possibility of a disordered eating pattern should be investigated if a vegetarian diet is accompanied by unwarranted weight loss. PMID:15212753

  7. Diet Quality of Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Kelly; Stoess, Amanda Ireland; Forsythe, Hazel; Kurzynske, Janet; Vaught, Joy Ann; Adams, Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Collegiate athletes generally appear healthy according to weight for height and body fat standards. Despite the fact that there are well known connections between athletic performance and nutrition, little is known about the diets of collegiate athletes. The objective of this study was to determine the diet quality of 138…

  8. Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

  9. Statement on student athlete sanctions

    OpenAIRE

    Hincker, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    I remain deeply concerned by the situation involving our three student-athletes. I remain concerned with the known behavior regardless of the judicial disposition. All of us in the Athletics Department believe behavior above reproach should be the norm for Virginia Tech student-athletes.

  10. Comparison of athletic training professional preparation to the prevalence of injury occurrence in the collegiate setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Beverly Jean

    1999-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the frequency of injuries that occur to certain body areas in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and the percentage of time teaching about the same subject areas in Athletic Training Education Programs (ATEP). Directors of Commission of Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accredited and National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) approved programs were surveyed. Randomly selected ATEP directors were interviewed by telephone to collect information on estimated teaching time, the strengths and weaknesses of their programs, and preferred teaching methods. Data were collected from the NCAA Injury Surveillance System to calculate the frequency of injury. Chi-square 'goodness-of-fit' tests were used to determine if a 'good fit' existed between injury frequency and teaching time in two categories: general body areas (head and face, upper extremity, lower extremity, spine, and abdomen and thorax) and specific body areas (head, face, upper arm and shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, hip and pelvis, thigh, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot, cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, abdomen, and thorax). Standardized residuals were used to assist in determining the location of statistical significance within the same two categories. The chi-square values calculated for both the general and specific body areas were greater than the critical value set at a significance level of .05 with 4 and 14 degrees of freedom respectively. Therefore, it was found that a 'good fit' does not exist between injury frequency and teaching time. The standardized residuals were calculated for each variable within the categories. One out of five general body areas and 10 out of 15 specific body areas were less than 2.00 in absolute value and were found not to contribute to the high chi-square value. Although the chi-square values showed a lack of fit between injury frequency and teaching time

  11. Do Balance Board Training Programs Reduce the Risk of Ankle Sprains in Athletes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy A.McGuine

    2008-01-01

    @@ Introduction Ankle sprains are the most common musculoskeletal injury that occurs in athletes,particularly in sports that require jumping and landing on one foot such as soccer,and basketball(1-4).

  12. Use of prescription drugs in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaranta, Antti; Alaranta, Hannu; Helenius, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    Although athletes are young and generally healthy, they use a variety of non-doping classified medicines to treat injuries, cure illnesses and obtain a competitive edge. Athletes and sports medicine physicians try to optimize the treatment of symptoms related to extreme training during an elite athlete's active career. According to several studies, the use of antiasthmatic medication is more frequent among elite athletes than in the general population. The type of training and the kind of sport influence the prevalence of asthma. Asthma is most common among those competing in endurance events, such as cycling, swimming, cross-country skiing and long-distance running. Recent studies show that athletes use also NSAIDs and oral antibacterials more commonly than age-matched controls, especially athletes competing in speed and power sports. Inappropriately high doses and concomitant use of several different NSAIDs has been observed. All medicines have adverse effects that may have deleterious effects on elite athletes' performance. Thus, any unnecessary medication use should be minimized in elite athletes. Inhaled beta(2)-agonists may cause tachycardia and muscle tremor, which are especially harmful in events requiring accuracy and a steady hand. In experimental animal models of acute injury, especially selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors have been shown to be detrimental to tissue-level repair. They have been shown to impair mechanical strength return following acute injury to bone, ligament and tendon. This may have clinical implications for future injury susceptibility. However, it should be noted that the current animal studies have limited translation to the clinical setting. Adverse effects related to the CNS and gastrointestinal adverse reactions are commonly reported in connection with NSAID use also in elite athletes. In addition to the potential for adverse effects, recent studies have shown that NSAID use may negatively regulate muscle growth by inhibiting

  13. Exercise Training in Athletes with Bicuspid Aortic Valve Does Not Result in Increased Dimensions and Impaired Performance of the Left Ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Stefani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is one of the most common congenital heart disease (0.9%–2% and is frequently found in the athletes and in the general population. BAV can lead to aortic valve dysfunction and to a progressive aortic dilatation. Trained BAV athletes exhibit a progressive enlargement of the left ventricle (LV compared to athletes with normal aortic valve morphology. The present study investigates the possible relationship between different aortic valve morphology and LV dimensions. Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2011, we investigated a total of 292 BAV subjects, divided into three different groups (210 athletes, 59 sedentaries, and 23 ex-athletes. A 2D echocardiogram exam to classify BAV morphology and measure the standard LV systo-diastolic parameters was performed. The study was conducted as a 5-year follow-up echocardiographic longitudinal and as cross-sectional study. Results. Typical BAV was more frequent in all three groups (68% athletes, 67% sedentaries, and 63% ex-athletes than atypical. In BAV athletes, the typical form was found in 51% (107/210 of soccer players, 10% (21/210 of basketball players, 10% track and field athletics (20/210, 8% (17/210 of cyclists, 6% (13/210 swimmers, and 15% (32/210 of rugby players and others sport. Despite a progressive enlargement of the LV (P<0.001 observed during the follow-up study, no statistical differences of the LV morphology and function were evident among the diverse BAV patterns either in sedentary subjects or in athletes. Conclusion. In a large population of trained BAV athletes, with different prevalence of typical and atypical BAV type, there is a progressive nonstatistically significant enlargement of the LV. In any case, the dimensions of the LV remained within normal range. The metabolic requirements of the diverse sport examined in the present investigations do not seem to produce any negative impact in BAV athletes

  14. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...... functional training advises can be made. Thus, more than a review in the traditional context this review should be viewed upon as an attempt to bring sports-physiologists and coaches or others working directly with the athletes together for a mutual discussion on how recently acquired physiological knowledge...

  15. Energy availability in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets...... of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure...

  16. Groin pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Groin pain in athletes is a common problem in sport medicine, and remains a diagnostic challenge. It is more common with sports that involve kicking, rapid accelerations and decelerations, and sudden direction changes. There is an extensive differential diagnosis and overlap in signs between possible diagnoses. It is important to appreciate the anatomy of the groin and undertake a careful history and examination. Adductor strain, groin disruption and osteitis pubis are among the common causes. The aim of this article is to briefly review the most common causes of groin pain in athletes. The diagnosis and management of these conditions are briefly discussed. PMID:20533693

  17. Immune parameters, symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections, and training-load indicators in volleyball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo Dias1, Anelena Bueno Frollini1, Diego Trevisan Brunelli1, André Katayama Yamada1, Richard Diego Leite4, Ricardo Adamoli Simões1, Guilherme Souza Lobo Salles1, Débora Trevisan1, Idico Luiz Pellegrinotti1, Marcelo de Castro César1, Silvia Cristina Crepaldi Alves1, Rozangela Verlengia1, João Paulo Borin2, Jonato Prestes2,3, Claudia Regina Cavaglieri21Núcleo de Performance Humana, Mestrado em Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil; 2Faculdade de Educação Física (FEF Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil; 3Programa de Mestrado e Doutorado em Educação Física, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, Brasil; 4Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica e Experimental em Biologia Vascular (BioVasc, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrasilBackground: The control of immunological alterations becomes important during in-season training, as a result of increased incidence of infectious diseases, and may assist in avoiding interruptions to training due to illness.Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate 28 weeks of chronic immune modulations in female volleyball athletes.Methods: The sample was composed of twelve athletes aged 19.47 ± 2.49 years, height 1.78 ± 0.08 cm, and body mass 66.77 ± 7.8 kg. Leukocytes, individual immune cell count, interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α plasma cytokines were measured during the competitive period.Results: Results revealed that immune variables were correlated with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and training-load indicators, indicating a possible marker of immune status. There was a statistically significant increase in total leukocytes, neutrophils, and monocyte count, a decrease in lymphocytes, and an increase in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms, with no change

  18. Effects of intermittent training on anaerobic performance and MCT transporters in athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Millet

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT on skeletal muscle monocarboxylate lactate transporter (MCT expression and anaerobic performance in trained athletes. Cyclists were assigned to two interventions, either normoxic (N; n = 8; 150 mmHg PIO2 or hypoxic (H; n = 10; ∼3000 m, 100 mmHg PIO2 over a three week training (5×1 h-1h30 x week(-1 period. Prior to and after training, an incremental exercise test to exhaustion (EXT was performed in normoxia together with a 2 min time trial (TT. Biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis were analyzed for MCT1 and MCT4 using immuno-blotting techniques. The peak power output (PPO increased (p<0.05 after training (7.2% and 6.6% for N and H, respectively, but VO2max showed no significant change. The average power output in the TT improved significantly (7.3% and 6.4% for N and H, respectively. No differences were found in MCT1 and MCT4 protein content, before and after the training in either the N or H group. These results indicate there are no additional benefits of IHT when compared to similar normoxic training. Hence, the addition of the hypoxic stimulus on anaerobic performance or MCT expression after a three-week training period is ineffective.

  19. Neuromuscular and athletic performance following core strength training in elite youth soccer: Role of instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieske, O; Muehlbauer, T; Borde, R; Gube, M; Bruhn, S; Behm, D G; Granacher, U

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies revealed that inclusion of unstable elements in core-strengthening exercises produced increases in trunk muscle activity and thus potential extra stimuli to induce more pronounced performance enhancements in youth athletes. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate changes in neuromuscular and athletic performance following core strength training performed on unstable (CSTU) compared with stable surfaces (CSTS) in youth soccer players. Thirty-nine male elite soccer players (age: 17 ± 1 years) were assigned to two groups performing a progressive core strength-training program for 9 weeks (2-3 times/week) in addition to regular in-season soccer training. CSTS group conducted core exercises on stable (i.e., floor, bench) and CSTU group on unstable (e.g., Thera-Band® Stability Trainer, Togu© Swiss ball) surfaces. Measurements included tests for assessing trunk muscle strength/activation, countermovement jump height, sprint time, agility time, and kicking performance. Statistical analysis revealed significant main effects of test (pre vs post) for trunk extensor strength (5%, P < 0.05, d = 0.86), 10-20-m sprint time (3%, P < 0.05, d = 2.56), and kicking performance (1%, P < 0.01, d = 1.28). No significant Group × test interactions were observed for any variable. In conclusion, trunk muscle strength, sprint, and kicking performance improved following CSTU and CSTS when conducted in combination with regular soccer training. PMID:25559249

  20. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS IN ATHLETES OF DIFFERENT SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Venckunas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Competitive athletics is often associated with moderate left ventricular (LV hypertrophy, and it has been hypothesized that training mode and type of exercise modulates long-term cardiac adaptation. The purpose of the study was to compare cardiac structure and function among athletes of various sports and sedentary controls. Standard transthoracic two-dimensional M-mode and Doppler echocardiography was performed at rest in Caucasian male canoe/kayak paddlers (n = 9, long distance runners (LDR, n = 18, middle distance runners (MDR, n = 17, basketball players (BP, n = 31, road cyclists (n = 8, swimmers (n = 10, strength/power athletes (n = 9 of similar age (range, 15 to 31 yrs, training experience (4 to 9 years, and age-matched healthy male sedentary controls (n = 15. Absolute interventricular septum (IVS thickness and LV wall thickness, but not LV diameter, were greater in athletes than sedentary controls. Left ventricular mass of all athletes but relative wall thickness of only BP, swimmers, cyclists, and strength/power athletes were higher as compared with controls (p < 0.05. Among athletes, smaller IVS thickness was observed in MDR than BP, cyclists, swimmers or strength/power athletes, while LDR had higher body size-adjusted LV diameter as compared to BP, cyclists and strength/power athletes. In conclusion, relative LV diameter was increased in long distance runners as compared with basketball players, cyclists, and strength/power athletes. Basketball, road cycling, strength/power, and swimming training were associated with increased LV concentricity as compared with paddling or distance running

  1. Coping skills of olympic developmental soccer athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M C; Stewart, C C; Laurent, C M; Leunes, A D; Bourgeois, A E

    2008-12-01

    Athletes at Olympic Developmental Program (ODP) camps experience unusually high levels of expectations and inherent mental and physical challenges within such a short span of time. With the increasing emphasis on talent development, there has been consensus by the ODP staff to more clearly define present levels of coping skills, in order to enhance athletic prediction, maximize training efforts, identify the predisposition to injury, and focus on areas pertinent to successful performance. This study examined athletic and pain coping skills of U. S. ODP soccer athletes not previously investigated. Following written informed consent, 70 males completed the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory and the Sports Inventory for Pain. Data were analyzed by competitive level (U-14, U-15), and skill position (goalkeeper/defense, midfield/foward). MANOVA indicated a significant main effect across competitive level (Wilks' Lambda F(12,57) = 2.27; p = 0.02; n-beta = 0.915) but no significant effect by skill position (Wilks' Lambda F(12,57) = 0.931; p = 0.523; n-beta = 0.457). Post hoc analyses indicated that U-15 athletes scored significantly higher in concentration (p = 0.01) and body awareness (p = 0.03), but lower in avoidance (p = 0.01) than U-14 competitors. In conclusion, older, more experienced athletes revealed more positive athletic and pain coping skills than younger, less experienced athletes, although athletes in skill positions requiring spontaneous decision-making skills and split-second adjustment in a constantly changing sport environment (forwards, midfielders) did not exhibit more positive athletic and pain coping skills than those positions requiring reaction and protection (defenders, goalkeepers). PMID:18548363

  2. EFFECT OF WOBBLE BOARD BALANCE TRAINING PROGRAM ON STATIC BALANCE, DYNAMIC BALANCE & TRIPLE HOP DISTANCE IN MALE COLLEGIATE BASKETBALL ATHLETE

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Panwar, MPT (Sports); Gaurav Kadyan, MPT (Sports); Aseem Gupta, MPT (Sports); Ravinder Narwal, MPT (Ortho,Cardiopulmonary)

    2014-01-01

    Aim & Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of wobble board balance training program on static & dynamic balance & on triple hop distance in male collegiate basketball athletes. Methodology: Fifty healthy basketball players within a age group of 18-22 yrs. were randomly selected with a baseline BESS score between 6 to 14 & modified SEBT score equal to or greater than 94 (till 100) and they randomly divided into control (n-25) & training group (n-25).The training grou...

  3. Educating Educators: Perceptions of Preceptors and Clinical Education Coordinators Regarding Training at a Division II Athletic Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, Renae Ellen; Mulvihill, Thalia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Clinical experiences give the student athletic trainer the opportunity to relate and apply didactic information to a real-world setting. During these experiences student athletic trainers are supervised by certified, licensed health care providers working in a variety of settings (e.g., hospital, physical therapy clinic, doctor's office).…

  4. Reduced thymic output in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Hinojosa, Adria; Knight, Andrea; Compton, Claude; Gleeson, Michael; Travers, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Athletes undergoing intensive training schedules have chronic exposure to stress-induced hormones such as cortisol that can depress immune function. We compared the circulating levels of T cell receptor excision circles (TREC), a marker of recent thymic emigrants, as well as the levels of naïve and memory subsets in a group of elite endurance athletes and in controls. The athletes showed a reduction in absolute numbers of naïve T cells, particularly in CD4 T cells. In contrast, memory cells were increased. TREC levels in the athletes were significantly reduced compared to age-matched controls. Such changes resemble premature ageing of the T cell component of the immune system. Since thymic production of T cells naturally decline with age, these results raise the concern that prolonging high intensity exercise into the 4th decade of life may have deleterious consequences for athletes' health.

  5. Methods of Echocardiographic Examination of Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr S. Sharykin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of echocardiography in in-depth medical examinations helps conduct screening for inborn or acquired heart anomalies, which, however, can oftentimes be not enough for assessing their significance. In athletes who train 5-6 times per week 2-3 times or more per day, the heart gets under physical stress more often than in non-athletes – therefore, examining them at rest cannot provide a full-scale picture of the heart’s operation. The article describes a methodology of echocardiography with graduated training load, which helps explore the condition of hemodynamics in athletes when they are engaged in doing habitual work.

  6. Accuracy of Athletic Trainer and Physician Diagnoses in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Nicholas J; Tucker, Bradford; Freedman, Kevin B; Austin, Luke S; Eck, Brandon; Pepe, Matthew; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P

    2016-09-01

    It is standard practice in high school athletic programs for certified athletic trainers to evaluate and treat injured student athletes. In some cases, a trainer refers an athlete to a physician for definitive medical management. This study was conducted to determine the rate of agreement between athletic trainers and physicians regarding assessment of injuries in student athletes. All high school athletes who were injured between 2010 and 2012 at 5 regional high schools were included in a research database. All patients who were referred for physician evaluation and treatment were identified and included in this analysis. A total of 286 incidents met the inclusion criteria. A total of 263 (92%) of the athletic trainer assessments and physician diagnoses were in agreement. In the 23 cases of disagreement, fractures and sprains were the most common injuries. Kappa analysis showed the highest interrater agreement in injuries classified as dislocations and concussions and the lowest interrater agreement in meniscal/labral injuries and fractures. In the absence of a confirmed diagnosis, agreement among health care providers can be used to infer accuracy. According to this principle, as agreement between athletic trainers and physicians improves, there is a greater likelihood of arriving at the correct assessment and treatment plan. Athletic trainers are highly skilled professionals who are well trained in the evaluation of athletic injuries. The current study showed that additional training in identifying fractures may be beneficial to athletic trainers and the athletes they treat. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e944-e949.]. PMID:27398784

  7. Limitations in intense exercise performance of athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    into the beneficial effects of SET have been conducted in untrained and recreationally active individuals, making extrapolation towards athletes' performance difficult. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that only few weeks of SET enhances intense exercise performance in highly-trained individuals...

  8. Feeding Your Child Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and minerals. Calcium and iron are two important minerals for athletes: Calcium helps build strong bones to resist breaking and stress fractures. Calcium-rich foods include low-fat dairy products like milk, yogurt, and cheese, as well as leafy green ...

  9. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  10. Eating Disorders among Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, George

    1987-01-01

    Case examples are presented of typical pressures felt by aerobic dance instructors, cheerleaders and majorettes, and wrestlers to illustrate how they may become susceptible to eating disorders. Suggestions are presented for coaches, parents, and administrators in preventing or intervening in eating disorders among athletes. (CB)

  11. Drug abuse in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L; Creado, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with "advances" in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. PMID:25187752

  12. Effects of Aerobic Training on Eating Disorders in Non-athlete Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rohi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common mental disorders is eating disorders that have high comorbidity with psychological factors and is observed in the teenage and young girls more than others. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of regular aerobic training on eating disorders in non-athlete female students. Methods: In this experimental study, the eating attitudes questionnaire was completed by 458 female students of University of Guilan, and 38 students were diagnosed with eating disorders. From these 38 students, 25 ones took part in the study. Finally, subjects were assigned into two groups randomly: experimental (n=13 and control (n=12 group. Both groups were homogeneous in regard to standpoint age, weight, and marriage and didn’t show statistical significant differences. Experimental group trained for 8 weeks and 2 times per week. After training program, two groups recompleted EAT-26 questionnaire. Because of exclusion of 2 individual from experimental group for discontinuing training program, 23 subjects were analyzed. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics, t test and ANCOVA. Results: Findings showed that there were significant differences between experimental and control groups in regard to their eating attitudes (p<0.05. Conclusion: It could be concluded that regular exercise training such as aerobic training may reduce eating disorders in female students

  13. Nutritional Practices of Athletes in Oman: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Waly, Mostafa I.; Kilani, Hashem A; and Majid S. Al-Busafi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Adequate dietary intake is crucial for optimum training and performance of athletes. There is almost no available information related to dietary practices among Omani athletes, especially during the competition. This study aimed to assess the nutritional practices (nutritional knowledge, eating habits and daily nutrients intake) among Omani male handball athletes in Muscat city, Oman.Methods: This is a cross sectional study including 35 male handball athletes involved in serious tr...

  14. Rehabilitation of the athlete with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standaert, Christopher J; Herring, Stanley A; Pratt, Todd W

    2004-02-01

    The rehabilitation of athletes with low back pain should be considered an essential component of their care. Comprehensive rehabilitation begins at the time of acute injury and encompasses the period of acute care through sport-specific training and return to competition. Rehabilitation of athletes with spinal pain should include a thorough psychosocial evaluation to identify potential barriers to clinical improvement. For athletes with low back pain, establishing effective core stability is central to optimizing the functional performance of the athlete. PMID:14728912

  15. Hormonal and Physiological Adaptations to High-Intensity Interval Training in Professional Male Canoe Polo Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhlouvand, Mohsen; Khalili, Erfan; Agha-Alinejad, Hamid; Gharaat, Mohammadali

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of 2 different high-intensity interval training (HIIT) programs in professional male canoe polo athletes. Responses of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), ventilatory threshold (VT), peak and mean anaerobic power output (PPO and MPO), blood volume, and hormonal adaptations to HIIT were examined. Male athletes (n = 21, age: 24 ± 3 years; height: 181 ± 4 cm; mass: 85 ± 6 kg; and body fat: 12.9 ± 2.7%) were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups (N = 7): (a) (G1) interval paddling with variable volume (6, 7, 8, 9, 9, 9, 8, 7, 6 repetitions per session from first to ninth session, respectively) × 60 second at lowest velocity that elicited VO2peak (vVO2peak), 1:3 work to recovery ratio; (b) (G2) interval paddling with variable intensity (6 × 60 second at 100, 110, 120, 130, 130, 130, 120, 110, 100% vVO2peak from first to ninth session, respectively, 1:3 work to recovery); and (c) (GCON) the control group performed three 60 minutes paddling sessions (75% vVO2peak) per week for 3 weeks. High-intensity interval training resulted in significant (except as shown) increases compared with pretest, in VO2peak (G1 = +8.8% and G2 = +8.5%), heart rate at VT (b·min) (G1 = +9.7% and G2 = +5.9%) and (%maximum) (G1 = +6.9%; p = 0.29 and G2 = +6.5%), PPO (G1 = +9.7% and G2 = +12.2%), MPO (G1 = +11.1%; p = 0.29 and G2 = +16.2%), total testosterone (G1 = +29.4% and G2 = +16.7%), total testosterone/cortisol ratio (G1 = +40.9% and G2 = +28.1%), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (G1 = +1.7% and G2 = +1.3%). No significant changes were found in GCON. High-intensity interval paddling may improve both aerobic and anaerobic performances in professional male canoe polo athletes under the conditions of this study.

  16. The Effects of Sports Vision Training on Binocular Vision Function in Female University Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierko, Teresa; Puchalska-Niedbał, Lidia; Krzepota, Justyna; Markiewicz, Mikołaj; Woźniak, Jarosław; Lubiński, Wojciech

    2015-12-22

    Binocular vision is the most important visual cue for spatial orientation in many sports. In this study, we investigated how binocular vision was influenced by an eye training program that may be used to improve individual's oculomotor function. The experiment involved twenty-four female student athletes from team ball sports (soccer, basketball, handball). After an initial testing session, 12 participants were randomly allocated to the experimental group. Optometric investigation which included synoptophore testing and a test of dissociated horizontal phoria based on the Maddox method was performed three times: before the experiment, after eight weeks of eye training (3 times a week for 20 minutes), and four weeks after the experiment was terminated. Eye exercise methodology was based on orthoptic, sport and psychological aspects of performance. The phoria screening examination showed that exophoria was the most frequent disorder of binocular vision. Low fusional vergence range was also observed. Following the training period, 3 of the 6 oculomotor variables improved. The greatest effect was observed in near dissociated phoria (χ(2) =14.56, p=0.001 for the right eye; χ(2) =14.757, p=0.001 for the left eye) and fusional convergence (χ(2) =8.522, p=0.014). The results of the retention test conducted four weeks after the experiment confirmed the effectiveness of the vision training program. The results of the study suggest that binocular functions are trainable and can be improved by means of appropriate visual training.

  17. The Effects of Sports Vision Training on Binocular Vision Function in Female University Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierko, Teresa; Puchalska-Niedbał, Lidia; Krzepota, Justyna; Markiewicz, Mikołaj; Woźniak, Jarosław; Lubiński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Binocular vision is the most important visual cue for spatial orientation in many sports. In this study, we investigated how binocular vision was influenced by an eye training program that may be used to improve individual's oculomotor function. The experiment involved twenty-four female student athletes from team ball sports (soccer, basketball, handball). After an initial testing session, 12 participants were randomly allocated to the experimental group. Optometric investigation which included synoptophore testing and a test of dissociated horizontal phoria based on the Maddox method was performed three times: before the experiment, after eight weeks of eye training (3 times a week for 20 minutes), and four weeks after the experiment was terminated. Eye exercise methodology was based on orthoptic, sport and psychological aspects of performance. The phoria screening examination showed that exophoria was the most frequent disorder of binocular vision. Low fusional vergence range was also observed. Following the training period, 3 of the 6 oculomotor variables improved. The greatest effect was observed in near dissociated phoria (χ2 =14.56, p=0.001 for the right eye; χ2 =14.757, p=0.001 for the left eye) and fusional convergence (χ2 =8.522, p=0.014). The results of the retention test conducted four weeks after the experiment confirmed the effectiveness of the vision training program. The results of the study suggest that binocular functions are trainable and can be improved by means of appropriate visual training. PMID:26925183

  18. A comparison of organ-tissue level body composition between college-age male athletes and non-athletes

    OpenAIRE

    T. Midorikawa; Sekiguchi, O.; Beekley, M.D.; Bemben, M.G.; T. Abe

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of skeletal muscle (SM) mass and internal organ (liver and kidney) mass in resistance and/or high-intensity trained collegiate athletes with non-athletes, and to examine the relationships between fat-free mass (FFM) and its major components of SM, liver mass and kidney mass. Fifteen athletes and seventeen non-athletes volunteered for the study. FFM was measured by two-compartment densitometry. Contiguous magnetic resonance imaging w...

  19. The Role of the Faculty Athletics Representative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Arthur W.

    1992-01-01

    The faculty athletics representative plays an important role in the athletic-academic relationship. This responsibility includes certifying student-athlete eligibility, reporting academic data as required, evaluating athlete-applicant qualifications and abilities, regular evaluation of athlete performance, and participation in evaluation of…

  20. Effects of Oral Sodium Supplementation on Indices of Thermoregulation in Trained, Endurance Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Earhart, Edward P. Weiss, Rabia Rahman, Patrick V. Kelly

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines recommend the consumption of sodium during exercise to replace losses in sweat; however, the effects of sodium on thermoregulation are less clear. To determine the effects of high-dose sodium supplementation on indices of thermoregulation and related outcomes, 11 endurance athletes participated in a double-blind, randomized-sequence, crossover study in which they underwent 2-hrs of endurance exercise at 60% heart rate reserve with 1800 mg of sodium supplementation (SS during one trial and placebo (PL during the other trial. A progressive intensity time-to-exhaustion test was performed after the 2-hr steady state exercise as an assessment of exercise performance. Sweat rate was calculated from changes in body weight, accounting for fluid intake and urinary losses. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE and heat stress were assessed using verbal numeric scales. Cardiovascular drift was determined from the rise in HR during the 2-hr steady state exercise test. Skin temperature was measured with an infrared thermometer. Dehydration occurred in both SS and PL trials, as evidenced by substantial weight loss (2.03 ± 0.43% and 2.27 ± 0.70%, respectively; p = 0.261 between trials. Sweat rate was 1015.53 ± 239.10 ml·hr-1 during the SS trial and 1053.60±278.24 ml/hr during the PL trial, with no difference between trials (p = 0.459. Heat stress ratings indicated moderate heat stress (“warm/hot” ratings but were not different between trials (p = 0.825. Time to exhaustion during the SS trial was 6.88 ± 3.88 minutes and during the PL trial averaged 6.96 ± 3.61 minutes, but did not differ between trials (p = 0.919. Cardiovascular drift, skin temperature, and RPE did not differ between trials (all p > 0.05. High-dose sodium supplementation does not appear to impact thermoregulation, cardiovascular drift, or physical performance in trained, endurance athletes. However, in light of the possibility that high sodium intakes might have other adverse

  1. Sleep, anxiety and electronic device use by athletes in the training and competition environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romyn, Georgia; Robey, Elisa; Dimmock, James A; Halson, Shona L; Peeling, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This study subjectively assessed sleep quality and quantity, state anxiety and electronic device use during a 7-day training week (TRAIN) and a 7-day competitive tournament (COMP). Eight state-level netball players used wrist-watch actigraphy to provide indirect sleep measures of bedtime, wake time, sleep duration, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset and fragmentation index. State anxiety was reported using the anxiety sub-scale in the Profile of Mood States-Adolescents. Before bed duration of electronic device use and the estimated time to sleep after finishing electronic device use was also recorded. Significant main effects showed that sleep efficiency (p = 0.03) was greater in COMP as compared to TRAIN. Furthermore, the bedtime and wake time were earlier (p = 0.01) during COMP. No further differences existed between conditions (p > 0.05). However, strong negative associations were seen between state anxiety and the sleep quality rating. Here, sleep efficiency was likely greater in COMP due to the homeostatic need for recovery sleep, resulting from the change in environment from training to competition. Furthermore, an increased anxiety before bed seems to influence sleep quality and should be considered in athletes portraying poor sleep habits. PMID:25790844

  2. A group-enhanced sprint interval training program for amateur athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Luc J; Anderson, Scott H; Schmale, Matthew S; Hallworth, Jillian R; Hazell, Tom J

    2016-08-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) can elicit improvements in aerobic and anaerobic capacity. While variations in SIT protocols have been investigated, the influence of social processes cannot be overlooked. As research supports the use of groups to influence individual cognitions and behaviours, the current project assessed the effectiveness of a group-based intervention with participants conducting SIT. Specifically, 53 amateur athletes (age, 21.9 ± 2.9 years; 53% females) took part in a 4-week training program (3 sessions per week, 30-s "all-out" efforts with 4 min active recovery, repeated 4-6 times per session), and were assigned to "true group", aggregate, or individual conditions. Results indicated no significant differences between groups for the physiological measures. With regards to training improvements from baseline for all participants- regardless of condition - significant main effects for time were identified for maximal oxygen uptake (2.5-2.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), p motivation (p = 0.033, η(2) = 0.13), task self-efficacy (p = 0.018, η(2) = 0.15), and scheduling self-efficacy (p = 0.003, η(2) = 0.22). The true group experienced greater improvements in motivation than the individual condition, but the aggregate and individual conditions demonstrated greater increases in task and scheduling self-efficacy. Though the SIT paradigm employed induced training improvements similar to previous work, the group intervention was not able to further these improvements. PMID:27377136

  3. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes - Results from Simulated Training Camps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Hecksteden

    Full Text Available Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1, after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8 and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11. Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery. With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l, urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl, free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml. For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling

  4. Features of blood pressure in student-athletes from different directions of the training process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalenichenko Aleksej Vladimirovich

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Performed blood pressure (BP and hemodynamics of 85 students: 30 non-athletes (group I, 27 athletes power enforcement types (group II and 28 - endurance sports (group III. It was found that the second and third groups had higher systolic and mean arterial pressure than in the I group. There are differences in blood pressure reactivity to changes in body position, mental and physical activity among the various groups studied. It is shown that the formation of moderate hypertension in group III is carried out by increasing peripheral vascular resistance, and II - at the expense of increased cardiac output.

  5. A 5° medial wedge reduces frontal but not saggital plane motion during jump landing in highly trained women athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael F Joseph1, Craig R Denegar1, Elaine Horn1, Bradley MacDougall1, Michael Rahl1, Jessica Sheehan1, Thomas Trojian2, Jeffery M Anderson1, James E Clark1, William J Kraemer11Department of Kinesiology, 2Department of Sports Medicine, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USAAbstract: Lower extremity mechanics during landing have been linked to traumatic and nontraumatic knee injuries, particularly in women’s athletics. The effects of efforts to mitigate these risks have not been fully elucidated. We previously reported that a 5° medial wedge reduced ankle eversion and knee valgus. In the present report we further investigated the effect of a 5° medial wedge inserted in the shoes of female athletes on frontal plane hip motion, as well as ankle, knee, hip, and trunk saggital plane motion during a jump landing task. Kinematic data were obtained from 10 intercollegiate female athletes during jump landings from a 31 cm platform with and without a 5° medial wedge. Hip adduction was reduced 1.98° (95% CI 0.97–2.99° by the medial wedge but saggital plane motions were unaffected. A 5° medial wedge reduces frontal plane motion and takes the knee away from a position associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although frontal plane motion was not captured it is unlikely to have increased in a bilateral landing task. Thus, it is likely that greater muscle forces were generated in these highly trained athletes to dissipate ground reaction forces when a medial wedge was in place. Additional investigation in younger and lesser trained athletes is warranted to assess the impact of orthotic devices on knee joint mechanics.Keywords: jump landing, foot orthotic, lower extremity kinematics, knee biomechanics, knee injury

  6. Initial Training of Teenage Weightlifting Athletes%青少年举重运动员的初期训练

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明亮

    2015-01-01

    To promote better development of weightlifting in China,the paper studies the initial training of teenage weightlifting athletes with methods of literature and logical analysis.By analyzing from the aspects of initial strength training,technique training and psychological quality training of teenage weightlifting athletes,the paper hopes to provide some theoretical reference for initial training of teenage weightlifting athletes.%为进一步促进我国举重运动项目的更好的发展,采用文献资料法、逻辑分析法研究了青少年举重运动员的初期训练,本文分别从青少年举重运动员的初期力量训练、初期技术训练、初期的心理素质训练三个方面进行了分析,希望能为青少年举重运动员的初期训练提供一定的理论借鉴。

  7. MRSA Prevention Information and Advice for Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What to do If You Think You Have MRSA Tell your parent, coach, athletic trainer, school nurse, ... MRSA in athletic facilities... Top of Page Why MRSA is Spread among Athletes MRSA might spread easily ...

  8. Pars Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Jonathan H; Gallina, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accuracy of MRI as a diagnostic modality. Acute injuries may be amenable to bracing with the goal of a healed lesion. Most cases of spondylolysis will result in asymptomatic non-union, though pars repair is an option for symptomatic pars defects without spondylolisthesis. PMID:26977552

  9. Groin pain in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Jim; Johson, Chris; Schroeder, Erik L

    2006-12-01

    Groin pain is a common and often frustrating problem in athletes who engage in sports involving kicking, rapid accelerations and decelerations, and sudden direction changes. The most common problems are adductor strain, osteitis pubis, and sports hernia. Other causes must be considered, including nerve pain, stress fractures, and intrinsic hip pathology. There is significant overlap and multiple problems frequently coexist. Accurate diagnosis leads to directed treatment, with rehabilitation focused on functional closed-chain strengthening and core stability. PMID:17067496

  10. Osteochondroses in athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Orava, S.; Virtanen, K.

    1982-01-01

    Osteochondroses are disorders of primary and secondary growth centres, or lesions at the apophyseal or epiphyseal growth areas of bones. Although there are many types of osteochondroses, the history, clinical symptoms and findings as well as radiological findings are typical. Physical exercise is one of the factors that provokes symptoms. In a series of 185 osteochondroses in active young athletes, there were 18 different disorders. The commonest were Osgood-Schlatter's disease, Sever's disea...

  11. Drug abuse in athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon CL; Creado S

    2014-01-01

    Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines t...

  12. Supplement use by Young Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Jill Anne McDowall

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews studies of supplement use among child and adolescent athletes, focusing on prevalence and type of supplement use, as well as gender comparisons. Supplement use among adult athletes has been well documented however there are a limited number of studies investigating supplement use by child and adolescent athletes. A trend in the current literature revealed that the most frequently used supplements are in the form of vitamin and minerals. While health and illness prevention a...

  13. The Female Athlete Triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss Kelly, Amanda K; Hecht, Suzanne

    2016-08-01

    The number of girls participating in sports has increased significantly since the introduction of Title XI in 1972. As a result, more girls have been able to experience the social, educational, and health-related benefits of sports participation. However, there are risks associated with sports participation, including the female athlete triad. The triad was originally recognized as the interrelationship of amenorrhea, osteoporosis, and disordered eating, but our understanding has evolved to recognize that each of the components of the triad exists on a spectrum from optimal health to disease. The triad occurs when energy intake does not adequately compensate for exercise-related energy expenditure, leading to adverse effects on reproductive, bone, and cardiovascular health. Athletes can present with a single component or any combination of the components. The triad can have a more significant effect on the health of adolescent athletes than on adults because adolescence is a critical time for bone mass accumulation. This report outlines the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the triad conditions. PMID:27432852

  14. Venous thrombosis in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Gregory; Whiteside, William K; Kanwisher, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Because deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can occur following orthopaedic procedures, knowledge of hereditary and acquired risk factors for DVT is essential. Hereditary forms of thrombophilia include factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, and deficiencies of antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S. Acquired risk factors include but are not limited to trauma, immobilization, and surgical procedures. In general, athletes have a low risk of venous thrombosis; however, this population is exposed to many acquired thrombogenic risk factors, including hemoconcentration, trauma, immobilization, long-distance travel, and the use of oral contraceptives. Thus, orthopaedic surgeons should consider screening athletes for thrombogenic risk factors, including history of venous thrombosis, hypercoagulable disorders, or high altitude exercise, during preparticipation physicals and preoperative examinations. If a patient is determined to be at high risk of DVT, preventive measures such as physical antithrombotic measures and/or low-molecular-weight heparin should be instituted. If an athlete develops a DVT, a risk factor assessment should be conducted along with anticoagulation treatment in accordance with the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. PMID:23378374

  15. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality.

  16. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality. PMID:27544991

  17. The Effect of HMB Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Four Weeks of Resistance Training in Amateur Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Arazi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nutritional supplements have been widely used in order to enhance athletic performance and improve health. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Beta-Hydroxy Beta-Methylbutyrate (HMB supplementation on cardiovascular risk factors after 4 weeks of resistance training in athletes. Patients and Methods: In this double-blind study, 20 male athletes were selected through simple random sampling, were assigned to supplement and control groups, and participated in resistance training 3 sessions a week for 4 weeks. The supplement group consumed 3 g HMB supplement per day and the control group consumed the placebo (rice flour in this period. Before and after the test period, blood pressure was measured and fasting blood samples were obtained to determine blood lipids and hematological parameters. After all, paired and unpaired t-test were used to examine within and between group differences, respectively. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: After the training period, no significant differences were found between HMB and placebo groups regarding blood lipids, blood pressure, and hematological parameters. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicated that HMB supplementation was safe and did not result in any adverse effects. Thus, HMB can be used safely by human as an ergogenic aid for exercise training.

  18. Pulmonary blood flow and its distribution in highly trained endurance athletes and healthy control subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Heinonen (Ilkka); M.J. Savolainen (Markku); C. Han (Chunlei); J. Kemppainen (Jukka); V. Oikonen (Vesa); M. Luotolahti (Matti); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); D. Merkus (Daphne); J. Knuuti (Juhani); K.K. Kalliokoski (Kari)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPulmonary blood flow (PBF) is an important determinant of endurance sports performance, yet studies investigating adaptations of the pulmonary circulation in athletes are scarce. In the present study, we investigated PBF, its distribution, and heterogeneity at baseline and during intrave

  19. Evaluation Models for Continuing Education Program Efficacy: How Does Athletic Training Continuing Education Measure up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty-Restrepo, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Brian J.; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Pitney, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Although continuing education is required for athletic trainers (AT) to maintain their Board of Certification credential, little is known regarding its efficacy for advancing knowledge and improving patient care. Continuing professional education (CPE) is designed to provide professionals with important practical learning opportunities.…

  20. Effect of Ramadan fasting and triangular exercise progressive on the vigilance, mood and blood glucose in trained athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfi Said

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study has for objective the assessment of the vigilance, mood states variations and the blood glucose levels, during a triangular effort progressive in trained athletes during Ramadan fasting (RF. Methods. Ten trained male athletes aged 21.8 ± 1.1 years are evaluated before (B.RF, during (1st, 2nd and 3th week and after Ramadan fasting, in the blood-glucose, vigilance, and mood states at rest and after (A. Ex. a triangular exercise test (TUB II.Results. Comparing to the reference period (B.RF, the RF induces a decrease in the maximal aerobic power (TUB II approximately 2-Cleanup Messy Code 5% and a hypoglycaemia. The objective vigilance is doubly influenced by the RF (F= 14.58, p

  1. Beetroot juice does not enhance altitude running performance in well-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Josh Timothy; Oliver, Samuel James; Lewis-Jones, Tammy Maria; Wylie, Lee John; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2015-06-01

    We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) provided as concentrated beetroot juice supplement would improve endurance running performance of well-trained runners in normobaric hypoxia. Ten male runners (mean (SD): sea level maximal oxygen uptake, 66 (7) mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); 10 km personal best, 36 (2) min) completed incremental exercise to exhaustion at 4000 m and a 10-km treadmill time-trial at 2500 m simulated altitude on separate days after supplementation with ∼7 mmol NO3(-) and a placebo at 2.5 h before exercise. Oxygen cost, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were determined during the incremental exercise test. Differences between treatments were determined using means [95% confidence intervals], paired sample t tests, and a probability of individual response analysis. NO3(-) supplementation increased plasma nitrite concentration (NO3(-), 473 (226) nmol·L(-1) vs. placebo, 61 (37) nmol·L(-1), P effect on time-trial performance was observed as the 11 [-60 to 38] s improvement was less than the a priori determined minimum important difference (51 s), and only 3 runners experienced a "likely, probable" performance improvement. NO3(-) also did not alter oxygen cost, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, or RPE. Acute dietary NO3(-) supplementation did not consistently enhance running performance of well-trained athletes in normobaric hypoxia. PMID:25942474

  2. Vascular adaptation in athletes: is there an 'athlete's artery'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Spence, A.; Rowley, N.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Naylor, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst the existence of a specific phenotype characterized as 'athlete's heart' is generally acknowledged, the question of whether athletes exhibit characteristic vascular adaptations has not been specifically addressed. To do so in this symposium, studies which have assessed the size, wall thicknes

  3. Nutritional Considerations for the Overweight Young Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lisa; Timmons, Brian W

    2015-11-01

    Nutritional considerations for the overweight young athlete have not been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature. With the high prevalence of childhood obesity, more children participating in sports are overweight or obese. This is particularly true for select sports, such as American football, where large size provides an added advantage. While sport participation should be encouraged because of the many benefits of physical activity, appropriate nutritional practices are vital for growth, and optimizing performance and health. The overweight young athlete may face certain challenges because of variable energy costs and nutrient requirements for growth and routine training, compared with nonoverweight athletes. Special attention should be given to adopting healthy lifestyle choices to prevent adverse health effects due to increased adiposity. In this review, we aim to discuss special nutritional considerations and highlight gaps in the literature concerning nutrition for overweight young athletes compared with their nonoverweight peers. PMID:26251973

  4. Nutritional Supplements for Strength Power Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilborn, Colin

    Over the last decade research involving nutritional supplementation and sport performance has increased substantially. Strength and power athletes have specific needs to optimize their performance. Nutritional supplementation cannot be viewed as a replacement for a balanced diet but as an important addition to it. However, diet and supplementation are not mutually exclusive, nor does one depend on the other. Strength and power athletes have four general areas of supplementation needs. First, strength athletes need supplements that have a direct effect on performance. The second group of supplements includes those that promote recovery. The third group comprises the supplements that enhance immune function. The last group of supplements includes those that provide energy or have a direct effect on the workout. This chapter reviews the key supplements needed to optimize the performance and training of the strength athlete.

  5. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures. PMID:23697359

  6. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  7. Vitamin supplementation benefits in master athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisswalter, Jeanick; Louis, Julien

    2014-03-01

    Master athletes are more than 35 years of age and continue to train as hard as their young counterparts despite the aging process. All life long, they are capable of accomplishing exceptional sporting performances. For these participants in endurance events, matching energy intake and expenditure is critical to maintain health and performance. The proportions of carbohydrate, fat, and protein must be optimized to provide enough calories to sustain the energy requirements of competition or training, and for recovery. In addition, endurance athletes must include adequate vitamins and minerals in their diets to maintain healthy immune function. Vitamins and minerals may be sufficient in the diets of endurance athletes, who have a high energy intake. This would make it unnecessary to use vitamin and mineral supplements. Furthermore, one major limitation for these athletes is the management of oxidative stress, which, when in excess, can be deleterious for the organism. For individuals exposed to oxidative stress, micronutritional supplementations rich in vitamins and minerals can be also an alternative strategy. Although these supplementations are increasingly used by master athletes, very few data are available on their effects on oxidative stress, muscle recovery, and physical performance. The potential benefits of supplement use in athletes are thus questionable. Some studies indicate no benefits, while others highlight potential negative side effects of vitamin supplementation. Additional studies are warranted in order to design adapted prescriptions in antioxidant vitamins and minerals. PMID:24323888

  8. The Development of Expert Male National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Certified Athletic Trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasarn, Ruemruk; Bloom, Gordon A; Crumpton, Rebecca

    2002-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the major influences in the development of expert male National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I certified athletic trainers. DESIGN AND SETTING: The participants were individually interviewed, and the data were transcribed and coded. SUBJECTS: Seven male NCAA Division I certified athletic trainers, who averaged 29 years of experience in the profession and 20 years at the Division I level. RESULTS: We found 3 higher-order categories that explained the development of the certified athletic trainers and labeled these meaningful experiences, personal attributes, and mentoring. The growth and development of the athletic trainers were influenced by a variety of meaningful experiences that began during their time as students and continued throughout their careers. These experiences involved dealing with challenging job conditions, educational conditions, and attempts to promote and improve the profession. The personal attributes category encompassed the importance of a caring and service-oriented attitude, building relationships with athletes, and maintaining strong bonds within their own families. Mentoring of these individuals occurred both inside and outside the athletic training profession. CONCLUSION: We provide a unique view of the development of athletic trainers that should be of interest to those in the field, regardless of years of experience.

  9. Athletics Reform and Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Hendricks, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Since their inception, intercollegiate athletics have engendered controversy and stimulated debate. Supporters assert that "college sports are significant in defining the essence of the American college and university", suggesting that benefits associated with athletics include more increased fundraising, positive public perceptions of graduates,…

  10. Sport participation motives of young Brazilian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Dartagnan P; Netto, Jose Evaristo S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the motives for sport participation in a sample of young Brazilian athletes according to sex, age, and training history. A total of 1,517 participants (714 girls, 803 boys) ages 12 to 18 years were included in the study. The Portuguese version of the Participation Motivation Questionnaire was used to identify motives for sport participation. The most important motives were Skill Development and Fitness, whereas the least important were Fun and Achievement/Status. Sex, age, type of sport, onset of training, duration of training, training volume, and competitive experience significantly influenced the motives for sport participation reported by the athletes. These results will contribute to establish intervention programs designed to reduce sport dropout rates among young athletes.

  11. Sports idols of senior athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ilić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify idols of senior athletes. And based on the identification of idols some conclusions can be made with respect to the system of values some person. The sample included 318 Serbian professional senior athletes (183 male and 135 female, 18 to 40 years old. Respondents were engaged in 28 different sports, mostly volleyball, water polo, basketball, karate, bocca, savate, handball, kyokushin. The independent variables were gender and selected idol and dependent variables were sport, gender, actuality and origin of idol. Senior athletes for their sports idols, in most cases elect Roger Federer, Michael Jordan, Milorad Čavić. It turns out that the majority of male and female athletes are selected for their idol person that comes out of their sport, but also that there are some differences in the choice of idols and characteristics of idols in male and female athletes.

  12. Fueling the vegetarian (vegan) athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Joel; Ferreri, Deana M

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarian diets are associated with several health benefits, but whether a vegetarian or vegan diet is beneficial for athletic performance has not yet been defined. Based on the evidence in the literature that diets high in unrefined plant foods are associated with beneficial effects on overall health, lifespan, immune function, and cardiovascular health, such diets likely would promote improved athletic performance as well. In this article, we review the state of the literature on vegetarian diets and athletic performance, discuss prevention of potential micronutrient deficiencies that may occur in the vegan athlete, and provide strategies on meeting the enhanced caloric and protein needs of an athlete with a plant-based diet. PMID:20622542

  13. [Groin pain in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziltener, J-L; Leal, S

    2007-08-01

    Groin pain is a common problem in athletes who engage in sports involving accelerations, decelerations and sudden direction changes. It is still a frustrating pathology which has significant overlap and multiple problems coexist frequently. The pathogeny remains unclear, but the hypothesis that imbalances between abdominal muscles and adductors exist, has a certain success. Some anatomic and biomechanic factors may play a role in this pathology. A good clinical examination is an important part of the diagnosis and imaging may be helpful to eliminate other causes of groin pain that wouldn't be mechanic. The conservative treatment is long and difficult and must be focused on functional strengthening and core stabilisation. PMID:17850006

  14. Energy expenditure and dietary intake during high-volume and low-volume training periods among male endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Eisenmann, Joey C; Carlson, Joseph J; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Pivarnik, James M

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine dietary intake in endurance-trained athletes during a week of high-volume and a week of low-volume training while measuring exercise energy expenditure (EEE), resting metabolic rate (RMR), and nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). In addition, compliance with current American College of Sports Medicine/American Dietetic Association nutrition and performance recommendations for macronutrients was evaluated. Energy expenditure and dietary intake were measured in 15 male endurance athletes during 2 nonconsecutive weeks resembling a high-volume and a low-volume training period. Anthropometric measurements were taken and percentage body fat was determined at the beginning and end of each week of training. Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) was calculated by summing RMR, NEAT, and EEE. Dietary intake was assessed with an online food-frequency questionnaire completed at the end of each week of data collection. Despite significant differences between TDEE and energy intake, no difference in body composition between the beginning and end of either week of training was observed, suggesting underreporting of caloric intake. Further, no changes in total caloric intake or macronutrient intake occurred even though TDEE increased significantly during the high-volume training. Reported carbohydrate intake (4.5 g·kg(-1)) and fiber intake (25 g·day(-1)) were below recommendations, whereas fat intake (1.3 g·kg(-1)) was slightly above recommendations. In summary, no short-term dietary adjustments occurred in response to differences in training regimen. Because these athletes were generally consuming a Western diet, they may have required some support to achieve desirable intakes for health and performance. PMID:22360344

  15. The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Knight, Timothy J; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

    2012-06-01

    A variety of resistance training interventions are used to improve field sport acceleration (e.g., free sprinting, weights, plyometrics, resisted sprinting). The effects these protocols have on acceleration performance and components of sprint technique have not been clearly defined in the literature. This study assessed 4 common protocols (free sprint training [FST], weight training [WT], plyometric training [PT], and resisted sprint training [RST]) for changes in acceleration kinematics, power, and strength in field sport athletes. Thirty-five men were divided into 4 groups (FST: n = 9; WT: n = 8; PT: n = 9; RST: n = 9) matched for 10-m velocity. Training involved two 60-minute sessions per week for 6 weeks. After the interventions, paired-sample t-tests identified significant (p ≤ 0.05) within-group changes. All the groups increased the 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m velocity by 9-10%. The WT and PT groups increased the 5- to 10-m velocity by approximately 10%. All the groups increased step length for all distance intervals. The FST group decreased 0- to 5-m flight time and step frequency in all intervals and increased 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m contact time. Power and strength adaptations were protocol specific. The FST group improved horizontal power as measured by a 5-bound test. The FST, PT, and RST groups all improved reactive strength index derived from a 40-cm drop jump, indicating enhanced muscle stretch-shortening capacity during rebound from impacts. The WT group increased absolute and relative strength measured by a 3-repetition maximum squat by approximately 15%. Step length was the major limiting sprint performance factor for the athletes in this study. Correctly administered, each training protocol can be effective in improving acceleration. To increase step length and improve acceleration, field sport athletes should develop specific horizontal and reactive power. PMID:21912294

  16. Athletic Participation and Wellness: Implications for Counseling College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    This study used a holistic wellness paradigm to explore the adjustment of student-athletes and non-athletes at a Division I institution. Results were that non-athletes reported higher levels of wellness than did student-athletes. The authors discuss the ways in which wellness may affect student-athletes' physical and mental health at different…

  17. Physical and physiological profiles of taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Craig A; Ferreira da Silva Santos, Jonatas; Chaabène, Helmi; Pieter, Willy; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-06-01

    Taekwondo has evolved into a modern-day Olympic combat sport. The physical and physiological demands of modern-day taekwondo competition require athletes to be competent in several aspects of fitness. This review critically explores the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes and presents implications for training and research. International taekwondo athletes possess low levels of body fat and a somatotype that characterises a blend of moderate musculoskeletal tissue and relative body linearity. While there is some variation in the maximum oxygen uptake of taekwondo athletes, moderate to high levels of cardio-respiratory fitness are necessary to support the metabolic demands of fighting and to facilitate recovery between consecutive matches. Taekwondo athletes demonstrate high peak anaerobic power characteristics of the lower limbs and this attribute appears to be conducive to achieving success in international competition. The ability to generate and sustain power output using both concentric and 'stretch-shortening cycle' muscle actions of the lower limbs may be important to support the technical and tactical actions in combat. Taekwondo competitors also display moderate to high maximum dynamic strength characteristics of the lower and upper extremities, and moderate endurance properties of the trunk and hip flexor musculature. The dynamic nature of the technical and tactical actions in the sport demand high flexibility of the lower limbs. More extensive research is required into the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes to extend existing knowledge and to permit specialised conditioning for different populations within the sport.

  18. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dejana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The athletic heart syndrome is characterized by morphological, functional and electrophysiological alterations as an adaptive response to vigorous physical activity. Athletes heart is predominantly associated with a programmed, intensive training. But as there are different kinds of physical activities, the degree of these changes is highly variable. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart. The response of the body to vigorous physical activity is a multiorgan system phenomenon. The integrated functioning of each of these organ systems is very important, but the cardiovascular system plays a critical role in mediating the activity. Because of that, most changes in the neurohumoral regulation pre- dominantly affect the cardiovascular system. These changes include: depression of sympathetic activity and stimulation of parasympathetic activity, so electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart must differ from the sedentary. Although these facts, are well known, the athlete's heart is not a precisely defined concept. It is a gray zone between physiology and pathology. Conclusion. Considering the number of sudden cardiac deaths in athletes, it is needless to say how important it is to distinguish physiological changes of the heart due to physical activity, and pathological changes due to some cardiac diseases.

  19. Improving the Academic Performance of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rosemary

    1986-01-01

    The new higher standards required of entering collegiate athletes will not immediately create change in the performance and attitudes of student athletes. Academic performance of student athletes can be enhanced through the development of a comprehensive program fusing the relationship between athletics and academics. (MD)

  20. Effect of compensatory acceleration training in combination with accommodating resistance on upper body strength in collegiate athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones MT

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Margaret T Jones Sports Medicine Assessment, Rehabilitation, and Testing Laboratory, School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA Purpose: To determine the impact of inclusion of a band or chain compensatory acceleration training (CAT, in a 5-week training phase, on maximal upper body strength during a 14-week off-season strength and conditioning program for collegiate male athletes. Patients and methods: Twenty-four National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA collegiate baseball players, who were familiar with the current strength and conditioning program and had a minimum of 1 year of formal collegiate strength and conditioning experience, participated in this off-season training study. None of the men had participated in CAT before. Subjects were matched following a maximal effort (1-repetition maximum [1-RM] bench press test in week 1, then were randomly assigned into a band-based CAT group or a chain-based CAT group and participated in a 5-week training phase that included bench pressing twice per week. Upper body strength was measured by 1-RM bench press again at week 6. A 2 × 2 mixed factorial (method × time analysis of variance was calculated to compare differences across groups. The alpha level was set at P<0.05. Results: No difference (F1,22=0.04, P=0.84 existed between the band-based CAT and chain-based CAT groups. A significant difference was observed between pre- and posttests of 1-RM bench (F1,22=88.46, P=0.001. Conclusion: A 5-week band CAT or chain CAT training program used in conjunction with an off-season strength and conditioning program can increase maximal upper body strength in collegiate baseball athletes. Using band CAT and/or chain CAT as a training modality in the off-season will vary the training stimulus from the traditional and likely help to maintain the athlete's interest. Keywords: variable resistance, band, baseball, chain, resistance training

  1. Visualization of Multivariate Athlete Performance Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, A.; Hillerin, P. de; Valeanu, V.

    2007-01-01

    We present a set of visualization methods for the analysis of multivariate data recorded from the measurement of the performance of athletes during training. We use a modified training device to measure the force, acceleration, displacement, and speed of the athlete’s feet and arms while performing

  2. The relation between athletic sports and prevalence of amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea in Iranian female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadgostar Haleh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1992, the concept of female athlete triad was introduced to describe the interrelated problems of amenorrhea, eating disorders and osteoporosis seen in female athletes. To gain a clearer picture of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea in Iran, one of the main components of the female athlete triad, we therefore established this study on the prevalence of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea in elite Iranian female athletes, also evaluating the risk factors of these disorders in the same population. Methods This study performed as a cross-sectional study. All elite Iranian female athletes of 34 sports federation, including female athletes in national teams and medalists of Tehran were invited to participate. A total of 788 (95% response rate returned the questionnaires and were examined. Younger athletes under the age of menarche were excluded. Each athlete completed a self-administered questionnaire, which covered the following questions about participant's demographic information, athletic history, history of injuries and menstrual pattern. In order to diagnose the causes of amenorrhea/Oligomenorrhea including polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS, participants with amenorrhea/Oligomenorrhea underwent further investigation. They were evaluated by following Para clinic investigation, and an ultrasonographic study of ovary. Results The age ranged from 13–37 (mean = 21.1, SD = 4.5. Seventy one (9.0% individuals had amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea, among those, 11 (15.5% had PCOS. There was also a positive association between amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea and the following: age under 20 OR; 2.67, 95%CI(1.47 – 4.85, weight class sports OR; 2.09, 95%CI(1.15 – 3.82, endurance sports OR; 2.89, 95%CI(1.22 – 6.84, late onset of menarche OR; 3.32 95%CI(1.04–10.51, and use of oral contraceptive pills OR; 6.17, 95%CI(3.00 – 12.69. Intensity of training sport or BMI were not risk factors. Conclusion These findings support the previous findings in the literature

  3. Research on Training Modes of Reserve Talents in Athletic Sports%我国竞技体育后备人才培养模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范成文; 刘亚云

    2011-01-01

    Reserve talents in athletic sports are becoming the core of athletics sports sustainable development. Diversified social training modes, such as school training, professional sports training, individual and family training modes, has come into our athletic reserve talents training. But the training modes of school and professional sports training are regarded as the main choice of social athletic reserve talents training modes. We should improve our sports management system of athletics sports and orientate reform goals about the professional sports accurately. Besides, we should perfect coordinated process cultivation and training system about reserve talents in athletic sports from primary school to college with the help of the university high level sports teams.%竞技体育后备人才培养成为竞技体育可持续发展的核心,我国出现了学校、职业俱乐部、企业和个人与家庭等多元化的竞技体育后备人才培养模式。但是学校培养模式和职业俱乐部培养模式是我国竞技体育后备人才培养的主要选择。我们应该完善竞技体育管理体制,准确定位职业体育改革目标,以高校高水平运动队为突破口,完善从小学到大学“一条龙”的培养和训练体系。

  4. Elevated hair cortisol concentrations in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoluda, Nadine; Dettenborn, Lucia; Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    Engaging in intensive aerobic exercise, specifically endurance sports, is associated with HPA axis activation indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Whether the repeated short-term elevations in cortisol levels result in higher long-term cortisol exposure of endurance athletes has been difficult to examine since traditional methods of cortisol assessments (saliva, blood, urine) reflect only relatively short time periods. Hair segment analysis provides a new method to assess cumulative cortisol secretion over prolonged time periods in a retrospective fashion. The aim of this study was to investigate cumulative cortisol secretion over several months reflecting intensive training and competitive races by examining hair cortisol levels of endurance athletes. Hair samples were obtained from 304 amateur endurance athletes (long-distance runners, triathletes, cyclists) and 70 controls. Cortisol concentrations were determined in the first to third 3-cm hair segments most proximal to the scalp. In addition, self-report measures of training volume were obtained. Endurance athletes exhibited higher cortisol levels in all three hair segments compared to controls (pathletes is associated with elevated cortisol exposure over prolonged periods of time. These findings may have important implications with regard to somatic and mental health of athletes which should be investigated in future research.

  5. Magnesium and the Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral and the second most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body. It is a required mineral that is involved in more than 300 metabolic reactions in the body. Magnesium helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function, heart rhythm (cardiac excitability), vasomotor tone, blood pressure, immune system, bone integrity, and blood glucose levels and promotes calcium absorption. Because of magnesium's role in energy production and storage, normal muscle function, and maintenance of blood glucose levels, it has been studied as an ergogenic aid for athletes. This article will cover the general roles of magnesium, magnesium requirements, and assessment of magnesium status as well as the dietary intake of magnesium and its effects on exercise performance. The research articles cited were limited from those published in 2003 through 2014.

  6. EFFECTS OF A SPECIFIC MODEL OF TRAINING ON BODY COMPOSITION OF JUDO ATHLETES OF YOUNGER SENIOR AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Rađević

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of a coach is to prepare an appropriate model of training for their athletes and provide adequate and healthy way of regulating their body weight.On a sample of 32 judo athletes of younger senior age on the territory of the city of BanjaLuka and municipality of Laktaši, a specific model of training was applied for a period of ten weeks and the judo athletes were divided into two groups. One group was the control group, and other was experimental. The experimental group has implemented 60 training sessions, of which 40 judo trainings (25 technical-tactical and 15 situational judo trainings-randoria and 20 trainings with the load (50-80% of 1 RM.In this period, the control group worked only judo trainings or 40 training sessions. Statistical analysis of the results is divided into two segments - the descriptive statistics and application of methods of the inferential statistics. The initial and final measurements of body composition of groups were conducted by the bioelectrical impedance(BIA method, and the two-component(2C model was used for this work - which divides the whole body in total body fat (fat mass and non-fat body mass (fat-free mass. From the field of descriptive statistics on the level of the entire sample, the central and dispersion parameters were calculated. The methods of inferential statistics used in this study were t-test for dependent and independent samples and analysis of covariance.The values of percentage of body fat in the experimental group, which was exposed to a specific training process for a period of ten weeks, were notably statistically reduced during this period.Value of body fat from an initial 23.10% after the training protocol, decreased to 20.41%, on the .01 level of significance. Values of the percentage of body fat in the control group were kept on the same, higher level than recommended for judo, even after the training, pointing to the effects of their less successful training protocol.

  7. Evaluation and management of arrhythmia in the athletic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Athletes may present with palpitations, syncope, or arrest resulting in the diagnosis of arrhythmia, or screening may result in diagnosis of conditions with predisposition to arrhythmia. This chapter focuses on 3 common arrhythmic conditions in athletes-atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), and the athlete with an implanted device. (1) Atrial fibrillation: most studies show that atrial fibrillation is more common in competitive athletes, particularly those participating in long-term endurance sports. Postulated mechanisms include morphologic changes such as atrial dilatation, autonomic changes such as increased vagal tone, or inflammatory changes due to sports participation. Treatment options include long-term antiarrhythmic agents, "pill in the pocket" medications, or radiofrequency ablation, a highly successful procedure in athletes. (2) Premature ventricular contractions: data conflict on whether the incidence of PVCs is increased in highly trained individuals. Very frequent PVCs in athletes, however, can be a manifestation of underlying heart disease, and athletes presenting with PVCs should undergo evaluation. In the absence of underlying heart disease, PVCs do not carry a poor prognosis, and US guidelines do not recommend restriction from sports. (3) Implanted devices: the safety of sports for the athlete with an implanted device is unknown, and current guidelines recommend against participation in vigorous competitive sports, based on postulated risks including failure to defibrillate and risk of injury. Many athletes with defibrillators and pacemakers do participate in sports. Ongoing research will better delineate the risks of sports for the athlete with an implanted device. PMID:22386293

  8. An examination of athletes' self-efficacy and strength training effort during an entire off-season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Todd A; Cisco Reyes, G F; Curnock, Lindsey E

    2012-02-01

    Over the past 30-plus years in which self-efficacy (or confidence at a task) has been researched, findings have shown that in almost every domain of human functioning, self-efficacy positively relates to effort, persistence, and other adaptive behaviors. However, in the past decade, new research postulating that too much self-efficacy can lead to complacency and a subsequent downturn in behavior or performance has also experienced resurgence in the literature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test these opposing viewpoints regarding self-efficacy and effort for Division I athletes in a strength and conditioning domain over off-season training, a procedure yet to be undertaken. Subjects (N = 99), from 4 different sports (M(ag)e = 20.0 years, SD = 1.2 years), completed self-efficacy and effort measures at 4 distinct time points during off-season training. In addition, strength and conditioning coaches also rated each subject's effort--at each time point--so that a more valid measure of this construct could be attained. Results were analyzed using a multilevel approach and revealed that self-efficacy was positively, and significantly, related to the current effort that athletes exerted in strength training sessions. Consequently, practitioners are advised to structure strength and conditioning training sessions and the overall environment in ways that will positively impact the 4 proven sources of self-efficacy. PMID:22233790

  9. 浅析田径核心力量训练%Analysis of Athletics Core Strength Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许荟蓉

    2012-01-01

    核心力量训练可以很好的提高竞技运动员核心区域肌肉的力量及稳定性,对提高运动员体能具有重要意义.本文采用文献综述等方法对核心力量训练的意义及其训练方法和手段进行了研究,并总结出一些核心训练的方法和手段.%Core strength training can improve the muscle strength in core region and stability of the competitive athletes, so it has an important significance to improve the physical power of athletes. The significance of core strength training and their training methods and means are researched by using literature review and other methods and some of the ways and means of the core training are summarized.

  10. Academics vs. Athletics: Two Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    College and University Business, 1973

    1973-01-01

    John Fuzak, associate dean of the college of education at Michigan State University and former St. Louis Cardinal's player, and Maurice Mitchell, University of Denver Chancellor, discuss the relationship between academics and athletics. (PG)

  11. Eating Disorders among Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Jorunn Sundgot; Corbin, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes a study of 168 college women to determine the extent to which preoccupation with weight and tendencies toward eating disorders are problems among female athletes. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  12. Entry-Level Athletic Trainers' Perceived Adequacy of Clinical Education in Preparation for Confident Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinew, Kayla A.

    2011-01-01

    Athletic training educators are responsible for giving athletic training students a proper environment in which they have opportunities to apply didactic knowledge using critical thinking and decision making skills in a real world context (Radtke, 2008). Clinical education needs to play an integral role in developing athletic training students…

  13. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  14. Scaling in Athletic World Records

    OpenAIRE

    Savaglio, Sandra; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2000-01-01

    World records in athletics provide a measure of physical as well as physiological human performance. Here we analyse running records and show that the mean speed as a function of race time can be described by two scaling laws that have a breakpoint at about 150-170 seconds (corresponding to the ~1,000 m race). We interpret this as being the transition time between anaerobic and aerobic energy expenditure by athletes.

  15. Impact of milk consumption and resistance training on body composition of female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Andrea R; Phillips, Stuart M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) preceding the provision of high-quality dairy protein supports muscle anabolism. Milk contains bioactive components, including two high-quality protein fractions, calcium and vitamin D, each of which has been shown modulate body composition (increasing lean mass and decreasing fat mass) under energy balance and hypoenergetic conditions. These dairy nutrients are also essential for skeletal health. Acutely, no study of RE and milk/whey consumption has been undertaken exclusively in female athletes, let alone women, nevertheless, studies with both men and women show increased lean mass accretion following milk/whey compared to soy/placebo. Currently, no longer-term RE studies with milk supplementation have been done in female athletes. However, trials in young recreationally active women demonstrated augmented increases in lean mass and decreases in fat mass with RE and milk or whey protein consumption. The amount of protein consumed post-exercise is also important; two trials using yogurt (5 g protein/6 oz) failed to demonstrate a positive change in body composition compared to placebo. For bone health, RE plus dairy improved bone mineral density at clinically important sites and reduced bone resorption. With energy restriction, in one study, higher dairy plus higher protein resulted in greater fat loss, lean mass gain and improved bone health in overweight women. In another study, milk and calcium supplementation showed no greater benefit. Neither trial exclusively utilized RE. Overall, RE and milk/dairy consumption positively impact body composition in women by promoting losses in fat, gains or maintenance of lean mass and preservation of bone. Future studies in female athletes and under energy restriction with RE alone are warranted. PMID:23075559

  16. Depression in athletes: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Andrew; Gross, Michael; Hong, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Depression affects an estimated 6.7% of today's adult population in a 12-month period. The prevalence rates for certain age groups, such as young adults and older adults, are higher. There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association student athletes competing each year and 5 to 7 million high school student athletes involved in competitive interscholastic sports. Given such a high prevalence rate in certain age groups and a large denominator pool of athletes, past notions that athletes are devoid of mental health issues have come under scrutiny by sports medicine providers. Initial data suggest that athletes are far from immune to depression. The purpose of this article was to review the current research on athletes and depression; particularly this article will provide an overview of studies, which have investigated the rate of depression among athletes, and discuss relevant risk factors, which may contribute to depression among athletes.

  17. Improving body composition and strength in athletes through a 4-month combined martial arts and strength training program

    OpenAIRE

    Stachoń, Aleksandra; Burdukiewicz, Anna; Pietraszewska, Jadwiga; Andrzejewska, Justyna; Stefaniak, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Stachoń Aleksandra, Burdukiewicz Anna, Pietraszewska Jadwiga, Andrzejewska Justyna, Stefaniak Tadeusz. Improving body composition and strength in athletes through a 4-month combined martial arts and strength training program. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(6):445-458. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.56131 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3617   The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education param...

  18. The Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer Training Program on Anthropometry, Physical Fitness and Skilled Performance in Special Olympics Soccer Athletes and Non-Disabled Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Funda; Aktop, Abdurrahman; Ozer, Dilara; Nalbant, Sibel; Aglamis, Ece; Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sport (UNS) soccer program on anthropometry, physical fitness and soccer skills of male youth athletes with and without intellectual disabilities (ID) who participated in a training group (TRG) and in a comparison group (CG) without specific training. Youth with ID (WID) were…

  19. Magnitude and duration of the impact generated on the athletes' body during training in Ippon-Seoi-Nage judo technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Piucco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory study aimed to analyse the magnitude and duration of the impact generated on the athletes' body during training in Ippon-Seoi-Nage judo technique. Two black belt judo athletes were studied, the tori (the thrower weighting 75 kg and having 19 years of practice, and the uke (the thrown weighting 72 kg and having 15 years of practice. A Bruel & Kjaer 4321 Accelerometer Triaxial, fastened to the fist, hip and ankle of the uke, was used. Data were collected in the laboratory. Ten falls were performed for each of the three articulations investigated. The largest impact values were observed for the fist in the vertical axis (351.95 g and the smallest values were for the hip anterior posterior axis (5.18g. Impact duration times were greater in the hip vertical axis (.58 s with no differences for the impact on fist and ankle. Considering these high impact values as well as the high frequency of falls during judo training, it is suggested a reevaluation of this training pattern and the sort of tatami adopted, in order to decrease the resulting harmful effects over the time.

  20. Monitoring endurance athletes : A multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, Tina Ardi

    2016-01-01

    Endurance athletes seek for the optimal balance in training stress and recovery so they can perform at their best and avoid injuries. The PhD thesis of Ruby Otter at the School of Sport Studies (Hanze University of Applied Sciences) and the Center of Human Movement Sciences (UMCG, University of Gron

  1. Comparison of Male and Female Differences in Emotional Intelligence Among Trained Univerisities Athletes of Lusaka Province, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathivanan D & Clement chileshe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available (Palmer and Stough 2001 defined as Emotional intelligence as ‘the capacity to deal effectively with one’s own and others’ emotions ’Previous empirical studies in this area have indicated that the construct of emotional intelligence provides an athlete with an understanding of their specific emotional competencies, and therefore a better understanding and awareness of how to use emotions in sport. The comparison of the study is to attempt and examine the differences between female and male athletes of Lusaka Province with respect to their emotional intelligence in the selected variables such as Self-awareness, Self-regulation, Motivation, Empathy, Social skills.It was assumed that female athletes would have high emotional intelligence as compared to the male athletes. “Emotional Intelligence Test” developed by Dr. N. K. Chadha (1998 was applied on all of the participants of the study (i.e. 30 female and 40 male athletes.Were selected random for this study Statistical analysis by computation of “t-test” revealed a significant difference in the emotional intelligence of female and male athletes of Lusaka Province. The results confirmed the hypothesis differences in relation to emotional intelligence, findings of the current study indicate that females are more emotionally intelligent than male athletes. The higher level of emotional intelligence of female than male in Lusaka Province are explained in terms of traditional trends, pattern of society and social roles assigned to male and female with respect to African culture in Zambia.

  2. Coaches, Athletes Training Motivation and Athlete Performance Correlation Study%教练员、运动员参训动机与运动员效能的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武笑玲; 魏烨; 李艳华

    2012-01-01

    通过问卷调研法和典型相关分析法,以河南省39名教练员和411名运动员为研究对象,探讨河南教练员、运动员参训动机与运动员效能的关系。结果表明:教练员、运动员参训动机与运动员效能整体良好;教练内在动机、教练外在动机与教练满意、团队满意和团队表现呈负相关,与个人表现呈正相关;教练满意、团队满意、团队表现和个人表现呈正相关;运动员认同调节、内射调节、外在调节与教练满意、团队满意、团队表现和个人表现呈正相关;运动员无动机与教练满意、团队满意、团队表现和个人表现呈负相关。%The main purpose of this study is to explore Henan's coaches, athletes training motivation and ath lete performance relationship, through the questionnaire survey method and canonical correlation analysis meth od, to Henan province 39 coaches and 411 athletes as the research object, the results: coaches, athletes training motivation and athlete performance is good; intrinsic motivation extrinsic motivation, coach coach and coach team satisfaction, satisfaction and team was negatively related to performance, and individual performance was posi tively related to satisfaction; coach, team satisfaction, team performance and individual performance was posi tively related to regulation, introjected regulation ; athletic identity, external regulati team satisfaction, team performance and individual performance was positively related tion; athlete, coach team satisfaction, team performance and individual performance on and coach satisfaction, to motivation and satisfac is negatively related to.

  3. Athletic Engagement and Athletic Identity in Top Croatian Sprint Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Vesna; Sarac, Jelena; Missoni, Sasa; Sindik, Josko

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to determine construct validity and reliability for two questionnaires (Athlete Engagement Questionnaire-AEQ and Athletic Identity Measurement Scale-AIMS), applied on elite Croatian athletes-sprinters, as well as the correlations among the dimensions in these measuring instruments. Then, we have determined the differences in the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity, according to gender, education level and winning medals on international competitions. A total of 71 elite athletes-sprinters (former and still active) are examined, from which 27 (38%) females and 44 (62%) males. The results of factor analyses revealed the existence of dimensions very similar as in the original instruments, which showed moderate to-high reliabilities. A small number of statistically significant correlations have been found between the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity, mainly in male sprinter runners. Small number of statistically significant differences in the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity have been found according to the gender, education level and winning medals on the international competitions. The most reasonable explanation of these differences could be given in terms of very similar characteristics of elite athletes on the same level of sport excellence.

  4. Integrative training for children and adolescents: techniques and practices for reducing sports-related injuries and enhancing athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Chu, Donald A; Falkel, Jeff; Ford, Kevin R; Best, Thomas M; Hewett, Timothy E

    2011-02-01

    As more children and adolescents participate in sports and conditioning activities (sometimes without consideration for cumulative workload), it is important to establish age-appropriate training guidelines that may reduce the risk of sports-related injury and enhance athletic performance. The purpose of this article is to review the scientific evidence on youth strength and conditioning and to provide age-appropriate recommendations for integrating different strength and conditioning activities into a well-designed program that is safe, effective, and enjoyable. Integrative training is defined as a program or plan that incorporates general and specific strength and conditioning activities that enhance both health- and skill-related components of physical fitness. The cornerstone of integrative training is age-appropriate education and instruction by qualified professionals who understand the physical and psychosocial uniqueness of children and adolescents.

  5. A comparison of traditional learning and problem-based learning in pharmacology education for athletic training students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Michael Richard

    The purpose of this research project was to compare Traditional Learning (TL) activities with Problem-based Learning (PBL) activities in an undergraduate pharmacology course. Fifteen athletic training students served as the sample. The students completed a four-week program focusing on analgesic and anti-inflammatory medications. All students received instruction via TL methods and PBL methods. The two methods were compared on measures of student satisfaction, content acquisition, problem-solving skill, and critical thinking skills. The results revealed a statistically significant difference (p value essay exams when scored for problem solving skills. There were no statistically significant differences for content acquisition using multiple-choice exams or on the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST). The focus group revealed support for the reported benefits of PBL, support for TL, and encouragement for a combined course. The results suggest that the PBL method is as effective as the TL method in regards to content acquisition and performance on the CCTST. However, student problem solving abilities appear to improve after PBL methods as evidenced with the improved performance on the essay exams. Educational effectiveness and reported benefits from the focus group support the use of PBL in the education of athletic training students in the domain of pharmacology.

  6. Female Head Athletic Trainers in NCAA Division I (IA Football) Athletics: How They Made It to the Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorant, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    The profession of athletic training has opened its doors to women, who now slightly outnumber men in the profession (Shingles, 2001; WATC, 1997, 2005). Unfortunately, this representation does not carry over into positions of high rank. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the lived experiences of female head athletic trainers in…

  7. Injured Athletes' Perceived Loss of Identity: Educational Implications for Athletic Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Barbara D.

    2010-01-01

    Context: As educators, athletic trainers should familiarize athletes with the concepts of self acceptance self-esteem and identity to assuage psychological trauma accompanying injury because the more a person identifies with being an athlete, the more difficult it is to deal with athletic injury. Objective: The objective of this article is to…

  8. Differences in Socialization between Visually Impaired Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Mojtahedi, Hossein; Farazyani, Fateh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in measure of socialization between visually impaired student-athletes and non-athletes. We compared the social skills of Iranian visually impaired student-athletes (n = 51) and visually impaired student non-athletes (n = 56) with ages ranging from 13 to…

  9. Effect of sand versus grass training surfaces during an 8-week pre-season conditioning programme in team sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Martyn John; Dawson, Brian; Arnot, Mark Alexander; Pinnington, Hugh; Landers, Grant; Peeling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the use of sand and grass training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme in well-trained female team sport athletes (n = 24). Performance testing was conducted pre- and post-training and included measures of leg strength and balance, vertical jump, agility, 20 m speed, repeat speed (8 × 20 m every 20 s), as well as running economy and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). Heart rate (HR), training load (rating of perceived exertion (RPE) × duration), movement patterns and perceptual measures were monitored throughout each training session. Participants completed 2 × 1 h conditioning sessions per week on sand (SAND) or grass (GRASS) surfaces, incorporating interval training, sprint and agility drills, and small-sided games. Results showed a significantly higher (P training load in the SAND versus GRASS group throughout each week of training, plus some moderate effect sizes to suggest lower perceptual ratings of soreness and fatigue on SAND. Significantly greater (P training surfaces throughout an 8-week conditioning programme can significantly increase the relative exercise intensity and training load, subsequently leading to superior improvements in aerobic fitness.

  10. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  11. Does Cupping = Success for Olympic Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160301.html Does 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes? Telltale red circles of ancient Chinese practice ... Eyebrows raised in Rio over the weekend when Olympic athletes like swimmer Michael Phelps started showing up ...

  12. Helping Athletes Avoid Hazardous Weight Control Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    This article addresses dangerous dieting techniques used by athletes and provides coaches and teachers specific strategies to aid in preventing eating-related disorders among athletes. Symptoms of anorexia and of bulimia are described. (JL)

  13. SOCIAL SECURITY OF TURKISH ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış ÖZTUNA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Law No. 5510 realized within the social security reform aims providing a structure which presents equal scope and quality of social security service other all citizens. According to Labor Law No 4857, unionization of sportsmen in Turkish legal environment is possible, sport clubs and sportsmen are continuing to live without so many rights and obligations but they didn’t. Aim of this study; to prove sportsmen of location of the labour law and to mark off. The purpose of the study is explained according to Law No. 4857 and Law No. 5510 Turkish athletes. Profesional athletes deemed to be insurance holders for the purposes of implementing short and long term insurance branches of No 5510 Law. But amateur athletes don't seem to be insurance holders for the purposes of implementing short and long term insurance branches of No 5510 Law. According to the law 5774 regarding to be called as an g overnment athlete, within the adults category of the sports that are accepted as olympic, paralympic and deaflympic; pension is paid to the amateur athletes who became first, second or third at Olymic games, World or European Champions as an individual or team sports and to the national team coaches and assistant coaches of the athletes’ who became Olympic or World Champion as a team.

  14. Adolescent Steroid Use and Intercollegiate Athletic Incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Brad R. Humphreys; Jane Ruseski

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relationship between college athletic scholarships and adolescent use of performance enhancing drugs. Annually, 4.5 million male high school athletes compete for about 132,000 athletic scholarships o_ered by NCAA Division I and II universities. Estimates from a probit model of self-reported steroid use among US adolescent males using data from the YRBSS suggest each sanction-related athletic scholarship reduction at NCAA institutions in a state increases the probability that hi...

  15. Neuromuscular Retraining in Female Adolescent Athletes: Effect on Athletic Performance Indices and Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank R. Noyes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While many anterior cruciate ligament (ACL prevention programs have been published, few have achieved significant reductions in injury rates and improvements in athletic performance indices; both of which may increase compliance and motivation of athletes to participate. A supervised neuromuscular retraining program (18 sessions was developed, aimed at achieving both of these objectives. The changes in neuromuscular indices were measured after training in 1000 female athletes aged 13–18 years, and the noncontact ACL injury rate in 700 of these trained athletes was compared with that of 1120 control athletes. There were significant improvements in the drop-jump test, (p < 0.0001, effect size [ES] 0.97, the single-leg triple crossover hop (p < 0.0001, ES 0.47, the t-test (p < 0.0001, ES 0.64, the multi-stage fitness test (p < 0.0001, ES 0.57, hamstring strength (p < 0.0001, and quadriceps strength (p < 0.01. The trained athletes had a significant reduction in the noncontact ACL injury incidence rate compared with the controls (1 ACL injury in 36,724 athlete-exposures [0.03] and 13 ACL injuries in 61,244 exposures [0.21], respectively, p = 0.03. The neuromuscular retraining program was effective in reducing noncontact ACL injury rate and improving athletic performance indicators.

  16. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: How Vulnerable Are Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses chronic fatigue syndrome as it affects elite athletes, noting that overtraining may mimic it. In some cases, athletes who have it perform exceedingly well in the face of debilitating fatigue. Among athletes and nonathletes, the cause and the mind-body connection are areas of controversy and research. (Author/SM)

  17. Steroids in Athletics: One University's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mike

    1990-01-01

    Presents an account of one university's experience in conducting an investigation into possible steroid use by student athletes and the development of a program to deal with the problem. Discusses why athletes use steroids and how steroids are taken. Concludes it is likely many steroid-related deaths of athletes go undetected. (Author/ABL)

  18. Female College Athlete Leadership and Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicinao, Brianne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study contributes to the research on athlete leadership and team effectiveness in college sports. Athletic departments and sports coaches could benefit from a study about athlete leadership and team effectiveness in order to assist their student-leaders with leadership development and explore additional means to help improve team…

  19. Personality and motivation of top athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kajtna

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The research investigated the differences in personality structure and the motivational structure of top athletes and athletes and male and female athletes, and we also looked for the interactive effect of sport success and gender. We also investigated anxiety in the mentioned groups. We gathered the results from 385 athletes, divided into two groups according to their success. World class athletes and international class athletes, as categorized according to the Slovenian Olympic committee, were assigned to "top athletes" group, whereas those with the perspective, national and youth class were assigned to the group of "athletes". We found no effect of sport success in the personality structure and anxiety, while we found that successful athletes are more competitive, have stronger win orientation, stronger need for power and stronger need for success and are more self – motivated. Differences between male and female athletes have demonstrated themselves to be significant in all three investigated areas – female athletes are more failure avoidant in the motivational scope of our investigation, express a higher level of state and trait anxiety than male athletes, and are less emotionally stable and are more agreeable as far as personality is concerned. We found no interactive effect of sport success and sex in any of the investigated areas.

  20. Smokeless Tobacco Education for College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia J.

    2001-01-01

    Chewing tobacco and taking snuff are common practices among college athletes. This article describes one college's smokeless tobacco education program for students athletes in the health, physical education, and recreation department. Research on the multiple-strategy intervention indicated decreases in student athletes' smokeless tobacco use and…

  1. Transportation Practices in Community College Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVetter, David; Kim, Hyun Duck

    2010-01-01

    Over 45,000 U.S. community college athletes were transported to events during 2005-2006. Transporting college athletes has been an overlooked risk management issue facing administrators. Team travel accidents have caused death, injury, liability claims, property loss, and grief. National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) member…

  2. MRI of overuse injury in elite athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overuse injuries are a common finding in elite athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal method for the diagnosis of overuse injury in athletes of all levels. We present a review of common and important overuse injuries occurring in elite athletes. A systematic approach based on the functional anatomic units - tendons, bones and joints - may assist in diagnosis of these injuries

  3. Intercollegiate Athletics Subsidies: A Regressive Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhart, Matthew; Vedder, Richard

    2010-01-01

    For most colleges and universities in the United States, intercollegiate athletics is a losing financial proposition. The vast majority ICA departments do not break even and require subsidization from the institution as a whole. When schools are forced to heavily subsidize athletics, ICA serves to impose an "athletics tax" on other dimensions of…

  4. Organized Athletics as a Leisure Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Thomas R.; Mendell, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Athletic programs are leisure time delivery systems for the athletes, spectators, and the local community as long as scholarships and extensive media coverage are not involved. College administration should make sure that sports and athletics do not become a delivery sytem for public relations and finance. (CJ)

  5. Carbohydrate restricted recovery from long term endurance exercise does not affect gene responses involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in highly trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine if the metabolic adaptations, particularly PGC-1α and downstream metabolic genes were affected by restricting CHO following an endurance exercise bout in trained endurance athletes. A second aim was to compare baseline expression level of these genes to untrained. Elite...... endurance athletes (VO2max 66 ± 2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), n = 15) completed 4 h cycling at ~56% VO2max. During the first 4 h recovery subjects were provided with either CHO or only H2O and thereafter both groups received CHO. Muscle biopsies were collected before, after, and 4 and 24 h after exercise. Also...

  6. Pre-competition habits and injuries in Taekwondo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Choung Young

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade, there has been heightened interest in injury rates sustained by martial arts athletes, and more specifically, Taekwondo athletes. Despite this interest, there is a paucity of research on pre-competition habits and training of these athletes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess training characteristics, competition preparation habits, and injury profiles of Taekwondo athletes. Methods A retrospective survey of Canadian male and female Taekwondo athletes competing in a national tournament was conducted. Competitors at a Canadian national level tournament were given a comprehensive survey prior to competition. Items on training characteristics, diet, and injuries sustained during training and competition were included. Questionnaires were distributed to 60 athletes. Results A response rate of 46.7% was achieved. Of those that responded, 54% dieted prior to competition, and 36% dieted and exercised pre-competition. Sixty-four percent of the athletes practised between 4–6 times per week, with 54% practicing 2 hours per session. Lower limb injuries were the most common (46.5%, followed by upper extremity (18%, back (10%, and head (3.6%. The majority of injuries consisted of sprains/strains (45%, followed by contusions, fractures, and concussions. More injuries occurred during training, including 59% of first injuries. Conclusion More research needs to be conducted to further illustrate the need for appropriate regulations on weight cycling and injury prevention.

  7. Effect of short-term heat acclimation on endurance time and skin blood flow in trained athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsung-I Chen,1,2 Pu-Hsi Tsai,3 Jui-Hsing Lin,4 Ning-Yuean Lee,5 Michael TC Liang61Graduate Institute of Sport Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan, 2Center for Physical Education, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, 3Department of Sport and Leisure, National Quemoy University, Kinmen, 4Department of Physical Education, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung, 5College of Living Technology, Tainan University of Technology, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA, USABackground: To examine whether short-term, ie, five daily sessions, vigorous dynamic cycling exercise and heat exposure could achieve heat acclimation in trained athletes and the effect of heat acclimation on cutaneous blood flow in the active and nonactive limb.Methods: Fourteen male badminton and table tennis athletes (age = 19.6 ± 1.2 years were randomized into a heat acclimation (EXP, n = 7 or nonheat acclimation (CON, n = 7 group. For 5 consecutive days, the EXP group was trained using an upright leg cycle ergometer in a hot environment (38.4°C ± 0.4°C, while the CON group trained in a thermoneutral environment (24.1°C ± 0.3°C. For both groups, the training intensity and duration increased from a work rate of 10% below ventilatory threshold (VT and 25 minutes per session on day 1, to 10% above VT and 45 minutes per session on day 5. Subjects performed two incremental leg cycle exercise tests to exhaustion at baseline and post-training in both hot and thermoneutral conditions. Study outcome measurements include: maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max; exercise heart rate (HR; O2 pulse; exercise time to exhaustion (tmax; skin blood flow in the upper arm (SkBFa and quadriceps (SkBFq; and mean skin (Tsk.Results: The significant heat-acclimated outcome measurements obtained during high-intensity leg cycling exercise in the high ambient environment are: (1 56%–100% reduction in cutaneous

  8. Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology position stand: The use of instability to train the core in athletic and nonathletic conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G; Drinkwater, Eric J; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Cowley, Patrick M

    2010-02-01

    The use of instability devices and exercises to train the core musculature is an essential feature of many training centres and programs. It was the intent of this position stand to provide recommendations regarding the role of instability in resistance training programs designed to train the core musculature. The core is defined as the axial skeleton and all soft tissues with a proximal attachment originating on the axial skeleton, regardless of whether the soft tissue terminates on the axial or appendicular skeleton. Core stability can be achieved with a combination of muscle activation and intra-abdominal pressure. Abdominal bracing has been shown to be more effective than abdominal hollowing in optimizing spinal stability. When similar exercises are performed, core and limb muscle activation are reported to be higher under unstable conditions than under stable conditions. However, core muscle activation that is similar to or higher than that achieved in unstable conditions can also be achieved with ground-based free-weight exercises, such as Olympic lifts, squats, and dead lifts. Since the addition of unstable bases to resistance exercises can decrease force, power, velocity, and range of motion, they are not recommended as the primary training mode for athletic conditioning. However, the high muscle activation with the use of lower loads associated with instability resistance training suggests they can play an important role within a periodized training schedule, in rehabilitation programs, and for nonathletic individuals who prefer not to use ground-based free weights to achieve musculoskeletal health benefits. PMID:20130673

  9. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  10. The special olympics healthy athletes experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Special Olympics is the largest sports organization in the world serving athletes with intellectual disabilities. Because of their unique needs, Special Olympics has designed a multitude of programs specifically for athletes with intellectual disabilities, including the world's largest public health screening program for people with intellectual disabilities, known as the Special Olympics Healthy Athletes Program. This article describes the Healthy Athletes program and some of the results of the program within the context of impacting health care professional education with respect to athletes with intellectual disabilities.

  11. Dual career pathways of transnational athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia; Ronkainen, Noora;

    2015-01-01

    a conceptual framework for the taxonomy of transnational dual careers (DC). Design and method Narrative inquiry from the life story perspective was used to elicit and analyze career narratives of six transnational athletes (3 male and 3 female), generating about five interview hours per athlete......Objectives Transnationalism, as part of the globalization processes, has transformed the lifestyle and the course of athletes' careers. This presents previously unexplored challenges encountered by student-athletes in combining athletic and academic pursuits. In this article, we propose...

  12. The effect of two weeks morning and afternoon special training program on performance and plasma levels of IL-17 and cortisol in wushu athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B ghayeblo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Recent evidences (knowing the effects of time on physiological variables show that the human body undergoes a lot of changes during the day and the night and has a special ability in each hour. Competition in the morning Confronts athletes with the problem of susceptibility to infection and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine The effect of two weeks morning and afternoon special training program on performance and plasma levels of IL-17 and cortisol in boy wushu athletes Materials and Methods: Fourteen sanda boy athletes were purposefully selected and after Bruce and  rast tests run, divided into the two Similar groups morning-time training group (N = 7, training time 9 a.m. and evening-time training group (N=7, training time 18 pm . The Subjects were trained for two weeks (6 session in each week according to an Sanda sport specific training program. Values of peak anaerobic power, average anaerobic power, minimum anaerobic power and fatigue index measured with Field  rast test. To determine the amount of plasma IL-17 and cortisol , the participants’ blood samples was taken In the fasting state three times, 24 h before the first training session in baseline status and Immediately after tests at 9 am and 48 h after the last training session immediately after tests performance at 9 a.m. Data were analyzed using repeated measures, independent-samplesT-test, ,paired- samplesT-test  and Covariance. Results: The results showed that there were significant differences between the amounts of plasma IL-17 of the two groups after two weeks(P0.05. Conclusion: It seems likely transition training time to the morning, 2 weeks before the competition in the morning, decrease inflammatory factors such as IL-17 in sanda boys. Therefore appears that two weeks transition training time from evening to morning can increase the safety of athletes immune during the competition.

  13. The use of dietary supplements by athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ronald J; Depiesse, Frederic; Geyer, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Many athletes use dietary supplements as part of their regular training or competition routine, including about 85% of elite track and field athletes. Supplements commonly used include vitamins, minerals, protein, creatine, and various "ergogenic" compounds. These supplements are often used without a full understanding or evaluation of the potential benefits and risks associated with their use, and without consultation with a sports nutrition professional. A few supplements may be helpful to athletes in specific circumstances, especially where food intake or food choice is restricted. Vitamin and mineral supplements should be used only when a food-based solution is not available. Sports drinks, energy bars, and protein-carbohydrate shakes may all be useful and convenient at specific times. There are well-documented roles for creatine, caffeine, and alkalinizing agents in enhancing performance in high-intensity exercise, although much of the evidence does not relate to specific athletic events. There are potential costs associated with all dietary supplements, including the risk of a positive doping result as a consequence of the presence of prohibited substances that are not declared on the label.

  14. Dehydration and endurance performance in competitive athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Eric D B

    2012-11-01

    The field of research examining the link between dehydration and endurance performance is at the dawn of a new era. This article reviews the latest findings describing the relationship between exercise-induced dehydration and endurance performance and provides the knowledge necessary for competitive, endurance-trained athletes to develop a winning hydration strategy. Acute, pre-exercise body weight loss at or above 3% may decrease subsequent endurance performance. Therefore, endurance athletes should strive to start exercise well hydrated, which can be achieved by keeping thirst sensation low and urine color pale and drinking approximately 5-10 mL/kg body weight of water 2 h before exercise. During exercise lasting 1 h or less, dehydration does not decrease endurance performance, but athletes are encouraged to mouth-rinse with sports drinks. During exercise lasting longer than 1 h, in which fluid is readily available, drinking according to the dictates of thirst maximizes endurance performance. In athletes whose thirst sensation is untrustworthy or when external factors such as psychological stress or repeated food intake may blunt thirst sensation, it is recommended to program fluid intake to maintain exercise-induced body weight loss around 2% to 3%.

  15. 浅谈初中三级跳远运动员的力量训练%On Strength Training of Triple Jump Athletes at Junior Middle Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪有仁

    2012-01-01

    Triple jump is an athletics with complex skills and higher requirements for speed and strength quality of athletes. To young triple jump athletes, junior middle school stage is an important period for their growth and devel- opment. In this paper, according to athlete' s physiological characteristics in this phase, it proposes the general strength training as well as special strength training methods, and summarizes the principles needed to be followed in the process of strength training through the analysis of triple jump skills and the role of muscle group.%三级跳远是一项技术复杂、且对运动员速度、力量素质要求较高的田径项目。对少年三级跳远运动员来说初中阶段是他们生长发育的重要时期。本文根据这一阶段运动员的生理特点,通过三级跳远动作技术和参与作用肌肉群的分析,提出一般力量训练和专项力量训练等方法,并总结力量训练中需要遵循的原则。

  16. Control of physical fitness of athletes specializing in combat sambo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tron R.A.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Confiscation of informative educational tests to assess motor qualities of skilled athletes. The survey was attended by 94 athletes (18 to 30 years. This group of tests includes: running too far on the bridge (second coups in space (second; perform 100 punches on the punching bag (second, perform 50 kicks on the punching bag (second. It was found that the highest correlation between the result and the qualifications of athletes seen in tests involving the use of wrestling skills (rushing on the bridge and from the place of revolutions. It is shown that in the groups of athletes of medium and heavy weight categories in tests measuring the speed of the application of various attacks on the punching bag have a weak relationship with the level of sportsmanship. The trend is strengthening correlation sports training and exercise, describing the power of athletes of different skills to increase their weight classes.

  17. LANDING PATTERN SCREENING OF RECREATIONAL MALE AND FEMALE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Landing Error Scoring System (LESS is a useful, quick, reliable, valid and responsive instrument for determination of landing movement errors of male and female athletes. This study focused to investigate the landing pattern of recreational male and female athletes, using the Landing Error Scoring System. The study included 241 volunteer recreational athletes (101 females, 140 males. Jump-landings were recorded by two camcorders from sagittal and frontal planes. These records were replayed and scored by a trained rater on LESS score sheets. Total and frontal plane LESS score was significantly different between male and female athletes. Beside the total LESS score, each item may be evaluated separately; frontal plane evaluation results, in particular, can be a guiding factor in designing such jump-landing activity programs in female athletes.

  18. Research on Effect of Sports Nutrition Supplements on Athletic Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sports drinks are developed on the basis of scientific research; aiming at adapting to the change of organism functions. The reasonable nutrient composition of sports drinks can improve functional status. Sports nutrition supplements are more and more accepted by the public in alleviating fatigue and enhancing athletic performance with appropriate usage. Varied sports supplements are developed to meet various requirements. This study reviewed recent advances in the effects of major sports supplements on athletic performance. The powerful means outside of sports training which is used after competitive sports is concerned by training sector all the time. The means of nutritional supplements plays a very important role in improving athletic ability.

  19. Effect of Implicit Perceptual-Motor Training on Decision-Making Skills and Underpinning Gaze Behavior in Combat Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Nicolas; Farrow, Damian; Fournier, Jean F

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of a 12-session, implicit perceptual-motor training program on decision-making skills and visual search behavior of highly skilled junior female karate fighters (M age = 15.7 years, SD = 1.2). Eighteen participants were required to make (physical or verbal) reaction decisions to various attacks within different fighting scenarios. Fighters' performance and eye movements were assessed before and after the intervention, and during acquisition through the use of video-based and on-mat decision-making tests. The video-based test revealed that following training, only the implicit perceptual-motor group (n = 6) improved their decision-making accuracy significantly compared to a matched motor training (placebo, n = 6) group and a control group (n = 6). Further, the implicit training group significantly changed their visual search behavior by focusing on fewer locations for longer durations. In addition, the session-by-session analysis showed no significant improvement in decision accuracy between training session 1 and all the other sessions, except the last one. Coaches should devote more practice time to implicit learning approaches during perceptual-motor training program to achieve significant decision-making improvements and more efficient visual search strategy with elite athletes. PMID:27371637

  20. Effect of Implicit Perceptual-Motor Training on Decision-Making Skills and Underpinning Gaze Behavior in Combat Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Nicolas; Farrow, Damian; Fournier, Jean F

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of a 12-session, implicit perceptual-motor training program on decision-making skills and visual search behavior of highly skilled junior female karate fighters (M age = 15.7 years, SD = 1.2). Eighteen participants were required to make (physical or verbal) reaction decisions to various attacks within different fighting scenarios. Fighters' performance and eye movements were assessed before and after the intervention, and during acquisition through the use of video-based and on-mat decision-making tests. The video-based test revealed that following training, only the implicit perceptual-motor group (n = 6) improved their decision-making accuracy significantly compared to a matched motor training (placebo, n = 6) group and a control group (n = 6). Further, the implicit training group significantly changed their visual search behavior by focusing on fewer locations for longer durations. In addition, the session-by-session analysis showed no significant improvement in decision accuracy between training session 1 and all the other sessions, except the last one. Coaches should devote more practice time to implicit learning approaches during perceptual-motor training program to achieve significant decision-making improvements and more efficient visual search strategy with elite athletes.

  1. Female Athlete Triad: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Curry, Emily J; Whitlock, Kaitlyn

    2015-07-01

    After the passage of Title IX in 1972, female sports participation skyrocketed. In 1992, the female athlete triad was first defined; diagnosis required the presence of an eating disorder, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. However, many athletes remained undiagnosed because they did not meet all three of these criteria. In 2007, the definition was modified to a spectrum disorder involving low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. With the new definition, all three components need not be present for a diagnosis of female athlete triad. Studies using the 1992 definition of the disorder demonstrated a prevalence of 1% to 4% in athletes. However, in certain sports, many female athletes may meet at least one of these criteria. The actual prevalence of athletes who fall under the "umbrella" diagnosis of the female athlete triad remains unknown. PMID:26111876

  2. The -female athlete triad-: Eating disorders - amenorrhea- osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Polikandrioti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The female athlete triad is a syndrome which consists of eating disorders, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. The syndrome is increasing in prevalence over the last thirty years, as more women are participating in sports at a competitive level. The aim of the present study was to review the research data regarding the female athlete triad in order to underline the significance of the problem. The method οf this study included search of international medical and nursing literature data-bases, for the reason that the female athlete triad has been extensively studied after 1990. The results from the review of relevant studies showed that female athletes who follow hard preparative athletic programmes in which body weight is critical for success, often manifest eating disorder patterns. These lead to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitarian-ovarian axis (HPO and as a result to amenorrhea. Hypothalamic amenorrhea can lead to osteoporosis and increased fracture risk. Adolescents may particularly be at risk because it is during this crucial time that females attain their peak bone mass. Conclusively, a course of action that aims at preventing the occurrence of the syndrome is necessary. Prevention of the female athlete triad through education and identification of the athletes at risk may decrease the incidence of long-term catastrophic effects to health. Monitoring from a group of specialists should serve as a cornerstone when planning a program of training and preparation for high athletic performance

  3. The Institution's Obligations to Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Linda A.; Sheilley, Holly K.

    2008-01-01

    Many commentators have noted that growing commercialization of college sports has made it increasingly difficult for universities to reconcile the gap between college sports and the fundamental mission of higher education. This article considers those individuals who choose to be a student athlete in good faith, and suggests strategies that can be…

  4. Nutrient Needs of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Barbara; Hemmelgarn, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Explains the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents, and the physiological roles of the major nutrients. Details the nutrient needs of young athletes, including pre- and postgame meals and fluid replacement. Discusses eating disorders and obesity. Advocates a diet rich in complex carbohydrates. (BC)

  5. Collegiate Athletes and Career Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Jennifer L.; Strear, Molly M.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.; Henderson, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    Given the unique experiences of collegiate athletes and the need to facilitate their transition as they complete postsecondary education and join the workforce, the present study sought to evaluate a group-administered career development program at a US university focused on preparing students for the transition into professional life upon…

  6. Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Colin P.

    A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

  7. Athletic Excellence and National Glory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The Athens Olympic Games marked a watershed in Chinesesporting history. China's remarkable achievements, second only tothose of America, placed indelibly it on the list of powerful sportingnations. More important, China's most celebrated athlete, 110-meterhurdle gold medallist Liu Xiang, banished forever the myth that Asianathletes do not measure up to those of Europe or the USA.

  8. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  9. Sex alters impact of repeated bouts of sprint exercise on neuromuscular activity in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Smith, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    This study characterized the effect of sex on neuromuscular activity during repeated bouts of sprint exercise. Thirty-three healthy male and female athletes performed twenty 5-s cycle sprints separated by 25 s of rest. Mechanical work and integrated electromyograhs (iEMG) of 4 muscles of the dominant lower limb were calculated in every sprint. The iEMG signals from individual muscles were summed to represent overall electrical activity of these muscles (sum-iEMG). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was calculated as the ratio of mechanical work and sum-iEMG for every sprint. Arterial oxygen saturation was estimated (SpO2) with pulse oximetry throughout the protocol. The sprint-induced work decrement (18.9% vs. 29.6%; p women than for the men. However, the sprints decreased NME (10.1%; p men, R2 = 0.87; women, R2 = 0.91; all p sprint exercise is not likely to be explained by a difference in muscle contractility impairment in men and women, but may be due to a sex difference in muscle recruitment strategy. We speculate that women would be less sensitive to arterial O2 desaturation than men, which may trigger lower neuromuscular adjustments to exhaustive exercise.

  10. The GLUT4 density in slow fibres is not increased in athletes. How does training increase the GLUT4 pool originating from slow fibres?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Franch, J; Beck-Nielsen, H;

    2001-01-01

    The influence of training on GLUT4 expression in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres was studied in male endurance-trained athletes and control subjects. The trained state was ensured by elevated maximal oxygen uptake (29%), as well as citrate synthase (60%) and 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydr......The influence of training on GLUT4 expression in slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres was studied in male endurance-trained athletes and control subjects. The trained state was ensured by elevated maximal oxygen uptake (29%), as well as citrate synthase (60%) and 3-hydroxy......-twitch fibres compared to fast-twitch fibres (Pathletes GLUT4 density was identical in slow- and fast-twitch fibres. Slow-twitch fibre diameters were 10% larger in the athletes (P...% of the fraction in the control group. Thus, GLUT4 originating from slow-twitch fibres was increased by 30% (Pathletes. We conclude that long-lasting endurance training increases slow-twitch fibre GLUT4 expression by means of an elevated slow-twitch fibre mass in human skeletal muscle....

  11. Is it possible to create a thermal model of warm-up? Monitoring of the training process in athletic decathlon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jakub Grzegorz; Olszewska, Magdalena; Boguszewski, Dariusz; Białoszewski, Dariusz; Reaburn, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to define if the athletes may vary their warm-up according to the specific demands of event they are preparing for and that higher-level athletes may differ in their thermal responses than lower-level athletes. Ten top level Polish male decathletes (19.9 ± 3.0 yr, 187.9 ± 4.7 cm, 82.7 ± 6.7 kg) who participated in the study were examined with a thermographic camera. Thermal imaging of each athlete was undertaken three times: at rest before the warm-up began, immediately after the general warm-up, and immediately after the specific warm-up. As significant changes in skin surface temperatures were observed between rest and both general and specific warm-ups (p exercises (r = 0.62; p physical effort of warm-up, the present findings suggest it is possible to individually adapt the warm-up to the needs of both the event being prepared for and the level of athlete.

  12. Anger in Adolescent Boy Athletes: a Comparison Among Judo, Karate, Swimming and Non Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Mansournia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Karate and judo are originally Japanese martial arts which may have different influences on adolescents’ behavior. This study was conducted to examine the total anger rate and its subscale-reactive anger, instrumental anger, and anger control-rates in young karateka and judoka.Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 11 to 19-year old boys. Adolescents included in the study were judoka (n=70, karateka (n=66, swimmers (n=59, and non athletes (n=96. One stage cluster sampling method was used to select judoka, karateka, and swimmers from sport clubs in Tehran. Students of governmental schools at the same area were chosen as the non-athletes group. The “Adolescent Anger Rating Scale” questionnaire was utilized to assess the anger rate.Findings: The mean age of participants was 12.90(±2.06 years. The total anger rates were 45.40 (±5.61 in judoka, 41.53(±5.63 in karateka, 41.19(±5.33 in swimmers, and 45.44 (±8.58 in non athletes. In total anger scale karateka and swimmers had a significantly lower score compared to judoka and non athletes. In instrumental anger subscale the difference was significant just between karateka and non athletes. In reactive anger subscale judoka showed higher scores than swimmers. In anger control subscale the difference was significant between judoka and swimmers and also judoka and karateka. The difference of anger control between karateka and non athletes was significant.Conclusion: The findings of this study propose a difference in the anger rate between judoka and karateka. In contrary to the results of previous studies, judo training may have no influence on anger control, while karate training could be beneficial.

  13. Muscle strength in athletes-hand kettlebell sport for different meteorological situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulthickiy Z.I.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered indicators of the strength of muscles of hands of students of general physical training and weightlifting athletes. The study involved 16 students of general physical training, 16 weightlifting athletes (III level and 16 athletes (II level. Age 18-23 years of study (men. Investigations were carried out at meteorological situations I and type III. It is established that muscle strength depends on the athletes and sports category varies for different types of weather. When the type III weather in all surveyed groups of athletes, a decrease of muscle strength.

  14. Longitudinal Study Evaluating Postural Balance of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Nemet, Dan; Pantanowitz, Michal; Zeev, Aviva; Hallumi, Monder; Sindiani, Mahmood; Meckel, Yoav; Eliakim, Alon

    2016-02-01

    Repeated anaerobic conditions during athletic performance may cause general and local fatigue that result in postural balance deficit. Evidence suggests that improved postural balance during athletic training may decrease the risk for fallings and traumatic injuries among athletes. Twenty athletes (12 girls, 8 boys) and 20 controls (12 girls, 8 boys) ages 10-15 years participated in the current study. All athletes were active in an 8-month physical activity program, 3 times per week for 90 min., specific to basketball, soccer, or athletic training. The control children participated in physical education at school only, with no involvement in organized extracurricular sports. All participants were evaluated for postural balance in three assessments over one year (at 4-mo intervals); the Interactive Balance System machine (Tetrax device) was used to assess balance at three test times (pre-, post-, and 10 min) after a session of a repeated sprint anaerobic test, consisting of 12 × 20 m run starting every 20 sec. The athletes had better postural balance than controls. There were different group patterns of change over the sessions; a significant interaction of session and group indicated that postural balance of the groups differed. The contribution of low sway frequencies (F1) and high sway frequencies (F6) differed between the controls and the athletes group. Results suggested that although athletes had better postural balance, improvement should be encouraged during training over the sessions and seasons, with special awareness of the balance deficit that occurs immediately after anaerobic stress and at the end of the season, to decrease the risk of injuries. PMID:27420320

  15. Injury Rates in Iranian Taekwondo Athletes; a Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Taekwondo, as the most popular martial art among Iranian sportsmen, might lead to injury for the athletes of this sport during competitions. We decided to report the incidence rate of injuries sustained by the athletes of this sport during national competitions. Methods All competitions of Iran national championship taekwondo league in 2006-2007 with 204 athletes were observed prospectively to detect the occurrence of injuries. The severity of injuries was classified into four groups (mild, moderate, severe, and critical according to the involvement of medical care team in the contest, ability of the athletes to resume and duration of probable absence of injured athletes from future competitions and training sessions. Athlete-Exposure (A-E was defined as the number of competitions multiplied by two. On this base, the rate of injury incidence per 1000 A-Es, the rate of injuries per time unit and the rate of injury occurred for each 100 athletes were considered as the major outcomes of this study. Results Of totally 1,338 A-Es, 93 injuries were recorded during the competitions. The rate of injury incidence was found to be 69.5 injuries per 1000 A-Es and the rate of injuries per minute of competitions was 0.023 which corresponded to 23.3 injuries per 1000 minutes of competitions. 45.6 injuries were occurred for each 100 athletes during the course of competitions. The most frequent injuries were mild (68.8% and critical injuries (24.7%, followed by moderate and severe injuries; 4.3% and 2.1%, respectively. Conclusion The rate of injury we found was lower than that of western countries. In spite of finding the lower limbs as the most frequent place of injuries in other studies, we found the upper limbs as the most predisposed place of injuries which might be due to difference in the method of combat of Iranian athletes with other athletes.

  16. Striving for success or addiction? Exercise dependence among elite Australian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Justin; McCabe, Marita P

    2012-01-01

    Exercise dependence is a condition that involves a preoccupation and involvement with training and exercise, and has serious health and performance consequences for athletes. We examined the validity of a biopsychosocial model to explain the development and maintenance of exercise dependence among elite Australian athletes. Participants were 234 elite Australian athletes recruited from institutes and academies of sport. Thirty-four percent of elite athletes were classified as having exercise dependence based on high scores on the measure of exercise dependence. These athletes had a higher body mass index, and more extreme and maladaptive exercise beliefs compared to non-dependent athletes. They also reported higher pressure from coaches and teammates, and lower social support, compared to athletes who were not exercise dependent. These results support the utility of a biopsychosocial model of exercise dependence in understanding the aetiology of exercise dependence among elite athletes. Limitations of the study and future research directions are highlighted.

  17. Anaerobic and aerobic peak power output and the force-velocity relationship in endurance-trained athletes: effects of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamari, K; Ahmaidi, S; Fabre, C; Massé-Biron, J; Préfaut, C

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that the anaerobic peak power output (Pan, peak) declines more than the peak aerobic power (Paer, peak) with increasing age. In addition, the force-velocity (F-v) relationship was studied to determine which of these two factors is primarily responsible for the expected alterations in anaerobic power. The Pan, peak, the maximal F when v is equal to zero (F0) and the maximal v when F is equal to zero (v0) were assessed by F-v test i.e. a brief intense intermittent exercise test using incremental braking forces. The Paer, peak was measured by a maximal increment exercise test. A group of 12 young athletes (YA) and 12 master athletes (MA) mean age 24.8 (SEM 1.3) and 65.1 (SEM 1.2) years, respectively, participated in this study. The YA and MA had similar body masses, heights and endurance training schedules. The results showed that Pan, peak was 42.7% lower in the older subjects, corresponding to mean values of 1089 (SEM 40) compared to 624 (SEM 33) W (t = 8.9, P Paer, peak was 35% lower with mean values of 323 (SEM 12) W for YA compared to 210 (SEM 6) W for MA (t = 8.3, P < 0.001). The mean maximal oxygen uptake was 34.7% lower with 4240 (SEM 160) ml.min-1 for YA compared to 2770 (SEM 120) ml.min-1 for MA (t = 7.2, P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Resiliency against stress among athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Litwic-Kaminska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this paper is to describe the results of a study concerning the relationship between resiliency and appraisal of a stressful situation, anxiety reactions and undertaken methods of coping among sportsmen. Participants and procedure The research concerned 192 competitors who actively train in one of the Olympic disciplines – individual or team. We used the following instruments: Resiliency Assessment Scale (SPP-25; Stress Appraisal Questionnaire A/B; Reactions to Competition Questionnaire; Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS; Sport Stress Coping Strategies Questionnaire (SR3S, self-constructed. Results Athletes most frequently apply positive types of stress appraisal, and they cope with stress through a task-oriented style during competitions. There is a relationship between the level of resiliency and the analysed aspects of the process of stress. The higher the resiliency, the more positive is the appraisal of a stressful situation and the more task-oriented are the strategies applied. Similarly, in everyday situations resilient sportspeople positively appraise difficult situations and undertake mostly task-oriented strategies. Resiliency is connected with less frequently experiencing reactions in the form of anxiety. Conclusions The obtained results, similarly to previous research, suggest that resiliency is connected with experiencing positive emotions. It causes more frequent appraisal of stressful situations as a challenge. More resilient people also choose more effective and situation-appropriate coping strategies. Therefore they are more resistant to stress.

  19. Psychological effects of chronic injury in elite athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shuer, M L; Dietrich, M S

    1997-01-01

    Many athletes train in a constant state of pain or injury while meeting the demands of an elite level program. It is hypothesized that the emotional distress experienced by athletes with chronic injuries is not inconsequential. A self-report battery, the Impact of Event Scale, was administered to 280 inter-collegiate athletes at a division I institution in an attempt to examine their response to chronic injury. Of the 280, 134 (48%) had been injured by study definition, with 117 (42%) meeting...

  20. Morphologic Features of the "Athlete's Heart" in Children: A Contemporary Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Recognizing the cardiac features of athletically trained children bears importance for health care providers and exercise physiologists alike. This literature review reveals that ventricular enlargement and/or hypertrophy are commonly observed in studies of pre- and early-adolescent endurance athletes, yet the magnitude of these features is less than that described in adult athletes. Moreover, the upper range of values in child athletes is sufficiently small that clinical confusion with findings mimicking those in individuals with heart disease should not be expected to occur. In contrast to sex differences in the "athlete's heart" in adults, cardiac structural findings in child athletes are similar in males and females. The extent that cardiac features observed in trained child athletes reflect a response to training or are influenced by genetic preselection remains uncertain. PMID:26694944

  1. Application of A Physiological Strain Index in Evaluating Responses to Exercise Stress – A Comparison Between Endurance and High Intensity Intermittent Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokora Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated differences in response to exercise stress between endurance and high-intensity intermittent trained athletes in a thermoneutral environment using a physiological strain index (PSI. Thirty-two subjects participated in a running exercise under normal (23°C, 50% RH conditions. The group included nine endurance trained athletes (middle-distance runners - MD, twelve high-intensity intermittent trained athletes (soccer players - HIIT and eleven students who constituted a control group. The exercise started at a speed of 4 km·h–1 which was increased every 3 min by 2 km·h–1 to volitional exhaustion. The heart rate was recorded with a heart rate monitor and aural canal temperature was measured using an aural canal temperature probe. The physiological strain index (PSI and the contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the overall physiological strain were calculated from the heart rate and aural canal temperature. The physiological strain index differed between the study and control participants, but not between the MD and HIIT groups. The physiological strain in response to exercise stress in a thermoneutral environment was mainly determined based on the circulatory strain (MD group - 73%, HIIT group – 70%. The contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the physiological strain did not differ significantly between the trained groups (MD and HIIT despite important differences in morphological characteristics and training-induced systemic cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations.

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ATHLETIC IDENTITY AND SPORTS PERFORMANCE AMONG NATIONAL ROWERS DURING DIFFERENT SEASONS OF COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Nili Ahmadabadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Psychologists believe that mental skill like any other skill, can be taught and practiced, and without making use of this factor, it is impossible to achieve peak performance; therefore, elite athletes in different levels and their coaches, shall know about practical concepts and methods of developing mental skills. So, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between athletic identity and sports performance among national rowers during different seasons of competition. Methods: Forty athletes (20 females and 20 males who were members of the national team with the age mean 23/67 (±3/71 participated in this correlation research. The statistic sample of this investigation was chosen with a special purpose. Athletic identity was measured by Brewer Athletic Identity Questionnaire (AIMS (1999, and sports performance was measured by 4 physical fitness tests and 4 Proficiency tests in 6 respective stages. The data was analyzed by descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and Multivariate regression analysis coefficient with P<0.05. Results: The results indicated that there was positive correlation between sports performance and athletic identity during different seasons of competition (P<0.05, but this amount of correlation was different in different seasons of competition. There was significant correlation between athletic identity and sports performance only during the seasons. The results indicated that athletic identity at the end of the training season is a good predictor for athletics success in competition season (P<0.05،f:7/12. So that 48%of athletic performance in competition season can be predicted from athletic identity scales at the end of the training season. Conclusion: Athletic identity increased as sports performance was enhanced; indicating that there was a significant correlation in this season because of its importance for the athletes. Athletes know that if they have good performance, their role of being

  3. Perspective: Does laboratory-based maximal incremental exercise testing elicit maximum physiological responses in highly-trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R West

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological assessment of highly-trained athletes is a cornerstone of many scientific support programs. In the present article, we provide original data followed by our perspective on the topic of laboratory-based incremental exercise testing in elite athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. We retrospectively reviewed our data on Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby athletes collected during the last two Paralympic cycles. We extracted and compared peak cardiometabolic (heart rate and blood lactate responses between a standard laboratory-based incremental exercise test on a treadmill and two different maximal field tests (4 min and 40 min maximal push. In the nine athletes studied, both field tests elicited higher peak responses than the laboratory-based test. The present data imply that laboratory-based incremental protocols preclude the attainment of true peak cardiometabolic responses. This may be due to the different locomotor patterns required to sustain wheelchair propulsion during treadmill exercise or that maximal incremental treadmill protocols only require individuals to exercise at or near maximal exhaustion for a relatively short period of time. We acknowledge that both field- and laboratory-based testing have respective merits and pitfalls and suggest that the choice of test be dictated by the question at hand: if true peak responses are required then field-based testing is warranted, whereas laboratory-based testing may be more appropriate for obtaining cardiometabolic responses across a range of standardised exercise intensities.

  4. High-Intensity Intermittent Training Positively Affects Aerobic and Anaerobic Performance in Judo Athletes Independently of Exercise Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Emerson; Julio, Ursula F.; Panissa, Valéria L. G.; Lira, Fábio S.; Gerosa-Neto, José; Branco, Braulio H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigated the effects of high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on lower- and upper-body graded exercise and high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE, four Wingate bouts) performance, and on physiological and muscle damage markers responses in judo athletes. Methods: Thirty-five subjects were randomly allocated to a control group (n = 8) or to one of the following HIIT groups (n = 9 for each) and tested pre- and post-four weeks (2 training d·wk−1): (1) lower-body cycle-ergometer; (2) upper-body cycle-ergometer; (3) uchi-komi (judo technique entrance). All HIIT were constituted by two blocks of 10 sets of 20 s of all out effort interspersed by 10 s set intervals and 5-min between blocks. Results: For the upper-body group there was an increase in maximal aerobic power in graded upper-body exercise test (12.3%). The lower-body group increased power at onset blood lactate in graded upper-body exercise test (22.1%). The uchi-komi group increased peak power in upper- (16.7%) and lower-body (8.5%), while the lower-body group increased lower-body mean power (14.2%) during the HIIE. There was a decrease in the delta blood lactate for the uchi-komi training group and in the third and fourth bouts for the upper-body training group. Training induced testosterone-cortisol ratio increased in the lower-body HIIE for the lower-body (14.9%) and uchi-komi (61.4%) training groups. Conclusion: Thus, short-duration low-volume HIIT added to regular judo training was able to increase upper-body aerobic power, lower- and upper-body HIIE performance.

  5. Medical considerations for the master athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlis-Mayor, Stephanie

    2012-09-01

    As the American population ages, older adults are likely to continue their active lifestyles including participation in high-level competitive sports. Physicians caring for the older athlete will need to guide activity and return-to-play to optimize the athlete's performance, as well as safely support their physical and mental health. Many medical concerns of the older athlete have the same etiology and treatment as those of their younger counterpart However, there are medical considerations of the mature athlete that are unique to this population. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the medical considerations that may arise in the care of the older athlete. For the purpose of this review, the mature athlete is de!ned as an individual over the age of 40, who participates in sport at a competitive level.

  6. The relation between athletic sports and prevalence of amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea in Iranian female athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Dadgostar Haleh; Razi Mohammad; Aleyasin Ashraf; Alenabi Talia; Dahaghin Saeideh

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In 1992, the concept of female athlete triad was introduced to describe the interrelated problems of amenorrhea, eating disorders and osteoporosis seen in female athletes. To gain a clearer picture of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea in Iran, one of the main components of the female athlete triad, we therefore established this study on the prevalence of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea in elite Iranian female athletes, also evaluating the risk factors of these disorders in the same popu...

  7. Sports injuries and adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, M J; Newcomb, W A; Warner, D

    1991-06-01

    A one-year study was undertaken investigating adolescent sports injury experiences at a major sports clinic in the state of Delaware. A total of 619 athletes sustained 870 injuries, for an overall injury rate of 1.4 injuries per athlete. The largest number of injuries was recorded in football (40.2 percent), followed by boys' soccer, wrestling, baseball and girls' basketball. Severity of injury was measured by the number of days lost per injury. Cheerleading had the highest average days lost per injury (28.8), followed by girls' basketball, wrestling, boys' cross-country and girls' tennis. Inflammation, fractures and dislocations comprised 50.6 percent of all the injuries, while 50.5 percent of the injuries were located in the knee, thigh, and shoulder. Twenty-seven of the 870 injuries required surgery. PMID:1874345

  8. Apophyseal damage in adolescent athlete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing demands on the adolescent athlete in high perfomance sports puts high biomechanical stress on the growing structures of the active and passive locomotor system. The ''growing factor'' itself increases stretching forces on tendon insertions, which are often overloaded when a physical demanding sport is performed additionally. The apophysis is an ossification nucleus near the tendon insertion, which appears before the growing age resumes and these apophysis finally fuses with the adjacent bone. The tensile forces from vigorous sports activity leads to a chronic or acute avulsion of the ossifying tendon insertion. The radiological appearance of this apophyseal damage with ossification and osteolytic processes is sometimes difficult with respect to differential diagnoses. Apophyseal impairment is associated with pain, tenderness to palpation and decreased muscle function. If it is not diagnosed and treated properly it can lead to end of career in many adolescent athletes. (orig.)

  9. Arthroscopic debridement of osteoarthritic elbow in professional athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hui; CUI Guo-qing; WANG Jian-quan; YIN Yu; AO Ying-fang

    2011-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic debridement is an appropriate procedure for osteoarthritic elbow in general populations.However,the results of arthroscopic debridement in the professional athletes,a younger and highly active patient cohort is unclear.The purposes of this study were to assess the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic debridement of osteoarthritic elbow in professional athletes and to evaluate the effect of prognostic factors on the clinical outcomes.Methods From January 1999 to January 2006,35 professional athletes with osteoarthritc elbow (36 elbows) were treated with arthroscopic debridement,consisted of osteophytes removal,loose bodies removal and fenestration of the olecranon fossa as necessary.Average patient age was (23±5) years (range 7-34 years).Average follow-up was (43±23) months (range 16-98 months).Athletic activities consisted mainly of wrestling,judo and weightlifting.Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) elbow scoring system.Results According to the modified HSS elbow scoring system,the result was excellent for 16 elbows,good for 14 and poor for 6.No case had got worse after surgery.All athletes reported an improvement in pain.After athletic training,15 elbows were not painful,16 mildly painful,3 moderately painful and 2 severely painful.The arc of flexion-extension improved from 111 ° preoperatively to 127° postoperatively.All of the athletes were able to return to their previous level of training.Five athletes won national-level championships.At follow-up,17 athletes (18 elbows) were greatly satisfied with the results,12 satisfied and 6 unsatisfied.Postoperatively,one athlete reported ulnar nerve symptoms and two others had residual loose bodies.The fenestration of the olecranon fossa was associated with a significantly increased chance of a poor outcome.The nature of the osteoarthritis,duration of symptoms,osteophytes removal and loose bodies removal did not predict

  10. Career development workshop for athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Faulkner, Michel J.

    1985-01-01

    The Career Development Workshop For Athletes was designed to aid in the comprehensive career development effort at Virginia Tech. The pilot research project involved 40 active freshman varsity football players enrolled during Fall and Winter quarters of the 1984-85 school year. The 40 students were randomly selected from a pool of 65 freshman football players. The experimental design was a two stage stratification. The first stage was selection and the second stage was as...

  11. Recognition and Management of Athletic Pubalgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul R. Geisler; Ed.D; ATC

    2011-01-01

    Whether termed “sports hernias”,“hockey groin”,or “athletic pubalgia”,insidious onset and vague groin and hip maladies seem to be on the rise in the last few years,creating much confusion as to the best way to diagnosis and treat the multifaceted and complex conditions.Because of the vague nature of their clinical presentation,sports hernias and athletic pubalgia are complicated and multifaceted problems for clinicians and athletes to manage.

  12. Academic and Athletic Motivation as Predictors of Academic Performance of Division I College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christina Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Division I intercollegiate student-athletes represent a unique population of college students on college campuses today because they face competing demands between the student and athlete roles. Without the proper environment and motivation for academic performance, some Division I student-athletes are unable to obtain a college degree and leave…

  13. Examining Academic and Athletic Motivation among Student Athletes at a Division I University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston-Gayles, Joy L.

    2004-01-01

    Academic motivation as a predictor of academic performance for college athletes has been debated in the literature. This study examined the utility of academic and athletic motivation as a key variable in predicting academic performance among 211 college athletes at a Division I institution in the Midwest. After controlling for background…

  14. Academic Comparison of Athletes and Non-Athletes in a Rural High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Holt

    1998-01-01

    Compares academic performance, behavior, and commitment of basketball and volleyball athletes and nonathletes in a rural Canadian high school. Compares mid-term and final grades in each school discipline, disciplinary visits to administrators, and misbehavior demerits. Estimates athletes' mean weekly time commitment in each sport. Athletes matched…

  15. Support Services for Student-Athletes: Assessing the Differences in Usage among Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usage rates of support services for student-athletes at a small, private college in the southeast with membership in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), in efforts to understand how universities and sport organizations can assist in the challenges student-athletes face when…

  16. Psychosocial Correlates of Disordered Eating in Female Collegiate Athletes: Validation of the Athlete Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S.; Kubas, Karen L.

    2005-01-01

    Female athletes may be at greater risk for disordered eating than their nonathletic peers, but the psychological antecedents of this dysfunctional behavior in athletes have yet to be elucidated. The objective of this study was to develop an athletics-oriented measure of psychological predictors of disordered eating and to test its initial…

  17. An Interpersonal Psychotherapy Approach to Counseling Student Athletes: Clinical Implications of Athletic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heird, Emily Benton; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that disruptive circumstances in an athlete's career (temporary injury, permanent injury, retirement) can pose significant difficulties, especially if the athlete has developed a salient athletic identity at the expense of a multidimensional self-concept. The authors present an interpersonal psychotherapy approach to case…

  18. Misperceptions of the Prevalence of Marijuana Use Among College Students: Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; Roland, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of marijuana use and perceptions of the prevalence of marijuana use was assessed in a sample of intercollegiate athletes and a separate sample of primarily first-year non-athlete students at a northwestern public university. Marijuana use prevalence in the non-athlete sample was higher than the prevalence found in nationwide surveys…

  19. Management of allergic Olympic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, K D

    1984-05-01

    Twenty percent of the recent Australian Olympic athletes have had an allergic disorder. Because of the ban on all sympathomimetic drugs except some beta 2-agonists. Olympic team physicians have a major responsibility to ensure that no competitor is disqualified for infringing on the antidoping rules of the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee. Inadvertent contravention of these regulations may occur because numerous banned sympathomimetics are available to athletes and their coaches without medical prescription and are frequently contained in combination preparations. The unbroken 24 yr in which asthmatics have won Olympic medals have been both before and after the introduction of drug tests. Currently a comprehensive range of preventive and therapeutic medications are available for asthmatics to compete with minimal respiratory disadvantage. It was, however, during a period of unnecessary restriction that an American swimmer forfeited his gold medal because of prerace ingestion of a banned sympathomimetic agent. Should adverse air quality be encountered during the Los Angeles Olympics, allergic competitors will be among the most inconvenienced . Athletes with allergic rhinitis and sinusitis will be the most disadvantaged because sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors remain banned. It is strongly recommended that the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee meet with an appropriate body of experts (i.e., the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology) to review this ban on vasoconstrictor agents. PMID:6715736

  20. Syndesmotic ankle sprains in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glenn N; Jones, Morgan H; Amendola, Annunziato

    2007-07-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common athletic injuries and represent a significant source of persistent pain and disability. Despite the high incidence of ankle sprains in athletes, syndesmosis injuries have historically been underdiagnosed, and assessment in terms of severity and optimal treatment has not been determined. More recently, a heightened awareness in sports medicine has resulted in more frequent diagnoses of syndesmosis injuries. However, there is a low level of evidence and a paucity of literature on this topic compared with lateral ankle sprains. As a result, no clear guidelines are available to help the clinician assess the severity of injury, choose an imaging modality to visualize the injury, make a decision in terms of operative versus nonoperative treatment, or decide when the athlete may return to play. Increased knowledge and understanding of these injuries by clinicians and researchers are essential to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this significant condition. This review will discuss the anatomy, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment of syndesmosis sprains of the ankle while identifying controversies in management and topics for future research. PMID:17519439

  1. [Exercise-induced asthma in athletes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuljanko, Ivana Maloča; Plavec, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Elite athletes are often subjected to endurance training in the environment in which they are chronically exposed to pollutants/irritants, allergens or cold air. These factors lead to an increased risk of upper and lower respiratory tract dysfunction. The diagnosis of asthma is crucial in elite athletes because of potential implications on athlete's general well-being as well as their competitive ability. Symptoms of asthma in elite athletes are not necessarily associated with the classic features of asthma seen in general population. Other clinical entities can create symptoms similar to those of asthma and therefore can lead to an incorrect diagnosis and ineffective treatment. The diagnosis requires a combination of symptoms and positive laboratory tests. Currently, there is no evidence that the treatment of asthma in athletes should be different from the treatment of asthma in non-athletes. However, some specific issues need to be considered in the elite athletes, such as compliance with the rules of World Anti-Doping Agency and International Olympic Committee. PMID:25647995

  2. Non-specific Adaptive Reactions of Athletes: Evaluation and Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Naumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work studies changes in non-specific adaptive reactions (NSAR of athletes who practice Wushu and Qigong and take Kladorod, a biological product made from plant material. The results of our study demonstrate the effectiveness of Kladorod as a remedy to enhance adaptive capacity with the possibility of application for training of athletes without any restrictions within the criteria of doping control.

  3. Seasonal Fluctuations in Airway Responsiveness in Elite Endurance Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Howard B Hemingson; Davis, Beth E.; Cockcroft, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that exposure to winter training conditions (irritants in indoor facilities and/or cold, dry air in the outdoors) can increase airway responsiveness in elite endurance athletes.OBJECTIVES: It has yet to be elucidated whether elite endurance athletes experience seasonal fluctuations in their airway responsiveness.METHODS: Eighteen members of a varsity cross-country running team underwent screening procedures and five members were enrolled in the study. Each at...

  4. Echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in Chinese endurance athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Y S; Chin, M K

    1990-01-01

    Most echocardiographic data on the athletic heart syndrome originate from the United States and Western Europe. There are no published data on echocardiographically documented left ventricular hypertrophy in Asian athletes. We investigated the echocardiographic changes which take place with endurance training by studying eight Hong Kong national cyclists. This study confirms that left ventricular hypertrophy and increased left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions are common findings in Chines...

  5. Nutrition for Women Athletes. Commonly Asked Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, N. Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Information on the nutritional needs of female athletes is presented. Among the topics discussed are proper eating habits, carbohydrate loading, amenorrhea, osteoporosis, anemia, vitamins, and minerals. (MT)

  6. Academic and Workplace-related Visual Stresses Induce Detectable Deterioration Of Performance, Measured By Basketball Trajectories and Astigmatism Impacting Athletes Or Students In Military Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2004-03-01

    Separate military establishments across the globe can confirm that a high percentage of their prospective pilots-in-training are no longer visually fit to continue the flight training portion of their programs once their academic coursework is completed. I maintain that the visual stress induced by those intensive protocols can damage the visual feedback mechanism of any healthy and dynamic system beyond its usual and ordinary ability to self-correct minor visual loss of acuity. This deficiency seems to be detectable among collegiate and university athletes by direct observation of the height of the trajectory arc of a basketball's flight. As a particular athlete becomes increasingly stressed by academic constraints requiring long periods of concentrated reading under highly static angular convergence of the eyes, along with unfavorable illumination and viewing conditions, eyesight does deteriorate. I maintain that induced astigmatism is a primary culprit because of the evidence of that basketball's trajectory! See the next papers!

  7. Peculiarities of changes in latent periods of sensor motor responses in young athletes aged 13-16 years depending on the orientation of their training process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoroshukha M.F.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is shown peculiarities of the specific impact of various types of training loads on the body of young athletes. In experiment involved 263 young athletes engaged in different sports (group A- speed-strength sports, group B-endurance sports and 62 secondary school pupils, who don't go in for sports, aged of 13-16 years. A technique of psycho-physiological research was considered. A comparative analysis of changes in rates of psycho-physiological reactions of the surveyed studies for data research'80s and 2000s is shown. It is established that the specificity of the training process is reflected in the nature of the changes of the latent period of simple and complex sensor motor reactions that have the majority of cases are genetically determined. Substantiated the importance of changes in these parameters in the practice of physical education.

  8. 探析跆拳道运动员的心理训练%Anslysis of the Metal Training of Taekwondo Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立春

    2012-01-01

    良好的心理素质是跆拳道运动员所必备的,也是比赛胜负的关键因素。文章对跆拳道运动员心理训练的原则、分类等进行了探析,并提出了合理的训练方法,供广大爱好者进行参考。%Good psychological quality is necessary for taekwondo athletes,it is also a key factor in the outcome of the game.This paper analyses the principle of mental training and classification of taekwondo athletes,and proposes the reasonable methods of training for the most amateurs.

  9. Profile of injures prevalence in athletes who participated in SESC Triathlon Caiobá-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Bertola, Izabela Pichinin; Sartori, Renato Pineda; Corrêa, Daniela Gallon; Zotz, Talita Gianello Gnoato; Gomes, Anna Raquel Silveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of injuries occurred during training and/or competition in triathlon athletes at SESC Triathlon Caiobá-2011. METHODS: One hundred and ninety athletes participated in the study (153 males and 37 females). RESULTS: Athletes reported time of practice between 3 to 6 years (20%), training frequency of 5 days per week (48%), at least one injury during trainings (76%). The prevalence of injuries according to the sports category was: running (79%), cycling (16%) ...

  10. A systematic review of studies comparing body image concerns among female college athletes and non-athletes, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnes, Julia R; Stellefson, Michael L; Janelle, Christopher M; Dorman, Steven M; Dodd, Virginia; Miller, M David

    2013-09-01

    Research prior to 2001 indicated that athletes experienced better body image than non-athletes, with no differences among sport types. Since then, female athletes have become increasingly sexually objectified in the media, and the sociocultural beauty ideal has shifted to emphasize appearing both athletic and thin. Part I of this paper explores the literature describing these changes. Part II presents a systematic and comprehensive literature review of 10 recent studies comparing body image concerns (BIC) among collegiate female athletes and non-athletes to identify the current status of BIC in female athletes. Findings indicate that involvement in collegiate athletics provides some protection from BIC; however, this protection appears attenuated for athletes in more feminine sports (e.g., gymnastics), and higher level athletes (Division I). Researchers should examine how sociocultural pressures unrelated to competition predict female athletes' BIC using measures that focus on objectification, positive body image, body functionality, and thin- and athletic-ideal internalization.

  11. A systematic review of studies comparing body image concerns among female college athletes and non-athletes, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnes, Julia R; Stellefson, Michael L; Janelle, Christopher M; Dorman, Steven M; Dodd, Virginia; Miller, M David

    2013-09-01

    Research prior to 2001 indicated that athletes experienced better body image than non-athletes, with no differences among sport types. Since then, female athletes have become increasingly sexually objectified in the media, and the sociocultural beauty ideal has shifted to emphasize appearing both athletic and thin. Part I of this paper explores the literature describing these changes. Part II presents a systematic and comprehensive literature review of 10 recent studies comparing body image concerns (BIC) among collegiate female athletes and non-athletes to identify the current status of BIC in female athletes. Findings indicate that involvement in collegiate athletics provides some protection from BIC; however, this protection appears attenuated for athletes in more feminine sports (e.g., gymnastics), and higher level athletes (Division I). Researchers should examine how sociocultural pressures unrelated to competition predict female athletes' BIC using measures that focus on objectification, positive body image, body functionality, and thin- and athletic-ideal internalization. PMID:23856303

  12. Injuries and Footwear (Part 1): Athletic Shoe History and Injuries in Relation to Foot Arch Height and Training in Boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Pope, Rodney; Orr, Robin; Grier, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the history of the athletic shoe, examines whether selecting running shoes based on foot arch height influences injuries, and examines historical data on injury rates when physical training (PT) is performed in boots versus running shoes. In the 1980s and into the 2000s, running shoe companies were advertising specialized shoes with "motion control," "stability," and "cushioning," designed for individuals with low, normal, and high arches, respectively. Despite marketing claims that these shoes would reduce injury rates, coordinated studies in Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps basic training showed that assigning or selecting shoes on this basis had no effect on injury rates. Consistent with this finding, biomechanical studies have shown that the relationships between arch height, foot joint mobility, and rear-foot motion are complex, variable, and frequently not as strong as often assumed. In 1982, the US Army switched from PT in boots to PT in running shoes because of the belief that boots were causing injuries and that running shoes would reduce injury rates. However, a historical comparison of injury rates before and after the switch to running shoes showed virtually no difference in injury risk between the two periods. It is not clear at this point if the type of footwear effects injury incidence.

  13. New trends in the system of sport training - a way to the holistic development of young athlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kratochvíl

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The modern sports movement is going through a process of differentiation. New activities have developed and are still developing. New values and new organizational forms and methods of sports training can replace older ones. Sport is a part of modern lifestyle and various subcultures show the diversity of modern sport. In this paper we try to introduce some experiences about the new philosophy of changing values in modern society and try to give a description of process of value differentiation in sport. We used the methods, methodological principles and means of experienced learning through the pedagogical experiment (special training camps that were a part of long time preparation of some groups of young athletes in Wild water slalom. The used programmes (icebreakers, contact games, trust games, initiative and team games, strategic games, social and dramatic games, communication and cooperation games, environmental games, overcoming obstacles, rope courses….. were firstly opportunities for self-development as well as for learning a great deal about teamwork. There are not exact quantitative results but our experiences show a considerable qualitative development in cohesion of the whole team and positive communication among team and coaches. The success of the Czech team at Junior World and European Championships probably reflects the personal development (selfconfidence, self-respect, self-fulfilment, high spirit of competitors.

  14. Division I Student Athletes' Perceptions: How Well Does the Athletic Department Promote Student Athlete Development in an Urban-Serving University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermillion, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to identify student athletes' perceptions of their athletic department regarding student development. Student athletes from a Division I athletic department were surveyed (n = 369) in order to monitor their development. Regression analyses, which included respondent's sport, gender, classification, reports of abuse,…

  15. Effects of specific resistance training program on force-velocity relationship, power consumption and work production of quadrics muscle during eccentric actions in elite athletes

    OpenAIRE

    KONSTANTINOS FLESSAS, MARIA KOUMPOULA, DESPINA TSOPANI, CHRALAMBOS OIKONOMOU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Resistance training is the most famous method for the prevention, rehabilitation of myotendinous injuries and especially for the development of muscle’s ability in competitive and recreational sports. The purpose of the present study was to examine the average exerted force ( ), the mean power consumption (Pmean) and the work production on Quadriceps Femoris Muscle of elite athletes, in accordance with joint’s knee movement velocity, during eccentric contractions, before and after the ap...

  16. Reduced mortality in former elite endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Garatachea, Nuria; Lucia, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    For centuries, the general consensus has been that vigorous, competitive exercise was harmful and shortened life expectancy. Recent data from prospective cohort studies conducted on marathon runners, professional cyclists, and Olympic athletes indicate, however, that regular intense endurance-exercise training has protective benefits against cardiovascular disease and premature death. There are still important questions to be answered, such as what is the optimal dose, in terms of both duration and intensity of training or competition, beyond which the health benefits of regular exercise stabilize or might even potentially disappear. PMID:24584695

  17. Personal health benefits of Masters athletics competition.

    OpenAIRE

    Shephard, R. J.; Kavanagh, T.; Mertens, D J; Qureshi, S; Clark, M.

    1995-01-01

    Questionnaires (750 respondents, 44.4% response rate) examined the long-term health value of endurance exercise training in older age-classed competitors ('Masters Athletes', 551 men and 199 women) over a 7-year period (1985-1992). The majority had initially completed maximal exercise tests. The weekly time devoted to training, competition and exercise-related travel was 10 to 30 h, and the annual expenditure on clothing, equipment and entrance fees was typically in the range Canadian $500-15...

  18. Is it possible to create a thermal model of warm-up? Monitoring of the training process in athletic decathlon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jakub Grzegorz; Olszewska, Magdalena; Boguszewski, Dariusz; Białoszewski, Dariusz; Reaburn, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to define if the athletes may vary their warm-up according to the specific demands of event they are preparing for and that higher-level athletes may differ in their thermal responses than lower-level athletes. Ten top level Polish male decathletes (19.9 ± 3.0 yr, 187.9 ± 4.7 cm, 82.7 ± 6.7 kg) who participated in the study were examined with a thermographic camera. Thermal imaging of each athlete was undertaken three times: at rest before the warm-up began, immediately after the general warm-up, and immediately after the specific warm-up. As significant changes in skin surface temperatures were observed between rest and both general and specific warm-ups (p decathlon event. Moving from rest to the general warm-up was characterized by decrease of the body surface temperature within the decathletes as a cohort. Interestingly, correlation was found between decathlon result measured by points and decrease of temperatures after commencing the general or specific warm-up exercises (r = 0.62; p < 0.05). However, the higher-performing competitors were characterized by a higher variability of skin temperatures depending on the event being prepared for. The present findings suggest that in sporting competitions characterized by the need for specificity of warm-up of different muscular segments, thermal imaging can be useful observe thermoregulatory responses. Due to these observed individual thermal reactions to the physical effort of warm-up, the present findings suggest it is possible to individually adapt the warm-up to the needs of both the event being prepared for and the level of athlete.

  19. Effects of jump and balance training on knee kinematics and electromyography of female basketball athletes during a single limb drop landing: pre-post intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagano Yasuharu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some research studies have investigated the effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury prevention programs on knee kinematics during landing tasks; however the results were different among the studies. Even though tibial rotation is usually observed at the time of ACL injury, the effects of training programs for knee kinematics in the horizontal plane have not yet been analyzed. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a jump and balance training program on knee kinematics including tibial rotation as well as on electromyography of the quadriceps and hamstrings in female athletes. Methods Eight female basketball athletes participated in the experiment. All subjects performed a single limb landing at three different times: the initial test, five weeks later, and one week after completing training. The jump and balance training program lasted for five weeks. Knee kinematics and simultaneous electromyography of the rectus femoris and Hamstrings before training were compared with those measured after completing the training program. Results After training, regarding the position of the knee at foot contact, the knee flexion angle for the Post-training trial (mean (SE: 24.4 (2.1 deg was significantly larger than that for the Pre-training trial (19.3 (2.5 deg (p Conclusions The jump and balance training program successfully increased knee flexion and hamstring activity of female athletes during landing, and has the possibility of producing partial effects to avoid the characteristic knee position observed in ACL injury, thereby preventing injury. However, the expected changes in frontal and transverse kinematics of the knee were not observed.

  20. Collegiate Athletic Trainers' Confidence in Helping Female Athletes With Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Jennifer L.; King, Keith A.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine college athletic trainers' confidence in helping female athletes who have eating disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING: We mailed a 4-page, 53-item survey to head certified athletic trainers at all National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA and IAA institutions (N = 236). A 2- wave mailing design was used to increase response rate. SUBJECTS: A total of 171 athletic trainers returned completed surveys for a response rate of 77%. Eleven institutions either did not identify their head athletic trainer or did not have an identifiable mailing address. Two surveys were undeliverable because of incorrect mailing addresses. MEASUREMENTS: The survey consisted of 4 subscales: (1) efficacy expectation, (2) outcome expectation, (3) outcome value, and (4) experience in dealing with eating disorders. Content validity was established by review from a national panel of experts. Reliability ranged from.66 to.73 for the subscales. RESULTS: Although virtually all athletic trainers (91%) had dealt with a female athlete with an eating disorder, only 1 in 4 (27%) felt confident identifying a female athlete with an eating disorder, and only 1 in 3 (38%) felt confident asking an athlete if she had an eating disorder. One in 4 athletic trainers (25%) worked at an institution that did not have a policy on handling eating disorders. Almost all athletic trainers (93%) felt that increased attention needs to be paid to preventing eating disorders among collegiate female athletes. CONCLUSIONS: Collegiate athletic programs are encouraged to develop and implement eating-disorder policies. Continuing education on the prevention of eating disorders among athletes is also strongly recommended. PMID:15085214

  1. 铅球运动员专项力量训练的研究%Research on the Shot Put Athletes Special Strength Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋德海

    2012-01-01

    铅球是所有田径项目中对力量要求较高的运动项目之一。有研究证明,运动员专项力量水平的高低是铅球运动员取得优异成绩的关键因素之一。铅球属于典型的速度-力量型运动项目,运动员在瞬间发挥出最大的肌力,以最快的速度完成动作,所以较强的专项力量是运动员必须具备的力量素质。我国铅球运动员专项力量训练存在的不足,从而导致专项成绩上不去,影响到运动员的专项水平。进一步认识铅球的专项力量特征,研究影响铅球运动员专项力量提高的因素,探讨专项力量训练的方法和手段,为铅球教练员和运动员走合理的力量训练道路提供参考和帮助。%Shot put is high demand on the power in track and field.Studies have shown that athletes,special forces level is the key of the excellent results achieved.Shot is a typical speed-strength-based sports,the greatest athletes to play in an instant the muscle,the fastest to complete the action,so strong is the athlete must possess a special power of the power quality.China's special strength training athletes shot shortcomings,leading to specific performance do not increase,the level of impact on the special athletes.Further understand the shot special forces characteristics,study impact the shot putter improvement factors of special strength training,and improve the performance of special shot putter,s special forces methods and means,,In order for our coaches and athletes to go decathlon reasonable way to provide reference and strength training help.

  2. 我国女足竞技后备人才培养体制的研究%On Reserve Personnel Training System of Women Football Athletics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李实; 薛俊

    2012-01-01

    Based on the status of reserve personnel training system of women football athletic in China, the author puts forward reforming the management organization structure and operation mechanism, establishing women football market mechanism of athletics reserve tal- ents and the integration mechanism of reserve personnel training system of women football in region, and perfecting the ideas and meas- ures of the trinity of "education, sports, society" of the reserve personnel training system of women football athletics.%在分析我女足竞技后备人才培养体制现状的基础上,提出改革女足组织管理机构设置和运行机制;建立女足竞技后备人才市场机制;建立区域女足竞技后备人才培养一体化机制;制建立健全“教育、体育、社会”三位一体的女足竞技后备人才培养体制的设想和措施。

  3. Discussion on Vocational and Technical Training of Athletes of Shaanxi Province%对陕西省运动员职业技术培训问题的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田世平

    2011-01-01

    To further improve the employment of retired athletes, to enhance vocational skills training of athletes and provide more guidance and training of vocational skills can make them have more competition ability for jobs. The paper surveys the employment of retired athletes and active athletes and vocational skills training in Shaanxi Province, and analyzes the problems that affect the current vocational and technical training of athletes. Through the prospects of vocational training of athletes in Shaanxi Province, the appropriate recommendations and countermeasures are made.%为进一步做好运动员退役后就业工作,加强运动员职业技能培训,为其提供更多适合需要的职业技能指导和培训,使其具备更强的就业竞争能力,对陕西省退役运动员和现役运动员就业及职业技能培训进行调查,分析目前影响运动员职业技术培训的问题,本文通过对我省运动员的职业技能培训前景,提出相应的建议和对策.

  4. Development of the Nutritional Diet Information System for Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiang Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of diet for a sportsman will impact directly on the training effectiveness and playing condition. Based on now information technologies the nutritional diet information system would design the planning of nutritional implementation and diet recipes for the athletes according to the different sporting events. The system will manage, balance and rationalize the diet and nutrition for the athletes so as to improve training effect and reduce the physical injury. It will also helpful to manage sports training and improve the quality of sports training.

  5. 十项全能运动员心理训练的探讨%Investigation on the Psychological Training for Decathlon Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马俊杰

    2012-01-01

    Decathlon, consisting of several different events, is an exclusively comprehensive event. It is required that the athletes should have not only good physical quality, but also psychological quality to participate in the labor-intensive competition. In this paper, sports psychology and competitive features of decathlon were analysed, the psychological problems of decathlon athletes before the competition, the process of competition and after the competition were also analysed. The significance of psycholog- ical training for decathlon athletes and the training methods of psychological skills was discussed. The study results may improve the psychological quality of decathlon athletes who participate in labor-intensive events through the reinforcement of psychological training.%十项全能运动是由不同单项群组成的一个独立的综合性比赛项目,它要求运动员既要有良好的身体素质,又要有适应高强度比赛的心理素质,本文以运动心理学的理论结合十项全能训练的竞赛特点对十项全能运动员比赛前,比赛中和比赛后心理问题的解决方法进行了分析,并对十项全能运动员心理训练的意义、重要性和心理技能的训练方法加以阐述,目的在于加强十项全能运动员心理方面的训练,使得运动员在较大强度的比赛中具备良好的心理素质,并取得理想成绩.

  6. Comparison of Athletes' Proneness to Depressive Symptoms in Individual and Team Sports: Research on Psychological Mediators in Junior Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Insa; Frank, Raphael; Beckmann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Depression among elite athletes is a topic of increasing interest and public awareness. Currently, empirical data on elite athletes' depressive symptoms are rare. Recent results indicate sport-related mechanisms and effects on depression prevalence in elite athlete samples; specific factors associated with depression include overtraining, injury, and failure in competition. One such effect is that athletes competing in individual sports were found to be more prone to depressive symptoms than athletes competing in team sports. The present study examined this effect by testing three possible, psychological mediators based on theoretical and empirical assumptions: namely, cohesion in team or training groups; perception of perfectionistic expectations from others; and negative attribution after failure. In a cross-sectional study, 199 German junior elite athletes (M age = 14.96; SD = 1.56) participated and completed questionnaires on perfectionism, cohesion, attribution after failure, and depressive symptoms. Mediation analysis using path analysis with bootstrapping was used for data analysis. As expected, athletes in individual sports showed higher scores in depression than athletes in team sports [t(197) = 2.05; p cohesion nor perfectionism met essential criteria to serve as mediators: cohesion was not elevated in either team or individual sports, and perfectionism was positively related to team sports. The results support the assumption of previous findings on sport-specific mechanisms (here the effect between individual and team sports) contributing to depressive symptoms among elite athletes. Additionally, attribution after failure seems to play an important role in this regard and could be considered in further research and practitioners in the field of sport psychology. PMID:27378988

  7. Comparison of Athletes' Proneness to Depressive Symptoms in Individual and Team Sports: Research on Psychological Mediators in Junior Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Insa; Frank, Raphael; Beckmann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Depression among elite athletes is a topic of increasing interest and public awareness. Currently, empirical data on elite athletes' depressive symptoms are rare. Recent results indicate sport-related mechanisms and effects on depression prevalence in elite athlete samples; specific factors associated with depression include overtraining, injury, and failure in competition. One such effect is that athletes competing in individual sports were found to be more prone to depressive symptoms than athletes competing in team sports. The present study examined this effect by testing three possible, psychological mediators based on theoretical and empirical assumptions: namely, cohesion in team or training groups; perception of perfectionistic expectations from others; and negative attribution after failure. In a cross-sectional study, 199 German junior elite athletes (M age = 14.96; SD = 1.56) participated and completed questionnaires on perfectionism, cohesion, attribution after failure, and depressive symptoms. Mediation analysis using path analysis with bootstrapping was used for data analysis. As expected, athletes in individual sports showed higher scores in depression than athletes in team sports [t(197) = 2.05; p sports (β = 0.27; p Mediation hypothesis was supported by a significant indirect effect (β = 0.07; p mediated the relationship between individual sports and depression scores. Neither cohesion nor perfectionism met essential criteria to serve as mediators: cohesion was not elevated in either team or individual sports, and perfectionism was positively related to team sports. The results support the assumption of previous findings on sport-specific mechanisms (here the effect between individual and team sports) contributing to depressive symptoms among elite athletes. Additionally, attribution after failure seems to play an important role in this regard and could be considered in further research and practitioners in the field of sport psychology.

  8. Isokinetic dynamometry of knee flexors and extensors: comparative study among non-athletes, jumper athletes and runner athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Cássio Marinho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation in intensive sports activities leads to muscular specializations that may generate alterations in involved articular forces and cause static (posture and dynamic changes (alterations of articular stability, coordination, etc.. Prevention of injury requires specific functional muscular evaluation in all athletes and for any kind of sport. OBJECTIVE: To dynamically evaluate, through isokinetic tests, the peak torque, total work, and average power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of jumper and runner athletes and compare them to those of a non-athletic population, evaluating dominance and balance between agonistic and antagonistic muscle groups. RESULTS: In the non-athlete group, we noted a higher asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant members. The jumpers had the highest values of the evaluated parameters of all groups, whereas parameters for the runners were intermediate between non-athletes and jumpers.

  9. A Review of Factors Influencing Athletes' Food Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenhead, Karen L; Slater, Gary

    2015-11-01

    Athletes make food choices on a daily basis that can affect both health and performance. A well planned nutrition strategy that includes the careful timing and selection of appropriate foods and fluids helps to maximize training adaptations and, thus, should be an integral part of the athlete's training programme. Factors that motivate food selection include taste, convenience, nutrition knowledge and beliefs. Food choice is also influenced by physiological, social, psychological and economic factors and varies both within and between individuals and populations. This review highlights the multidimensional nature of food choice and the depth of previous research investigating eating behaviours. Despite numerous studies with general populations, little exploration has been carried out with athletes, yet the energy demands of sport typically require individuals to make more frequent and/or appropriate food choices. While factors that are important to general populations also apply to athletes, it seems likely, given the competitive demands of sport, that performance would be an important factor influencing food choice. It is unclear if athletes place the same degree of importance on these factors or how food choice is influenced by involvement in sport. There is a clear need for further research exploring the food choice motives of athletes, preferably in conjunction with research investigating dietary intake to establish if intent translates into practice. PMID:26243016

  10. [Athletic drinks: body rehydration as a vital aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novokshanova, A L; Ozhiganova, E V

    2013-01-01

    106 students of the Faculty of Physical Education and athletes who train at the center of power arts (aged 18 to 30 years) have been investigated. The relation between the amount of lost and consumed liquid during physical activity has been studied. The amount of fluid lost was determined by the method of measuring the body mass of an athlete before and after the workout. The kinds of liquids used for eliminating dehydration have been analyzed. It has been revealed that while doing some physical activity and sports most of those being tested don't restore the lost liquid volume (with an average weight loss of 1,15 kg the amount of fluids they drunk was 0.91 l). In the given research the interrelation between the body weight and the lost liquid amount, and between the lost liquid amount and the kind of sports has not been exposed. Liquid loss of athletes in the medium intensive training process during the period of 1.5 h at the ambient temperature 21-22 degrees C constituted on average 1.53% of the body weight and didn't depend on the kind of sports. Despite the advantages of the athletic drinks are evident, the share of their consumption among the athletes in Russia is negligibly small. The great majority of respondents, namely 72%, use common or mineral water to restore the liquid. Only 6% of those being tested consume specialized athletic drinks.

  11. Sex Discrimination in High School Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Timothy K.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses Yellow Springs Exempted Village School District Board of Education vs Ohio High School Athletic Association where U.S. District Court in Ohio held unconstitutional a state athletic association rule prohibiting girls from participating on the same team as boys in contact sports. Available from City School of Law, 5100 Rockhill Road, K.C.,…

  12. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Iranian Female Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Baradaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190, volleyball (103, running (42, fencing (45 and rock climbing (38. The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 % soccer players, 21/103(20.38 % volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 % runners, 6/45(13.33 % fencers and 10/38 (26.31% rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners.

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Division I Male Student-Athletes: The Relationship between Student-Athlete Contact, Athletic Department Involvement, and Perceptions of Intercollegiate Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that student-athletes, especially in the sports of men's basketball and football, endure stereotyping (Bowen & Levin, 2003; Simons, Bosworth, Fujita, & Jensen, 2007, Baucom & Lantz, 2001). Although stereotypes about male basketball and football student-athletes academic behaviors are expressed by many sectors of the…

  14. Noncognitive Predictors of Student Athletes' Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Herbert D.; Van Rheenen, Derek

    2000-01-01

    Examines the role of four noncognitive variables in predicting academic performance in 200 Division I athletes. Studies the noncognitive variables of athletic-academic commitment, feelings of being exploited, academic self-worth, self-handicapping excuses as well as several background and academic preparation variables. Finds all four noncognitive…

  15. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer, pro

  16. Controlling Athletics in Education: History and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William H.

    The organization of amateur sports around the school and university system is a uniquely American administrative structure. This paper traces the developmental patterns leading to the emergence of sports-governing bodies such as the Amateur Athletic Union, the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and the National Association for Girls and…

  17. Organic food consumption by athletes in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Baranauskas Marius; Stukas Rimantas; Tubelis Linas; Žagminas Kęstutis; Šurkienė Genė; Dobrovolskij Valerij; Jakubauskienė Marija; Giedraitis Vincentas Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    Background: With environmental pollution increasing, interest in organic farming and organic foodstuffs has been growing all over the world. Data on organic food consumption by Lithuanian athletes is not yet available. This lack of data determined the aim of this study: to identify the particulars of organic foodstuff consumption among athletes.

  18. The Stereotype and Recognition of Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Cyd; And Others

    The stereotype of women athletes in college is predominantly positive rather than negative. In one study, female athletes were seen to be strong, strong-willed, leaders, brave and healthy. In the second study, women were judged to be significantly more attractive when the interviewer was male, and males gave significantly higher ratings than…

  19. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  20. 运动员高强度训练期的营养策略%Nutritional Strategies for Athletes in High Intensity Training Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭静璐; 林子扬; 唐宝盛

    2013-01-01

    随着竞技体育的发展,教练员、运动员日益重视应用营养学手段促进疲劳恢复,高强度训练期运动员营养需求增加,需要科研人员通过膳食和补剂等手段结合,保证其机体需求,顺利完成训练计划。在调研分析运动员膳食营养现状的基础上,提出科学合理的膳食营养补充和营养补剂应用策略,制定标准化食谱,供教练员和运动员参考。%With the development of competitive sports , coaches and athletes pay more attention to fatigue re-covery by nutrition , in high intensity training period , the nutritional requirements of athletes has increased , the researchers ensure the body need and complete the training programs by dietary supplements and nutri -tional supplements .On the basis of analyzing the nutritional status of athletes , the paper proposes the scien-tific plan of dietary supplements and nutritional supplements , and makes the standard recipes for reference .

  1. Nutritional Strategies for Athletes in High Intensity Training Period%运动员高强度训练期的营养策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭静璐; 林子扬; 唐宝盛

    2013-01-01

    随着竞技体育的发展,教练员、运动员日益重视应用营养学手段促进疲劳恢复,高强度训练期运动员营养需求增加,需要科研人员通过膳食和补剂等手段结合,保证其机体需求,顺利完成训练计划。在调研分析运动员膳食营养现状的基础上,提出科学合理的膳食营养补充和营养补剂应用策略,制定标准化食谱,供教练员和运动员参考。%With the development of competitive sports , coaches and athletes pay more attention to fatigue re-covery by nutrition , in high intensity training period , the nutritional requirements of athletes has increased , the researchers ensure the body need and complete the training programs by dietary supplements and nutri -tional supplements .On the basis of analyzing the nutritional status of athletes , the paper proposes the scien-tific plan of dietary supplements and nutritional supplements , and makes the standard recipes for reference .

  2. The Explanation of the Problems of Middle-distance Race Athletes' Nutritional Meals

    OpenAIRE

    Jinzhou Peng; Sizhe Sun

    2015-01-01

    In order to minimize the negative effects of high strength and speed endurance training, when training with monitoring, the nutrition of the athletes should also be paid attention to. Middle-distance race takes speed endurance as the predominantly physical ability project; the requirements of speed and speed endurance of athletes are relatively high. Nutrition and diet are the most important found for athletes to intake nutrients and maintain their physical fitness, which play an important ro...

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament tear prevention in the female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, Holly J; Giza, Eric R; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2005-12-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of implementing neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programs in female athletes and their ability to decrease the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The relationship of sex, age, and training on the incidence of ACL injury is pivotal in developing a comprehensive neuromuscular and proprioceptive training program to decrease ACL injuries occurring in female athletes. Based on the 2-year results, ACL incidence has remained consistently lower in the intervention group versus the control group. A prophylactic neuromuscular and proprioceptive training program may have a direct benefit in decreasing the number of ACL injuries incurred by female athletes. This research foundation endorses further epidemiologic and biomechanic studies to determine the exact mechanism of ACL injury and the most effective intervention that will effectively decrease ACL injuries in this high-risk population. PMID:16282037

  4. A measure of stress for athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggar, J F; Pedersen, D M; Hawkes, N R; McGown, C

    1997-02-01

    The Athlete Stress Inventory of 49 items was developed. Using factor analysis on the intercorrelations of responses of 148 women student-athletes, four orthogonal factors of stress in athletes were identified-Negative Mood, Team Compatibility, Physical Well-being, and Academic Efficacy. Scales for these factors were reliable and valid. The predictive validity of these scores was investigated by correlations with the athletic performance of 32 women athletes on three intercollegiate teams-tennis, gymnastics, and basketball. Stress scores (except Emotional Mood) reported four days prior to competition tended to be significantly correlated with performance for the individual sports (tennis and gymnastics) but not for the group sport (basket-ball). The correlation involving Physical Well-being was not significant for gymnasts. PMID:9132713

  5. Mechanical jumping power in athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkendall, D T; Street, G M

    1986-01-01

    The Wingate cycle ergometer test is a widely used test of sustained muscular power. A limitation of the test is the lack of development and retrieval of stored elastic energy due to a lack of an eccentric phase. To measure mechanical power output of the entire stretch-shortening cycle, the test of Bosco et al (1983) was administered to 119 male athletes in 7 different activities during their pre-participation evaluations. The sports tested were indoor soccer, American football and ballet (pro...

  6. Eight-Week Training Cessation Suppresses Physiological Stress but Rapidly Impairs Health Metabolic Profiles and Aerobic Capacity in Elite Taekwondo Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Hung; Sung, Yu-Chi; Chou, Chun-Chung; Chen, Chung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Changes in an athlete's physiological and health metabolic profiles after detraining have not been studied in elite Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. To enable a better understanding of these physiological changes to training cessation, this study examined the effects of 8-weeks detraining on the aerobic capacity, body composition, inflammatory status and health metabolic profile in elite TKD athletes. Sixteen elite TKD athletes (age: 21.0 ± 0.8 yrs, BMI: 22.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; Mean ± SD; 11 males and 5 females) participated in this study. Physical activity level assessment using computerized physical activity logs was performed during the competitive preparation season (i.e. one-week before national competition) and at two week intervals throughout the detraining period. Participant aerobic capacity, body fat, and blood biomarkers were measured before and after detraining, and the blood biomarker analyses included leukocyte subpopulations, blood glucose, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), and cortisol. Eight-week detraining increased DHEA-S/cortisol ratio (+57.3%, p = 0.004), increased insulin/cortisol ratio (+59.9%, p = 0.004), reduced aerobic power (-2.43%, p = 0.043), increased body fat accumulation (body fat%: +21.3%, p < 0.001), decreased muscle mass (muscle mass%: -4.04%, p < 0.001), and elevated HOMA-IR (the biomarker of systemic insulin resistance; +34.2%, p = 0.006). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), a systemic inflammatory index, increased by 48.2% (p = 0.005). The change in aerobic capacity was correlated with the increased fat mass (r = -0.429, p = 0.049) but not with muscle loss. An increase in the NLR was correlated to the changes in HOMA-IR (r = 0.44, p = 0.044) and aerobic capacity (r = -0.439, p = 0.045). We demonstrate that 8-week detraining suppresses physiological stress but rapidly results in declines in athletic performance and health metabolic profiles, including reduced aerobic capacity, increased body fat, muscle loss, insulin

  7. Eight-Week Training Cessation Suppresses Physiological Stress but Rapidly Impairs Health Metabolic Profiles and Aerobic Capacity in Elite Taekwondo Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Liao

    Full Text Available Changes in an athlete's physiological and health metabolic profiles after detraining have not been studied in elite Taekwondo (TKD athletes. To enable a better understanding of these physiological changes to training cessation, this study examined the effects of 8-weeks detraining on the aerobic capacity, body composition, inflammatory status and health metabolic profile in elite TKD athletes. Sixteen elite TKD athletes (age: 21.0 ± 0.8 yrs, BMI: 22.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; Mean ± SD; 11 males and 5 females participated in this study. Physical activity level assessment using computerized physical activity logs was performed during the competitive preparation season (i.e. one-week before national competition and at two week intervals throughout the detraining period. Participant aerobic capacity, body fat, and blood biomarkers were measured before and after detraining, and the blood biomarker analyses included leukocyte subpopulations, blood glucose, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S, and cortisol. Eight-week detraining increased DHEA-S/cortisol ratio (+57.3%, p = 0.004, increased insulin/cortisol ratio (+59.9%, p = 0.004, reduced aerobic power (-2.43%, p = 0.043, increased body fat accumulation (body fat%: +21.3%, p < 0.001, decreased muscle mass (muscle mass%: -4.04%, p < 0.001, and elevated HOMA-IR (the biomarker of systemic insulin resistance; +34.2%, p = 0.006. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR, a systemic inflammatory index, increased by 48.2% (p = 0.005. The change in aerobic capacity was correlated with the increased fat mass (r = -0.429, p = 0.049 but not with muscle loss. An increase in the NLR was correlated to the changes in HOMA-IR (r = 0.44, p = 0.044 and aerobic capacity (r = -0.439, p = 0.045. We demonstrate that 8-week detraining suppresses physiological stress but rapidly results in declines in athletic performance and health metabolic profiles, including reduced aerobic capacity, increased body fat, muscle loss

  8. On the Field and Outside the Lines: Relationships between Student-Athletes' Perceptions of Their Intercollegiate Coaches' Leadership Practices and Student-Athletes' Self Reported Satisfaction, Athletic and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispo, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between intercollegiate student-athletes' perceptions of their coaches' exemplary leadership practices and those student-athletes' self-reported athlete satisfaction, athletic and academic performances, while controlling for the demographics of coach and student-athlete gender, student-athlete playing…

  9. The Effect of β-Hydroxy-β-Methylbutyrate on Aerobic Capacity and Body Composition in Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkalec-Michalski, Krzysztof; Jeszka, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Durkalec-Michalski, K and Jeszka, J. The effect of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate on aerobic capacity and body composition in trained athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2617-2626, 2016-The aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementation with β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) affects body composition, aerobic capacity, or intramuscular enzymes activity, as well as in anabolic and/or catabolic hormones and lactate concentrations. A cohort of 58 highly trained males was subjected to 12-week supplementation with HMB (3 × 1 gHMB·d) and a placebo (PLA) in randomized, PLA controlled, double-blind crossover trials, with a 10-day washout period. Body composition and aerobic capacity were recorded, whereas the levels of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, testosterone, cortisol, and lactate, as well as the T/C ratio, in blood samples were measured. After HMB supplementation, fat-free mass increased (+0.2 kgHMB vs. -1.0 kgPLA, p = 0.021), with a simultaneous reduction of fat mass (-0.8 kgHMB vs. +0.8 kgPLA, p supplementation, in comparison to PLA, maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above][Combining Dot Above]O2max: +0.102 L·minHMB vs. -0.063 L·minPLA, p = 0.013), time to reach ventilatory threshold (VT) (TVT: +1.0 minHMB vs. -0.4 minPLA, p supplying HMB promotes advantageous changes in body composition and stimulates an increase in aerobic capacity, although seeming not to significantly affect the levels of the analyzed blood markers. PMID:26849784

  10. Evaluation of Iranian college athletes' sport nutrition knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessri, Mahsa; Jessri, Maryam; RashidKhani, Bahram; Zinn, Caryn

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the nutrition knowledge and the factors determining this knowledge in Iranian college basketball and football athletes. By highlighting gaps in nutrition knowledge of these athletes, sport nutrition professionals may begin to address these gaps by educating athletes with a view toward minimizing injury and enhancing sport performance. Sixty-six basketball and 141 football players (response rate 78.4%) from 4 medical and 8 nonmedical universities in Tehran agreed to participate in this cross-sectional study. A 2-part questionnaire was used; the first part comprised questions identifying demographic information, and the second part comprised a previously well-validated questionnaire on sport nutrition knowledge. The overall knowledge score was 33.2% (+/- 12.3%). Men scored 28.2% (+/- 12.7%), and women, 38.7% (+/- 14.2%). In both genders, the highest score was obtained for the nutrients subcategory, and the supplements subcategory was the most poorly answered. When compared with their peers, a significantly higher score was obtained by women (p nutrition information from reputable sources (p = .03). The coach was cited by 89.4% of athletes as their main source of nutrition information. This study showed that the sport nutrition knowledge of these athletes is inadequate. Considering that this substandard level of knowledge may contribute to poor dietary behaviors, these athletes would benefit from nutrition-related training and education.

  11. Evaluation of Iranian college athletes' sport nutrition knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessri, Mahsa; Jessri, Maryam; RashidKhani, Bahram; Zinn, Caryn

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the nutrition knowledge and the factors determining this knowledge in Iranian college basketball and football athletes. By highlighting gaps in nutrition knowledge of these athletes, sport nutrition professionals may begin to address these gaps by educating athletes with a view toward minimizing injury and enhancing sport performance. Sixty-six basketball and 141 football players (response rate 78.4%) from 4 medical and 8 nonmedical universities in Tehran agreed to participate in this cross-sectional study. A 2-part questionnaire was used; the first part comprised questions identifying demographic information, and the second part comprised a previously well-validated questionnaire on sport nutrition knowledge. The overall knowledge score was 33.2% (+/- 12.3%). Men scored 28.2% (+/- 12.7%), and women, 38.7% (+/- 14.2%). In both genders, the highest score was obtained for the nutrients subcategory, and the supplements subcategory was the most poorly answered. When compared with their peers, a significantly higher score was obtained by women (p coach was cited by 89.4% of athletes as their main source of nutrition information. This study showed that the sport nutrition knowledge of these athletes is inadequate. Considering that this substandard level of knowledge may contribute to poor dietary behaviors, these athletes would benefit from nutrition-related training and education. PMID:20601743

  12. Athletes' perceptions toward substance use in Baghdad city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb, Mohammed Baqer; Kasim, Wissam Jabbar; Khamees, Leith Abbas; Hawi, Mohammed Mukheilef; Khashoom, Qais Nea'amah

    2012-11-01

    The majority of men's sports need high levels of strength and power. The effects of any given type of performance-enhancing substance are mostly directly related to its ergogenic effects (enhanced strength, higher energy production, and better recovery), anabolic potential (increased protein synthesis, especially in muscles), and/or stimulating properties (increased attention and loss of fear), which give a competitive advantage to athletes. A descriptive correlational study was conducted to identify bodybuilders' and athletes' perception toward substance use and to identify the relationship between substance use and those athletes' sociodemographic characteristics of age, level of education, social status, and monthly income. A purposive "nonprobability" sample of 172 bodybuilding athletes were recruited from gym users of Baghdad city. The study found that two fifths of those who used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were 19 years old or younger, less than one half were overweight (body mass index = 25-29.9), two fifths of participants enjoyed exercise/training to an extreme level, two fifths of study participants highly perceived the improvement of athletic performance, two fifths of the study participants highly perceived the importance of improving athletic performance, less than half of the study participants used AAS, one quarter of the study participants who used AAS had been influenced by their coaches to use such substances, and more than one third of the study participants who used AAS were using such substances in the form of oral tablets and intramuscular injection together.

  13. Athletes' perceptions toward substance use in Baghdad city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb, Mohammed Baqer; Kasim, Wissam Jabbar; Khamees, Leith Abbas; Hawi, Mohammed Mukheilef; Khashoom, Qais Nea'amah

    2012-11-01

    The majority of men's sports need high levels of strength and power. The effects of any given type of performance-enhancing substance are mostly directly related to its ergogenic effects (enhanced strength, higher energy production, and better recovery), anabolic potential (increased protein synthesis, especially in muscles), and/or stimulating properties (increased attention and loss of fear), which give a competitive advantage to athletes. A descriptive correlational study was conducted to identify bodybuilders' and athletes' perception toward substance use and to identify the relationship between substance use and those athletes' sociodemographic characteristics of age, level of education, social status, and monthly income. A purposive "nonprobability" sample of 172 bodybuilding athletes were recruited from gym users of Baghdad city. The study found that two fifths of those who used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were 19 years old or younger, less than one half were overweight (body mass index = 25-29.9), two fifths of participants enjoyed exercise/training to an extreme level, two fifths of study participants highly perceived the improvement of athletic performance, two fifths of the study participants highly perceived the importance of improving athletic performance, less than half of the study participants used AAS, one quarter of the study participants who used AAS had been influenced by their coaches to use such substances, and more than one third of the study participants who used AAS were using such substances in the form of oral tablets and intramuscular injection together. PMID:22713800

  14. Validation of the student athletes' motivation towards sports and academics questionnaire to Korean student-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghee; Hong, Seungbun; Lee, Miyoung

    2015-08-01

    The current study had three aims: (1) to validate a Korean version of the Student Athletes' Motivation toward Sports and Academics Questionnaire (SAMSAQ-Kr), (2) to examine South Korean university student-athletes' motivation towards athletic and academic achievement, and (3) to identify the relationship between athletic identity and their athletic and academic achievement. A total of 126 South Korean university student-athletes (41.4% males and 58.6% females; mean age 20.5, SD = 2.74) completed the SAMSAQ-Kr. To investigate the validity evidence of the SAMSAQ-Kr a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch model were employed. To examine the relationship between Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS) and SAMSAQ for Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated. Findings indicated that the SAMSAQ-Kr showed a different model from other versions and revealed positive correlations between AIMS scores and athletic motivations. The current study highlighted that importance of considering socio-cultural context in developing questionnaire and contributed to help understand South Korean university student-athletes' motivation towards athletic and academic achievement. PMID:26331138

  15. Comparison of Mental Health Components among Athlete and Non-athlete Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Ghiami

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a period of rapid biological and behavioral changes that may expand the risk of mental health issues. Objective: This study aimed to compare the mental health of male and female athletes and non-athletes among a high school student groups. Methodology: On this base 100 students (50 athletes and 50 non-athletes, Mage = 16 (SD = ±1 were selected through multi stage random sampling and divided equally into four groups (female athlete / non-athlete, male athlete / non-athlete. General Health Questionnaire designed by Goldberg and Hiller (1979 was used for data collections. Results: The analysis of one-way ANOVA displayed significant differences between the mean scores in mental health among the groups in terms of mental health, F (3, 96 =39, P = .01 with less prevalence of these symptoms among athletes comparing to non-athletes. Conclusion: Increasing opportunities for students to take part in sport competitions can protect them against poor psychological well-being.Keywords: Mental Health; Depression; Anxiety; Social dysfunction; Somatic

  16. The Health of University Athletes: Attitudes, Behaviors, and Stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Rosemary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study surveyed 267 university athletes to identify sources of stress for student athletes and sex differences among athletes with respect to health-related behaviors and attitudes. Specific recommendations based on the findings are made for health professionals who work with college athletes. (IAH)

  17. ATLAS: A Community Policing Response to Adverse Student Athlete Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The University at Albany Police and the University at Albany Athletics Department have teamed together to implement a ground breaking program aimed at identifying, addressing and managing negative behavior among student athletes. ATLAS stands for: Athletics, Team Building, Leadership Development, And Mentoring for Student Athletes. The program was…

  18. Student Athletes Majoring in Family and Consumer Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roofe, Nina L.

    2010-01-01

    This study used action research methodology to explore factors that influenced student athletes to major in family and consumer sciences (FCS). Three survey groups included current student athletes (n = 23), alumni athletes (n = 14), and FCS faculty (n = 5). Current student athletes and FCS faculty participated in separate focus groups. The…

  19. Strength and Motivation: What College Athletes Bring to Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyett, Anna; Dean, Charlotte; Zeitlin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    College athletes develop many strengths and skills during their athletic career, such as dedication, ability to work across cultures, leadership, and community building. Social workers need many of these same skills. This study explores the potential transfer of skills from athletics to social work among 15 former college athlete MSW students.…

  20. An Analysis of Individual Stretching Programs of Intercollegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael; And Others

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate individual stretching programs of intercollegiate athletes, 238 athletes (164 male, 74 female) in ten sports were surveyed about their stretching practices. Almost all of the athletes stretched, but to varying degrees. Muscle groups stretched by the fewest athletes were the adductors, plantar flexors, hips, and neck. (Author/MT)

  1. Importance and Applicability of Approved Clinical Instructor Standards and Criteria to Certified Athletic Trainers in Different Clinical Education Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Thomas G.; Henning, Jolene M.

    2005-01-01

    Context: For optimal clinical education of athletic training students, Clinical Instructor Educators and program directors need to proactively select, train, and evaluate their Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs).

  2. Sport participation motives of young Brazilian judo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dartagnan Pinto Guedes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the motives for sport participation in a sample of young judo athletes according to sex, age, and training history. A total of 392 subjects aged 12 to 18 years old participated in the study. Portuguese version of the Participation Motivation Questionnaire was used to identify motives for sports participation. Boys reported giving significantly more importance to sports participation in terms of Competition and Skill Development, whereas girls presented significantly higher ratings for Teamwork and Friendship. Motivational factors related to Achievement/Status and Fun presented significantly higher average ratings in younger judo athletes, whereas average ratings of Competition significantly increased with increasing age. Average ratings related to Fitness, Competition and Skill Development were proportionally and significantly higher according to training experience and training volume. These results will contribute to establishing intervention programs designed to reduce sport dropout rates among young judo athletes.

  3. The Effect o f Entertaining Fun Athletics Training Program R elated To the Self - Confidence Levels among Children Aged 12 - 14 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan YARIMKAYA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the effect of entertaining fun athletics training program on the self - conf i dence levels of children. The sample group of the study is occuring 160 students in 12 - 14 age group from Keçiören Hacı Sabancı Primary School loc ated in Keçiören district of Ankara. Both the experimental and the control group were applied Piers - Harris Self - Confidence test developed by Piers and Harr i s (1984 before and after 8 - week procedure. The SPSS statistical program (version 15.0 was used for data analysis.The research indicates a statistical difference (P<0,05 between the experimental and the control group in terms of post - test. In the compari son of pre - test and post - test results of the experimental group, there is a significant difference between pre - test and post - test results. ( P<0,05. In those comparisons, it was found that the post - test results are higher than pre - test results. As a resul t, in the survey made for inspecting the self - confidence of the children in 12 – 14 age group who are making e ntertaining fun athletics excersises, it is fixed that the entertaining fun athletics excersise applied to the test group effects the self - confide nce level of the kids significiantly. In this context, we can say that e ntertaining fun athletics excersise positively effect the self - confidence properties of the kids in 12 - 14 age group.

  4. A Survey of Medication Taken by Chinese Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jingzhu; Wu Moutian; Zhang Yinong; Liu Xin; Yang Zhiyong

    2004-01-01

    Objective To make a survey of medication taken by Chinese athletes and a comparison between Chinese athletes and athletes from other countries in order to get information about how to improve Chinese athletes' performance. Method The information came from the forms"Doping Control Sample Collection" in which athletes answered the question: "What medications have you taken in the past 3 days?" The medicines taken by athletes were classified and statistically analyzed.Results 2,330 athletes and 25 kinds of sports were involved in. Medicines were statistically analyzed with 4 classes: profiling of declaration, vitamins and minerals, medicines for treatments, alternative medicine. Conclusion The survey recorded the types of supplements and medications taken by athletes in China in 1999. Chinese athletes took less vitamins and more alternative medicines than athletes from other countries.

  5. Effect of auricular acupuncture on oxygen consumption of boxing athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zen-Pin; WANG Chung-Yuan; JANO Tsong-Rong; MA Tso-chiang; CHIA Fan; LIN Jaung-Geng; HSU Jen-Jeng; HO Tsung-Jung

    2009-01-01

    @@ Boxing is an official sport at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games and the fast development of world-class high strength training and sport science has made a significant impact on scientific training. Boxing needs high cardio-respiratory function, speed, muscle strength, and anaerobic and intensive physical demands including weight control covering the grading of athlete's.

  6. Analysis of Physical Training of Juvenile Judo Athletes%少年柔道运动员身体素质训练浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张跃飞

    2015-01-01

    The physical quality training is an important part of sports training. Combining with training practice, the thesis analyzes the characteristics of Judo and the significance of the physical training for juvenile judo athletes and it also points out that training should pay attention to several issues. Besides, training methods and means are also discussed.%身体素质训练是运动训练的重要组成部分,结合训练实践,文章从柔道项目特点及身体素质训练的重要意义,身体素质训练中应注意的几个问题,身体素质训练安排等进行了论述。

  7. Tangled in a Complex Web of Relationships: Athletic/Academic Advisors Negotiating Privacy Disclosure Warnings with College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    To investigate privacy management in the relationship between athletic/academic advisors and college student-athletes, I interviewed 37 advisors to address the following questions: What type of privacy rules do student-athletes communicate to advisors? How do advisors manage student-athletes' private information following these rules?…

  8. A Comparison of Athletes and Non-Athletes at Highly Selective Colleges: Academic Performance and Personal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aries, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Danielle; Salovey, Peter; Banaji, Mahzarin R.

    2004-01-01

    Student-athletes were studied over 4 years at a highly selective liberal arts college and an Ivy League university. Students spending 10 or more hours per week in athletic activities had lower entering academic credentials and academic self-assessments than non-athletes, but the academic performance of athletes was not below what would be expected…

  9. An Examination of the Relationship between Collegiate Student-Athlete's Leadership Role in the Athletic Setting and Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Darla K.

    2013-01-01

    Academic performance of collegiate student-athletes compared to non-athletes has been studied extensively. Results of these studies have been mixed in their findings of student-athletes academic performance in comparison to the nonstudent-athlete population. These conflicting results may be due to differences in level of competition or demographic…

  10. The Effect of Athletic Identity and Locus of Control on the Stress Perceptions of Community College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 72,000 student-athletes compete annually in athletic programs at the community college level. However, research addressing the effect of athletic participation on the psychological well-being of the community college student-athlete is sparse. This study represents an attempt to address this gap by examining the relationship among perceived…

  11. Athletic identity and well-being among young talented athletes who live at a Dutch elite sport center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Hove, van P.; Dik, G.

    2012-01-01

    Differences in athletic identity and well-being were examined between athletes living in a Dutch elite sport center (CTO) and athletes not living in such a center (age range: 16–30). Measures included the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS; Brewer & Cornelius, 20014. Brewer , B. W. and Co

  12. Organization of the Greek athletic Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COSTAS MOUNTAKIS, VASSILIKI AVGERINOU, GEORGE KYPRAIOS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the school year 1988-99 the first ‘’Classes of Athletic Facilitation’’ were established in Greece. These Classes were for young prospective athletes and were established in certain schools in addition to ordinary studies. The purpose of these Classes was to contribute to the development of the elite athlete in order for Greece to achieve the best possible performance in the Olympic Games of 1996 which it was then thought would be staged by Greece. The aim of this study was to examine whether the Classes of Athletic Facilitation actually achieved their aim. This study was carried out with the case study methodology. From our findings it may be concluded that these Classes failed to meet the expectations of their proponents, since only 9% of the Greek Olympic team participated in them. The main reasons of that are: a the unwillingness of the most talented athletes to attend these Classes because of their low academic standards, b the lack of official connection between these Classes and athletic clubs and athletic federations, and c the serious problems concerning the appointment of the teacher – coaches.

  13. Effects of 12 weeks high-intensity & reduced-volume training in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilen, Anders; Larsson, Tanja Hultengren; Jørgensen, Majke;

    2014-01-01

    It was investigated if high-intensity interval training (HIT) at the expense of total training volume improves performance, maximal oxygen uptake and swimming economy. 41 elite swimmers were randomly allocated to a control (CON) or HIT group. For 12 weeks both groups trained ∼12 h per week. HIT c...

  14. The effect of varsity athletics on midshipman military performance

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, M. Christopher

    2003-01-01

    This study will examine the statistical effects of varsity athletics on Naval Academy Midshipman performance. Academic performance averages, military performance averages, conduct grade, and honor violation are analyzed with respect to Midshipmen participating in varsity athletics versus non-varsity athletics. Using hierarchical regression analysis, the expectation is that varsity athletes make up the upper-echelon of the Brigade of Midshipmen than non-varsity athletes. In the analysis howeve...

  15. Examining Leadership in Intercollegiate Athletics: A Content Analysis of NCAA Division I Athletic Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Pedersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the gender and race underrepresentation of women and minorities in intercollegiate athletic departments at the athletic director position. The human capital theory was used with focus on the personal human capital investments attained in career success. A content analysis was conducted and 21 variables observed of intercollegiate athletic director biographies published on the 348 NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association member institutions’ athletic website. Results suggest that there was no statistical difference in the human capital investments on the basis of gender or race and that there must be other factors contributing to the under representation of women and minorities in intercollegiate athletic departments.

  16. Desaturation Patterns Detected by Oximetry in a Large Population of Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Chamorro, Raul P.; Gonzalez-Lorenzo, Marta; Sirvent-Belando, Jose; Blasco-Lafarga, Cristina; Roche, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Optimal exercise performance in well trained athletes can be affected by arterial oxygen saturation failure. Noninvasive detection of this phenomenon when performing a routine ergometric test can be a valuable tool for subsequent planning of the athlete's training, recovery, and nutrition. Oximetry has been used to this end. The authors studied…

  17. 运动员的心理训练:理论与应用的联结%Psychological Training of Athletes:Connection between Theory and Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力为

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical development or theory guidance is the most important subject in the field of psychological study ever since a long time ago. This paper analyzed the relationship between macro-level theories, micro-level theories and method of operations relating the major topics of mental training such as purpose of mental training,athletes' self control,athletes' burnout,take-it-easy mentality. It is pointed out that mental training practitioners who are deeply involved in managing daily problems of athletic should pay close attention to the theoretical and academic basis underlying their operational methods in their mental training program.%理论发展和理论导向长期以来一直是心理学研究最为醒目的主线.本文通过分析心理训练主题涉及的宏观理论、微观理论与操作方法之间的关系,探讨了心理训练的理论分层与应用操作之间的关系.这些心理训练主题包括心理训练目的、运动员自我控制、运动员心理疲劳、自我超越、平常心等.本文特别指出,深陷于运动队现实问题的运动心理学工作者也应当关注心理训练操作方法的理论基础和学理倾向.

  18. Effect of 8 weeks of pre-season training on body composition, physical fitness, anaerobic capacity, and isokinetic muscle strength in male and female collegiate taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Myong-Won; Jung, Hyun-Chul; Song, Jong-Kook; Kim, Hyun-Bae

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of 8 weeks pre-season training on body composition, physical fitness, anaerobic capacity, and isokinetic strength in collegiate taekwondo athletes. Thirty-four collegiate athletes (male: 22, female: 12) participated. Body composition, bone mineral density, physical fitness, anaerobic capacity, and isokinetic muscle strength were tested. After statistical analysis was performed the results indicated that there were significant decreases in body weight, percent body fat, and fat tissue after 8 weeks of pre-season training. Bone mineral density increased significantly only in males. There were significant improvements in the 50 m shuttle run and 20 m multistage endurance run in both males and females. The sit & reach test and standing long jump were not significantly changed after 8 weeks. Relative peak power and anaerobic capacity were significantly improved in males. Significant increases in angular velocity were observed for knee extension at both % BW 60°/sec and 180°/sec in both males and females. A significant increase in angular velocity was seen for right knee flexion at % BW 60°/sec for males, but it decreased at % BW 180°/sec for both males and females. In conclusion, this study suggests that 8 weeks of pre-season training has a positive effect on body composition, physical fitness, anaerobic capacity, isokinetic muscular strength, and endurance. Nevertheless, an exercise approach with the goal of increasing lean tissue, and improving power in knee flexors and flexibility of athletes, should be included in the training program.

  19. The modern biomechanics technology in practice of preparedness athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmetov R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized information about directions of application of biomechanics technologies in modern sport is resulted. Some aspects of the use of biomechanics ergogenical tools of the moved delayed action in the system of preparation of athletes-jumpers are considered. Presents the possibility of using training complex «easy leading» for perfection of structure of motive actions of sportsmen, specialized in high jumps. The introduction of a vast arsenal of technical tools in practice the training process open new prospects associated with increased efficiency in the preparation of athletes.

  20. Air quality and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Sue-Chu, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    A higher prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway remodeling, and asthma has been identified among athletes who compete and train in environmental conditions of cold dry air and/or high air pollution. Repeated long-duration exposure to cold/dry air at high minute ventilation rates can cause airway damage. Competition or training at venues close to busy roadways, or in indoor ice arenas or chlorinated swimming pools, harbors a risk for acute and chronic airway disorders from high pollutant exposure. This article discusses the effects of these harsh environments on the airways, and summarizes potential mechanisms and prevalence of airway disorders in elite athletes. PMID:23830133

  1. Air quality and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Sue-Chu, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    A higher prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway remodeling, and asthma has been identified among athletes who compete and train in environmental conditions of cold dry air and/or high air pollution. Repeated long-duration exposure to cold/dry air at high minute ventilation rates can cause airway damage. Competition or training at venues close to busy roadways, or in indoor ice arenas or chlorinated swimming pools, harbors a risk for acute and chronic airway disorders from high pollutant exposure. This article discusses the effects of these harsh environments on the airways, and summarizes potential mechanisms and prevalence of airway disorders in elite athletes.

  2. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Norwegian female biathlon athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Håvard Østerås,1 Kirsti Krohn Garnæs,2 Liv Berit Augestad3 1Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Abstract: The purpose was to examine musculoskeletal disorders in Norwegian female biathlon athletes (age ≥ 16, both juniors and seniors. The design was a retrospective cross-sectional study. In all, 148 athletes (79.1% responded; of these, 118 athletes were 16–21 years (juniors (77.6%, and 30 athletes were 22 years or older (seniors (20.3%, and mean age was 19.1. A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 57.8%. The most affected parts were the knee (23.0% of the total injuries, calf (12.2%, ankle/foot (10.8%, lower back (10.8%, and thigh (10.1%. The disorders resulted in training/competition cessation for 73.5% of athletes, in alternative training for 87.8%. Fifty percent of the athletes had one or several musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the problems occurred preseason, and the duration of symptoms was often prolonged. Few differences between the juniors and seniors were found. This study showed the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems among female biathlon athletes. The results indicate that prevention of lower limb problems must be prioritized, especially during the preseason. Keywords: injuries, cross-country skiing, skating

  3. Organization of the Greek athletic Schools

    OpenAIRE

    COSTAS MOUNTAKIS, VASSILIKI AVGERINOU, GEORGE KYPRAIOS

    2008-01-01

    In the school year 1988-99 the first ‘’Classes of Athletic Facilitation’’ were established in Greece. These Classes were for young prospective athletes and were established in certain schools in addition to ordinary studies. The purpose of these Classes was to contribute to the development of the elite athlete in order for Greece to achieve the best possible performance in the Olympic Games of 1996 which it was then thought would be staged by Greece. The aim of this study was to examine wheth...

  4. Low Back Pain in Young Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, Laura; Micheli, Lyle

    2009-01-01

    Context Low back pain in young athletes is a common complaint and should be taken seriously. It frequently results from a structural injury that requires a high degree of suspicion to diagnose and treat appropriately. Evidence Acquisition A Medline search was conducted from 1996 to May 2008 using the search terms “low back pain in children” and “low back pain in athletes.” Known texts on injuries in young athletes were also reviewed. References in retrieved articles were additionally searched...

  5. Academic performance study in young athletes from Playas de Castellón Athletics Club

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Capdevila Seder; Héctor Bellmunt Villalonga; Carlos Hernando Domingo

    2014-01-01

    The study analyzed the possible relationship between academic performance of young athletes and some of the variables most used in this field. The sample consisted of 40 athletes Athletics Club Playas de Castellón, between 14 and 16 years, 22 boys and 18 girls. The main variables analyzed were academic performance, study habits, gender, sleep, sedentary leisure, socioeconomic status and dedication to sport. The instruments used were questionnaires CHTE (habits and study skills), PFYTL (physic...

  6. A COMPARISON OF SENSATION SEEKING AMONG DIFFERENT GROUPS OF ATHLETES AND NON-ATHLETE STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Kooshan; Fahimeh Keyvanlou; Mohammad Sayed Ahmadi; Akbar Pajouhan

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the differences in sensation seeking and it’s components between athletesand non- athletes students. Methods and materials: In these descriptive analytical study 160students (80 athletic students and 80 non-athletic students) with average age of 22 years selectedrandomly from students of azad university of mashhad. Sensation seeking scale V (SSS; form V)developed by Zackerman and cognitive questionnaire were used for data collection. The obtaineddata were analyzed in SP...

  7. Desire of Athlete and Non-athlete Students to Drugs Use

    OpenAIRE

    Saadi Sami; Sadigh Mahmoudi; Naseh Karimiani

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare athlete and non-athlete students’ tendency to drug use. 240 undergraduate students of University of Kurdistan with ages ranging from 19 to 23 years who had the experience of regular exercise (n = 120) and non-athlete ones (n = 120) were selected as the sample. Relapse Prediction Scale (RPS) was used for data collection. To analyze data, descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) and inferential statistics (independent t-test) wer...

  8. Left ventricular mass in male adolescent athletes and non-athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling David Kaunang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Systematic exercise leads to increased left ventricular mass, which may be misleading in a differential diagnosis of heart disease in athletes (physiologic hypertrophy versus pathologic hypertrophy. The cause of left ventricular hypertrophy is an important risk factor in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases. Objective To compare left ventricular mass and left ventricular hypertrophy in male adolescent athletes and non-athletes. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, analytic study, from September to December 2012 in male adolescents aged 15-18 years. The case group included athletes from the Bina Taruna Football Club Manado, while the control group included non-athlete adolescents. All subjects underwent history-taking, physical examinations and further supporting examinations. Left ventricular mass was measured by cardiovascular echocardio-graphy (Esaote Mylab 4.0 and calculated based on a formula. Left ventricular hypertrophy was defined as left ventricular mass of > 134 g/m2 body surface area. Results Subjects’ mean left ventricular masses were 359.69 (SD 188.4; 95%CI 283.58 to 435.81 grams in the athlete group and 173.04 (SD 50.69; 95%CI 152.56 to 103.51 grams in the non-athlete group, a statistically significant difference (P=0.0001. Ventricular hypertrophy was found 76.9% compared to 11.5% in the non-athlete group (P=0.0001. Conclusion Left ventricular mass in athletes is bigger than in non-athletes. In addition, left ventricular hypertrophy is more common in male adolescent athletes than in non-athletes. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:305-8.].

  9. Critical review of the impact of core stability on upper extremity athletic injury and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Silfies, Sheri P.; David Ebaugh; Marisa Pontillo; Courtney M. Butowicz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered. OBJECTIVES: 1) Open a dialogue on the definition and comp...

  10. Morphological optimization of female combat sports athletes as seen by the anthropologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukiewicz Anna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Body build and proportions are key determinants of athletic success. The effects of the athlete selection process and discipline-specific training are differentiated body dimensions. The aim of the study was to examine the physical characteristics of female combat athletes. The results of anthropometric measurements of 154 females aged 21.2±1.79 years competing in judo, jiu-jitsu, karate, taekwondo, and fencing for 7.5±3.43 years.

  11. Motivation mediates the perfectionism–burnout relationship: A three-wave longitudinal study with junior athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Daniel J.; Stoeber, Joachim; Passfield, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Perfectionism in sports has been shown to predict longitudinal changes in athlete burnout. What mediates these changes over time, however, is still unclear. Adopting a self-determination theory perspective and using a three-wave longitudinal design, the present study examined perfectionistic strivings, perfectionistic concerns, autonomous motivation, controlled motivation, and athlete burnout in 141 junior athletes (mean age 17.3 years) over 6 months of active training. When multilevel struct...

  12. 对标枪运动员快速力量的训练分析%Analysis of the javelin athletes speed strength training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许家林

    2014-01-01

    标枪是投掷项目中器械最轻的项目,所以它要求肌肉产生爆发式收缩,以最快的速度,最大的力量把器械投掷出去,在训练中提高快速力量的训练对专项成绩的提高起着重大作用。因此文章运用文献资料法和观察法对青少年男子标枪运动员快速力量的方法与手段进行分析,旨在总结出适合青少年男子标枪运动员的快速力量训练方法,给其青少年训练提供科学的参考依据。%Javelin is the instrument most light project items, so it requires the muscles to produce explosive contraction, with the fastest speed, the greatest strength to throw out device, improve the fast strength training on specific performance plays an important role in training. This article utilizes the literature material and the observation method to analyze Javelin Athletes speed strength and means, summarize the fast strength training method suitable for Young Men Javelin Athletes, to provide scientific reference for the training of adolescent.

  13. Education and Training of Athletes' Self-Prevention Ability of Sports Injury%运动员自我运动损伤防范及教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈香仙; 崇玉萍; 赵芳; 王运良; 何章明

    2012-01-01

    体育运动中运动员的自我损伤防范能力与损伤发生密切相关.对运动员开展自我损伤防范意识的教育与培养,可以有效降低运动损伤的发生风险,为损伤愈合创造了良好的条件.运动损伤防范能力的教育和培养内容包括运动人体科学基本知识、体育道德与行为、竞赛规则、训练原则、科学的训练方法与专项技术、运动损伤发生规律和营养对机体损伤与康复的影响.%Sport athletes' injury prevention capability is closely related to the injury occurred. To carry out the education and training of the athletes self-injury awareness can reduce the risk of sports injuries effectively, and it' s also creating good conditions for wound healing. The education and training of sports injury prevention ability including: Basic knowledge of human movement science, sports ethics and behavior, competition principles, training principles, scientific training method and special technology, sports injury occurrence and nutrition on body injury and influence for rehabilitation.

  14. Brugada ECG patterns in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eugene H

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is responsible for up to 4% of all sudden cardiac deaths worldwide and up to 20% of sudden cardiac deaths in patients with structurally normal hearts. Heterogeneity of repolarization and depolarization, particularly over the right ventricle and the outflow tract, is responsible for the arrhythmogenic substrate. The coved Type I ECG pattern is considered diagnostic of the syndrome but its prevalence is very low. Distinguishing between a saddle back Type 2 Brugada pattern and one of many "Brugada-like" patterns presents challenges especially in athletes. A number of criteria have been proposed to assess Brugada ECG patterns. Proper precordial ECG lead placement is paramount. This paper reviews Brugada syndrome, Brugada ECG patterns, and recently proposed criteria. Recommendations for evaluating a Brugada ECG pattern are provided.

  15. Submaximal exercise intensities do not provoke variations in plasma magnesium concentration in well-trained euhydrated endurance athletes with no magnesium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; López-Colón, José L; Llorente, María T; Escanero, Jesús F

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of exercise intensity during an incremental exercise test on plasma Mg concentration in well-trained euhydrated athletes. Twenty-seven well-trained endurance athletes carried out a cycloergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W·kg(-1), the workload increased by 0.5 W·kg(-1) every 10 min until exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (VO(2)), blood lactate concentration ([La(-)](b)), catecholamines, and plasma Mg were measured at rest, at the end of each stage and at 3, 5 and 7 minutes post-exercise. Urine specific gravity (U(SG)) was analyzed before and after the test, and subjects drank water ad libitum. Fat oxidation rate (FAT(oxr)), carbohydrate oxidation rate (CHO(oxr)), energy expenditure from fat (EE(FAT)), energy expenditure from carbohydrate (EE(CHO)), and total EE (EE(TOTAL)) were estimated using stoichiometric equations. Plasma Mg concentration at each relative exercise intensity (W·kg(-1)) were compared by means of repeated-measures ANOVA. Pearson's correlations were performed to assess the relationship between variables. The significance level was set at p<0.05. No significant differences were found in U(SG) between before and after the test (1.014±0.004 vs 1.014±0.004 g·cm(-3)). Nor were significant differences found in plasma Mg as a function of the different exercise intensities. Further, no significant correlations were detected between Mg and metabolic variables. In conclusion, acute exercise at a range of submaximal intensities in euhydrated well-trained endurance athletes does not affect plasma Mg concentration, suggesting that the plasma volume plays an important role in Mg homeostasis during exercise.

  16. Eight-Week Training Cessation Suppresses Physiological Stress but Rapidly Impairs Health Metabolic Profiles and Aerobic Capacity in Elite Taekwondo Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Hung; Sung, Yu-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Changes in an athlete’s physiological and health metabolic profiles after detraining have not been studied in elite Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. To enable a better understanding of these physiological changes to training cessation, this study examined the effects of 8-weeks detraining on the aerobic capacity, body composition, inflammatory status and health metabolic profile in elite TKD athletes. Sixteen elite TKD athletes (age: 21.0 ± 0.8 yrs, BMI: 22.4 ± 3.9 kg/m2; Mean ± SD; 11 males and 5 females) participated in this study. Physical activity level assessment using computerized physical activity logs was performed during the competitive preparation season (i.e. one-week before national competition) and at two week intervals throughout the detraining period. Participant aerobic capacity, body fat, and blood biomarkers were measured before and after detraining, and the blood biomarker analyses included leukocyte subpopulations, blood glucose, insulin, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), and cortisol. Eight-week detraining increased DHEA-S/cortisol ratio (+57.3%, p = 0.004), increased insulin/cortisol ratio (+59.9%, p = 0.004), reduced aerobic power (–2.43%, p = 0.043), increased body fat accumulation (body fat%: +21.3%, p < 0.001), decreased muscle mass (muscle mass%: –4.04%, p < 0.001), and elevated HOMA-IR (the biomarker of systemic insulin resistance; +34.2%, p = 0.006). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), a systemic inflammatory index, increased by 48.2% (p = 0.005). The change in aerobic capacity was correlated with the increased fat mass (r = –0.429, p = 0.049) but not with muscle loss. An increase in the NLR was correlated to the changes in HOMA-IR (r = 0.44, p = 0.044) and aerobic capacity (r = –0.439, p = 0.045). We demonstrate that 8-week detraining suppresses physiological stress but rapidly results in declines in athletic performance and health metabolic profiles, including reduced aerobic capacity, increased body fat, muscle

  17. Joint-Angle Specific Strength Adaptations Influence Improvements in Power in Highly Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of training at different ranges of motion during the squat exercise on joint-angle specific strength adaptations. Methods. Twenty eight men were randomly assigned to one of three training groups, differing only in the depth of squats (quarter squat, half squat, and full squat performed in 16-week training intervention. Strength measures were conducted in the back squat pre-, mid-, and post-training at all three depths. Vertical jump and 40-yard sprint time were also measured. Results. Individuals in the quarter and full squat training groups improved significantly more at the specific depth at which they trained when compared to the other two groups (p < 0.05. Jump height and sprint speed improved in all groups (p < 0.05; however, the quarter squat had the greatest transfer to both outcomes. Conclusions. Consistently including quarter squats in workouts aimed at maximizing speed and jumping power can result in greater improvements.

  18. The Female Athlete Triad: A Metabolic Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne B. Loucks

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE The Female Athlete Triad (Triad is a syndrome in which low energy availability triggers a broad range of endocrine mechanisms that conserve energy expenditure, and thereby impairs reproductive and skeletal health.  Energy availability is the amount of dietary energy remaining after exercise training for all other physiological functions each day.  The specific kind of reproductive dysfunctions caused by low energy availability are functional hypothalamic menstrual disorders.  To ensure that affected athletes receive appropriate care, endocrine tests are required to diagnose these disorders by the exclusion of other types of menstrual disorders unrelated to the Triad.  In addition, low energy availability impairs skeletal health by uncoupling bone turnover, in which the rate of bone resorption increases while the rate of bone formation declines.  The result is a progressive loss or failure to accrue bone mass, which increases the risks of stress fractures and osteoporosis.  Low energy availability originates in one or more of three sources:  restrictive eating disorders, especially anorexia nervosa; intentional efforts to lose body weight or body fat to improve athletic performance or appearance; and the inadvertent suppression of appetite by exercise and diets containing a high percentage of carbohydrates.  It is necessary to know the origin of low energy availability in a particular athlete in order to intervene effectively with her.  The key behavior modification for preventing and treating the Triad is to increase energy availability, either by increasing dietary energy intake, reducing exercise energy expenditure, or both.  Guidelines for doing so are provided. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5

  19. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429142

  20. Athletes in How Many, How Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A

    1969-01-01

    Presented before the cobined session of the Section on Athletic Medicine and the Section on Mental Health, American College Health Association, Forty-sixth Annual Meeting, Minneapolis Minnesota, May 2, 1968.