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Sample records for atherosclerotic heart disease

  1. Periodontal disease and risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

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    Nakajima, Takako; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2009-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is an important component of coronary heart disease (CHD), which is the leading cause of death worldwide, including in Japan. Because atherosclerotic processes are typified by chronic inflammatory responses, which are similar to those elicited by chronic infection, the role of infection in promoting or accelerating atherosclerosis has received considerable focus. Increasing evidence supports the notion that periodontitis is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis through dysfunction of endothelial cells induced by either periodontopathic bacteria or their products, or inflammatory mediators derived from infected periodontal tissue. Here we review whether periodontitis represents a risk factor for CHD or atherosclerosis, particularly in a Japanese population.

  2. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

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    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  3. Moderate overweight is beneficial and severe obesity detrimental for patients with documented atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azimi, Aziza; Charlot, Mette Gitz; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is paradoxically associated with enhanced survival in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We explored this paradox further by examining the influence of obesity on survival in patients with verified atherosclerotic heart disease.......Obesity is paradoxically associated with enhanced survival in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We explored this paradox further by examining the influence of obesity on survival in patients with verified atherosclerotic heart disease....

  4. Low circulating microRNA levels in heart failure patients are associated with atherosclerotic disease and cardiovascular-related rehospitalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Eline L.; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berezikov, Eugene; van der Meer, Peter; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Objective Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in both heart failure and atherosclerotic disease. The aim of this study was to examine associations between heart failure specific circulating miRNAs, atherosclerotic disease and cardiovascular-related outcome in patients with heart

  5. Cysteinyl leukotriene signaling aggravates myocardial hypoxia in experimental atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobili, Elena; Salvado, M Dolores; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard

    2012-01-01

    Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT) are powerful spasmogenic and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases, in particular asthma. Here, we investigated whether cys-LT signaling, in the context of atherosclerotic heart disease, compromises the myocardial microcirculation and ...

  6. Heart Disease

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    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  7. Correlations of chemokine CXCL16 and TNF-α with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease.

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    Xing, Jieyong; Liu, Yanshao; Chen, Tao

    2018-01-01

    This study determined the correlations of CXC ligand 16 (CXCL16) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CAHD) and screened for new clinical markers for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. Eighty patients with coronary heart disease and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled into a CAHD or healthy control group, respectively. Computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography and Gensini integral were used to classify plaques and evaluate patients with coronary heart disease. The serum levels of CXCL16 and TNF-α of subjects in each group were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and the correlation between levels and clinical markers (such as blood pressure, glucose, lipid and heart rate) and the severity of disease were analyzed. Our results showed the serum levels of CXCL16 and TNF-α were significantly higher in the CAHD group than those in the CK group. The serum CXCL16 levels of the CAHD group patients with plaques were distinctly higher than those of the CADH group patients without plaques, but there were no significant difference in serum TNF-α levels between these two groups of patients. The level of CXCL16 had a significantly positive correlation with the severity of disease, but there was no significant correlation between TNF-α level and the severity of disease. Also, there was no significant correlation between the CXCL16 levels and blood pressure, blood glucose, heart rate, total cholesterol, triglyceride or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but there was a clear correlation with the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Finally no significant correlations were found between TNF-α levels and each of the clinical markers studied. Based on our findings, the levels of CXCL16 and TNF-α in the patients with coronary heart disease were abnormally increased and the level of CXCL16 correlated closely with the severity of disease. These markers seem to be reliable biological markers for

  8. Does exercise conditioning delay progression of myocardial ischemia in coronary atherosclerotic heart disease?

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    Froelicher, V F

    1977-01-01

    The data regarding the effect of physical of physical conditioning on the progression of myocardial is chemia, although suggestive of a favorable influence, are in no way definitive. Efforts to alter the physical activity habits of our population should not supersede efforts directed to alter the major risk factors. The emphasis in the prevention of coronary atherosclerotic heart disease for the general public should be on the well established cardinal risk factors, that is, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and cigarette smoking. The National Postinfarction Rehabilitation Study, when completed, may demonstrate how physical conditioning influences the progression of myocardial ischemia. However, "moderate activity is a part of a balanced satisfying living and is the safe and sane hygienic prescription of the thoughtful physician for his patients, the high risk and the healthy alike.

  9. Moderate overweight is beneficial and severe obesity detrimental for patients with documented atherosclerotic heart disease.

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    Azimi, Aziza; Charlot, Mette Gitz; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H; Køber, Lars; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Ravkilde, Jan; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Thuesen, Leif

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is paradoxically associated with enhanced survival in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We explored this paradox further by examining the influence of obesity on survival in patients with verified atherosclerotic heart disease. This retrospective registry based cohort study included all patients from the Western Denmark Heart Registry with coronary atherosclerosis confirmed by coronary angiography from January 2000 to December 2010. Patients were divided into eight groups according to body mass index (BMI) based on WHO BMI classification. Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark. The study included 37 573 patients (70.7% men) with a mean age of (66.3 ± 11.1) years. During the 11 years of follow-up, 5866 (15.6%) patients died. Multivariable analysis confirmed that the risk of death was the lowest among the preobese patients (27.5 ≤ BMIObese classes I and II did not differ from the reference group (23 ≤ BMIheart disease patients have improved survival compared with normal weight patients. Underweight and severely obese patients have increased mortality. Our results lean more towards an overweight paradox than an obesity paradox.

  10. Cysteinyl leukotriene signaling aggravates myocardial hypoxia in experimental atherosclerotic heart disease.

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    Elena Nobili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT are powerful spasmogenic and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases, in particular asthma. Here, we investigated whether cys-LT signaling, in the context of atherosclerotic heart disease, compromises the myocardial microcirculation and its response to hypoxic stress. To this end, we examined Apoe(-/- mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet and analysed the expression of key enzymes of the cys-LT pathway and their receptors (CysLT1/CysLT2 in normal and hypoxic myocardium as well as the potential contribution of cys-LT signaling to the acute myocardial response to hypoxia. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Myocardial biopsies from Apoe(-/- mice demonstrated signs of chronic inflammation with fibrosis, increased apoptosis and expression of IL-6, as compared to biopsies from C57BL/6J control mice. In addition, we found increased leukotriene C(4 synthase (LTC(4S and CysLT1 expression in the myocardium of Apoe(-/- mice. Acute bouts of hypoxia further induced LTC(4S expression, increased LTC(4S enzyme activity and CysLT1 expression, and were associated with increased extension of hypoxic areas within the myocardium. Inhibition of cys-LT signaling by treatment with montelukast, a selective CysLT1 receptor antagonist, during acute bouts of hypoxic stress reduced myocardial hypoxic areas in Apoe(-/- mice to levels equal to those observed under normoxic conditions. In human heart biopsies from 14 patients with chronic coronary artery disease mRNA expression levels of LTC(4S and CysLT1 were increased in chronic ischemic compared to non-ischemic myocardium, constituting a molecular basis for increased cys-LT signaling. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CysLT1 antagonists may have protective effects on the hypoxic heart, and improve the oxygen supply to areas of myocardial ischemia, for instance during episodes of sleep apnea.

  11. Atherosclerotic Heart Disease: Prevalence and Risk Factors in Hospitalized Men with Hemophilia A

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    Ragni, Margaret V.; Moore, Charity G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Atherosclerotic heart disease (ASHD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Few studies have determined prevalence and predictors of ASHD in hemophilia (HA), a population whose survival is improving with safer blood products and effective treatments for AIDS and hepatitis C. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with ASHD in hemophilia A patients in Pennsylvania. Methods The prevalence of ASHD (myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease), cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, co-morbidities, and in-hospital mortality were assessed on statewide ASHD discharge data, 2001–2006, from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4). Results The prevalence of hemophilia ASHD admissions fluctuated between 6.5% and 10.5% for 2001 to 2006, p=0.62. Compared to HA without ASHD, HA with ASHD were older and more likely to be hypertensive, hyperlipidemic, and diabetic, all pHemophilia patients with ASHD have similar cardiovascular risk factors, admitting diagnoses, severity of illness, and in-hospital mortality as the general population. These findings suggest cardiovascular prevention measures should be promoted in hemophilia. PMID:21371197

  12. Circulating chemokines accurately identify individuals with clinically significant atherosclerotic heart disease.

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    Ardigo, Diego; Assimes, Themistocles L; Fortmann, Stephen P; Go, Alan S; Hlatky, Mark; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Iribarren, Carlos; Tsao, Philip S; Tabibiazar, Raymond; Quertermous, Thomas

    2007-11-14

    Serum inflammatory markers correlate with outcome and response to therapy in subjects with cardiovascular disease. However, current individual markers lack specificity for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesize that a multimarker proteomic approach measuring serum levels of vascular derived inflammatory biomarkers could reveal a "signature of disease" that can serve as a highly accurate method to assess for the presence of coronary atherosclerosis. We simultaneously measured serum levels of seven chemokines [CXCL10 (IP-10), CCL11 (eotaxin), CCL3 (MIP1 alpha), CCL2 (MCP1), CCL8 (MCP2), CCL7 (MCP3), and CCL13 (MCP4)] in 48 subjects with clinically significant CAD ("cases") and 44 controls from the ADVANCE Study. We applied three classification algorithms to identify the combination of variables that would best predict case-control status and assessed the diagnostic performance of these models with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The serum levels of six chemokines were significantly higher in cases compared with controls (P algorithms entered three chemokines in their final model, and only logistic regression selected clinical variables. Logistic regression produced the highest ROC of the three algorithms (AUC = 0.95; SE = 0.03), which was markedly better than the AUC for the logistic regression model of traditional risk factors of CAD without (AUC = 0.67; SE = 0.06) or with CRP (AUC = 0.68; SE = 0.06). A combination of serum levels of multiple chemokines identifies subjects with clinically significant atherosclerotic heart disease with a very high degree of accuracy. These results need to be replicated in larger cross-sectional studies and their prognostic value explored.

  13. A MMP derived versican neo-epitope is elevated in plasma from patients with atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Genovese, Federica; Larsen, Lise Korsager

    2013-01-01

    ELISA for detection of the fragment in plasma. VCANM was measured in plasma of patients with different levels of heart diseases. Patients experiencing I) acute coronary syndrome, II) stable ischemic heart disease and III) demonstrating high levels of coronary calcium deposits had significantly higher...... plasma levels of VCANM compared to a control group of individuals with no detectable coronary calcium deposits. VCANM was also detected by immunohistochemistry in coronary artery sections of patients with different degrees of atherosclerosis. VCANM ability to separate patients with atherosclerotic...

  14. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

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    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  15. Short-term effect of severe exposure to methylmercury on atherosclerotic heart disease and hypertension mortality in Minamata.

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    Inoue, Sachiko; Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-15

    Recent studies suggest potential adverse effects of methylmercury exposure on myocardial infarction and hypertension, although the evidence is still limited. We thus evaluated this association using age-standardized mortality ratios (ASMRs) in Minamata, where severe methylmercury poisoning had occurred. We obtained mortality data from annual vital statistics and demographic statistics from census. We then compared mortality of atherosclerotic heart disease including degenerative heart disease and hypertension in Minamata-city with those in Kumamoto Prefecture, which includes Minamata city, as a control. We estimated ASMRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) during the period from 1953 to 1970. ASMRs of atherosclerotic heart disease were continuously decreased during the period from 1953 to 1967. In contrast, the ASMR of hypertension was significantly elevated during the period from 1963 to 1967 (SMR=1.38, CI; 1.06-1.80); but they decreased later. Although dilution is present in this ecological study, our study supports the notion that methylmercury exposure induces hypertension. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

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    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  17. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION, CORONARY HEART DISEASE, AND ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION OF LOWER EXTREMITY ARTERIES IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS

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    A. A. Karlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic lesion of lower extremity arteries frequently complicates the long-term course of hypertension and it is generally associated with coronary heart disease. Our study has attempted to evaluate the impact of combination antihypertensive therapy involving amlodipine, bisoprolol, and lisinopril on quality of life in this category of patients.

  18. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

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    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  19. [Clinical science relating atherosclerotic diseases and hypertriglyceridemia].

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    Fujioka, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies and meta-analysis with triglyceride levels are revealing that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with coronary heart diseases independent of other coronary risk factors, although the direct effect of serum triglycerides to atherosclerotic lesion is still uncertain. Multiple genetic and environmental factors from familial hyperlipidemia to food and alcohol intake are implicated in elevating triglycerides. Especially, a number of investigators demonstrated a relationship between atherosclerotic diseases and postprandial hyperlipidemia, which may lead to nonfasting TG elevation. The purpose of this article is to review several clinical studies relating serum fasting and nonfasting triglyceride levels and coronary heart disease, and to discuss whether hypertriglyceridemia initiates atherosclerosis or plays a role as a biomarker for metabolic abnormalities.

  20. The atherosclerotic heart disease and protecting properties of garlic: contemporary data.

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    Gorinstein, Shela; Jastrzebski, Zenon; Namiesnik, Jacek; Leontowicz, Hanna; Leontowicz, Maria; Trakhtenberg, Simon

    2007-11-01

    This article reviews the contemporary data concerning atherosclerosis and protecting properties of garlic. Recent advances in basic science have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of this disease from initiation through progression and, ultimately, the thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis. These new findings provide important links between risk factors and the mechanisms of atherogenesis and garlic properties. Numerous in vitro studies have confirmed the ability of garlic to reduce the parameters of the risk of atherosclerosis: total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, oxidized LDL. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant potentials in fresh, cooked, boiled and commercial garlic from different regions are presented, using beta-carotene, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) with K2S2O8 or MnO2, ferric-reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP), cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) and others assays for antioxidant status. In vivo studies were reviewed on with garlic and cholesterol supplemented diets. The positive influences of garlic on plasma lipids, proteins, antioxidant activity, and some indices of blood coagulation are dose dependent. Garlic could be a valuable component of atherosclerosis-preventing diets only in optimal doses. Many recently published reports show that garlic possesses plasma lipid-lowering and plasma anticoagulant and antioxidant properties and improves impaired endothelial function.

  1. Vorapaxar in atherosclerotic disease management.

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    Cheng, Judy W M; Colucci, Vincent; Howard, Patricia A; Nappi, Jean M; Spinler, Sarah A

    2015-05-01

    To review the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of vorapaxar, a protease activator receptor-1 (PAR-1) antagonist, in the management of atherosclerotic diseases. Peer-reviewed clinical trials and review articles were identified from MEDLINE and Current Content database (both 1966 to December 31, 2014) using the search terms vorapaxar and protease activator receptor antagonist. A total of 30 clinical studies were identified (16 clinical trials, including subanalyses, 14 related to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics and drug interactions). Two phase III clinical trials with vorapaxar have been published. In patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI), vorapaxar failed to significantly reduce the primary efficacy end point (composite of cardiovascular death, MI, stroke, recurrent ischemia with hospitalization, and urgent coronary revascularization). Conversely, in a study of secondary prevention for patients with cardiovascular disease, the composite end point of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke was significantly reduced. In both trials, the safety end points of major/minor bleeding were increased compared with placebo. In the secondary prevention trial, an increased incidence of intracranial hemorrhage led to the exclusion of patients with a prior history of stroke. Vorapaxar is approved for use with aspirin and/or clopidogrel in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in stable patients with peripheral arterial disease or a history of MI. However, the addition of vorapaxar to other antiplatelets can significantly increase the risk of bleeding. It is, therefore, essential to balance the need for further reduction of risk of thrombotic event with patient's individual bleeding risk. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. New cholesterol guidelines for the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk: a comparison of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines with the 2014 National Lipid Association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia.

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    Adhyaru, Bhavin B; Jacobson, Terry A

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and compares it with the 2014 National Lipid Association (NLA) Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia. The review discusses some of the distinctions between the guidelines, including how to determine a patient's atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, the role of lipoprotein treatment targets, the importance of moderate- and high-intensity statin therapy, and the use of nonstatin therapy in light of the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

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    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  4. [The G894T mutation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene is associated with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease in Chinese].

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    Wei, Danhong; Shan, Jiang; Chen, Zhimei; Shi, Yuping

    2002-12-01

    To investigate the association of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CHD) in Chinese Han nationality. For 106 patients with CHD and 108 unrelated health individuals, the G894T mutation at exon 7 of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene was studied by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. (1) Among the normal subjects of Chinese Han nationality, the frequencies of the eNOS/GG, GT and TT genotypes were 0.9095, 0.0883 and 0.0021, respectively. The G and T allele frequencies were 0.9537 and 0.0463. (2) The authors assumed the effects of the T allele to be dominant (GT and TT combined vs GG). The GT+TT genotype frequencies in CHD and myocardial infarction (MI) subgroup were 0.2219 and 0.2387, respectively. The frequencies of eNOS/GT+TT genotypes in CHD patients, as well as MI subgroup were significantly higher than that of the normal subjects (P0.05). The G894T mutation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene may be a marker for genetical predisposition of CHD in Chinese Han population.

  5. Stress and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

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    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent major advances in medical science have introduced a wide variety of treatments against atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases, which has led to a significant reduction in mortality associated with these diseases. However, atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death. Furthermore, progress in medical science has demonstrated the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease to be complicated, with a wide variety of underlying factors. Among these factors, stress is thought to be pivotal. Several types of stress are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress, mental stress, hemodynamic stress and social stress. Accumulating evidence indicates that traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking, induce oxidative stress in the vasculature. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, hypertension and remodeling of blood vessels. Meanwhile, mental stress is a well-known major contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular system is constantly exposed to hemodynamic stress by the blood flow and/or pulsation, and hemodynamic stress exerts profound effects on the biology of vascular cells and cardiomyocytes. In addition, social stress, such as that due to a lack of social support, poverty or living alone, has a negative impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, there are interactions between mental, oxidative and hemodynamic stress. The production of reactive oxygen species is increased under high levels of mental stress in close association with oxidative stress. These stress responses and their interactions play central roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the pathophysiological and clinical implications of stress are discussed in this article.

  6. Heart Diseases

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    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  7. The gut microbiome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

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    Jie, Zhuye; Xia, Huihua; Zhong, Shi-Long

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to cardiovascular diseases. However, the composition and functional capacity of the gut microbiome in relation to cardiovascular diseases have not been systematically examined. Here, we perform a metagenome-wide association study on stools from 218 individuals...... with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD) and 187 healthy controls. The ACVD gut microbiome deviates from the healthy status by increased abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus spp. and, functionally, in the potential for metabolism or transport of several molecules important for cardiovascular......), with liver cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our data represent a comprehensive resource for further investigations on the role of the gut microbiome in promoting or preventing ACVD as well as other related diseases.The gut microbiota may play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the authors perform...

  8. [Impact of CYP2C19 genotype and platelet function on clinical outcome in coronary atherosclerotic heart diseases patients received clopidogrel post percutaneous coronary intervention].

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    Wu, Y; Zhang, X X; Tian, L; Jiang, J J; Xu, L; Huang, Y L; Liu, H; Li, Y S

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To analyze association of CYP2C19 genotype and platelet function phenotype and their impact on clinical outcomes including bleeding events of coronary artery disease(CAD) patients received clopidogrel post percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI). Methods: Coronary atherosclerotic heart diseases patients underwent elective PCI and coronary stent implantation in Fuwai hospital were prospectively enrolled during May 2012 to April 2013. Patients were assigned into groups by genotype of CYP2C19 (extensive metabolizers, intermediate metabolizers, and poor metabolizers) and phenotype of platelet function (clopidogrel responders, semi-responders, and non-responders). The rates of major adverse cardiovascular events, combined cardiovascular events, and bleeding events were recorded during a at least 12 months follow-up period and compared among above defined groups. The association between genotype or phenotype and clinical outcome was assessed using multivariable Cox regression hazards model. Results: Three hundred and eighty patients received coronary stent implantation and met the inclusion criteria of the study, including 157(41.3%) clopidogrel extensive metabolizers, 176(46.3%) intermediate metabolizers, and 47(12.4%) poor metabolizers according to the genotype grouping; 98(25.8%) were responders to clopidogrel, 149(39.2%) were semi-responders, and 133 (35.0%) were non-responders according to the phenotype grouping. Three hundred and seventy-six patients accomplished follow-up. The highest combined cardiovascular events rate was observed in the poor metabolizers (34.0%(16/47)) as compared to the intermediate metabolizers (19.0%(33/174), P=0.026) and the extensive metabolizers (15.5%(24/155), P=0.005). The highest bleeding events rate was observed in the clopidogrel responders (33.7%(33/98)) as compared to the semi-responders (18.9%(28/149), P=0.008) and non-responders (17.7%(23/130), P=0.008). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, the adjusted risk of

  9. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

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    Syed I Hussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  10. Pregnancy loss and later risk of atherosclerotic disease

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    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension.......Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension....

  11. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic

  12. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  13. Assessing Level of Agreement for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Categorization Between Coronary Artery Calcium Score and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines and the Potential Impact on Treatment Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isma'eel, Hussain; Min, David; Al-Shaar, Laila; Hachamovitch, Rory; Halliburton, Sandra; Gentry, James; Griffin, Brian; Schoenhagen, Paul; Phelan, Dermot

    2016-11-15

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cardiovascular prevention guidelines use a new pooled cohort equation (PCE) to predict 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events which form the basis of treatment recommendations. Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) has been proposed as a means to assess atherosclerotic risk. We sought to study the level of agreement in predicted ASCVD risk by CACS and PCE-calculated models and the potential impact on therapy of additional CACS testing. We studied 687 treatment naive, consecutive patients (mean age 53.5 years, 72% men) who had a CACS study at our institution. Clinical and imaging data were recorded. ASCVD risk was calculated using the published PCE-based algorithm. CACS-based risk was categorized by previously published recommendations. Risk stratification comparisons were made and level of agreement calculated. In the cohort, mean ASCVD PCE-calculated risk was 5.3 ± 5.2% and mean CACS was 80 ± 302 Agatston units (AU). Of the intermediate PCE-calculated risk (5% to guidelines, 40% had a CACS of 0 AU and an additional 44% had CACS >0 but <100 AU. The level of agreement between the new PCE model of ASCVD risk and demonstrable coronary artery calcium is low. CACS testing may be most beneficial in those with an intermediate risk of ASCVD (PCE-calculated risk of 5% to <7.5%) where, in approximately half of patients, CACS testing significantly refined risk assessment primarily into a very low-risk category. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. ATHEROSCLEROTIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Kizer, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70 to 74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus Diabetes Mellitus in older age deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age. PMID:25453299

  15. Rapid emergence of atherosclerosis in Asia: a systematic review of coronary atherosclerotic heart disease epidemiology and implications for prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Zhang, De Xing; Wang, Harry H X

    2015-08-01

    There is a global epidemic of coronary heart disease (CHD) caused by atherosclerosis. We discussed its emergence, underlying reasons, and implications for prevention and control strategies in Asia. Most countries in Asia are experiencing the challenges from CHD, with the mortality rate varying from 103 to 366 per 100 000 adult populations, reported by recently published studies. Raised population cholesterol levels played a pivotal role. Men, older adults, and those with dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes were high-risk individuals. During the past decade, there was a marked rising trend of atherosclerosis-related burden particularly in Eastern Asia where an alarming increase of 117.2 and 115.3% of total deaths and disability adjusted life-years, respectively, were observed. The rise of CHD could be attributed to unhealthy lifestyles, clinical-risk factors, psychosocial factors, and public health transitions. Ageing, urbanization, and increase in prosperity may serve as underlying key drivers. The burden of CHD is substantial, whereas contributors are multifactorial. This grand challenge should be a top priority for injecting healthcare resources. The formulation of public health measures will need to adopt an integrated and life-course approach, based on the need and risks of different population subgroups in Asia.

  16. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  17. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K-CY McGrath

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  18. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  19. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  20. Effects of Anacetrapib in Patients with Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowman, Louise; Hopewell, Jemma C; Chen, Fang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease remain at high risk for cardiovascular events despite effective statin-based treatment of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. The inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) by anacetrapib reduces LDL cholesterol...... vascular disease who were receiving intensive atorvastatin therapy and who had a mean LDL cholesterol level of 61 mg per deciliter (1.58 mmol per liter), a mean non-HDL cholesterol level of 92 mg per deciliter (2.38 mmol per liter), and a mean HDL cholesterol level of 40 mg per deciliter (1.03 mmol per...... was lower by 17 mg per deciliter (0.44 mmol per liter), a relative difference of -18%. There were no significant between-group differences in the risk of death, cancer, or other serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease who were receiving intensive statin...

  1. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email updates Enter email Submit Heart Disease and Stroke Heart disease and stroke are important health issues ... Stroke risk factors View more Heart Disease and Stroke resources Related information Heart-healthy eating Stress and ...

  2. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  3. The gut microbiome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jie, Zhuye; Xia, Huihua; Zhong, Shi-Long

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to cardiovascular diseases. However, the composition and functional capacity of the gut microbiome in relation to cardiovascular diseases have not been systematically examined. Here, we perform a metagenome-wide association study on stools from 218 individuals...... health. Although drug treatment represents a confounding factor, ACVD status, and not current drug use, is the major distinguishing feature in this cohort. We identify common themes by comparison with gut microbiome data associated with other cardiometabolic diseases (obesity and type 2 diabetes......), with liver cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our data represent a comprehensive resource for further investigations on the role of the gut microbiome in promoting or preventing ACVD as well as other related diseases.The gut microbiota may play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the authors perform...

  4. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  5. Epigenetic Modulation in the treatment Atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela M Byrne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the single largest cause of death in the western world and its incidence is on the rise globally. Atherosclerosis, characterised by the development of atheromatus plaque, can trigger luminal narrowing and upon rupture result in myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Epigenetic mechanisms are a source of considerable research interest due to the role they play in gene regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation have been identified as potential drug targets in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. miRNAs are known to play a role in gene silencing, which has been widely investigated in cancer. In comparison, the role they play in cardiovascular disease and plaque rupture is not well understood. Nutritional epigenetic modifiers from dietary components, for instance sulforaphane found in broccoli, have been shown to suppress the pro-inflammatory response through transcription factor activation. This review will discuss current and potential epigenetic therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, focusing on the use of miRNAs and dietary supplements such as sulforaphane and protocatechuic aldehyde.

  6. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Coffee consumption and calcified atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries: The NHLBI Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yash R; Gadiraju, Taraka V; Ellison, R Curtis; Hunt, Steven C; Carr, John Jeffrey; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K; Pankow, James S; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2017-02-01

    While a recent meta-analysis of prospective studies reported that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, limited and inconsistent data are available on the relation of coffee intake with subclinical disease. Thus, the aim of the present study was to see the association of coffee consumption with the prevalence of atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries in NHLBI Family Heart Study. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1929 participants of the NHLBI Family Heart Study without known coronary heart disease. Coffee consumption was assessed by a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and coronary-artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac computed tomography. We defined prevalent CAC as an Agatston score of ≥100 and used generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence ratios of CAC as well as a sensitivity analysis at a range of cutpoints for CAC. Mean age was 56.7 years and 59% of the study subjects were female. In adjusted analysis for age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, field center, and energy intake, prevalence ratio (95% CI) for CAC was 1.0 (reference), 0.92 (0.57-1.49), 1.34 (0.86-2.08), 1.30 (0.84-2.02), and 0.99 (0.60-1.64) for coffee consumption of almost never, coffee consumption and prevalent CAC when CAC cut points of 0, 50, 150, 200, and 300 were used. These data do not provide evidence for an association between coffee consumption and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  9. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood cholesterol levels High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to ...

  10. Salusins: Potential Use as a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human salusin-α and salusin-β are related peptides produced from prosalusin. Bolus injection of salusin-β into rats induces more profound hypotension and bradycardia than salusin-α. Central administration of salusin-β increases blood pressure via release of norepinephrine and arginine-vasopressin. Circulating levels of salusin-α and salusin-β are lower in patients with essential hypertension. Salusin-β exerts more potent mitogenic effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and fibroblasts than salusin-α. Salusin-β accelerates inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Human macrophage foam cell formation is stimulated by salusin-β but suppressed by salusin-α. Chronic salusin-β infusion into apolipoprotein E-deficient mice enhances atherosclerotic lesions; salusin-α infusion reduces lesions. Salusin-β is expressed in proliferative neointimal lesions of porcine coronary arteries after stenting. Salusin-α and salusin-β immunoreactivity have been detected in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, with dominance of salusin-β in macrophage foam cells, VSMCs, and fibroblasts. Circulating salusin-β levels increase and salusin-α levels decrease in patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that salusin-β and salusin-α may contribute to proatherogenesis and antiatherogenesis, respectively. Increased salusin-β and/or decreased salusin-α levels in circulating blood and vascular tissue are closely linked with atherosclerosis. Salusin-α and salusin-β could be candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Arterial hypertension, microalbuminuria, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    2000-01-01

    Albumin excretion in urine is positively correlated with the presence of ischemic heart disease and atherosclerotic risk factors. We studied prospectively whether a slight increase of urinary albumin excretion, ie, microalbuminuria, adds to the increased risk of ischemic heart disease among...

  12. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about other tests and procedures, go to the diagnosis sections of the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease , Heart Failure , and Cardiomyopathy articles. Treatment Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated ...

  13. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  14. Diagnosis and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Roy O; Bangalore, Sripal; Lavelle, Michael P; Pellikka, Patricia A; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Boden, William E; Asif, Arif

    2017-04-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, likely reflecting the presence of traditional risk factors. A greater distinguishing feature of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in CKD is the severity of the disease, which is reflective of an increase in inflammatory mediators and vascular calcification secondary to hyperparathyroidism of renal origin that are unique to patients with CKD. Additional components of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease that are prominent in patients with CKD include microvascular disease and myocardial fibrosis. Therapeutic interventions that minimize cardiovascular events related to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD, as determined by well-designed clinical trials, are limited to statins. Data are lacking regarding other available therapeutic measures primarily due to exclusion of patients with CKD from major trials studying cardiovascular disease. Data from well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to guide clinicians who care for this high-risk population in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease to improve clinical outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Erythrocyte membrane, plasma and atherosclerotic plaque lipid pattern in coronary heart disease Perfil lipídico de membrana de eritrocito, plasma y placa ateromatosa en la enfermedad coronaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia R. Lausada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze the lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque (AP, plasma and erythrocyte membrane (EM in patients with advanced coronary heart disease (CHD. AP were obtained through endarterectomy in 18 patients. Ten normolipemic healthy subjects were selected to obtain the normal lipid pattern profile. Total lipids of AP and EM were determined by HPTLC, and the fatty acid profile from AP, EM and plasma using TLC-FID. The relative amount of the lipid species analyzed in AP was in line with the data in the literature [phospholipids: 23.5 mol% ± 3.5; total cholesterol 68.9 mol% ± 7.9; triglyceride 7.6 mol% ± 3.4]. Plasma and EM from CHD patients compared to controls, showed a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids and an increase in saturated fatty acids leading to a decrease in the unsaturation index (plasma: 1.67 ± 0.06 vs. 1.28 ± 0.03, PEl objetivo fue analizar la composición lipídica de las membranas de eritrocitos (ME, plasma y placas ateromatosas (PA en pacientes con enfermedad coronaria avanzada (ECV. Las PA fueron obtenidas de endarterectomías coronarias de 18 pacientes. Fueron seleccionados 10 sujetos sanos, normolipémicos, como grupo control. Los lípidos totales de PA y ME se determinaron utilizando HPTLC, y el perfil de ácidos grasos de las PA, ME y plasma mediante TLC-FID. La cantidad relativa de las especies lipídicas obtenidas de las PA coinciden con la literatura [fosfolípidos 23.5 mol% ± 3.5; colesterol total 68.9 mol% ± 7.9; triglicéridos 7.6 mol% ± 3.4]. En el plasma y en las ME de los pacientes con ECV se observó, comparando con los pacientes controles, una disminución de los ácidos grasos poli-no saturados acompañado de un aumento de los ácidos grasos saturados que provocó el descenso del índice de instauración (plasma: 1.67 ± 0.06 vs. 1.28 ± 0.03, P<0.05; ME: 2.28 ± 0.04 vs. 1.25 ± 0.010, P<0.05 y el incremento del cociente AG saturados/insaturados (plasma: 0.35 ± 0.02 vs. 0

  16. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms at Work Popular Topics Autoimmune diseases Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome ... Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms at Work Popular Topics Autoimmune diseases Breastfeeding Carpal tunnel syndrome ...

  17. The role of Visfatin in atherosclerotic peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoulias, Matthaios G; Skoura, Lemonia; Pitoulias, Apostolos G; Chatzidimitriou, Dimitris; Margariti, Apostolia; Arsenakis, Minas; Pitoulias, Georgios A

    2017-03-01

    Visfatin is an adipokine molecule acting as an essential coenzyme in multiple cellular redox reactions. The increased serum levels of Visfatin have been correlated with metabolic syndrome and endothelial homeostasis. In this study we investigate the possible relationship of Visfatin serum levels with the severity and location of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Study protocol included 45 consecutive PAOD and 20 Control patients with age >55years old. Definition of PAOD was based in Rutherord's classification (RC). End-stage PAOD patients (RC-V & -VI) were excluded from study. Data were collected prospectively and included age, gender, atherosclerotic risk factors and the body mass index (BMI). In PAOD patients recorded the PAOD's clinical stage and the presence of carotid stenosis >50%. PAOD patients divided in two subgroups, those with mild (RC-I & -II) and moderate disease (RC-III & -IV). In all serum samples Visfatin was measured, blindly, twice by anosoenzymatic technique. Statistical analysis was performed by non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson's chi-square, One Way Anova and Kruskall-Wallis tests, as appropriate. The mean Visfatin value in PAOD and Control groups were 38.5±16.0 and 13.9±3.8ng/ml respectively (p0.05). Univariate analysis showed that severity of PAOD (mild vs severe), presence of carotid stenosis >50% and multilevel disease significantly affected outcomes (p=0.018, p=0.010 and p=0.006 respectively). In multivariate regression analysis severity of PAOD was the solely factor with strong correlation with high visfatin values (p=0.001). High Visfatin levels seem to be strongly correlated with the presence and severity of PAOD. Further and in depth investigation is needed to define the possible role of Visfatin in atherosclerosis and it's value as a potential prognostic biomarker of PAOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  19. The Evolving Paradigm in the Management of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali K. Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is a major cause of ischemic stroke worldwide and represents a significant health problem. The pathogenesis and natural history of ICAD are poorly understood, and rigorous treatment paradigms do not exist as they do for extracranial atherosclerosis. Currently, the best treatment for ICAD remains aspirin therapy, but many patients who are placed on aspirin continue to experience recurrent strokes. As microsurgical and endovascular techniques continue to evolve, the role of extracranial to intracranial bypass operations and stenting are increasingly being reconsidered. We performed a PubMed review of the English literature with a particular focus on treatment options for ICAD and present evidence-based data for the role of surgery and stenting in ICAD against medical therapy alone.

  20. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation...... in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all...

  1. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Aims To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from...... genetic studies, prospective epidemiologic cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies, and randomized trials of LDL-lowering therapies. In clinical studies, plasma LDL burden is usually estimated by determination of plasma LDL cholesterol level (LDL-C). Rare genetic mutations that cause reduced LDL...... receptor function lead to markedly higher LDL-C and a dose-dependent increase in the risk of ASCVD, whereas rare variants leading to lower LDL-C are associated with a correspondingly lower risk of ASCVD. Separate meta-analyses of over 200 prospective cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies...

  2. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Women Leer en español How Does Heart ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  3. Treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: Synopsis of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading U.S. cause of death, lost quality of life and medical costs. Nearly one in three Americans die from heart disease and stroke. Most ASCVD is preventable through a healthy lifestyle and effective treatment of cholesterol and blood pressure...

  4. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  5. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  6. Prevalence of Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Masters Endurance Athletes With a Low Atherosclerotic Risk Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghani, Ahmed; Maestrini, Viviana; Rosmini, Stefania; Cox, Andrew T; Dhutia, Harshil; Bastiaenan, Rachel; David, Sarojini; Yeo, Tee Joo; Narain, Rajay; Malhotra, Aneil; Papadakis, Michael; Wilson, Mathew G; Tome, Maite; AlFakih, Khaled; Moon, James C; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-07-11

    Studies in middle-age and older (masters) athletes with atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease report higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores compared with sedentary individuals. Few studies have assessed the prevalence of coronary artery disease in masters athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile. We assessed 152 masters athletes 54.4±8.5 years of age (70% male) and 92 controls of similar age, sex, and low Framingham 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores with an echocardiogram, exercise stress test, computerized tomographic coronary angiogram, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and a 24-hour Holter. Athletes had participated in endurance exercise for an average of 31±12.6 years. The majority (77%) were runners, with a median of 13 marathon runs per athlete. Most athletes (60%) and controls (63%) had a normal CAC score. Male athletes had a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques of any luminal irregularity (44.3% versus 22.2%; P=0.009) compared with sedentary males, and only male athletes showed a CAC ≥300 Agatston units (11.3%) and a luminal stenosis ≥50% (7.5%). Male athletes demonstrated predominantly calcific plaques (72.7%), whereas sedentary males showed predominantly mixed morphology plaques (61.5%). The number of years of training was the only independent variable associated with increased risk of CAC >70th percentile for age or luminal stenosis ≥50% in male athletes (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15; P=0.016); 15 (14%) male athletes but none of the controls revealed late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Of these athletes, 7 had a pattern consistent with previous myocardial infarction, including 3(42%) with a luminal stenosis ≥50% in the corresponding artery. Most lifelong masters endurance athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile have normal CAC scores. Male athletes are more likely to have a CAC

  7. Acute myeloid leukaemia as a cause of acute ischaemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, P.L.; Schot, Bart; Hoendermis, E.S.; van den Berg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is almost invariably the result of atherosclerotic degeneration of the coronary arteries. However, other causes of ischaemic heart disease should always be considered. Here we describe two patients with a classic presentation of ischaemic heart disease resulting from acute

  8. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 17,2017 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  9. Association between pregnancy losses in women and risk of atherosclerotic disease in their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Behrens, Ida

    2016-01-01

    , respectively, as parents whose daughters had no miscarriages. For parents with ≥3 daughters, the HRs were 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.24), 1.29 (95% CI 1.13-1.48), and 1.33 (95% CI 1.12-1.57). Effect magnitudes did not differ for fathers and mothers. We observed similar patterns for IHD and CVI (parents...... regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for each outcome by history of pregnancy loss in daughters/sisters. Overall, parents whose daughters had 1, 2, and ≥3 miscarriages had 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.04], 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.11), and 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.19) times the rate of MI......) and the atherosclerotic endpoint (brothers). Parents whose daughters had stillbirths had 1.14 (95% CI 1.05-1.24) and 1.07 (95% CI 0.96-1.18) times the rates of MI and CVI, respectively, as parents whose daughters had no stillbirths. CONCLUSION: Certain pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic diseases in both heart and brain...

  10. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  11. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  12. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  13. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    -macroglobulin (r=0.78, P < 0.01). These results indicate that in patients with peripheral arterial disease plasma viscosity increases with the progression of the atherosclerotic process and is correlated with the clinical stages of the disease.

  14. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  15. Mast cells in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease - Activators and actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2017-10-12

    Mast cells are potent actors involved in inflammatory reactions in various tissues, including both in the intimal and the adventitial layers of atherosclerotic arteries. In the arterial intima, the site of atherogenesis, mast cells are activated to degranulate, and thereby triggered to release an abundance of preformed inflammatory mediators, notably histamine, heparin, neutral proteases and cytokines stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules. Depending on the stimulus, mast cell activation may also launch prolonged synthesis and secretion of single bioactive molecules, such as cytokines and derivatives of arachidonic acid. The mast cell-derived mediators may impede the functions of different types of cells present in atherosclerotic lesions, and also compromise the structural and functional integrity of the intimal extracellular matrix. In the adventitial layer of atherosclerotic coronary arteries, mast cells locate next to peptidergic sensory nerve fibers, which, by releasing neuropeptides may activate mast cells to release vasoactive compounds capable of triggering local vasoconstriction. The concerted actions of arterial mast cells have the potential to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, and ultimately to destabilization and rupture of an advanced atherosclerotic plaque with ensuing atherothrombotic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Also known as Coronary Artery Disease Leer en ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  17. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Also known as Coronary Artery Disease Leer en ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  18. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 22367731 . Ridker PM, Libby P, Buring JE. Risk markers and the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. ...

  19. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21325087 . Ridker PM, Libby P, Buring JE. Risk markers and the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. ...

  20. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  1. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  2. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travel and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Travel precautions help people with heart disease. Traveling to a faraway place ... you do so. Tell your doctor about your travel plans to get the best ... some people might need compression stockings or additional oxygen. Others ...

  3. Association of ideal cardiovascular health and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Jeremy M; Petrone, Andrew B; Carr, J Jeffrey; Pankow, James S; Hunt, Steven C; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K; Ellison, R Curtis; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-03-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) established recommendations based on 7 ideal health behaviors and factors with the goal of improving cardiovascular health (CVH) and reducing both morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease by 20% by 2020. Few studies have investigated their association with subclinical coronary heart disease. We sought to examine whether the 7 AHA CVH metrics were associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1,731 predominantly white men and women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study without prevalent coronary heart disease. Diet was assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac computed tomography. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of 100+ and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Mean age was 56.8 years, and 41% were male. The median number of ideal CVH metrics was 3, and no participant met all 7. There was a strong inverse relationship between number of ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC of 100+ were 1.0 (reference), 0.37 (0.29-0.45), 0.35 (0.26-0.44), and 0.27 (0.20-0.36) among subjects with 0 to 1, 2, 3, and 4+ ideal CVH metrics, respectively (P = .0001), adjusting for sex, age, field center, alcohol, income, education, and energy consumption. These data demonstrate a strong and graded inverse relationship between AHA ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Earlobe crease in women: evaluation of reproductive factors, alcohol use, and Quetelet index and relation to atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, N L

    1995-10-01

    The diagonal earlobe crease (ELC) has been found to be associated with atherosclerotic heart disease. Although atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is less prevalent among women than among men, no studies have been reported for women on the possible relationship of reproductive factors, contraceptive and menopausal estrogen use, and alcohol use on the expression of the ELC. The presence of ELC was determined in 625 white women who were seen as part of a breast research project. Information was obtained on age, height, weight, age at menarche, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives or menopausal estrogens, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Statistical methods used included estimation of the age-adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals, and multiple logistic regression. No association was found between the ELC and reproductive factors and smoking. Only age, Quetelet index, and alcohol use were associated with the ELC. The ELC was negatively associated with alcohol use, and was more marked in women under 59 years of age. The positive association of ELC with the Quetelet index progressively became more marked with advancing age, especially after 60 years of age. The negative association found between the ELC and alcohol use is of interest because of the reported protective effect of moderate alcohol consumption on risk of coronary heart disease. No significant association was found between the ELC and reproductive risk factors. Based on events occurring during the embryonic development of the earlobes, a new hypothesis is proposed for the formation and peculiar diagonal localization of the ELC in adult earlobes in association with atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  5. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  6. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  7. Magnesium in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and sudden death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R B; Singh, V P; Cameron, E A

    1981-01-01

    Magnesium ions are important for maintaining the functional and structural integrity of the myocardium. Epidemiologic studies suggest that myocardial hypomagnecytia can predispose to sudden cardiac death and that hard water protective factor preventing heart attack could be magnesium. Recent studies show that infarcted portion of the myocardium has lowered magnesium content as compared to noninfarcted segment. Magnesium deficiency sensitises the myocardium to the toxic effect of various drugs, hypoxia etc. and magnesium administration is protective. The metabolic, biochemical and electrophysiologic effects of magnesium appear to be significant in treatment of myocardial ischaemia. Magnesium is a metal-coenzyme and activates adenosine-triphosphatase which may be inhibited by nonglucose fuels like lactate and free fatty acids. Magnesium deficiency may be responsible for the chronic electrical instability of the myocardium predisposing to sudden cardiac death. The acute precipitating stress dependent trigger which lie in the brain may also be related to magnesium. In addition to fast Na and Ca channels there could be a Mg-carrying transport system maintaining the electrical activity of the myocardium. There is sufficient evidence to suggest the use of magnesium salts against ischaemic heart disease and sudden cardiac death. Magnesium is cardioprotective and influences action potential duration, membrane potential and perhaps maintains the fast response. The therapeutic and prophylactic value of magnesium needs further assessment.

  8. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack . Your provider may recommend to take daily aspirin if: You do not have a history of heart disease or stroke, but you are at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. You have been diagnosed ... already. Aspirin helps get more blood flowing to your legs. ...

  9. Estimating risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases in non-atherosclerotic Pakistani patients: Study conducted at National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Tariq; Achakzai, Abdul Samad; Farooq, Fawad; Memon, Muhammad Anis; Mengal, Naeem; Abbas, Khawaja Yawar; Ishaq, Haroon; Mueed, Abdul

    2017-04-01

    To assess ten-year and lifetime estimated cardiovascular disease risks in non-atherosclerotic subjects. This cross-sectional study was carried out at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Karachi, from July 2014 to March 2015, and comprised male and female subjects with multi-ethnic background, aged 20-79 years and having non-atherosclerotic disease. SPSS 22 was used for data analysis. Of the 437 participants, 174(39.8%) were men and 263(60.2%) were women. The overall mean age was 42.65±11.45 years. The mean age of men was 43.3±12.1 years and that of women was 42.2±10.8 years. Moreover, ten-year and lifetime risk assessment rates were higher in men (50[28.2%] and 86[49.4%] respectively) compared to women (28[10.6%] and 84[31.9%], respectively). Urdu-speaking Pakistanis were found to be at higher risk from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  10. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Each year, the American Heart Association, in conjunction ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  11. Structural Remodeling of Sympathetic Innervation in Atherosclerotic Blood Vessels: Role of Atherosclerotic Disease Progression and Chronic Social Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, Crystal M; Mendez, Armando J; Szeto, Angela; Boulina, Marcia; Llabre, Maria M; Zaias, Julia; Schneiderman, Neil; McCabe, Philip M

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) can undergo dramatic structural plasticity in response to behavioral factors and/or the presence of disease, leading to SNS hyperinnervation of peripheral tissues. The SNS has been proposed as an important mediator between stressful behavior and the progression of atherosclerosis in the vasculature. The present study examined whether structural remodeling of the SNS occurs in the vasculature in a genetically hyperlipidemic animal model of atherosclerosis, the Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit (WHHL; relative to normolipidemic New Zealand white rabbits [NZW]), and whether SNS plasticity is driven by the progression of disease and/or by stressful social behavior. WHHL and NZW rabbits were assigned to an unstable or stable social environment for 4 months. Aortic atherosclerosis was assessed and SNS aortic innervation quantified using immunofluorescent microscopy. Numerous SNS varicosities were observed throughout the aorta in WHHLs and NZWs, extending into the vascular media and intima, an innervation pattern not previously reported. WHHLs exhibited significantly greater innervation than NZWs (F(1,41) = 55.3, p Social environment did not influence innervation in NZWs (aortic arch: p = .078, thoracic aorta: p = .34) or WHHLs (arch: p = .97, thoracic: p = .61). The findings suggest that hyperinnervation is driven largely by the progression of disease rather than social environment. SNS innervation patterns observed in atherosclerotic human and mouse aortas were consistent with the rabbit, suggesting that SNS hyperinnervation of the diseased vessel wall is a general feature across mammalian species.

  12. Chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: Innocent bystanders or partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-09

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline-based recommendations. These include regular CVD risk assessment, aggressive treatment of traditional CVD risk factors, and recognition of reduced CVD as an added benefit of strict inflammatory disease control. At present, chronic inflammatory diseases would appear to qualify as partners in crime and not merely innocent bystanders to CVD, but definite incremental contributions of inflammation versus effects of the complex interplay with other CVD risk factors may never be fully elucidated and for the foreseeable future, inflammation is posed to maintain its current position as both a marker and a maker of CVD, with clinical utility both for identification of patient at risk of CVD and as target for therapy to reduce CVD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Calcified Atherosclerotic Plaque in the Coronary Arteries: The NHLBI Family Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; Arnett, Donna K.; Pankow, James S.; Borecki, Ingrid; North, Kari E.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims While a diet rich in anti-oxidant has been favorably associated with coronary disease and hypertension, limited data have evaluated the influence of such diet on subclinical disease. Thus, we sought to examine whether chocolate consumption is associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries (CAC). Methods In a cross-sectional design, we studied 2,217 participants of the NHLBI Family Heart Study. Chocolate consumption was assessed by a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire and CAC was measured by cardiac CT. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of at least 100 and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Results There was an inverse association between frequency of chocolate consumption and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC were 1.0 (reference), 0.94 (0.66-1.35), 0.78 (0.53-1.13), and 0.68 (0.48-0.97) for chocolate consumption of 0, 1-3 times per month, once per week, and 2+ times per week, respectively (p for trend 0.022), adjusting for age, sex, energy intake, waist-hip ratio, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, ratio of total-to-HDL-cholesterol, non-chocolate candy, and diabetes mellitus. Controlling for additional confounders did not alter the findings. Exclusion of subjects with coronary heart disease or diabetes mellitus did not materially change the odds ratio estimates but did modestly decrease the overall significance (p = 0.07). Conclusions These data suggest that chocolate consumption might be inversely associated with prevalent CAC. PMID:20655129

  14. Subclinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prospective hospital-based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chindhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an important non-communicable disease worldwide with a rising global incidence. COPD is associated with multiple co-morbidities. Patients with COPD are at increased risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in COPD. The present case-control study was designed to assess the relationship between sub-clinical atherosclerotic vascular diseases with COPD. Methods: It was a prospective case-control blinded observational study. There were 142 COPD patients and 124 age-and sex-matched controls without COPD and cardiovascular diseases. Frequency of sub-clinical atherosclerosis was assessed by the carotid B-mode duplex ultrasonography assessment of carotid wall intima medial thickness (IMT. Plaque was defined as IMT of more than 1.2 mm. Results: Prevalence of carotid plaqing was significantly higher amongst patients of COPD (38.7% compared to controls (13.7% , odds ratio 3.9, P < 0.0001. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed COPD as an independent predictor of carotid plaqing (r = 0.85, P < 0.023. Conclusion: The frequency of carotid plaqing is high in COPD patients. Carotid plaqing may be due to shared risk factors or the presence of low-grade systemic inflammation. Presence of increased CIMT and carotid plaqing in COPD patients identifies early atherosclerotic changes and future cardiovascular risk. Hence screening of CIMT should be a part of cardiovascular assessment in patients with COPD.

  15. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. Preeclampsia is linked to an increased lifetime risk of heart disease, including CHD, heart attack, ... can prevent and control coronary heart disease ( ...

  16. Sarcoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bell, Alex; Mittal, Tarun K

    2007-10-01

    To this day the aetiology of sarcoidosis continues to elude definition. Partially as a consequence of this, little in the way of new therapies has evolved. The enigma of this condition is that, unusually for a disease with the potential for devastating consequences, many patients show spontaneous resolution and recover. Cardiac involvement can affect individuals of any age, gender or race and has a predilection for the conduction system of the heart. Heart involvement can also cause a dilated cardiomyopathy with consequent progressive heart failure. The most common presentation of this systemic disease is with pulmonary infiltration, but many cases will be asymptomatic and are detected on routine chest radiography revealing lymphadenopathy. Current advances lie in the newer methods of imaging and diagnosing this unusual heart disease. This review describes the pathology and diagnosis of this condition and the newer imaging techniques that have developed for determining cardiac involvement.

  17. Carcinoid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Saamir A; Banchs, Jose; Iliescu, Cezar; Dasari, Arvind; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Yusuf, Syed Wamique

    2017-10-01

    Rare neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) that most commonly arise in the gastrointestinal tract can lead to carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease. Patients with carcinoid syndrome present with vasomotor changes, hypermotility of the gastrointestinal system, hypotension and bronchospasm. Medical therapy for carcinoid syndrome, typically with somatostatin analogues, can help control symptoms, inhibit tumour progression and prolong survival. Carcinoid heart disease occurs in more than 50% of these patients and is the initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in up to 20% of patients. Carcinoid heart disease has characteristic findings of plaque-like deposits composed of smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts, extracellular matrix and an overlying endothelial layer which can lead to valve dysfunction. Valvular dysfunction can lead to oedema, ascites and right-sided heart failure. Medical therapy of carcinoid heart disease is limited to symptom control and palliation. Valve surgery for carcinoid heart disease should be considered for symptomatic patients with controlled metastatic carcinoid syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to guide optimal management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: New Insights From Epidemiology, Genetics, and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-02-19

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need to reduce levels to no advice on treatment. New insight in epidemiology now suggests that these lipoproteins, marked by high triglycerides, are strong and independent predictors of ASCVD and all-cause mortality, and that their cholesterol content or remnant cholesterol likewise are strong predictors of ASCVD. Of all adults, 27% have triglycerides >2 mmol/L (176 mg/dL), and 21% have remnant cholesterol >1 mmol/L (39 mg/dL). For individuals in the general population with nonfasting triglycerides of 6.6 mmol/L (580 mg/dL) compared with individuals with levels of 0.8 mmol/L (70 mg/dL), the risks were 5.1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all-cause mortality. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Molecular analysis of oral bacteria in dental biofilm and atherosclerotic plaques of patients with vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Clarissa Pessoa; Oliveira, Francisco Artur Forte; Silva, Paulo Goberlânio de Barros; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodriguez; Seabra, Aline Damasceno; Lobo Filho, José Glauco; Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon Evelin; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2014-07-01

    Oral bacteria have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques at a variable frequency; however, the connection between oral health and vascular and oral bacterial profiles of patients with vascular disease is not clearly established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral bacterial DNA in the mouth and atherosclerotic plaques, in addition to assessing the patients' caries and periodontal disease history. Thirty samples of supragingival and subgingival plaque, saliva and atherosclerotic plaques of 13 patients with carotid stenosis or aortic aneurysm were evaluated, through real-time polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of Streptococcus mutans (SM), Prevotella intermedia (PI), Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) and Treponema denticola (TD). All patients were submitted to oral examination using the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth) and PSR (Periodontal Screening and Recording) indexes. Histopathological analysis of the atherosclerotic plaques was performed. Most of the patients were edentulous (76.9%). SM, PI, PG and TD were detected in 100.0%, 92.0%, 15.3% and 30.7% of the oral samples, respectively. SM was the most prevalent targeted bacteria in atherosclerotic plaques, detected in 100% of the samples, followed by PI (7.1%). The vascular samples were negative for PG and TD. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the presence of PG and TD in the oral cavity and vascular samples. SM was found at a high frequency in oral and vascular samples, even in edentulous patients, and its presence in atherosclerotic plaques suggests the possible involvement of this bacterium in the disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Valvular heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Viji; Haddadin, Ala' Sami

    2006-09-01

    Patients who have valvular heart disease coming for surgery present many challenges to the anesthesiologist. Over the past 3 decades there has been a persistent improvement in our understanding of the pathophysiology of valvular heart disease and in the surgical techniques for correcting it. With the development of efficient and safe noninvasive monitoring of cardiac function, new surgical techniques, better designs of prosthetic valves, and the development of useful guidelines for choosing the proper timing of surgical intervention, patients who have valvular disease with varying physiology can be encountered in the perioperative period. The perioperative physician has to be aware of the varying effects of hemodynamic variables on this subpopulation of patients.

  1. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Liang [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Bu-Lang [Department of Medical Research Shijiazhuang First Hospital, Hebei Medical University (China); Li, Tian-Xiao, E-mail: litianxiaod@163.com [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Li, Zhao-Shuo [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  2. Mashhad stroke and heart atherosclerotic disorder (MASHAD) study: design, baseline characteristics and 10-year cardiovascular risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Moohebati, Mohsen; Esmaily, Habibollah; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Parizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Heidari-Bakavoli, Ali Reza; Safarian, Mohammad; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Nematy, Mohsen; Saber, Hamidreza; Mohammadi, Maryam; Andalibi, Mohammad Sobhan Sheikh; Ferns, Gordon A; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-07-01

    The Mashhad stroke and heart atherosclerotic disorder (MASHAD) study is a 10-year cohort study that aims to evaluate the impact of various genetic, environmental, nutritional and psychosocial risk factors on the incidence of cardiovascular events among an urban population in eastern Iran. The MASHAD study comprises a cohort of 9704 individuals aged 35-65 years using a stratified cluster random sampling design. This cohort will be followed up until 2020, with follow-up examinations being undertaken every 3 years. Ten-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimation was determined using NCEP ATP III criteria. Overall, 88.4 % of women and 79.2 % of men (P 20 % were observed to be 86.6, 11 and 2.5 %, respectively. Predicted risk of CVD > 10 % using the Framingham algorithm was considerably higher in men compared to women. Overall, 9.5 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 8.9-10.1 %] of our subjects had prevalent CAD. The prevalence of CVD risk factors within our population is high compared to Western countries, indicating the necessity for interventional risk modifications.

  3. Caveolin-1 influences vascular protease activity and is a potential stabilizing factor in human atherosclerotic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Rodriguez-Feo

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is a regulatory protein of the arterial wall, but its role in human atherosclerosis remains unknown. We have studied the relationships between Cav-1 abundance, atherosclerotic plaque characteristics and clinical manisfestations of atherosclerotic disease.We determined Cav-1 expression by western blotting in atherosclerotic plaques harvested from 378 subjects that underwent carotid endarterectomy. Cav-1 levels were significantly lower in carotid plaques than non-atherosclerotic vascular specimens. Low Cav-1 expression was associated with features of plaque instability such as large lipid core, thrombus formation, macrophage infiltration, high IL-6, IL-8 levels and elevated MMP-9 activity. Clinically, a down-regulation of Cav-1 was observed in plaques obtained from men, patients with a history of myocardial infarction and restenotic lesions. Cav-1 levels above the median were associated with absence of new vascular events within 30 days after surgery [0% vs. 4%] and a trend towards lower incidence of new cardiovascular events during longer follow-up. Consistent with these clinical data, Cav-1 null mice revealed elevated intimal hyperplasia response following arterial injury that was significantly attenuated after MMP inhibition. Recombinant peptides mimicking Cav-1 scaffolding domain (Cavtratin reduced gelatinase activity in cultured porcine arteries and impaired MMP-9 activity and COX-2 in LPS-challenged macrophages. Administration of Cavtratin strongly impaired flow-induced expansive remodeling in mice. This is the first study that identifies Cav-1 as a novel potential stabilizing factor in human atherosclerosis. Our findings support the hypothesis that local down-regulation of Cav-1 in atherosclerotic lesions contributes to plaque formation and/or instability accelerating the occurrence of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the large number of patients studied, we believe that Cav-1 may be considered as a novel target

  4. Sarcoid heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bell, Alex; Mittal, Tarun K

    2007-01-01

    To this day the aetiology of sarcoidosis continues to elude definition. Partially as a consequence of this, little in the way of new therapies has evolved. The enigma of this condition is that, unusually for a disease with the potential for devastating consequences, many patients show spontaneous resolution and recover. Cardiac involvement can affect individuals of any age, gender or race and has a predilection for the conduction system of the heart. Heart involvement can also cause a dilated...

  5. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  6. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  7. Weight loss therapy for clinical management of patients with some atherosclerotic diseases: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Oshakbayev, Kuat; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar; Otarbayev, Nurzhan; Togizbayeva, Gulnar; Tabynbayev, Nariman; Gazaliyeva, Meruyert; Idrisov, Alisher; Oshakbayev, Pernekul

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and burden of atherosclerotic (AS) diseases are increasing during the last twenty years. Some studies show a close relationship between overweight and AS, but influence on AS diseases of different weight loss methods are still studying. The purpose of the research was to study the effectiveness of a weight loss program in AS patients in randomized controlled trial, and to develop a conception of evolution of AS. Methods A randomized controlled prospective clinical tr...

  8. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  9. Relationship between education and atherosclerotic disease risk factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, M; Vlajinac, H; Radak, D; Marinkovic, J; Maksimovic, J; Jorga, J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether different levels of education are associated with different atherosclerotic disease risk factors. The cross-sectional study, involving 388 consecutive patients with verified peripheral arterial disease, was performed in Belgrade. Formal education level was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Anthropometric parameters and data on cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in participants with different levels of education. In the analysis, univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used. Multivariate analysis showed that low education was significantly positively related to alcohol consumption (Odds Ratio - OR, 4.67; 95% confidence interval - CI, 1.80-12.12), increased triglycerides (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.13-6.61), and physical activity during work (OR, 43.10; 95% CI 14.37-129.28), and negatively related to former smoking (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.03-0.46) and sports and leisure - time physical activity (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.04-0.41 and OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.11-0.57). Medium education was significantly positively related to increased triglycerides (OR, 1.74; 95% CI 1.01-2.98) and increased LDL-cholesterol (OR 2.37; 95% CI, 1.35-4.18), and to physical activity during work (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.34-3.67), and negatively related to age (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98) and leisure - time physical activity (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.30-0.74). It can be concluded that if there are differences in the risk of the occurrence of peripheral arterial disease by education status, they could be only partly explained by differences in the observed atherosclerotic disease risk factors.

  10. Renal glucosuria is not associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease outcome in a general Japanese community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Sakata, Kenji; Yoneda, Takashi; Yasuda, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2017-06-01

    Renal glucosuria is defined as the excretion of detectable amounts of glucose in the urine without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Few data exist regarding the prevalence of renal glucosuria and its clinical impact on atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. This study included 47,842 subjects (16,913 men, 35.4%) aged ≥40 years who underwent the Japanese specific health checkup in Kanazawa City during 2014. We defined renal glucosuria as fulfillment of all of the following three criteria: 1) detectable glucosuria; 2) the absence of diabetes; 3) normal blood glucose (renal glucosuria and of factors associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and stroke, was assessed. The criteria for renal glucosuria were met by 665 (1.4%) subjects. Significantly higher proportions of subjects with renal glucosuria exhibited coronary artery disease, stroke, or either outcome than those without (14.9% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.0305; 9.9% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.00255; 22.3% vs. 17.0%, p = 4.0 × 10-4, respectively), but multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that renal glucosuria was not associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio [OR] = 0.940, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.748-1.171, not significant), stroke (OR = 1.122, 95% CI = 0.853-1.453, not significant), or atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (OR = 1.122, 95% CI = 0.853-1.453, not significant). These results indicate that the prevalence of renal glucosuria in the Japanese general population was 1.4%, and that renal glucosuria was not associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases per se. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: an autopsied sudden death case with severe atherosclerotic disease of the left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Mukai, T; Takahashi, S; Takada, A; Saito, K; Harada, K; Mori, S; Abe, N

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA) is a rare anomaly. It may contribute to myocardial ischemia or sudden death, although the lesion is usually asymptomatic. We report a sudden death case of a 58-year-old man with ARCAPA coexisting with severe atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. He had been healthy until he complained of chest pain, several days before death, despite the discovery of heart murmur in childhood and suspicion of valvular heart disease. The autopsy revealed not only typical findings of the right coronary anomaly with well-developed collateral circulations but also severe atherosclerotic lesions of the left coronary artery, and ischemic change of the myocardium in the left and right coronary arterial perfusion territory. In addition to the "coronary steal" phenomenon primarily caused by ARCAPA, the reduced flow of both coronary arteries and further increase of "coronary steal" due to atherosclerotic obstructive coronary disease might have contributed to the patient's death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. FastStats: Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Heart Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... the U.S. Morbidity Number of adults with diagnosed heart disease: 28.4 million Percent of adults with diagnosed ...

  13. Anxiety and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Kokalj; Brigita Novak Šarotar

    2018-01-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease anxiety is often overlooked. Symptoms of anxiety are often similar to coronary heart disease symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety in general population and coronary heart disease patients is very high. While the underlying pathophysiology of the connection remains unclear, anxiety lowers the quality of life and is a factor for a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  14. Long-Term Risk of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in US Adults With the Familial Hypercholesterolemia Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perak, Amanda M; Ning, Hongyan; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Gooding, Holly C; Wilkins, John T; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-05

    Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) affects up to 1 in 200 individuals in the United States, but atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) outcomes of FH in the general US population have not been described. We therefore sought to evaluate long-term coronary heart disease (CHD) and total ASCVD risks in US adults with an FH phenotype. Using individual pooled data from 6 large US epidemiological cohorts, we stratified participants by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level at index ages from 20 to 79 years. For the primary analysis, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≥190 and definition. We used Cox regression models to assess covariate-adjusted associations of the FH phenotype with 30-year hazards for CHD (CHD death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) and total ASCVD (CHD or stroke). We included 68 565 baseline person-examinations; 3850 (5.6%) had the FH phenotype by the primary definition. Follow-up across index ages ranged from 78 985 to 308 378 person-years. After covariate adjustment, the FH phenotype was associated with substantially elevated 30-year CHD risk, with hazard ratios up to 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-21.7). Across index ages, CHD risk was accelerated in those with the FH phenotype by 10 to 20 years in men and 20 to 30 years in women. Similar patterns of results were found for total ASCVD risk, with hazard ratios up to 4.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-13.4). Alternative FH phenotype definitions incorporating family history, more stringent age-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol thresholds, or alternative lipid fractions decreased the FH phenotype prevalence to as low as 0.2% to 0.4% without materially affecting CHD risk estimates (hazard ratios up to 8.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-61.6). In the general US population, the long-term ASCVD burden related to phenotypic FH, defined by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥190 mg/dL, is likely substantial. Our finding of CHD risk acceleration may aid

  15. Cohort study of predictive value of urinary albumin excretion for atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Yokoyama, H; Mathiesen, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether slightly elevated urinary albumin excretion precedes development of atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes independently of conventional atherogenic risk factors and of diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cohort study with 11 year follow......, smoking habits, and serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor. END POINT: atherosclerotic vascular disease assessed by death certificates, mailed questionnaires, and hospital records. RESULTS: Thirty patients developed...... atherosclerotic vascular disease during follow up of 2457 person year. Elevated urinary albumin excretion was significantly predictive of atherosclerotic vascular disease (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.18) per 5 mg increase in 24 hour urinary albumin excretion, P = 0.002). Predictive effect...

  16. Stages of change for fruit and vegetable intake among patients with atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Simone; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo A

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the stages of change in fruit and vegetable intake among patients with atherosclerotic disease, identifying demographic, socioeconomic, and health predictive factors for each stage of change. It is a cross-sectional study of 290 consecutive patients with atherosclerotic disease submitted to endovascular procedures in two referral hospitals. The staging algorithm included intentional and behavioral criteria, and patients were categorized into "pre-action" (pre-contemplation, contemplation, and preparation), or "action" (action, non-reflective action, and maintenance). Most of the patients were in action for the fruits intake (67.9%) and pre-action for the vegetables intake (69.1%). The logistic regression analysis for the stages of action change for fruits intake has identified as predictive factors, the higher level of education and consultation with a cardiologist. For the stages of action change for vegetable intake, absence of abdominal obesity, previous cardiac surgery, and consultation with dietitian have shown significant association. This study has shown differences in the distribution of stages of change for the fruits and vegetable intake among the patients with atherosclerotic disease. The different predictive factors for the stage of changes for fruits and vegetables suggest that approaches of nutritional orientation of the individuals must be distinct for each eating behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of Thrombomodulin Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Atherosclerotic Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Jin, Jun; Tan, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have proved that the dysfunction of thrombomodulin (TM) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases. In order to reveal their inherent relationship, we conducted a meta-analysis to uncover the association between two polymorphisms -33G/A and Ala455Val (c.1418C>T) in the TM gene and atherosclerotic diseases. We carried out a systematic search in PubMed, Science Direct, BIOSIS Previews, SpringerLink, the Cochrane library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chinese Biomedical Database, the Wei Pu database, and the Wanfang Database. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed to show the association. We included 22 eligible studies which involved 5472 patients and 7786 controls. There were statistically significant associations between -33G/A polymorphisms in TM and the MI group under the Allele and Recessive models in Asians (G vs. A: OR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.56-0.78, P < 0.00001; GG vs. GA+AA: OR = 0.66, 95%CI = 0.56-0.78, P < 0.00001). However, these findings of the overall and subgroups showed that Ala455Val polymorphisms did not have any relationship with atherosclerotic diseases. After Bonferroni correction, the above associations remained statistically significant. This meta-analysis provides robust evidence of association between the -33G/A polymorphism in the TM gene and the risk of myocardial infarction in Asians. The A allele may increase the incidence of MI in Asians. However, the Ala455Val variant was not associated with atherosclerotic risk. Further studies with adequate sample size are needed to verify our findings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  18. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart bypass surgery - discharge Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart failure - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  19. Triglycerides as a risk factor in extracranial atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrence, C F; Rao, G R

    1983-07-01

    A retrospective study was carried out on a group of 138 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy for extracranial vascular disease. Risk factors of cerebrovascular disease and routine laboratory evaluations were assessed. Of the laboratory evaluations of blood lipids, only mean triglycerides were found to be significantly different from laboratory normals. Stroke as a clinical event has been suggested not to be correlated with blood lipids in a number of large studies, but the present investigation supports the notion that extracranial vascular disease may be associated with blood lipid concentrations. Previous studies of stroke and lipids have not separated out the anatomical site responsible for the cerebral infarction, and thus probably have underestimated the effect of lipids as a risk factor in cervical extracranial atherosclerosis and brain infarction.

  20. Urinary albumin excretion. An independent predictor of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Johnsen, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    1999-01-01

    ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a population-based cohort. In 1983, urinary albumin and creatinine levels were measured, along with the conventional atherosclerotic risk factors, in 2085 consecutive participants without IHD, renal disease, urinary tract infection, or diabetes mellitus. The participants......Cross-sectional studies suggest that an increased urinary albumin excretion rate is associated with cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to analyze prospectively whether the urinary albumin-to -creatinine (A/C) ratio can independently predict......, 1.3 to 3.9, P=0.002), and the 10-year disease-free survival decreased from 97% to 91% (P

  1. Tachyarrhythmias in structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiès, Philippine

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the major cause of sudden unexpected cardiac arrest, occur specifically in patients with structural heart disease. In general, all types of structural heart disease may lead to chronic heart failure, a severe condition with an additional high risk of atrial- and

  2. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  3. Patient-Provider Communication and Health Outcomes Among Individuals With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in the United States: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunrintemi, Victor; Spatz, Erica S; Di Capua, Paul; Salami, Joseph A; Valero-Elizondo, Javier; Warraich, Haider; Virani, Salim S; Blaha, Michael J; Blankstein, Ron; Butt, Adeel A; Borden, William B; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Ting, Henry; Krumholz, Harlan M; Nasir, Khurram

    2017-04-01

    evidence-based therapies, healthcare resource utilization, and expenditures among those with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. How Is Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  5. Depressive symptom clusters are differentially associated with atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, B A A; Marijnissen, R M; Holewijn, S; Franke, B; Purandare, N; de Graaf, J; den Heijer, M; Buitelaar, J K; Voshaar, R C Oude

    2011-07-01

    Depression increases the risk of subsequent vascular events in both cardiac and non-cardiac patients. Atherosclerosis, the underlying process leading to vascular events, has been associated with depression. This association, however, may be confounded by the somatic-affective symptoms being a consequence of cardiovascular disease. While taking into account the differentiation between somatic-affective and cognitive-affective symptoms of depression, we examined the association between depression and atherosclerosis in a community-based sample. In 1261 participants of the Nijmegen Biomedical Study (NBS), aged 50-70 years and free of stroke and dementia, we measured the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery as a measure of atherosclerosis and we assessed depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Principal components analysis (PCA) of the BDI items yielded two factors, representing a cognitive-affective and a somatic-affective symptom cluster. While correcting for confounders, we used separate multiple regression analyses to test the BDI sum score and both depression symptom clusters. We found a significant correlation between the BDI sum score and the IMT. Cognitive-affective, but not somatic-affective, symptoms were also associated with the IMT. When we stratified for coronary artery disease (CAD), the somatic-affective symptom cluster correlated significantly with depression in both patients with and patients without CAD. The association between depressive symptoms and atherosclerosis is explained by the somatic-affective symptom cluster of depression. Subclinical vascular disease thus may inflate depressive symptom scores and may explain why treatment of depression in cardiac patients hardly affects vascular outcome.

  6. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Systemic Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of aortic arch calcification, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, with rotator cuff tendinosis and tears given the hypothesis that decreased tendon vascularity is a contributing factor in the etiology of tendon degeneration. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients ages 50 to 90 years who had a shoulder MRI and a chest radiograph performed within 6 months of each other. Chest radiographs and shoulder MRIs from 120 patients were reviewed by two sets of observers blinded to the others' conclusions. Rotator cuff disease was classified as tendinosis, partial thickness tear, and full thickness tear. The presence or absence of aortic arch calcification was graded and compared with the MRI appearance of the rotator cuff. The tendon tear grading was positively correlated with patient age. However, the tendon tear grading on MRI was not significantly correlated with the aorta calcification scores on chest radiographs. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between aorta calcification severity and tendon tear grading. In conclusion, rotator cuff tears did not significantly correlate with aortic calcification severity. This suggests that tendon ischemia may not be associated with the degree of macrovascular disease.

  7. Genetics of Dyslipidemia and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Baliga, Ragavendra R

    2017-05-01

    Genetic dyslipidemias contribute to the prevalence of ischemic heart disease. The field of genetic dyslipidemias and their influence on atherosclerotic heart disease is rapidly developing and accumulating increasing evidence. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of knowledge in regard to inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias. The disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and elevated lipoprotein(a) will be detailed. Genetic technology has made rapid advancements, leading to new discoveries in inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias, which will be explored in this review, as well as a description of possible future developments. Increasing attention has come upon the genetic disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia and elevated lipoprotein(a). This review includes new knowledge of these disorders including description of these disorders, their method of diagnosis, their prevalence, their genetic underpinnings, and their effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. In addition, it discusses major advances in genetic technology, including the completion of the human genome sequence, next-generation sequencing, and genome-wide association studies. Also discussed are rare variant studies with specific genetic mechanisms involved in inherited dyslipidemias, such as in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) enzyme. The field of genetics of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease is rapidly growing, which will result in a bright future of novel mechanisms of action and new therapeutics.

  8. Acute Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Varun; Barr, Brian; Srivastava, Mukta

    2018-02-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is a common clinical entity. Recognition of decompensated VHD is crucial to instituting appropriate workup and management. Initial evaluation focuses on hemodynamics, peripheral perfusion, volume overload, and active myocardial ischemia. Initial therapy is targeted at improving hemodynamics, fluid status, and decreasing myocardial ischemia before intervention. Echocardiography can rapidly identify VHD etiology and severity along with physical examination findings. Owing to improved survival with cardiac surgery over the past several decades, prosthetic valve dysfunction should be recognized and initial treatment understood. Mechanical circulatory support is increasingly part of clinical practice in stabilizing patients with decompensated VHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Atherosclerotic disease in axial spondyloarthritis: increased frequency of carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Corrales, Alfonso; Blanco, Ricardo; Fuentevilla, Patricia; Portilla, Virginia; Expósito, Rosa; Mata, Cristina; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    To establish whether subclinical atherosclerosis is increased in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA). A set of 149 consecutive patients with no history of cardiovascular disease that fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society classification criteria for ax-SpA was studied by carotid ultrasonography. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaques were assessed. A series of 181 community-based controls with no cardiovascular disease were studied for comparison. To establish whether ax-SpA might have a direct effect on the risk of carotid plaques or an indirect effect via its putative influence on hypertension, dyslipidaemia or obesity, we obtained adjusted odds ratios (OR) for each clinical factor by the development of adjusted models. cIMT was increased in patients (0.621±0.123 mm) when compared to controls (0.607±0.117 mm) but the difference was not significant (p=0.30). Nevertheless, carotid plaques were more commonly observed in patients with ax-SpA than in controls (41.6% vs. 26.4%; p=0.003). Patients with plaques had longer duration of the disease than those without plaques (20.5±11.2 years vs. 12.0±8.6 years; p<0.001). Plaques were more frequent in patients with hip involvement (crude odds ratio 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-9.75; p=0.05), syndesmophytes (crude OR 4.94, 95% CI 2.14-11.4; p<0.001), in patients with higher functional limitation and mobility index measured by BASFI (crude OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.33; p=0.03) and BASMI (crude OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.19-1.77; p<0.001), and in those with psoriasis (crude OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.31-11.84; p=0.02. However, except for psoriasis that continued being a strong risk factor for plaques after adjustment, the relationship between other clinical features of ax-SpA and carotid plaques disappeared in the adjusted models. Our results confirm the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with ax-SpA.

  10. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Shapiro

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B (apoB-containing lipoproteins are now widely accepted as the most important causal agents of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Multiple unequivocal and orthogonal lines of evidence all converge on low-density lipoprotein and related particles as being the principal actors in the genesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the fundamental role of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease and several other humoral and parietal factors that are required to initiate and maintain arterial degeneration. The biology of foam cells and their interactions with high-density lipoproteins, including cholesterol efflux, are also briefly reviewed.

  11. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Implantation of Total Artificial Heart in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S. L.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation.

  13. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...... to measure, and there were no data showing a relation between reduced LV mass and improvement in LV systolic and diastolic function and improved cardiovascular outcome. However, improvements to echocardiographic equipment have made it possible to measure LV mass with the same precision as for aortic valve......% associated risk reduction in cardiovascular mortality if patients with LV hypertrophy were treated to limits of LV mass. Hypertension causes impaired LV systolic function by increased afterload and LV hypertrophy. Normal estimations of LV ejection fraction tend to overestimate LV systolic function; however...

  14. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. Preeclampsia is linked to an increased lifetime risk of CHD, heart attack, heart failure , and high blood pressure. Screening and Prevention Taking action to control risk factors can help ...

  15. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages Past Issues / Winter ... weeks of a heart attack. For Women with Heart Disease: About 6 million American women have coronary heart ...

  16. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  17. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent or slow the progression of coronary artery disease. A heart-healthy diet, exercise, and other lifestyle choices are the basic steps to keeping your heart strong and healthy. Coronary artery disease begins when fatty deposits (plaques) containing cholesterol build ...

  18. The Role of Perivascular Adipose Tissue in Non-atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Horimatsu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT surrounds most large blood vessels and plays an important role in vascular homeostasis. PVAT releases various chemokines and adipocytokines, functioning in an endocrine and paracrine manner to regulate vascular signaling and inflammation. Mounting evidence suggests that PVAT plays an important role in atherosclerosis and hypertension; however, the role of PVAT in non-atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including neointimal formation, aortic aneurysm, arterial stiffness and vasculitis, has received far less attention. Increasing evidence suggests that PVAT responds to mechanical endovascular injury and regulates the subsequent formation of neointima via factors that promote smooth muscle cell growth, adventitial inflammation and neovascularization. Circumstantial evidence also links PVAT to the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and vasculitic syndromes, such as Takayasu's arteritis, where infiltration and migration of inflammatory cells from PVAT into the vascular wall may play a contributory role. Moreover, in obesity, PVAT has been implicated to promote stiffness of elastic arteries via the production of reactive oxygen species. This review will discuss the growing body of data and mechanisms linking PVAT to the pathogenesis of non-atherosclerotic vascular diseases in experimental animal models and in humans.

  19. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  20. Prognosis of non-significant coronary atherosclerotic disease detected by coronary artery tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Siqueira, Bruna Pinto; Guimaraes, Carolina Camargos Braichi; Cruz, David Filipe Silva; Guimaraes, Leiziane Assuncao Alves; Lima, Maicom Marcio Perigolo, E-mail: marciovlbarros@gmail.com [Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana, Vespasiano, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira [Universidade de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz [Hospital Materdei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Introduction: Although studies have shown high diagnostic accuracy of coronary tomography (CT) in detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), data on the prognostic value of this method in patients with no significant coronary obstruction are limited. Objective: To evaluate the value of CT in predicting adverse events in patients with suspected CAD and no significant coronary obstruction. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 440 patients between January 2008 and July 2013 by MDCT, diagnosed with no significant obstruction or no atherosclerotic coronary obstruction with an average follow-up of 33 months. The outcomes evaluated were: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina associated with hospitalization or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: Of the 440 patients studied, 295 (67%) were men with mean age 55.9 ± 12.0 years. Non-significant obstruction was found in 152 (35%) of the patients and there were 49 (11%) outcomes. In the multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model, the predictors of clinical outcomes were non-significant obstruction on CT (hazard ratio 3.51; 95% CI 1.73 - 7.8; p <0.01), age and hypertension. Non-significant obstruction on CT was associated with adverse clinical outcomes and survival analysis showed a significant difference (log-rank 24.6; p <0.01) in predicting these outcomes. Conclusion: The detection of non-significant atherosclerotic obstruction by CT was associated with the presence of adverse events in patients with suspected CAD, which may prove useful in the risk stratification of these patients. (author)

  1. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? Updated:Dec 8,2015 There are ... include: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heart disease Atrial fibrillation (Abnormal heart rhythm) Call 9-1- ...

  2. Living with heart disease and angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000576.htm Living with heart disease and angina To use the sharing features on ... pain and reduce your risks from heart disease. Heart Disease and Angina CHD is a narrowing of the ...

  3. Cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease as an initial or subsequent manifestation of atherosclerotic disease: Results from a Swedish nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvant, Birgitta; Hasvold, Pål; Kragsterman, Björn; Falkenberg, Mårten; Johansson, Saga; Thuresson, Marcus; Nordanstig, Joakim

    2017-08-01

    Long-term progression of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) as initial manifestation of atherosclerotic arterial disease is not well described. Cardiovascular (CV) risk was examined in different PAD populations diagnosed in a hospital setting in Sweden. Data for this retrospective cohort study were retrieved by linking data on morbidity, medication use, and mortality from Swedish national registries. Primary CV outcome was a composite of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke (IS), and CV death. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for describing risk and relative risk. Of 66,189 patients with an incident PAD diagnosis (2006-2013), 40,136 had primary PAD, 16,786 had PAD + coronary heart disease (CHD), 5803 had PAD + IS, and 3464 had PAD + IS + CHD. One-year cumulative incidence rates of major CV events for the groups were 12%, 21%, 29%, and 34%, respectively. Corresponding numbers for 1-year all-cause death were 16%, 22%, 33%, and 35%. Compared with the primary PAD population, the relative risk increase for CV events was highest in patients with PAD + IS + CHD (hazard ratio [HR], 2.01), followed by PAD + IS (HR, 1.87) and PAD + CHD (HR, 1.42). Despite being younger, the primary PAD population was less intensively treated with secondary preventive drug therapy. PAD as initial manifestation of atherosclerotic disease diagnosed in a hospital-based setting conferred a high risk: one in eight patients experienced a major CV event and one in six patients died within 1 year. Despite younger age and substantial risk of future major CV events, patients with primary PAD received less intensive secondary preventive drug therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HEART ANEURYSM IN CHAGAS' DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA,José Alberto Mello de

    1998-01-01

    This prospective study on 41 autopsy collected human hearts concerns the "apical" lesion in Chagas' disease. Previous report did not show a correlation between lesion frequency and heart weight then discarding a vascular factor in its pathogenesis. The present paper involves other variables besides the heart weight to evaluate the relative coronary insufficiency. Distinct colored gel (green and red) injected through the capillary beds of both coronary arteries defined the extent of both vesse...

  5. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National ... Heart Truth ®, in partnership with many national and community organizations. The program's goal is to raise awareness ...

  6. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure starts to go up. LDL cholesterol , or “bad” cholesterol, tends to increase while HDL, or “good” cholesterol declines or remains the same. Triglycerides, certain types of fats in the blood, also increase. Strive for Heart ...

  7. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order AHA Brochures Your Heart Valve Surgery Your Mitral Valve Prolapse Innocent Heart Murmurs If Your Child Has a Congenital Heart Defect See all of our brochures Valve Disease Resources Patient Guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem | ...

  8. Heart Truth for Women: If You Have Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    THE FOR WO MEN TRUTH THE HEART TRUTH FoR WoMEN: iF You HAVE HEART DisEAsE If you have heart disease, or think you do, it’s vital to take action to protect your heart health. Fortunately, there’s a lot you can do. ...

  9. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  10. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 14,2017 Plain old snoring can ... and is associated with high blood pressure , arrhythmia , stroke and heart failure . Heart disease is the leading ...

  11. Celebrities Gather to Fight Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Celebrities Gather to Fight Heart Disease Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Kit to offer community education programs on women's heart disease. Organize heart-health screening events and health fairs ...

  12. The ACC/AHA 2013 pooled cohort equations compared to a Korean Risk Prediction Model for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keum Ji; Jang, Yangsoo; Oh, Dong Joo; Oh, Byung-Hee; Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Seong-Wook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Yun, Young Duk; Choi, Sung Hee; Sung, Jidong; Lee, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sung Hi; Koh, Sang Baek; Kim, Moon Chan; Chang Kim, Hyeon; Kimm, Heejin; Nam, Chungmo; Park, Sungha; Jee, Sun Ha

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the performance of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 2013 Pooled Cohort Equations in the Korean Heart Study (KHS) population and to develop a Korean Risk Prediction Model (KRPM) for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events. The KHS cohort included 200,010 Korean adults aged 40-79 years who were free from ASCVD at baseline. Discrimination, calibration, and recalibration of the ACC/AHA Equations in predicting 10-year ASCVD risk in the KHS cohort were evaluated. The KRPM was derived using Cox model coefficients, mean risk factor values, and mean incidences from the KHS cohort. In the discriminatory analysis, the ACC/AHA Equations' White and African-American (AA) models moderately distinguished cases from non-cases, and were similar to the KRPM: For men, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCs) were 0.727 (White model), 0.725 (AA model), and 0.741 (KRPM); for women, the corresponding AUROCs were 0.738, 0.739, and 0.745. Absolute 10-year ASCVD risk for men in the KHS cohort was overestimated by 56.5% (White model) and 74.1% (AA model), while the risk for women was underestimated by 27.9% (White model) and overestimated by 29.1% (AA model). Recalibration of the ACC/AHA Equations did not affect discriminatory ability but improved calibration substantially, especially in men in the White model. Of the three ASCVD risk prediction models, the KRPM showed best calibration. The ACC/AHA Equations should not be directly applied for ASCVD risk prediction in a Korean population. The KRPM showed best predictive ability for ASCVD risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Combined operation for ischemic heart diseases and valvular heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; Ohba, O; Shichijo, T; Yunoki, K; Suezawa, T; Honjo, O; Kyo, Y

    2000-07-01

    We performed combined operation for patients who have both ischemic heart disease and valvular heart disease in 21 cases from January 1991 to October 1999. This operation was 3.1% of 682 cases of coronary artery bypass grafting and 5.0% of 416 cases of operation for valvular heart disease during that period. The mean age of these patients was 67.9 +/- 9.1 years. The average number of grafts in the coronary artery bypass grafting was 1.5 +/- 0.6. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 6 cases, mitral valve replacement in 10 cases and mitral valve plasty in 5 cases. Together with this combined operation, ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement was done in 1 case and abdominal aortic replacement in 2 cases. Three patients died due to postoperative aortic rupture, cerebral infarction or excessive surgical intervention in ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement. Combined operation for ischemic heart diseases and valvular heart diseases can safely performed, but it appears necessary to pay attention to arteriosclerotic lesions.

  15. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for acne, chemicals, alcohol, and infections (such as rubella ) during pregnancy can contribute to some congenital heart problems. Poorly ... medicines. Have a blood test early in your pregnancy to see if you are immune to rubella. If you are not immune, avoid any possible ...

  16. Tackling heart disease and poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geraldine; Carrington, Melinda

    2007-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with a projected increase in incidence in developed and developing countries. This paper will review the literature on the role of poverty and socioeconomic deprivation in cardiovascular disease and outline ways to tackle poverty. The literature acknowledges the individual risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but highlights the negative effects of neighborhood deprivation on the incidence of cardiovascular disease and its mortality rates. The studies show that equitable access to health care is not evident and those in less affluent neighborhoods have greater disease incidence and increased mortality and morbidity rates, particularly for angina, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. The approach to reducing disease rates needs to be conducted from an individual level to the societal level and needs to prevent and treat heart disease (particularly in deprived neighborhoods). Nurses and health professionals must drive health policy so that progress can be achieved in reducing the disease rates.

  17. Dietary inflammatory index in relation to sub-clinical atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Nicola P; Lewis, Joshua R; Blekkenhorst, Lauren C; Shivappa, Nitin; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ward, Natalie C; Hébert, James R; Thompson, Peter L; Prince, Richard L; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2017-06-01

    Arterial wall thickening, stimulated by low-grade systemic inflammation, underlies many cardiovascular events. As diet is a significant moderator of systemic inflammation, the dietary inflammatory index (DIITM) has recently been devised to assess the overall inflammatory potential of an individual's diet. The primary objective of this study was to assess the association of the DII with common carotid artery-intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and carotid plaques. To substantiate the clinical importance of these findings we assessed the relationship of DII score with atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD)-related mortality, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVA)-related mortality and ischaemic heart disease (IHD)-related mortality more. The study was conducted in Western Australian women aged over 70 years (n 1304). Dietary data derived from a validated FFQ (completed at baseline) were used to calculate a DII score for each individual. In multivariable-adjusted models, DII scores were associated with sub-clinical atherosclerosis: a 1 sd (2·13 units) higher DII score was associated with a 0·013-mm higher mean CCA-IMT (P=0·016) and a 0·016-mm higher maximum CCA-IMT (P=0·008), measured at 36 months. No relationship was seen between DII score and carotid plaque severity. There were 269 deaths during follow-up. High DII scores were positively associated with ASVD-related death (per sd, hazard ratio (HR): 1·36; 95 % CI 1·15, 1·60), CVA-related death (per sd, HR: 1·30; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·69) and IHD-related death (per sd, HR: 1·40; 95 % CI 1·13, 1·75). These results support the hypothesis that a pro-inflammatory diet increases systemic inflammation leading to development and progression of atherosclerosis and eventual ASVD-related death.

  18. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  19. ALOHA to women's heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Kimberly J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the American Heart Association, ALOHA program. ALOHA is a multidisciplinary approach to helping lay people and clinicians determine the best course of action for managing cardiac risk factors in women. ALOHA, an acronym that stands for designated interventions based on individualized assessment of patients, along with the Framingham risk assessment calculator, allows health care providers with their patients to individualize treatment for heart disease and management of risk factors.

  20. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  1. Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165667.html Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide Low-cost, effective ... deaths around the world are the result of heart disease and stroke, making cardiovascular disease the number one ...

  2. Weight loss therapy for clinical management of patients with some atherosclerotic diseases: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshakbayev, Kuat; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar; Otarbayev, Nurzhan; Togizbayeva, Gulnar; Tabynbayev, Nariman; Gazaliyeva, Meruyert; Idrisov, Alisher; Oshakbayev, Pernekul

    2015-11-25

    The prevalence and burden of atherosclerotic (AS) diseases are increasing during the last twenty years. Some studies show a close relationship between overweight and AS, but influence on AS diseases of different weight loss methods are still studying. The purpose of the research was to study the effectiveness of a weight loss program in AS patients in randomized controlled trial, and to develop a conception of evolution of AS. A randomized controlled prospective clinical trial including 97 people, from them 71 patients with various AS manifestations. Patients were divided in 2 subgroups for non-drug weight loss program, and conventional drug therapy. The weight loss program included calorie restriction with 100-150 kcal/day, fat-free vegetables, salt diet, and optimum physical activity. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows version 17.0. The weight loss subgroup lost ranging between 7-20% from an initial weight (P = 0.016). Weight loss was achieved due to fatty mass reduction only (P = 0.005). Hemoglobin levels (P bone mineral density (P water (P = 0.006) and muscle masses (P = 0.0038) were increased in weight loss subgroup. Ejection fraction (P body fat. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01700075. State registration is # 0109RK000079, code is O.0475 at the National Center for Scientific and Technical Information of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  3. Chlamydia pneumoniae in the atherosclerotic plaques of coronary artery disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Izadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An association between Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to study this potential relationship in 105 Iranian patients. Coronary artery specimens from 105 Iranian patients undergoing CABG were analyzed by PCR method for C. pneumoniae. Serological evaluation for C. pneumoniae IgG and IgM was performed using ELISA. 53 specimens from mamillary artery were also investigated. C. pneumoniae PCR test result was positive for 23 (21.9% of patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis, but none of the specimens from the mamillary artery was positive for C. pneumoniae when it was evaluated by the PCR (P<0.001. Coronary artery disease patients with and without a history of unstable angina or myocardial infarction were comparable in C. pneumoniae PCR test positive rates (P=0.618. Relevance of IgG and IgM positivity were also studied by correlating it to the study parameters, but no difference was found. CRP was significantly higher in the IgM positive group (P<0.001. A significant proportion of coronary atherosclerotic plaques are infected with C. pneumoniae while no infection was found in the normal mamillary artery specimens. No association was found between acute coronary syndromes and serological and PCR positivity. Further prospective randomized controlled studies with large patient population are needed to confirm our findings.

  4. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  5. Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Genetic Testing for Inherited Heart Disease Allison L. Cirino , ... for developing the family’s heart condition. What Is Genetic Testing and What Can it Tell Me? Genetic ...

  6. Atherosclerotic renovascular disease and renal impairment : Can we predict the effect of intervention?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mui, Kwok-Wai; Woittiez, Arend-Jan; Navis, Gerjan

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) is associated with hypertension, ischemic nephropathy, and high cardiovascular risk. We review the data on revascularization of the renal artery by percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) and pharmacological therapy. In patients with severe

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Women Leer en español How Does Heart ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  8. HIV and Nonischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Pravin; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don

    2017-01-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated heart disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases. HIV infection may involve the pericardium, myocardium, coronary arteries, pulmonary vasculature, and valves, as well as the systemic vasculature. Access to combination antiretroviral therapy, as well as health resources, has had a significant influence on the prevalence and severity of the effects on each cardiac structure. Investigations over the recent past have improved our understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease. This review will focus on our current understanding of pathogenesis and risk factors associated with HIV infection and heart disease, and it will discuss relevant advances in diagnosis and management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Immunizations Infant Health & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected OMH Home > Policy and Data > ... 260.pdf [PDF | 3.5MB] At a glance – Death Rate: Age-Adjusted Heart Disease Death Rates per ...

  10. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  11. Guidelines for Management of Hyperlipidemia: Implications for Treatment of Patients with Stroke Secondary to Atherosclerotic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandapat, Sudeepta; Robinson, Jennifer G

    2016-03-01

    After careful review of randomized cardiovascular outcomes trial data, the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline focused on using the appropriate intensity of statin therapy to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk and moved away from recommending specific low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment targets. In patients who have had a stroke or other clinical ASCVD event, a high-intensity statin should be initiated up to age 75 years unless there are safety concerns, including a history of hemorrhagic stroke. A moderate-intensity statin is recommended if there are safety concerns or age is greater than 75 years. Atorvastatin 40-80 mg and rosuvastatin 20-40 mg are considered high-intensity statins. These new guidelines avoid unnecessary usage of non-statins to achieve specific LDL-C values, thus avoiding potential adverse effects or use of an inadequate statin intensity in patients who are "at goal." When non-statins are considered for additional LDL-C lowering, ezetimibe is the only non-statin clearly shown to further reduce ASCVD risk when added to background statin therapy.

  12. Three Decades of Atherosclerotic Reno-vascular Disease Management - Changing Outcomes in an Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vassallo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Optimized medical therapy has improved cardiovascular outcomes in the general population. To investigate whether changes in the management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD have had an impact on clinical outcomes. Methods: Recruitment into this single-center prospective cohort study started in 1986. Data was analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups based on relationship of diagnosis year to landmark randomized controlled trials (RCT; group 1 - pre-large RCT data (1986-2000; group 2 - post-early RCT (2001-2004; group 3 - ASTRAL study recruitment era (2004-2009; group 4 - post-ASTRAL (2009-2014. Results: In total, 872 patients were followed for a median 54.9 months (IQR 20.2-96.2. Over successive time-periods, there was an increase in baseline utilization of renin angiotensin blockade (RAB (group 4: 69% vs. group 1: 31%, pConclusions: Although fewer patients are being investigated for ARVD in our center, these have more cardiovascular comorbidities. Nonetheless, optimized medical therapy may have contributed towards improved proteinuria, renal function and clinical outcomes in patients diagnosed with ARVD.

  13. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Vaccination Records Vaccine-Preventable Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination ... are hospitalized, and some even die. People with heart disease and those who have suffered stroke are at ...

  14. Inflammation – a common pathogenic factor of arterial atherosclerotic and venous thromboembolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Kaja Ježovnik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is among the basic mechanisms of arterial atherosclerotc diseases and is most likely also involved in the onset of venous thromboembolic disease. Various risk factors for atherosclerosis cause damage to the vascular wall and trigger inflammatory changes, which may lead to the development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, people with advanced atherosclerosis, and particularly those with unstable atherosclerotic plaques as a result of intense inflammatory changes, are found to have elevated levels of inflammatory markers in the blood. The most frequent findings include elevated levels of highly specific C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, which is a non-specific systemic indicator of inflammation, and certain interleukins (interleukin–6, interleukin–8 that are considered to be more specific markers of vascular wall inflammation. Therefore, studies are underway to improve the prognostic value for cardiovascular events by the determination of inflammatory markers in the blood. However, due to the unspecifcity of individual inflammatory markers, different methods of their determination and close relation between marker levels and the established risk factors, these have failed to contribute significantly to the evaluation of the role of inflammation in the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Currently, the determination of hs-CRP as one of the most prominent risk factors is recommended only in persons at high risk for cardiovascular events, in those that do not have classical risk factors and are at risk due to other causes, such as e.g. familial predisposition.Recently, it has also been found that inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis. In the case of a damaged venous wall inflammation occurs as a response to injury, while in idiopathic venous thrombosis without the presence of risk factors the vascular wall inflammation is probably a primary event that is followed by coagulation activation. Namely

  15. Body fat distribution and risk of coronary heart disease in men and women in the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition in Norfolk cohort: a population-based prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canoy, Dexter; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas; Luben, Robert; Welch, Ailsa; Bingham, Sheila; Buchan, Iain; Day, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2007-01-01

    Body fat distribution has been cross-sectionally associated with atherosclerotic disease risk factors, but the prospective relation with coronary heart disease remains uncertain. We examined the prospective relation between fat distribution indices and coronary heart disease among 24,508 men and

  16. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  17. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are at High Risk of Developing Complications from ...

  18. Erectile Dysfunction: A Sign of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause erectile dysfunction. Alcohol Use. Drinking too much alcohol can cause heart disease and might contribute to other causes of heart disease, such as high blood pressure or abnormal cholesterol. Alcohol also impairs erections. High blood pressure. Over time, ...

  19. Congenital Heart Diseases associated with Identified Syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Congenital heart diseases are commonly associated with other extra cardiac congenital malformations. OBJECTIVE: To identify congenital heart diseases associated with identified syndromes and other extra cardiac congenital malformations in children in our hospital. METHODS: A prospective descriptive ...

  20. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  1. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...... chronic diseases results in an elevation in specific elements of the chronic stress concept. A total of 361 participants with IHD were included, of whom 47 suffered from concomitant diabetes. Stress was measured by pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and by the following questionnaires: the Major Depression...

  2. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Michele

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238 or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224, and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS, were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA and/or Selective Angiography (SA. An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA. Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis.

  3. Diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokonas, P S; Kannel, W B

    1996-02-01

    Data from epidemiologic studies document the role of clinically manifest diabetes mellitus as a powerful risk determinant for an array of atherosclerotic cardiovascular outcomes including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease, particularly in the elderly. Although dyslipidemias and hypertension are quite prevalent in persons with diabetes mellitus and contribute heavily to the underlying atherosclerotic process, other factors involving alternative pathogenetic mechanisms are necessary to explain for the dramatic acceleration of atherogenesis observed in this condition. Myocardial ischemia may be silent and myocardial infarction (MI) may be either painless or atypical in presentation which further complicates both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of CHD in older diabetic patients. MI, in this context, is confounded by dual prognostic disadvantages of higher risk for MI-related complications attributable to both advanced age and diabetes mellitus. Because available evidence has yet to demonstrate that control of hyperglycemia, either by oral agents or by insulin, effectively forestalls either the development or complications of atherosclerosis, preventive management in older patients with diabetes requires critical attention to correcting coexisting cardiovascular risk factors.

  4. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors and platelet aggregation inhibitors among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and depression or anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Douglas Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medications commonly used to treat heart disease, anxiety, and depression can interact resulting in an increased risk of bleeding, warranting a cautious approach in medical decision making. This retrospective, descriptive study examined the prevalence and the factors associated with the use of both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression. Methods: Respondents aged 22 years and older, alive throughout the study period, and diagnosed with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression (n = 1507 in years 2007 through 2013 of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey were included. The use of treatment was grouped as follows: selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Results: Overall, 16.5% used both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, 61.2% used selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and 22.3% used neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Respondents aged over 65 years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–3.45 and having a diagnosis of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–2.31 and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–3.27 were more likely to be prescribed the combination. Conclusion: The drug interaction was prevalent in patients who are already at higher risk of health disparities and worse outcomes thus requiring vigilant evaluation.

  6. Association Between Circulating Oxidized LDL and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shen; Zhao, Dong; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Fan; Han, Xueyu; Qi, Yue; Liu, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Although basic research has suggested that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, population observational studies have yielded conflicting results about the association between circulating ox-LDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of currently available observational studies to verify the association between circulating ox-LDL and ASCVD. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library from their inception to March 27, 2017, for nested case-control studies, case-cohort studies, and prospective cohort studies on the relationship between ox-LDL and ASCVD. Studies that did not assess the hazard ratio, relative risk, or odds ratio of ox-LDL or did not adjust for other risk factors, or those without examination of ox-LDL before collection of ASCVD occurrences were excluded. The summarized effect size was combined using fixed effect models. Subgroup analyses were performed on the basis of study quality, study design, definition of ASCVD events, effect size types, types of ox-LDL assay, ox-LDL contrast level, and whether low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was adjusted in a multivariate model. A total of 12 included studies consisted of 3 nested case-control studies, 1 case-cohort study, 5 hospital-based cohort studies, and 3 community-based cohort studies. The summary effect size of increased circulating ox-LDL was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.56-2.05) for ASCVD. Similar associations were shown in all subgroups. Our findings indicate that increased levels of circulating ox-LDL are associated with clinical ASCVD events. Further well designed community-based cohort studies or intervention studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea combined dyslipidemia render additive effect on increasing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ping; He, Zhiqing; Yang, Jing; Liang, Chun; Ren, Yusheng; Wu, Zonggui

    2016-05-26

    Current study was designed to investigate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) combined dyslipidemia on the prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD). This was a cross-sectional study and subjects with documented dyslipidemia and without previous diagnosis of OSA were enrolled. Polysomnography was applied to evaluate apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Based on AHI value, subjects were classified into four groups: without OSA, mild, moderate and severe OSA groups. Clinical characteristics and laboratory examination data were recorded. Relationship between AHI event and lipid profiles was analyzed, and logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of OSA combined dyslipidemia on ASCVD prevalence. Totally 248 subjects with dyslipidemia were enrolled. Compared to the other 3 groups, subjects with severe OSA were older, male predominant and had higher smoking rate. In addition, subjects with severe OSA had higher body mass index, waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, and higher rates of overweight and obesity. Serum levels of fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, LDL-C and CRP were all significantly higher. ASCVD prevalence was considerably higher in subjects with severe OSA. AHI event in the severe OSA group was up to 35.4 ± 5.1 events per hour which was significantly higher than the other groups (P dyslipidemia plus no-OSA group (reference group), OSA enhanced ASCVD risk in subjects with dyslipidemia, regardless of OSA severity. After extensively adjusted for confounding variables, the odds of dyslipidemia plus mild-OSA was reduced to insignificance. While the effects of moderate- and severe-OSA on promoting ASCVD risk in subjects with dyslipidemia remained significant, with severe-OSA most prominent (odds ratio: 1.52, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-2.02). OSA combined dyslipidemia conferred additive adverse effects on cardiovascular system, with severe-OSA most prominent.

  8. Bradyarrhythmias in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven K; Patel, Akash R; Chang, Philip M

    2017-06-01

    Bradyarrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) comprise a complex group of arrhythmia disorders with congenital and acquired origins, highly variable long-term sequelae, and complicated treatment options. They can develop across the spectrum of CHD defects and can be encountered at all ages. Although permanent pacing is effective in treating bradyarrhythmias, it is associated with many complications and morbidity, where it is often used early in life. This section discusses the incidence and prevalence of bradyarrhythmias in the CHD population, their timing of occurrence with respect to specific disease entities and interventions, and their short- and long-term clinical sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Mi; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines.

  10. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether...

  11. Employment after heart transplantation among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Chou, Helen; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark; McConnell, Patrick I

    2017-12-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease may require heart transplantation for end-stage heart failure. Whereas heart transplantation potentially allows adults with congenital heart disease to resume their usual activities, employment outcomes in this population are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and predictors of work participation after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease. Retrospective review of a prospective registry. United Network for Organ Sharing registry of transplant recipients in the United States. Adult recipients of first-time heart transplantation with a primary diagnosis of congenital heart disease, performed between 2004 and 2015. None. Employment status reported by transplant centers at required follow-up intervals up to 5 y posttransplant. Among 470 patients included in the analysis (mean follow-up: 5 ± 3 y), 127 (27%) worked after transplant, 69 (15%) died before beginning or returning to work, and 274 (58%) survived until censoring, but did not participate in paid work. Multivariable competing-risks regression analysis examined characteristics associated with posttransplant employment, accounting for mortality as a competing outcome. In descriptive and multivariable analysis, pretransplant work participation was associated with a greater likelihood of posttransplant employment, while the use of Medicaid insurance at the time of transplant was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of working after transplant (subhazard ratio compared to private insurance: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.95; P = .032). Employment was rare after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease, and was significantly less common than in the broader population of adults with congenital heart disease. Differences in return to work were primarily related to pretransplant employment and the use of public insurance, rather than clinical characteristics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Who Is at Risk for Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  13. Lipocalin (LCN 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Oberoi

    Full Text Available Lipocalin (LCN 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans.In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1 and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr-/- mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients as determined by coronary angiography.Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression.

  14. Heart Failure in Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Robert B; Ware, Stephanie M

    2017-03-17

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome resulting from diverse primary and secondary causes and shared pathways of disease progression, correlating with substantial mortality, morbidity, and cost. HF in children is most commonly attributable to coexistent congenital heart disease, with different risks depending on the specific type of malformation. Current management and therapy for HF in children are extrapolated from treatment approaches in adults. This review discusses the causes, epidemiology, and manifestations of HF in children with congenital heart disease and presents the clinical, genetic, and molecular characteristics that are similar or distinct from adult HF. The objective of this review is to provide a framework for understanding rapidly increasing genetic and molecular information in the challenging context of detailed phenotyping. We review clinical and translational research studies of HF in congenital heart disease including at the genome, transcriptome, and epigenetic levels. Unresolved issues and directions for future study are presented. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol efflux capacity as a relevant predictor of atherosclerotic coronary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Nakajima, Takatomo; Mutoh, Makoto; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    We examined the clinical relevance of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux capacity from macrophage (cholesterol efflux capacity) as a predictor of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) in comparison with that of conventional coronary and lipid risk variables in Japanese daily practice. Fasting blood sampling, including 6 routinely measured dyslipidemia-related variables, was performed at the time of coronary angiography (CAG) or multi-slice coronary computed tomography (MSCT) between January 2011 and January 2013. CAD, defined as native coronary atherosclerosis stenosis >50% by CAG or MSCT, was identified in 182 patients (CAD group), but not in 72 patients (non-CAD group). Cholesterol efflux capacity, measured using a cell-based efflux system in (3)[H]-cholesterol-labeled J774 macrophages in apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma, was significantly impaired in the CAD group compared with the non-CAD group (0.86 ± 0.26 vs. 1.02 ± 0.38; p = 0.001). After adjusting 15 patient and dyslipidemia-related variables using a propensity score matching analysis produced 55 patients in each arm, cholesterol efflux capacity in the CAD group remained to be significant compared with the non-CAD group (0.83 ± 0.24 vs. 0.97 ± 0.36; p = 0.019). Stepwise logistic regression analysis using a backward method after the baseline adjustment showed that cholesterol efflux capacity (odds ratio [OR]: 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.056-0.91; p = 0.037) was the single predictor of CAD, while other variables including HDL-C (p = 0.088) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (p = 0.681) were removed owing to those insignificance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve after the baseline adjustment was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.51-0.73, p = 0.048 by Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistics). The present observational study conducted under daily clinical practice confirmed that cholesterol efflux capacity is a clinically relevant predictor of CAD among the

  16. Atherosclerotic and thrombotic genetic and environmental determinants in Egyptian coronary artery disease patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Manal S; Toraih, Eman A; Aly, Nagwa M; Fakhr-Eldeen, Abeer; Badran, Dahlia I; Hussein, Mohammad H

    2017-01-13

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Multiple genetic variants in combination with various environmental risk factors have been implicated. This study aimed to investigate the association of twelve thrombotic and atherosclerotic gene variants in combination with other environmental risk factors with CAD risk in a preliminary sample of Egyptian CAD patients. Twenty three consecutive CAD patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and 34 unrelated controls, have been enrolled in the study. Genotyping was based on polymerase chain reaction and reverse multiplex hybridization. Five genetic association models were tested. Data distribution and variance homogeneity have been checked by Shapiro-Wilk test and Levene test, respectively; then the appropriate comparison test was applied. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation analysis and logistic regression has been performed to adjust for significant risk factors. Clustering the study participants according to gene-gene and gene-environment interaction has been done by Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA). The univariate analysis indicated that the five variants; rs1800595 (FVR2; factor 5), rs1801133 (MTHFR; 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), rs5918 (HPA-1; human platelet antigen 1), rs1799752 (ACE; angiotensin-converting enzyme), and rs7412 and rs429358 (ApoE; apolipoprotein E) were significantly associated with CAD susceptibility under different genetic models. Multivariate analysis revealed clustering of the study population into three patient groups (P) and one control group. FVR2 was the most variant associated with CAD patients, combined with the factor V Leiden (FVL) variant in P1 cluster and with both ACE and MTHFR 667C > T in P2. Whereas, P3 was mostly affected by both MTHFR 667C > T and FXIII (factor 13) V89L mutations. When combined with traditional risk factors, P1 was mostly affected by dyslipidemia, smoking

  17. Cohort study of predictive value of urinary albumin excretion for atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Yokoyama, H; Mathiesen, E

    1996-01-01

    , smoking habits, and serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor. END POINT: atherosclerotic vascular disease assessed by death certificates, mailed questionnaires, and hospital records. RESULTS: Thirty patients developed...... was independent of age; sex; blood pressure; smoking; serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor; level of haemoglobin A(lc); insulin dose, duration of diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy (hazard ratio 1.04 (1.01 to 1.08) per 5 mg...

  18. Peripheral ARtery Atherosclerotic DIsease and SlEep disordered breathing (PARADISE) trial - protocol for an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Filip M; Gałązka, Zbigniew; Płatek, Anna E; Górko, Dariusz; Ostrowski, Tomasz; Adamkiewicz, Karolina; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ryś, Anna; Semczuk-Kaczmarek, Karolina; Celejewski, Krzysztof; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is in fact a group of disease entities with different symptoms and course but a common underlying cause, i.e. atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is known to be aggravated by several cardiovascular risk factors, including obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Following paper is a protocol for the Peripheral ARtery Atherosclerotic DIsease and SlEep disordered breathing (PARADISE) trial, which aims to describe the prevalence of OSA in PAD patients scheduled for revascularisation, and to determine the effect of OSA on the procedure outcomes. The PARADISE study is an observational cohort trial. It plans to include 200 consecutive patients hospitalised for revascularisation due to PAD. In every patient an overnight sleep study will be performed to diagnose sleep disorders. Accord¬ing to the results of the test, patients will be divided into two groups: group A - patients with OSA, and group B - patients without OSA (control group). All patients will also be screened for classical and non-classical cardiovascular risk factors. In some of the patients, during surgery, a fragment of atherosclerotic plaque will be collected for further testing. Patients will be followed for one year for adverse events and end-points. Primary end-point of the study will be the failure of revascularisa¬tion defined as recurrence or new onset of the symptoms of ischaemia from the treated region, a need for re-operation or procedure revision, or recurrence of ischaemia signs on the imaging tests. The data obtained will help determine the incidence of OSA in the population of patients with PAD. The au¬thors expect to show that, as with other cardiovascular diseases associated with atherosclerosis, also in patients with PAD the incidence of undiagnosed OSA is high and its presence is associated with elevated cholesterol, inflammatory markers, and higher prevalence of arterial hypertension and poor control of other cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, due to

  19. The global burden of paediatric heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Ndidiamaka L; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Zheleva, Bistra

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 15 million children die or are crippled annually by treatable or preventable heart disease in low- and middle-income countries. Global efforts to reduce under-5 mortality have focused on reducing death from communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries with little...... to no attention focusing on paediatric CHD and acquired heart disease. Lack of awareness of CHD and acquired heart disease, access to care, poor healthcare infrastructure, competing health priorities, and a critical shortage of specialists are important reasons why paediatric heart disease has not been addressed...... in low resourced settings. Non-governmental organisations have taken the lead to address these challenges. This review describes the global burden of paediatric heart disease and strategies to improve the quality of care for paediatric heart disease. These strategies would improve outcomes for children...

  20. Comparison of osteoprotegerin to traditional atherosclerotic risk factors and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for diagnosis of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; Pedersen, Sune Holm; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    (OPG) to clinical and subclinical atherosclerotic disease in a large community-based, cross-sectional population study. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, OPG concentrations were measured in 5,863 men and women. A total of 494 participants had been hospitalized for ischemic heart disease or ischemic...

  1. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  2. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  3. Association of kidney stones with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease among adults in the United States: Considerations by race-ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, LaShaunta M; Bass, Martha Ann; Carithers, Teresa; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    There is a paucity of research examining the relationship between kidney stones and risk of cardiovascular disease while considering individuals of different race-ethnicities. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between history of kidney stones and increased odds of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (via the Pooled Cohort Equations) across race-ethnicity groups. 5571 participants aged 40-79 from the 2007-2012 cycles of the NHANES were used for this study. A history of kidney stones was collected from survey data. Predicted odds of having a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) event was assessed from the Pooled Cohort Equations. After adjustments, having kidney stones was not associated with an increase odds of having an ASCVD event within the next 10-years (OR 1.03; 95% CI: 0.58-1.82, P=0.91). However, among non-Hispanic blacks, those with kidney stones had a 2.24 increased odds (OR 2.24; 95% CI: 1.08-4.66; P=0.03) of having an ASCVD event within the next 10-years when compared to non-Hispanic blacks with no history of a kidney stone. Kidney stones were associated with 10-year risk of a future ASCVD event among non-Hispanic blacks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heart Valve Disease among Patients with Hyperprolactinaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  5. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Jung Min

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy a...

  6. Primary prevention of ischemic stroke: a guideline from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council: cosponsored by the Atherosclerotic Peripheral Vascular Disease Interdisciplinary Working Group; Cardiovascular Nursing Council; Clinical Cardiology Council; Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism Council; and the Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Larry B; Adams, Robert; Alberts, Mark J; Appel, Lawrence J; Brass, Lawrence M; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Culebras, Antonio; DeGraba, Thomas J; Gorelick, Philip B; Guyton, John R; Hart, Robert G; Howard, George; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Nixon, J V Ian; Sacco, Ralph L

    2006-06-20

    This guideline provides an overview of the evidence on various established and potential stroke risk factors and provides recommendations for the reduction of stroke risk. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of each writer's previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews (covering the time period since the last review published in 2001 up to January 2005), reference to previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulate recommendations based on standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had numerous opportunities to comment in writing on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. The guideline underwent extensive peer review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Schemes for assessing a person's risk of a first stroke were evaluated. Risk factors or risk markers for a first stroke were classified according to their potential for modification (nonmodifiable, modifiable, or potentially modifiable) and strength of evidence (well documented or less well documented). Nonmodifiable risk factors include age, sex, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, and genetic factors. Well-documented and modifiable risk factors include hypertension, exposure to cigarette smoke, diabetes, atrial fibrillation and certain other cardiac conditions, dyslipidemia, carotid artery stenosis, sickle cell disease, postmenopausal hormone therapy, poor diet, physical inactivity, and obesity and body fat distribution. Less well-documented or potentially modifiable risk factors include the metabolic syndrome, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, oral contraceptive use, sleep-disordered breathing, migraine

  7. Hyperuricaemia in congenital heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricaemia is associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as type 2 diabetes or dyslipidaemia and a higher mortality. Out of 528 congenital heart disease patients, 329 patients, including 190 male and 139 female patients, in whom uric acid determination was performed, were studied and followed up to determine survival. Male congenital heart disease patients with high serum uric acid concentrations (>7 mg/dl) showed significantly (p congenital heart disease patients with lower serum uric acid levels (≤7 mg/dl). Meanwhile, female congenital heart disease patients with higher serum uric acid concentrations (>5.7 mg/dl) were significantly (p congenital heart disease patients with lower serum uric acid concentrations (≤5.7 mg/dl). During a median follow-up of 90 months, 16 out of 528 congenital heart disease patients died - 14 patients of cardiac origin and two patients of non-cardiac origin - of whom 10 were hypoxaemic. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no significant differences in mortality between male and female congenital heart disease patients with high and low serum uric acid level concentrations. Hypoxaemia, body mass index, and C-reactive protein concentrations are higher in hyperuricaemic congenital heart disease patients, although no significant differences were seen in mortality between congenital heart disease patients with high and low serum uric acid concentrations.

  8. Associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid intima-media thickness and manifest atherosclerotic vascular disease with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liira Helena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of atherosclerosis in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS has not previously been addressed in population studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT, and clinical atherosclerotic diseases with CTS. Methods In this cross sectional study, the target population consisted of subjects aged 30 or over who had participated in the national Finnish Health Survey in 2000-2001. Of the 7977 eligible subjects, 6254 (78.4% were included in our study. Carotid IMT was measured in a sub-sample of subjects aged 45 to 74 (N = 1353. Results Obesity (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.1-5.4, high LDL cholesterol (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-9.1 for >190 vs. 200 vs. Conclusions Our findings suggest an association between CTS and cardiovascular risk factors in young people, and carotid IMT and clinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in older people. CTS may either be a manifestation of atherosclerosis, or both conditions may share similar risk factors.

  9. Systems biology approaches to heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Silke R

    2011-07-15

    Even though the foundation of systems biology approaches to cardiac function was led more than fifty years ago, there has been slow progression over the last few decades. Systems biology studies were mainly focused on lower organisms, frequently on yeast. With the boost of high-throughput technologies, systems level analyses, building one backbone of systems biology, started to complement the single-gene focus in the fields of heart development and congenital heart disease. A challenge is to bring together the many uncovered molecular components driving heart development and eventually to establish computational models describing this complex developmental process. Congenital heart diseases represent overlapping phenotypes, reflecting the modularity of heart development. The aetiology of the majority of congenital heart disease is still unknown, and it is suggestive that understanding the biological network underlying heart development will enhance our understanding for its alteration. This review provides an overview of the framework for systems biology approaches focusing on the developing heart and its pathology. Recent methodological developments building the basis for future studies are highlighted and the knowledge gained is specified.

  10. Current challenges in pediatric heart transplantation for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirklin, James K

    2015-10-01

    Pediatric heart transplantation is an established therapy for end-stage cardiac disease without suitable medical or surgical options. However, transplantation for congenital heart disease carries an incremental risk that challenges the pediatric transplant team on multiple levels. With improved outcomes following palliative and corrective congenital cardiac surgery, cardiac transplantation has decreased in recent years as a primary therapy. Nevertheless, congenital heart disease remains the most common indication for cardiac transplantation during infancy. Primary transplantation in infancy is selectively recommended for severe systemic ventricular dysfunction, severe atrioventricular valve insufficiency, and occlusive coronary artery anomalies, particularly with single ventricle physiology. Wait-list mortality remains highest for infants with prior palliative surgery and patients with failing Fontan physiology, both of whom have limited options for effective mechanical circulatory support. The sensitized patient carries an increased risk with prolonged wait times, although virtual cross-matches and single bead assays for donor-specific antigens have facilitated the transplant process. Early and late survival after transplantation for congenital heart disease remain inferior to cardiomyopathy, with prior Fontan procedure as a major risk factor. However, among survivors at 6 months, late outcomes are generally excellent. Major late causes of death include allograft vasculopathy, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, and acute rejection. Noncompliance with medications remains a major risk for teenage mortality. Despite the myriad of evolving challenges, pediatric heart transplantation for congenital heart disease enjoys routine short and long-term success at experienced centers for the vast majority of such patients without other options.

  11. HIV and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiat, Ahmed; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Zachariah, Don; Manga, Pravin

    2017-01-03

    The association of coronary heart disease (CHD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been well recognized for many years. The etiology of the increased prevalence of CHD in HIV-infected populations is the result of complex interactions among the viral infection, host factors, traditional risk factors, and therapies for HIV. As the HIV population is living longer, largely attributable to combination antiretroviral therapy, there is concern about the effect of the rising prevalence of CHD on morbidity and mortality, as well its effect on health systems around the world. This review will highlight the epidemiological evidence linking HIV infection and CHD. It will also focus on our current understanding of the pathogenesis and factors associated with HIV infection and CHD. In addition, the review will highlight modes of presentation and management strategies for mitigating risk and treatment of HIV-positive patients presenting with CHD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Periodontitis as a risk factor of coronary heart diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, M; Górska, R; Suwalski, P; Czerniuk, M R; Kowalski, J

    2006-01-01

    Unstable atherosclerotic plaque is a dangerous clinical state, possibly leading to acute coronary deficiency resulting in cardiac infarction. Inflammatory factor's role in creating pathological lesions in the endothelium of coronary vessels is frequently raised. This state may be caused by bacteria able to initiate clot formation in blood vessel and destabilizing atherosclerotic plaque already present. Source of these pathogens are chronic inflammatory processes occurring in organism, among them periodontal disease as one of more frequent. Aim of the work was to evaluate incidence of selected anaerobic bacteria in subgingival plaque and in atherosclerotic plaque in patients treated surgically because of coronary vessels' obliteration. Study was performed on 20 individuals with chronic periodontitis. Subgingival plaque was collected from periodontal pockets deeper than 5 mm DNA test was used for marking eight pathogens responsible for periodontal tissues destruction. In the same patients, as well as in 10 edentulous individuals material from atherosclerotic plaque was collected during by-pass implantation procedure, and identical DNA testing occurred. In 13 of 20 patients pathogens most frequent in severe chronic periodontitis were found in coronary vessels. In 10 cases those bacteria were also present in atherosclerotic plaque. Pathogens linked with periodontal disease were also found in 7 of 10 edentulous individuals. Most frequently marked bacteria were: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola. It seems that advancement of periodontal disease does not have influence on bacteria permeability to coronary vessels. Important is the presence of active inflammatory process expressed by significantly higher bleeding index in patients with marked bacteria in atherosclerotic plaque.

  13. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as surgery for adults who have aortic valve stenosis. Doctors often use balloon valvuloplasty to repair valve stenosis in infants and children. Replacing Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t ...

  14. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as surgery for adults who have aortic valve stenosis. Doctors often use balloon valvuloplasty to repair valve stenosis in infants and children. Replacing Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t ...

  15. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t be repaired and must be replaced. This surgery involves removing the faulty valve and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made ...

  16. How to Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your heart. Some ways to help manage your stress include exercise, listening to music, focusing on something calm or peaceful, and meditating. Manage diabetes. Having diabetes doubles your risk of diabetic heart ...

  17. The Danish Register of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Morten; Videbæk, Jørgen; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-07-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) constitute the largest group of congenital defects with a prevalence at birth of 5-11 per 1000 live births, and the population of adults with CHD is increasing. However, few population-based long-term outcome data exist. The Danish Register of Congenital Heart Disease holds data on patients diagnosed with CHD since 1963 and patients below 25 years of age with other types of heart disease. Overall and defect specific validation is ongoing. Together with other Danish registers, the Danish Register of Congenital Heart Disease provides extensive research possibilities.

  18. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Also known as Coronary Artery Disease Leer en ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Also known as Coronary Artery Disease Leer en ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  20. Atherosclerotic burden in coronary and peripheral arteries in patients with first clinical manifestation of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjec, Igor

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the atherosclerotic burden in patients with the first symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 100 consecutive patients (new-onset severe angina or myocardial infarction) and 70 age and sex matched asymptomatic volunteers. Functional and morphologic atherosclerotic markers were sought in carotid, brachial and femoral arteries of all individuals by means of high-resolution ultrasonography, whereas coronary arteriography was performed in the CAD patients only. A total of 347 coronary lesions [230 (66%) obstructive] were discovered in the CAD patients as well as 105 peripheral plaques [26 (25%) obstructive]. The mean percentage diameter stenosis of the culprit coronary lesion was 83.8 ± 15.8%, the mean vessel score 1.7 (range 0-3), the mean stenosis score 19.8 (range 1.5-89.0), and the mean extent score 49.1% (range 10-65%). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as assessed by the brachial flow-mediated response (FMR), was reduced by 50% in the CAD patients (P peripheral arteries of the CAD patients (P arteries of the CAD patients by 43%, in brachial arteries by 20% and in femoral arteries by 57% (P peripheral arteries of our patients with the first clinical presentation of CAD.

  1. Gender differences in coronary heart disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maas, A.H.E.M; Appelman, Y.E.A

    2010-01-01

    ...’ against cardiovascular disease. The under-recognition of heart disease and differences in clinical presentation in women lead to less aggressive treatment strategies and a lower representation of women in clinical trials...

  2. Surgery in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A. C.; Verheugt, C. L.; Vaartjes, I.; Uiterwaal, C. S. P. M.; Langemeijer, M. M.; Koolbergen, D. R.; Hazekamp, M. G.; van Melle, J. P.; Konings, T. C.; Bellersen, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with congenital heart disease require surgery in adulthood. We aimed to give an overview of the prevalence, distribution, and outcome of cardiovascular surgery for congenital heart disease. We specifically questioned whether the effects of surgical treatment on

  3. Nutritional treatment of congenital heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Bougle, D; Iselin, M; Kahyat, A; Duhamel, J F

    1986-01-01

    Twelve of 13 patients with congenital heart disease given continuous enteral nutrition displayed normal growth; cardiac function remained stable or improved in 10 in spite of the water load (146 +/- 22 ml/kg/day). This is safe treatment for malnutrition in congenital heart disease.

  4. Sleep in infants with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ykeda, Daisy Satomi; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Lopes, Antonio A B; Alves, Rosana S C

    2009-01-01

    To investigate hypoxia and sleep disordered breathing in infants with congenital heart disease. Prospective study. In-hospital full polysomnography was performed on 14 infants with congenital heart disease, age 7 +/-1 months, and in 7 normal infants, age 10 +/-2 months. Congenital heart disease infants were classified as acyanotic (n=7) or cyanotic (n=7). Nutritional status, assessed by the Gomez classification and expressed as % weight for age, was 70 +/-7, 59 +/-11 and 94 +/-16 in the acyanotic, cyanotic congenital heart disease and control infants, respectively (pcongenital heart disease infants (11 out of 14) and only one control infant had an AHI >1 event/hour. The minimum oxygen saturation was 79% (74-82), 73% (57-74) and 90% (90-91) in the acyanotic, cyanotic congenital heart disease infants and controls, respectively (p congenital heart disease frequently present with sleep-disordered breathing associated with oxygen desaturations but not arousals. Therefore, sleep may represent a significant burden to infants with congenital heart disease.

  5. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was used to assess mortality

  6. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to do a marathon.” Learn more: Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke Make the Effort to Prevent Heart Disease with Life's Simple 7 ® Learn more about African-Americans and stroke at our Power To End Stroke ...

  7. Transcription Factor Pathways and Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulley, David J.; Black, Brian L.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout life. Mutations in numerous transcription factors have been identified in patients and families with some of the most common forms of cardiac malformations and arrhythmias. This review discusses factor pathways known to be important for normal heart development and how abnormalities in these pathways have been linked to morphological and functional forms of congenital heart defects. A comprehensive, current list of known transcription factor mutations associated with congenital heart disease is provided, but the review focuses primarily on three key transcription factors, Nkx2-5, GATA4, and Tbx5, and their known biochemical and genetic partners. By understanding the interaction partners, transcriptional targets, and upstream activators of these core cardiac transcription factors, additional information about normal heart formation and further insight into genes and pathways affected in congenital heart disease should result. PMID:22449847

  8. 3D Whole Heart Imaging for Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Greil, Gerald; Tandon, Animesh (Aashoo); Silva Vieira, Miguel; Hussain, Tarique

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) whole heart techniques form a cornerstone in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease (CHD). It offers significant advantages over other CHD imaging modalities and techniques: no ionizing radiation; ability to be run free-breathing; ECG-gated dual-phase imaging for accurate measurements and tissue properties estimation; and higher signal-to-noise ratio and isotropic voxel resolution for multiplanar reformatting assessment. However, there are...

  9. Adult congenital heart disease: a growing epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Pablo; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Dore, Annie; Marcotte, François; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Ibrahim, Reda; Asgar, Anita; Miro, Joaquim; Andelfinger, Gregor; Mondésert, Blandine; de Guise, Pierre; Poirier, Nancy; Khairy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Medical and surgical breakthroughs in the care of children born with heart defects have generated a growing population of adult survivors and spawned a new subspecialty of cardiology: adult congenital heart disease. The prevalence of adult congenital heart disease is escalating at a rampant rate, outpacing the relatively static prevalence of pediatric congenital heart disease, because adults now surpass children in numbers by a ratio of 2:1. As such, congenital heart disease can no longer be considered primarily a pediatric specialty. Most congenital heart defects are not curable and require lifelong specialized care. Health care systems worldwide are challenged to meet the unique needs of this increasingly complex patient population, including the development of supraregional centres of excellence to provide comprehensive and multidisciplinary specialized care. In this review, we explore the incidence and prevalence of congenital heart disease and their changing patterns, address organization and delivery of care, highlight the importance of appropriate training and dedicated research, summarize the high burden of health care resource utilization, and provide an overview of common issues encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anesthetic drugs in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    The structural defects associated with the various forms of congenital heart disease lead to pathological and functional changes that place patients at risk for adverse events, and in fact the perioperative incidence of morbidity and mortality has been documented to be increased in children with congenital heart disease. Patients with congenital heart disease can present to the anesthesiologist in a relatively precarious state of balance of several hemodynamic factors, including preload, ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, heart rate, and cardiac rhythm. Anesthetic drugs can affect each of these, and an ideal anesthetic drug for such patients does not exist. The purpose of this article is to review the hemodynamic effects of anesthetic drugs and how they may contribute to the occurrence of adverse events in children with congenital heart disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Preattentive processing of heart cues and the perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was aimed at clarifying whether preattentive processing of heart cues results in biased perception of heart sensations in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD) who are also highly trait anxious. Twenty-six patients with ConHD and 22 healthy participants categorized

  13. Interleukin-18 Gene Polymorphism in Patients with and without Atherosclerotic Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghaderi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Several studies have revealed that inflammation plays an important role in development of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD and its other manifestations. IL-18 is a pleiotropic cytokine that enhances Th1( T helper 1 or Th2( T helper 2 immune response depending on its cytokine milieu and genetic background. It strongly induces formation of plaques in patients with CAD. Variations in the IL-18 gene found to influence both levels of IL-18 and clinical outcomes in individuals with history of heart disease. To investigate the association of two IL-18 promoter gene polymorphisms at -607C/A and -137G/C positions with CAD, and some CAD risk factors such as diabetes, arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cigarette smoking and obesity.Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted by the salting out method from the peripheral arterial blood of 280 patients with CAD documented by coronary angiography (143 with a documented history of myocardial infarction termed positive MI and 137 without myocardial infarction designated negative MI and 140 age- sex matched persons with a normal coronary angiography (control group.The genotype of both CAD and control groups were assessed by ASP-PCR method. Arlequin program was used for gametic phase estimation and haplotype analysis.Results: There was no significant difference between patient and control groups either allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic for both variants (p>0.05. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between IL-18 genotypes and CAD risk factors in the patient group (P>0.05. Conclusion: These results suggest that the investigated IL-18 gene promoter polymorphisms at -607C/A and -137G/C positions are not associated with genetic susceptibility to CAD in southern Iran.

  14. Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahiru, Ehete; de Cates, Angharad N; Farr, Matthew Rb; Jarvis, Morag C; Palla, Mohan; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah; Huffman, Mark D

    2017-03-06

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet ASCVD risk factor control and secondary prevention rates remain low. A fixed-dose combination of blood pressure- and cholesterol-lowering and antiplatelet treatments into a single pill, or polypill, has been proposed as one strategy to reduce the global burden of ASCVD. To determine the effect of fixed-dose combination therapy on all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal ASCVD events, and adverse events. We also sought to determine the effect of fixed-dose combination therapy on blood pressure, lipids, adherence, discontinuation rates, health-related quality of life, and costs. We updated our previous searches in September 2016 of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, ISI Web of Science, and DARE, HTA, and HEED. We also searched two clinical trials registers in September 2016. We used no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of a fixed-dose combination therapy including at least one blood pressure-lowering and one lipid-lowering component versus usual care, placebo, or an active drug comparator for any treatment duration in adults 18 years old or older, with no restrictions on presence or absence of pre-existing ASCVD. Three review authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted the data for this update. We evaluated risk of bias using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MD) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using fixed-effect models when heterogeneity was low (I2 50%) and random-effects models when heterogeneity was high (I2 ≥ 50%). We used the GRADE approach to evaluate the quality of evidence. In the initial review, we identified nine randomised controlled trials with a total of 7047 participants and four additional trials (n = 2012 participants; mean age range 62 to 63 years; 30% to 37% women) were included in this

  15. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. 1. Evidence from genetic, epidemiologic, and clinical studies. A consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ference, Brian A; Ginsberg, Henry N; Graham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results: We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence f...

  16. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. 1. Evidence from genetic, epidemiologic, and clinical studies. A consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian; Ray, Kausik K.; Packard, Chris J.; Bruckert, Eric; Hegele, Robert A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Raal, Frederick J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Watts, Gerald F.; Boren, Jan; Fazio, Sergio; Horton, Jay D.; Masana, Luis; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; van de Sluis, Bart; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Landmesser, Ulf; Laufs, Ulrich; Wiklund, Olov; Stock, Jane K.; Chapman, M. John; Catapano, Alberico L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results: We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from

  17. Sex matters to the arteries : studies into the (epi)genetic background and clinical outcome of atherosclerotic disease in women and men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haitjema, S

    2017-01-01

    The higher incidence of atherosclerotic disease at a younger age in men has directed most cardiovascular research since the early 1980s towards men. Yet, if studied, sex-differences are found in etiology, diagnostics, therapy and prognosis of CVD. It has been suggested that sex hormone status

  18. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can't Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease and Stroke email updates Enter email Submit Heart disease risk factors you can't control Some factors ... 2013). Hypertension in Pregnancy. Previous Page Next Page Heart disease resources Related information Heart-healthy eating Stress and ...

  19. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  20. Heart disease, family history and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Millar, W J

    2001-08-01

    This article examines the association of family history of heart disease and leisure-time physical activity with incident heart disease. The data are from the 1994/95, 1996/97 and 1998/99 longitudinal household components of Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey. This study is based on information provided by 9,255 respondents aged 20 or older who reported that, in 1994/95, they were free of diagnosed heart disease and in good health. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate the association of family history and physical activity with a new diagnosis of heart disease, while controlling for age, sex, educational attainment, smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, and body mass index. When family history and other risk factors were taken into account, people who, in 1994/95, engaged in regular physical activity at a moderate level or beyond had lower odds of receiving a new diagnosis of heart disease than did sedentary individuals. People with a family history of heart disease who regularly participated in at least moderate physical activity had lower odds of developing heart disease than did their sedentary counterparts.

  1. Diagnosis and Management of Noncardiac Complications in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, George K; Saidi, Arwa; Bhatt, Ami B; Burchill, Luke J; Deen, Jason F; Earing, Michael G; Gewitz, Michael; Ginns, Jonathan; Kay, Joseph D; Kim, Yuli Y; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Krieger, Eric V; Wu, Fred M; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-11-14

    Life expectancy and quality of life for those born with congenital heart disease (CHD) have greatly improved over the past 3 decades. While representing a great advance for these patients, who have been able to move from childhood to successful adult lives in increasing numbers, this development has resulted in an epidemiological shift and a generation of patients who are at risk of developing chronic multisystem disease in adulthood. Noncardiac complications significantly contribute to the morbidity and mortality of adults with CHD. Reduced survival has been documented in patients with CHD with renal dysfunction, restrictive lung disease, anemia, and cirrhosis. Furthermore, as this population ages, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and its risk factors are becoming increasingly prevalent. Disorders of psychosocial and cognitive development are key factors affecting the quality of life of these individuals. It is incumbent on physicians who care for patients with CHD to be mindful of the effects that disease of organs other than the heart may have on the well-being of adults with CHD. Further research is needed to understand how these noncardiac complications may affect the long-term outcome in these patients and what modifiable factors can be targeted for preventive intervention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Implantation of total artificial heart in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S L

    2014-07-18

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation. In the case presented here, a 17 year-old patient with congenital transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) experienced progressively worsening HF due to his congenital condition. He was hospitalized multiple times and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). However, his condition soon deteriorated to end-stage HF with multisystem organ failure. Due to the patient's grave clinical condition and the presence of complex cardiac lesions, the decision was made to proceed with a TAH. The abnormal arrangement of the patient's ventricles and great arteries required modifications to the TAH during implantation. With the TAH in place, the patient was able to return home and regain strength and physical well-being while awaiting a donor heart. He was successfully bridged to heart transplantation 5 months after receiving the device. This report highlights the TAH is feasible even in patients with structurally abnormal hearts, with technical modification.

  3. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF THE STATINS IN PREVENTING AND TREATING OF THE CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to stabilize and reverse the atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries due to therapy with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin was demonstrated in recent studies. The advantage of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy compared with standard therapy is proven in patients with both stable and acute forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD. Pleiotropic effects, in particular, effect on endothelial function, ability to reduce the blood level of C-reactive protein are important in the statins mode of action. Risk reduction of cardiovascular complications and slow down of atherosclerosis progression in patients with IHD was significantly associated with decrease in levels of both atherogenic lipids and C-reactive protein.

  5. Preventing Heart Disease - At Any Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cook. Know your family history . Shake down your family tree to learn about heart health. Having a relative with heart disease increases your risk, and more so if the relative is a parent or ... in your family. Tame your stress . Long-term stress causes an ...

  6. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A. Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart

  7. [Congenital heart diseases in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, Carlo; Veronesi, Benedetta; Grassi, Laura; Bompani, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases are abnormalities in the heart's structure that are present at birth. Some are known to be associated with genetic disorders. They affect 8 out of every 1,000 newborns. They range from simple defects with no symptoms to complex defects. They are divided in two types: cyanotic and not cyanotic.

  8. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction and Ischemic Heart Disease – Where Are We in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W.; Pepine, Carl J.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. PMID:25454903

  9. Microvascular coronary dysfunction and ischemic heart disease: where are we in 2014?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... procedures, and cardiac rehabilitation (a program consisting of education, counseling, and exercise training) are among the mainstays of conventional treatment . Some heart patients also turn to chelation therapy using disodium EDTA ( ...

  11. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a bit of a penchant for racial bias where Hispanic and Latina women are concerned. And ... Tu Corazón About Go Red For Women Alliances Media Room The American Heart Association is a qualified ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  13. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Economic Evaluation Spotlights & Strategies Results & Lessons Learned Data & Statistics Fact Sheets Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheets ... Roadmap for State Planning Other Data Resources Other Statistic Resources Grantee Information Cross-Program Information Online Tools ...

  14. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...

  15. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Dental Association. 2012;143:826. Brushing your teeth. American Dental Association. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/b/brushing-your-teeth. Accessed Sept. 19, 2015. Heart disease and oral ...

  16. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto Júnior,Valdester Cavalcante; Branco,Klébia Magalhães P. Castello; Cavalcante,Rodrigo Cardoso; Carvalho Junior,Waldemiro; Lima,José Rubens Costa; Freitas,Sílvia Maria de; Fraga,Maria Nazaré de Oliveira; Souza,Nayana Maria Gomes de

    2015-01-01

    AbstractIntroduction:Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007.Objective:To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes.Methods:The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for...

  17. Dental considerations in patients with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Pamplona, Marta; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Cardiovascular diseases are one of the main causes of death in the developed world, and represent the first cause of mortality in Spain. In addition to their associated morbidity, such disorders are important due to the number of affected individuals and the many patients subjected to treatment because of them. Objective: An update is provided on the oral manifestations seen in patients with arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, arrhythmias and heart failure, and...

  18. Heart Disease in Women: Unappreciated Challenges, GPER as a New Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. Feldman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease in women remains underappreciated, underdiagnosed and undertreated. Further, although we are starting to understand some of the social and behavioral determinants for this, the biological basis for the increased rate of rise in atherosclerosis risk in women after menopause remains very poorly understand. In this review we will outline the scope of the clinical issues related to heart disease in women, the emerging findings regarding the biological basis underlying the increased prevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors in postmenopausal women (vs. men and the role of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER and its genetic regulation as a determinant of these sex-specific risks. GPER is a recently appreciated GPCR that mediates the rapid effects of estrogen and aldosterone. Recent studies have identified that GPER activation regulates both blood pressure. We have shown that regulation of GPER function via expression of a hypofunctional GPER genetic variant is an important determinant of blood pressure and risk of hypertension in women. Further, our most recent studies have identified that GPER activation is an important regulator of low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor metabolism and that expression of the hypofunctional GPER genetic variant is an important contributor to the development of hypercholesterolemia in women. GPER appears to be an important determinant of the two major risk factors for coronary artery disease-blood pressure and LDL cholesterol. Further, the importance of this mechanism appears to be greater in women. Thus, the appreciation of the role of GPER function as a determinant of the progression of atherosclerotic disease may be important both in our understanding of cardiometabolic function but also in opening the way to greater appreciation of the sex-specific regulation of atherosclerotic risk factors.

  19. Rheumatic Heart Disease Associated with Secondary Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of systemic amyloidosis worldwide, AA amyloidosis occurs in the course of chronic inflammatory diseases, hereditary periodic fevers, and with certain neoplasms such as Hodgkin disease and renal cell carcinoma. Amyloidosis due to rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is not common but can be seen. We report here a patient ...

  20. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  1. [Hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Jan

    Hypothyroidism is frequently found in patients with heart disease. It is a risk factor for atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease and has a direct negative effect on both the left and right ventricular functions (hypothyroidism-induced cardiomyopathy). The confirmed manifest hypothyroidism is always a reason for replacement therapy with levothyroxine; regarding patients with heart disease, we always begin treatment with a small dose and increase it gradually. The treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is disputable and its benefits probably depend on age. At a higher age, the therapy-related risks often outweigh its benefits, so we make do with the target levels of the thyroid stimulating hormone being within the upper band of the normal range, or even slightly above it, rather than overdosing the patient. To summarize in a simplified way, the treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is the most effective in younger individuals, mainly those aged below 65, while at a higher age > 80 years the risk usually outweighs the benefit.Key words: cardiovascular risk - hypothyroidism - ischemic heart disease - left ventricular dysfunction - right ventricular dysfunction - subclinical hypothyroidism - thyroid peroxidase antibodies.

  2. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  3. Coronary Arteries in Childhood Heart Disease: Implications for Management of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, Fernando; Valente, Anne Marie; Porayette, Prashob; Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Sanders, Stephen P

    2012-06-15

    Survival of patients with congenital heart defects has improved dramatically. Many will undergo interventional catheter or surgical procedures later in life. Others will develop atherosclerotic or post-surgical coronary heart disease. The coronary artery anatomy in patients with congenital heart disease differs substantially from that seen in the structurally normal heart. This has implications for diagnostic procedures as well as interventions. The unique epicardial course seen in some defects could impair interpretation of coronary angiograms. Interventional procedures, especially at the base of the heart, risk injuring unusually placed coronary arteries so that coronary artery anatomy must be delineated thoroughly prior to the procedure. In this review, we will describe the variants of coronary artery anatomy and their implications for interventional and surgical treatment and for sudden death during late follow-up in several types of congenital heart defects including: tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and defects with functionally one ventricle. We will also discuss the coronary abnormalities seen in Kawasaki disease.

  4. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about other tests and procedures, go to the diagnosis sections of the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease , Heart Failure , and Cardiomyopathy articles. Treatment Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated ...

  6. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Handbook for Women Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease Overweight and Obesity A healthy weight is important ... a woman is, the higher her risk for heart disease. Overweight also increases the risks for stroke, congestive ...

  7. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  8. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects: A cause of heart disease? Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart ...

  9. Effects of Submaximal Aerobic Exercise on Regulatory T Cell Markers of Male Patients Suffering from Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raygan, Fariba; Sayyah, Mansour; Janesar Qamsari, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sehat, Mojtaba

    2017-02-01

    There are confirmed beneficiary effects of exercise on atherosclerotic inflammation of ischemia-associated heart diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aerobic exercise on T-regulatory cell markers of IL-35 as well as FoxP3 and T-helper2 marker of IL-33 in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). This research was performed on 44 asymptomatic male patients with ischemic heart disease. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups of submaximal aerobic exercise and control group. Blood samples were collected before and after the termination of the exercise protocol. Serum levels of IL-35 and IL-33 as well as the amount of FoxP3 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured by Elisa and Real time PCR, respectively. Serum levels of IL-35 (p=0.001) as well as the amount of FoxP3 gene expression increased significantly (p=0.012)  in exercise group even after controlling the likely confounding effects of age, length of ischemia, duration of the disease, and the amount of such factors before exercise (p≤0.042). It seems that exercise may yield a better control of atherosclerotic inflammation in patients with ischemic heart disease through the induction of regulatory T cells.

  10. Relationship between vascular endothelium and periodontal disease in atherosclerotic lesions: Review article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Aurélio Lumertz Saffi Mariana Vargas Furtado Carisi Anne Polanczyk Márlon Munhoz Montenegro Ingrid Webb Josephson Ribeiro Cassio Kampits Alex Nogueira Haas Cassiano Kuchenbecker R?sing Eneida Rejane Rabelo-Silva

    2015-01-01

    .... Recent studies suggest that periodontal infection and the ensuing increase in the levels of inflammatory markers may be associated with myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease...

  11. Valvular aspects of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Boglarka; ElGuindy, Ahmed; Smith, Sidney C; Yacoub, Magdi; Holmes, David R

    2016-03-26

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain major global health problems. Although strategies for primary and secondary prevention are well established, their worldwide implementation is suboptimum. In patients with advanced valvular heart disease, mechanical approaches (both percutaneous and surgical) are well described and can, for selected patients, greatly improve outcomes; however, access to centres with experienced staff is very restricted in regions that have the highest prevalence of disease. Development of diagnostic strategies that can be locally and regionally provided and improve access to expert centres for more advanced disease are urgent and, as yet, unmet clinical needs. We outline current management strategies for valvular rheumatic heart disease on the basis of either strong evidence or expert consensus, and highlight areas needing future research and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heart Disease in Women | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease in Women Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most ...

  13. Effects of direct renin inhibition on atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Brian K; Trujillo, Alex; Seifert, Charles F; Simoni, Jan S; Doctolero, Susan; Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate whether the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, has a more favorable effect compared to amlodipine on atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease and diabetes currently receiving standard secondary prevention therapy. A total of 38 patients were randomly assigned initially to either aliskiren (150 mg daily) or amlodipine (5 mg daily) for 2 weeks after which the dose of either medication was increased to its maximum daily dose for 4 additional weeks. Baseline and 6-week blood samples were analyzed for changes from baseline and between treatment groups for vascular and intracellular cell adhesion molecule, C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, 8-isoprostane, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Thirty-one patients completed the study. More of the dropouts occurred in patients receiving aliskiren. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both treatment arms with no differences between the groups being noted. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, nitric oxide, and C-reactive protein concentrations increased in both groups from baseline but changes from baseline or between groups were not significant. Vascular and intracellular cell adhesion molecule, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and isoprostane concentrations decreased in each treatment arm from baseline, but these changes were not significant and no differences were noted between the groups. Treatment with either aliskiren or amlodipine did not significantly alter surrogate biomarkers of atherosclerosis in patients with both diabetes and established cardiovascular disease already receiving appropriate secondary cardiovascular prevention therapy. The study is limited in its size and duration to see an effect.

  14. Current smoking is associated with extracranial carotid atherosclerotic stenosis but not with intracranial large artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ruijun; Pan, Yuesong; Yan, Hongyi; Zhang, Runhua; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Penglian; Wang, Yilong; Li, Hao; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-26

    Accumulating evidence has shown that cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear about the potential mechanisms through which cigarette smoking affects stroke risk. In the study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between cigarette smoking and the occurrence of extracranial (ECAS) and intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). We analyzed patients enrolled in the Chinese intracranial atherosclerosis (CICAS), which was a prospective, multicenter, hospital-based cohort study. Smoking status was classified into never, former and current smoking. For those patients with current smoking, data on time duration (year) and extent (the number of cigarette smoked per day) was recorded and pack year of smoking was calculated. ICAS was evaluated with 3-dimentional time-of-flight MRA and ECAS was evaluated with cervical ultrasonography or contrast-enhanced MRA. Multivariable Logistic regression was performed to identify the association between smoking status and the occurrence of ECAS and ICAS. A total of 2656 patients (92.7%) of acute ischemic stroke and 208 (7.3%) of transient ischemic attack were analyzed. The mean age was 61.9 ± 11.2 and 67.8% were male. There were 141 (4.9%) patients had only ECAS, 1074 (37.5%) had only ICAS, and 261 (9.1%) had both ECAS and ICAS. Current smoking was significantly associated with the occurrence of ECAS (adjusted OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.09-1.99, P smoking increment, the risk of ECAS increased by 1.1% (adjusted OR = 1.011; 95% CI = 1.003-1.019; P = 0.005); with one cigarette smoked per day increment, the risk of ECAS increased by 1.0% (adjusted OR = 1.010; 95% CI = 1.001-1.020; P = 0.03); and with one pack year of smoking increment, the risk of ECAS increased by 0.7% (adjusted OR = 1.007; 95% CI = 1.002-1.012; P smoking status and the occurrence of ICAS. A dose-response relationship was identified between cigarette smoking and the occurrence of ECAS, but not ICAS

  15. Do the Effects of Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in PAD Patients Differ from Other Atherosclerotic Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, Pavel; Jezovnik, Mateja Kaja

    2015-06-25

    Atherosclerosis is considered a generalized disease. Similar or identical etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors are involved in various atherosclerotic diseases, and the positive effects of preventive measures on atherogenesis in different parts of the arterial system were shown. However, until know, great emphasis has been placed on the aggressive pharmacological management of coronary artery disease (CHD), while less attention has been devoted to the management of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), despite its significant morbidity and mortality. Data on the efficacy of preventive measures in PAD patients have mostly been gained from subgroup analyses from studies devoted primarily to the management of coronary patients. These data have shown that treatment of risk factors for atherosclerosis with drugs can reduce cardiovascular events also in patients with PAD. The effects of some preventive procedures in PAD patients differ from coronary patients. Aspirin as a basic antiplatelet drug has been shown to be less effective in PAD patients than in coronary patients. The latest Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration (ATC) meta-analysis demonstrates no benefit of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular events in PAD. Statins reduce cardiovascular events in all three of the most frequently presented cardiovascular diseases, including PAD to a comparable extent. Recent studies indicate that in PAD patients, in addition to a reduction in cardiovascular events, statins may have some hemodynamic effects. They prolong walking distance and improve quality of life. Similarly, angiotensin enzyme inhibitors are also effective in the prevention of cardiovascular events in coronary, cerebrovascular, as well as PAD patients and show positive effects on the walking capacity of patients with intermittent claudication. In PAD patients, the treatment of hypertension and diabetes also effectively prevents cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As PAD patients are at a highest risk

  16. Is carotid artery evaluation necessary for primary prevention in asymptomatic high-risk patients without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim GH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available GeeHee Kim,1 Ho-Joong Youn,2 Yun-Seok Choi,2 Hae Ok Jung,2 Wook Sung Chung,2 Chul-Min Kim1 1Department of Internal Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objective: Routine measurement of the carotid intima–media thickness is not recommended in recent clinical practice guidelines for risk assessment of the first atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD event (the definition of which includes acute coronary syndromes, a history of myocardial infarction, stable or unstable angina, coronary or other arterial revascularization, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or peripheral arterial disease presumed to be of atherosclerotic origin. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of carotid artery evaluation for primary prevention of ASCVD in asymptomatic high-risk patients visiting a teaching hospital.Methods: Eight hundred seventy-three patients (487 male [55.8%], mean age 59.4±11.5 years who were statin-naive and without ASCVD, which was proven by coronary angiography or coronary CT angiography, were enrolled in this study. The patients underwent carotid scanning in the Medical Department of St Mary’s Hospital from September 2003 to March 2009. ASCVD outcomes were evaluated for median follow-up of 1,402 days.Results: A total of 119 participants experienced ASCVD events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR] =1.026, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.002–1.050, P=0.033, history of smoking (HR =1.751, 95% CI =1.089–2.815, P=0.021, statin therapy (HR =0.388, 95% CI =0.205–0.734, P=0.004, and carotid plaques (HR =1.556, 95% CI =1.009–2.400, P=0.045 were associated with ASCVD events. In middle-aged group (45≤ age <65, n=473, history of smoking (HR =1.995, 95% CI =1.142–3.485, P=0.015, statin therapy (HR =0.320, 95% CI =0.131

  17. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  18. Metabolic management of heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshyaya K Pradhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of cardiac metabolism occur with ischemia and heart failure (HF. This results in increased utilization of noncarbohydrate substrates for energy production and depletion of myocardial adenosine triphosphate, phosphocreatine, and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. A direct approach to manipulate cardiac energy metabolism consists in modifying substrate utilization by the failing heart. The results of research suggest that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and toward glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with HF, in terms of left ventricular function and glucose metabolism improvement. In this paper, some of these concepts will be discussed, and the role of drugs such as trimetazidine will be discussed.

  19. [Percutaneous approaches in valvular heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mustafa; Cetiner, Mehmet Ali

    2009-07-01

    Valvular heart diseases still continue to be an important health problem. Surgical replacement of cardiac valves keeps a widely used treatment method for the present. However, the efficiency of minimal invasive and percutaneous methods targeted to repair and replacement of the diseased valves has been searched for nowadays. The first clinical experiences and early stage outcomes on the applicability of these methods are encouraging. Nevertheless, it should be kept in mind that percutaneous valvular interventions are at their development stages. Long term confidence and efficiency studies of these treatment modalities are needed. The present review emphasizes the studies on percutaneous techniques initiated in the treatment of valvular heart diseases.

  20. Natriuretic peptides in common valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Christopher D; Ray, Simon; Ng, Leong L; McCann, Gerry P

    2010-05-11

    Valvular heart disease, particularly aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, accounts for a large proportion of cardiology practice, and their prevalence is predicted to increase. Management of the asymptomatic patient remains controversial. Biomarkers have been shown to have utility in the management of cardiovascular disease such as heart failure and acute coronary syndromes. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence relating to natriuretic peptides as potential biomarkers in aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The natriuretic peptides correlate with measures of disease severity and symptomatic status and also can be used to predict outcome. This review shows that natriuretic peptides have much promise as biomarkers in common valvular heart disease, but the impact of their measurement on clinical practice and outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  2. Fish consumption, mercury exposure, and heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hing Man; Egeland, Grace M

    2004-02-01

    There is increasing concern regarding methylmercury exposure in populations that consume large amounts of fish. This situation poses a dilemma for those who choose to consume fish for its beneficial effects on heart disease risk. Recent evidence suggests that high mercury content in fish may diminish the cardioprotective effect of fish intake. We explore the current knowledge of Hg toxicity on the heart and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence to date.

  3. Genetic Syndromes associated with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that genetic alterations or variations contribute considerably to the development of congenital heart disease. Many kinds of genetic tests are commercially available, and more are currently under development. Congenital heart disease is frequently accompanied by genetic syndromes showing both cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies. Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of birth defects, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality during infancy and childhood. This review introduces common genetic syndromes showing various types of congenital heart disease, including Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, Williams syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. Although surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved substantially, patients with genetic syndromes may be at an increased risk of death or major complications associated with surgery. Therefore, risk management based on an accurate genetic diagnosis is necessary in order to effectively plan the surgical and medical management and follow-up for these patients. In addition, multidisciplinary approaches and care for the combined extra-cardiac anomalies may help to reduce mortality and morbidity accompanied with congenital heart disease.

  4. Women's hearts : ischaemic heart disease and stress management in women

    OpenAIRE

    Claesson, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI), caused by ischaemic heart disease (IHD), is a leading cause of death in both men and women in the western society. Hypertension, diabetes, and smoking are examples of well-known risk factors of IHD, but also there are psychosocial factors, such as stress, vital exhaustion (unusual fatigue, irritability, and demoralization) and depression that have been associated with an increased risk in both genders. After an AMI, however, women are more likely than men to...

  5. [Prevalence and extent of coronary artery calcification in an asymptomatic cardiovascular Mexican population: Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas-Romero, Carlos; López-Bautista, Fabiola; Rodas-Díaz, Marco A; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Kimura-Hayama, Eric; Juárez-Rojas, Juan G; Medina-Urrutia, Aida X; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo C; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Jorge-Galarza, Esteban

    The prevalence of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a specific marker of atherosclerosis, is unknown in Mexico. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and quantity of CAC and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in a Mexican population. CAC was measured by multidetector computed tomography in asymptomatic subjects who participated in the Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease study. Cardiovascular risk factors and medication were recorded. The sample included 1,423 individuals (49.5% men), aged 53.7±8.4 years. Those with CAC showed a higher prevalence of dyslipidaemia, diabetes, hypertension, and other risk factors. The prevalence of CAC>0 Agatston units was significantly higher among men (40%) than among women (13%). Mean values of CAC score increased consistently with increasing age and were higher in men than women in each age group. Age and high low density lipoprotein cholesterol were independently associated with prevalence of CAC>0 in men and women, while increasing systolic blood pressure in women and age in both genders showed an independent association with CAC extension. In the Mexican population the prevalence and extent of CAC were much higher in men than in women, and strongly increased with age. Independent predictors of CAC prevalence were age and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Data on the lipoprotein (a, coronary atherosclerotic burden and vulnerable plaque phenotype in angiographic obstructive coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Niccoli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein Lp(a represents an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD. However, its association with CAD burden and lipid rich plaques prone to rupture in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS still remains unknown. These data aim to investigate the association among serum Lipoprotein(a (Lpa levels, coronary atherosclerotic burden and features of culprit plaque in patients with ACS and obstructive CAD. For his reason, a total of 500 ACS patients were enrolled for the angiographic cohort and 51 ACS patients were enrolled for the optical coherence tomography (OCT cohort. Angiographic CAD severity was assessed by Sullivan score and by Bogaty score including stenosis score and extent index, whereas OCT plaque features were evaluated at the site of the minimal lumen area and along the culprit segment. In the angiographic cohort, Lp(a was a weak independent predictor of Sullivan score (p30 md/dl compared to patients with lower Lp(a levels (<30 md/dl exhibited a higher prevalence of lipidic plaque at the site of the culprit stenosis (P=0.02, a wider lipid arc (p=0.003 and a higher prevalence of thin-cap fibroatheroma (p=0.004

  7. Periodontitis is an independent risk indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases among 60?174 participants in a large dental school in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Beukers, Nicky G F M; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; van Wijk, Arjen J; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ACVD) has been established in some modestly sized studies (35?years (period 1998?2013). A participant was recorded as having periodontitis based on diagnostic and treatment codes. Any affirmative answer for cerebrovascular accidents, angina pectoris and/or myocardial infarction labelled a participant as having ACVD. Other risk factors for ACVD, notably age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, hyper...

  8. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madrid, Alexander Scheller; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... (telomerase RNA component), which code for proteins and RNA involved in telomere maintenance. We studied 105 055 individuals from Copenhagen; 17 235 of these individuals were diagnosed with ischemic heart disease between 1977 and 2013, and 66 618 had telomere length measured. For genetic studies, we further...

  10. HEART DISEASE IN CHILDREN WITH RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Babachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between heart disease and infectious pathogens is well known. Despite the high frequency of cardiac pathology in infectious diseases, it is rarely diagnosed because of lack of specific clinical  and  laboratory  symptoms. It is especially  difficult to diagnose in  children. Airborne  infections in the structure of infectious morbidity of children occupy a leading place.The aim of this work was to study the nature of the lesions of the heart  in children suffering from acute infection of the respiratory tract.Materials and  methods: 341 children with acute respiratory infection of moderate severity were surveyed by a method of ECG dispersion mapping. Cardiac  pathology has not previously been determined in these children. Signs of disease of the heart was identified in 76 children (22%. Further study included instrumental (ECG, ECHO-KG,  daily monitoring of ECG, biochemical and  etiological (ELISA, PCR, immunocytochemical research  methods for determining the nature of the damage to the heart and the etiology of the disease.Results. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 2%  of children, a violation of repolarization – in 21%,  heart  rhythm disorders  – in 35%  (AV – blockade in 4%.  Most  often  signs  of heart disease were detected in children with Epstein-Barr virus (32%, streptococcal (28%, cytomegalovirus (25%, herpesvirus type  6 infection (24%. Pathogens from the  group of acute respiratory virus infections were identified in 28%, enterovirus – in  10%,  Haemophilus influenzae – in  10%, Mycoplasma pneumonia – in 10%,  Pneumococcus – in 9%, Chlamydia – in 9%, Parvovirus B19 – in 6%.Conclusion. Sensitive screening test  to  detect cardiac pathology is the method of ECG dispersion mapping. Heart damage in children with respiratory diseases in 60% of cases is associated with  mixed infections. Timely  diagnosis of lesions of the heart in infectious diseases in children allows to adjust the

  11. [Stress and heart disease in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Birgit; Kleiber, Christina; Stanske, Beate; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    2005-08-01

    Psychosocial aspects of heart diseases have usually been studied in predominantly male patients. Growing evidence shows that the results of these studies cannot simply be generalized to women. The research on associations between psychosocial factors and heart disease, especially coronary heart disease, in women is therefore summarized in a literature review. The literature shows that women are subject to adverse cardiac effects of stress and chronic negative affects in a similar way as men. However, in women the relevant sources of distress are often found in other areas, i.e., in the family and household environment, and less often at the workplace. Especially for working mothers, the combination of professional and household work constitutes a considerable stressor.Stress is also perceived differently in men and women, and it leads to different physiological reactions. One striking example is the recently described "stress cardiomyopathy", an acute, life-threatening illness, which is often triggered by sudden emotional distress and can mainly be found in women. Women with heart disease report more psychological distress in response to their illness than men. As in men, depressive symptoms may negatively impact prognosis. Nevertheless, women receive less rehabilitation treatment than men and also benefit less from common psychological offerings. There is some evidence that women need specially developed psychosocial interventions and should not simply be treated in predominantly male stress-management groups. In clinical practice, gender-specific stressors and accompanying psychological symptoms should be discussed with the female heart patient. If needed, she should receive individualized psychosomatic treatment.

  12. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdester Cavalcante Pinto Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction:Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007.Objective:To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes.Methods:The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables.Results:The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498; atrial septal defect (4,693; persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490; pulmonary stenosis (1,431; tetralogy of Fallot (973; coarctation of the aorta (973; transposition of the great arteries (887; and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults.Conclusion:In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration.

  13. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Júnior, Valdester Cavalcante; Branco, Klébia Magalhães P Castello; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Carvalho Junior, Waldemiro; Lima, José Rubens Costa; Freitas, Sílvia Maria de; Fraga, Maria Nazaré de Oliveira; Souza, Nayana Maria Gomes de

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007. To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes. The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables. The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498); atrial septal defect (4,693); persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490); pulmonary stenosis (1,431); tetralogy of Fallot (973); coarctation of the aorta (973); transposition of the great arteries (887); and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults. In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration.

  14. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding valvular heart disease in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Mandell, Brian F

    2004-11-01

    Specific systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with distict valvular heart disorders. We discuss the valvular disorders associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, the seronegative spondyloarthropathies, the systemic vasculitides, and scleroderma.

  16. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  17. Drug Therapy in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contractor, Tahmeed; Levin, Vadim; Mandapati, Ravi

    2017-06-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are at risk for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias that can lead to an increased morbidity as well as mortality. When catheter ablation is not an option or unsuccessful, antiarrhythmic drugs are the mainstay of treatment. There is limited data on the use of antiarrhythmics in this population. The purpose of this article is to discuss the practical aspects of the use of antiarrhythmics in adults with congenital heart disease. Several tables have been provided to provide clinicians a reference for daily use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...

  19. Dietary manipulation and social isolation alter disease progression in a murine model of coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nakagawa-Toyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with a deficiency in the HDL receptor SR-BI and low expression of a modified apolipoprotein E gene (SR-BI KO/ApoeR61(h/h called 'HypoE' when fed an atherogenic, 'Paigen' diet develop occlusive, atherosclerotic coronary arterial disease (CHD, myocardial infarctions (MI, and heart dysfunction and die prematurely (50% mortality ~40 days after initiation of this diet. Because few murine models share with HypoE mice these cardinal, human-like, features of CHD, HypoE mice represent a novel, small animal, diet-inducible and genetically tractable model for CHD. To better describe the properties of this model, we have explored the effects of varying the composition and timing of administration of atherogenic diets, as well as social isolation vs. group housing, on these animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HypoE mice were maintained on a standard lab chow diet (control until two months of age. Subsequently they received one of three atherogenic diets (Paigen, Paigen without cholate, Western or control diet for varying times and were housed in groups or singly, and we determined the plasma cholesterol levels, extent of cardiomegaly and/or survival. The rate of disease progression could be reduced by lowering the severity of the atherogenic diet and accelerated by social isolation. Disease could be induced by Paigen diets either containing or free of cholate. We also established conditions under which CHD could be initiated by an atherogenic diet and then subsequently, by replacing this diet with standard lab chow, hypercholesterolemia could be reduced and progression to early death prevented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HypoE mice provide a powerful, surgery-free, diet-'titratable' small animal model that can be used to study the onset of recovery from occlusive, atherosclerotic CHD and heart failure due to MI. HypoE mice can be used for the analysis of the effects of environment (diet, social isolation on a variety of features of

  20. A comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns between different vascular tissues from patients with coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Nazarenko

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation in context of cardiovascular diseases are of considerable interest. So far, our current knowledge of the DNA methylation profiles for atherosclerosis affected and healthy human vascular tissues is still limited. Using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation27 BeadChip, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in right coronary artery in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques, atherosclerotic-resistant internal mammary arteries, and great saphenous veins obtained from same patients with coronary heart disease. The resulting DNA methylation patterns were markedly different between all the vascular tissues. The genes hypomethylated in athero-prone arteries to compare with atherosclerotic-resistant arteries were predominately involved in regulation of inflammation and immune processes, as well as development. The great saphenous veins exhibited an increase of the DNA methylation age in comparison to the internal mammary arteries. Gene ontology analysis for genes harboring hypermethylated CpG-sites in veins revealed the enrichment for biological processes associated with the development. Four CpG-sites located within the MIR10B gene sequence and about 1 kb upstream of the HOXD4 gene were also confirmed as hypomethylated in the independent dataset of the right coronary arteries in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in comparison with the other vascular tissues. The DNA methylation differences observed in vascular tissues of patients with coronary heart disease can provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the development of pathology and explanation for the difference in graft patency after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

  1. The effect of revascularization in patients with anatomically significant atherosclerotic renovascular disease presenting with high-risk clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Diana; Ritchie, James; Green, Darren; Chrysochou, Constantina; Kalra, Philip A

    2017-03-23

    Patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) and high-risk clinical presentations have largely been excluded from randomized controlled trials comparing renal revascularization and optimal medical therapy. Here, we explore the effect of revascularization on death, progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and cardiovascular events (CVE) in a highly selected cohort of patients with ARVD. All patients with a radiological diagnosis of ARVD referred to our tertiary centre have been recruited into a single-centre cohort study between 1986 and 2014. Patients with ≥70% unilateral or bilateral ARVD together with one or more of the following putative high-risk presentations were designated 'high-risk': flash pulmonary oedema (FPE), severe hypertension, rapidly deteriorating renal function. The effect of revascularization on clinical outcomes in high-risk patients, patients with bilateral severe ARVD and those with Revascularization was associated with a reduced risk of progression to ESKD, CVE and all combined events in patients with rapidly deteriorating renal function [ESKD: hazard ratio (HR) 0.47 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.25-0.85), P = 0.01; CVE: HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.91), P = 0.02; Any: HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.90), P = 0.02]. High-risk patients with bilateral ≥70% RAS and those with revascularization when compared with controls. Our results indicate that revascularization may be of benefit in patients with anatomically significant RAS who present with rapidly deteriorating renal function, especially in the presence of severe bilateral ARVD or <1 g/day proteinuria.

  2. Acute non-atherosclerotic ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in an adolescent with concurrent hemoglobin H-Constant Spring disease and polycythemia vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekarat Rattarittamrong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a major complication of polycythemia vera (PV and also a well-known complication of thalassemia. We reported a case of non-atherosclerotic ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in a 17- year-old man with concurrent post-splenectomized hemoglobin H-Constant Spring disease and JAK2 V617F mutation-positive PV. The patient initially presented with extreme thrombocytosis (platelet counts greater than 1,000,000/μL and three months later developed an acute STEMI. Coronary artery angiography revealed an acute clot in the right coronary artery without atherosclerotic plaque. He was treated with plateletpheresis, hydroxyurea and antiplatelet agents. The platelet count decreased and his symptoms improved. This case represents the importance of early diagnosis, awareness of the increased risk for thrombotic complications, and early treatment of PV in patients who have underlying thalassemia with marked thrombocytosis.

  3. Genetic risks for cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafarmand, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), which involves the heart, brain, and peripheral circulation, is a major health problem world-wide. The development of atherosclerosis is a complex process, and several established risk factors are involved. Nevertheless, these established risk factors

  4. Ticagrelor for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease: insights from the PARTHENON clinical development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Peter; Himmelmann, Anders; Ditmarsch, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Ticagrelor (P2Y12 receptor antagonist) is presently indicated for preventing atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome and patients with a history of myocardial infarction. The PARTHENON clinical development program comprises five randomized, controlled, cardiovascular, indication-seeking outcome studies, aiming to evaluate ticagrelor across the spectrum of patients with atherothrombotic disease. Results of two large-scale trials support a benefit for ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndrome (PLATO; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00391872) and in patients with a history of myocardial infarction (PEGASUS-TIMI 54; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01225562). Ongoing trials will provide information on the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (SOCRATES; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01994720), peripheral artery disease (EUCLID; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01732822) and coronary artery disease in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (THEMIS: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01991795).

  5. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors. Overweight and obese adults with risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, ... lead to clinically meaningful reductions in some risk factors, larger weight ... of developing cardiovascular disease. Even when glucose levels are under control, ...

  6. Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein as Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Ivanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL plays a key role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. LDL consists of several subclasses of particles with different sizes and densities, including large buoyant (lb and intermediate and small dense (sd LDLs. It has been well documented that sdLDL has a greater atherogenic potential than that of other LDL subfractions and that sdLDL cholesterol (sdLDL-C proportion is a better marker for prediction of cardiovascular disease than that of total LDL-C. Circulating sdLDL readily undergoes multiple atherogenic modifications in blood plasma, such as desialylation, glycation, and oxidation, that further increase its atherogenicity. Modified sdLDL is a potent inductor of inflammatory processes associated with cardiovascular disease. Several laboratory methods have been developed for separation of LDL subclasses, and the results obtained by different methods can not be directly compared in most cases. Recently, the development of homogeneous assays facilitated the LDL subfraction analysis making possible large clinical studies evaluating the significance of sdLDL in the development of cardiovascular disease. Further studies are needed to establish guidelines for sdLDL evaluation and correction in clinical practice.

  7. [New pharmacological approaches to ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddino, Riccardo; Della Pina, Paolo; Gorga, Elio; Brambilla, Giulio; Regazzoni, Valentina; Gavazzoni, Mara; Dei Cas, Livio

    2012-10-01

    Major steps have been made in the treatment of ischemic heart disease from the discovery of nitrates as antianginal medication to the techniques of percutaneous angioplasty. This incredible therapeutic progress has resulted in a reduced incidence of ischemic heart disease and related mortality and morbidity. However, statistical and epidemiological data indicate that in ischemic heart disease, despite the achievement of great success, there is a necessity for a further step toward treatment, considering the fact that the characteristics of this population are changing (increased prevalence of subendocardial infarction compared with classic transmural infarction, especially in the elderly population). Furthermore, the need for alternative therapeutic approaches to traditional ones is recognized. Ranolazine is a selective inhibitor of Na channels that prevents pathological extension of late Na current developing in the ischemic myocardial cell. This current is responsible for calcium overload, with consequent impairment of diastolic relaxation. Ranolazine reduces Na overload induced by calcium and improves diastolic relaxation and coronary subendocardial flow, without affecting hemodynamic parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, or inotropic state of the heart, avoiding undesirable side effects. Efficacy of ranolazine has been evaluated in several trials, using clinical and instrumental endpoints (MARISA and CARISA) or, more recently, using endpoints such as mortality and reinfarction (ERICA and MERLIN-TIMI 36). Ivabradine acts through the inhibition of late Na current (also known as If), which controls the spontaneous diastolic depolarization of sinus node cells. The partial inhibition of these channels reduces the frequency of sinus node action potential initiation, resulting in decreased heart rate without effects on contractility, atrio-ventricular conduction, or repolarization. The BEAUTIFUL trial has tested whether the effect of ivabradine in lowering

  8. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Vogels, T.; Ottenkamp, J.; Wall, E.E. van der; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Vliegen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate job participation, careerrelated problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the

  9. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Mascha; Vogels, Ton; Ottenkamp, Jaap; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. Pauline; Vliegen, Hubert W.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate job participation, career-related problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Cross-sectional study. Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the Department of Pediatric

  10. Impact of Congenital Heart Disease at Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opić (Petra)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSince the first surgical techniques for patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD) became available some 55 years ago, virtually every area of patient care has evolved substantially. These improvements lead to an increased survival for patients with ConHD, with over 90% of infants

  11. Congenial Heart Disease at Adult Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Congenital cardiac defects are by far the most common congenital anomalies. Of all live births around the world, approximately 1% is born with congenital heart disease.1 This number is even higher if patients with a bicuspid aortic valve are included.2 Accordingly,

  12. Congenital Heart Disease and General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. de Koning (Wilfred)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe treatment of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has progressed vastly over the last five decennia. In the Netherlands, around 200,000 children are born each year, around 1,800 of whom have a CHD. This incidence – 6 – 8 per thousand live births – is reported to be similar

  13. Cardiac Biomarkers in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Eindhoven (Jannet)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Congenital heart disease (ConHD) is the most common congenital abnormality in newborns, with a birth prevalence of 9 per 1000 live births.2 ConHD comprises a number of cardiac abnormalities with varying aetiology which can be divided into simple, moderate and

  14. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Immunizations Infant Health & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected OMH Home > Policy and Data > ... 260.pdf [PDF | 3.5MB] At a glance – Death Rate: Age-Adjusted Heart Disease Death Rates per ...

  15. [Percutaneous treatment of valvular heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, Federica; Fiorina, Claudia; Lipartiti, Felicia; Maffeo, Diego; Curello, Salvatore; Chizzola, Giuliano; Curnis, Antonio; Chiari, Ermanna; Dei Cas, Livio

    2012-10-01

    Surgical valve replacement represents the treatment of choice for symptomatic and severe valvular heart disease. However, the operative risk is increased in presence of advanced age and comorbidities, therefore such patients are often not deemed suitable for surgical treatment. Recently, percutaneous valve replacement has emerged as an optional treatment for such patients, particularly for treating severe aortic stenosis and severe mitral regurgitation.

  16. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  17. Education and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2013-01-01

    Educational-related gradients in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mediation by behavioral risk factors are plausible given previous research; however this has not been comprehensively addressed in absolute measures. Questionnaire data on health behavior of 69,513 participants, 52 % women, from...

  18. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  19. Carcinoid heart disease secondary to ovarian tumour: a logical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are only few reported cases of carcinoid heart disease caused by ovarian tumours. The main cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients is right heart failure. Most cases of carcinoid heart disease have liver metastases and undergo cardiac surgery, followed by liver resection. Ovarian carcinoids cause heart ...

  20. Association of Inter-Arm Systolic Blood Pressure Difference with Coronary Atherosclerotic Disease Burden Using Calcium Scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Ae Young; Cho, Kyoung Im; Garg, Scot; Kim, Yong Hoon; Shin, Eun Seok

    2017-09-01

    There are no sufficient data on the correlation between inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference and coronary atherosclerosis found using coronary artery calcium score (CACS). We aimed to investigate if the increased difference in inter-arm BP is independently associated with severity of CACS. Patients who had ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors or an intermediate Framingham Risk Score (FRS; ≥10) were enrolled. Inter-arm BP difference was defined as the absolute difference in BP in both arms. Quantitative CACS was measured by using coronary computed tomography angiography with the scoring system. A total of 261 patients were included in this study. Age (r=0.256, parm systolic BP (SBP; r=0.172, p=0.005), mean of left arm SBP (r=0.190, p=0.002), inter-arm SBP difference (r=0.152, p=0.014), and the FRS (r=0.278, parm SBP difference (≥6 mm Hg) was significantly associated with CACS ≥300 [odds ratio (OR) 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-4.22; p=0.022]. In multivariable analysis, the inter-arm SBP difference ≥6 mm Hg was also significantly associated with CACS ≥300 after adjusting for clinical risk factors (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.06-5.19; p=0.036). An increased inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mm Hg) is associated with coronary atherosclerotic disease burden using CACS, and provides additional information for predicting severe coronary calcification, compared to models based on traditional risk factors.

  1. Residual atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in statin-treated adults: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Zhao, Yanglu; Quek, Ruben G W; Blumenthal, Roger S; Budoff, Matthew J; Cushman, Mary; Garg, Parveen; Sandfort, Veit; Tsai, Michael; Lopez, J Antonio G

    Residual atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk in statin-treated US adults without known ASCVD is not well described. To quantitate residual ASCVD risk and its predictors in statin-treated adults. We studied 1014 statin-treated adults (53.3% female, mean 66.0 years) free of clinical ASCVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. We examined ASCVD event rates by National Lipid Association risk groups over 11-year follow-up and the relation of standard risk factors, biomarkers, and subclinical atherosclerosis measures with residual ASCVD event risk. Overall, 5.3% of participants were at low, 12.2% at moderate, 60.3% at high, and 22.2% at very high baseline risk. Despite statin therapy, age- and race-standardized ASCVD rates per 1000 person-years for men and women were both 4.9 for low/moderate risk, 19.1 and 14.2 for high risk, and 35.6 and 26.7 for very high risk, respectively. Specific independent predictors of residual risk included current smoking, family history, diabetes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein particle number, carotid intimal medial thickness, and especially coronary artery calcium score. Those on moderate- or high-intensity statins at baseline (compared with low intensity) had 39% lower risks and those who increased statin intensity 62% lower ASCVD event risks (P < .01). Residual risk of ASCVD remains high despite statin treatment and is predicted by specific risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. These findings may be helpful for identifying those at highest risk needing more aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  2. [Epidemiology of valvular heart diseases in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iung, Bernard

    2009-02-20

    Valvular heart diseases remain frequent in Western countries since the decrease in the frequency of rheumatic heart diseases has been replaced by degenerative valve diseases. Thus, there is an important increase in the prevalence of valvular heart diseases after the age of 65. The frequency of heart valve disease in the elderly has an important impact on patient management, given the frequency of comorbidity and the increase in the risk of interventions. The two other most frequent causes of heart valve disease are rheumatic fever and infective endocarditis. In Europe, the two most frequent heart valve diseases are calcified aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, while aortic regurgitation and mitral stenosis are rare. Rheumatic heart diseases remain frequent in developing countries. Their prevalence is underestimated by clinical screening alone. Systematic echocardiographic screening estimates the prevalence of rheumatic heart valve disease to be between 20 and 30 per 1000 in children of school age.

  3. Low Serum Levels of Vitamin D are Associated with Progression of Subclinical Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Prospective, Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Fontán, Miguel; Borràs Sans, Mercè; Bajo Rubio, Maria Auxiliadora; Rodriguez-Carmona, Ana; Betriu, Angels; Valdivielso, José Maria; Fernández, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis and the main predictors of progression of this condition in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) have been insufficiently investigated. Following a prospective, multicenter, observational design, we studied 237 patients who were treated with PD for ≥3 months, without any clinical background of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Our objectives were the following: (1) to investigate the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to a control group of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and (2) to disclose PD technique-related predictors of progression of disease during a 24-month follow-up period. We used vascular ultrasound for characterization of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. A total of 123 patients (51.9%) vs. 79 controls (33.5%) presented ≥1 carotid plaque, and 114 patients (48.3%) vs. 72 controls (30.5%) ≥1 femoral plaque, at baseline evaluation (p identified age, carotid intima-media thickness, presence of ≥1 carotid plaque, and serum levels of 25OH vitamin D and C-reactive protein (CRP) at baseline as independent correlates of progression of atherosclerotic disease. On the contrary, PD technique-related variables did not show any association with this outcome. Atherosclerotic vascular disease is frequent among asymptomatic patients undergoing PD. Older age, pre-existent disease (assessed by vascular ultrasound), and serum levels of 25OH vitamin D and CRP are independent markers of the progression of this condition. These findings may contribute to improve identification of subpopulations with a high risk of CV events, deserving intensified measures of prevention. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The American Journal of Cardiology and Journal of Periodontology editors' consensus: periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedewald, Vincent E; Kornman, Kenneth S; Beck, James D; Genco, Robert; Goldfine, Allison; Libby, Peter; Offenbacher, Steven; Ridker, Paul M; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Roberts, William C

    2009-07-01

    This Editors' Consensus is supported by an educational grant from Colgate-Palmolive, Inc., New York, New York, and is based on a meeting of the authors held in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 9, 2009. Dr. Friedewald has received honoraria for speaking from Novartis, East Hanover, New Jersey. Dr. Kornman is a full-time employee and shareholder of Interleukin Genetics, Waltham, Massachusetts, which owns patents on genetic biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases. Dr. Genco is a consultant to Merck, Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. Dr. Ridker has received research support from AstraZeneca, Wilmington, Delaware; Novartis; Pfizer, New York, New York; Roche, Nutley, New Jersey; Sanofi-Aventis, Bridgewater, New Jersey; and Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois. Dr. Ridker has received non-financial research support from Amgen, Thousand Oaks, California. Dr. Ridker is a co-inventor on patents held by Brigham and Women's Hospital that relate to the use of inflammatory biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. Dr. Ridker is a research consultant for Schering-Plough, Kenilworth, New Jersey; Sanofi-Aventis; AstraZeneca; Isis, Carlsbad, California; Novartis; and Vascular Biogenics, Tel Aviv, Israel. Dr. Van Dyke is a co-inventor on patents held by Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, that relate to inflammation control, including consulting fees. Dr. Roberts has received honoraria for speaking from Merck, Schering-Plough, AstraZeneca, and Novartis. All other individuals in a position to control content disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

  5. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  6. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  8. [Reoperation for valvular heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, H; Matsuda, H

    1994-08-01

    To elucidate the limitation of mitral valve reconstruction, 53 mitral disease patients (Mitral stenosis: 29, Mitral regurgitation: 24) undergoing reoperation late after valve reconstruction were studied, taking account of valvular lesions at initial operation. Reoperation rate after open mitral commissurotomy for mitral stenosis was higher in the patients with valvular regurgitation at initial operation than in those with severe subvalvular lesions or calcified valve. Reoperation rate for mitral regurgitation after mitral valvuloplasty was higher in the patients with stenotic fibrous degeneration or dilated annulus at initial operation than in those with torn chorda. Thus, these findings suggest that combined lesion of stenosis and regurgitation at initial operation may affect the reoperation rate in patients undergoing mitral valve reconstruction for either mitral stenosis or mitral regurgitation. Different approaches to the mitral valve through the left atrium and various techniques of the atriotomy have been practiced according to the need for a particular patients. The left atrium and the mitral valve can be exposed through median sternotomy followed by biatrial atriotomy or transplant approach. A correct approach and good exposure plays a key role in the success of redo surgical procedure for mitral valve disease.

  9. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia in obesity and insulin resistance: pathophysiology, impact on atherosclerotic disease and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M John; Sposito, Andrei C

    2008-03-01

    Hypertension, a prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, frequently occurs in conjunction with metabolic disturbances and in particular with dyslipidaemia; such comorbidity presents in more than one-third of hypertensive patients. Moreover, hypertension and dyslipidaemia often manifest concomitantly in the clinical context of obesity and insulin resistance. In this setting, distinct metabolic anomalies may account for the development of both conditions, and may equally act to exacerbate their effects on vascular dysfunction. Significantly, hypertension and dyslipidaemia are linked mechanistically and may act in synergy at the arterial wall to enhance atherosclerosis. In this review, we identify potential mechanisms underlying the pathophysiological interaction between hypertension and dyslipidaemia at the cellular and molecular levels, and which may underlie elevated cardiovascular risk in obesity and insulin resistance. Finally, the clinical evidence supporting the beneficial effects of an integrated pharmacotherapeutic strategy to the reduction of cardiovascular risk in patients with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is critically discussed.

  10. Atorvastatin therapy modulates telomerase activity in patients free of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Strazhesko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background— Telomerase activity (TA is considered as the biomarker for cardiovascular aging and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies suggest a link between statins and telomere biology that may be explained by anti-inflammatory actions of statins and their positive effect on TA. Until now this effect has not been investigated in prospective randomized studies.We hypothesized that 12 months of atorvastatin therapy increased TA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.Methods—In a randomized, placebo-controlled study 100 hypercholesterolemic patients, aged 35–75 years, free of known cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 received 20 mg of atorvastatin daily or placebo for 12 months. TA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.Results—At study end 82 patients had sufficient peripheral blood mononuclear cells needed for longitudinal analysis. TA expressed as natural logarithms changed from 0.46±0.05 to 0.68±0.06 (p=0.004 in the atorvastatin group and from 0.67±0.06 to 0.60±0.07 (P=0.477 in the control group. In multiple regression analysis, atorvastatin therapy was the only independent predictor (p=0.05 of the changes in TA independently of markers of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Atorvastatin therapy was associated with increases in IL-6 within the normal range and a tendency towards reductionin blood urea.Conclusions—These initial observations suggest atorvastatin can act as telomerase activator and potentially as effective geroprotector.

  11. [Alcohol and risk of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darioli, R

    2005-09-01

    More than 60 prospective cohort studies have shown a consistent association between regular and moderate alcohol consumption and decrease in risk of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke and heart failure by 20 to 40% as compared to heavy alcohol intake or drinking no alcohol. Lower protective effects were found in young, in women and in men living outside the Mediterranean area. Moreover, some biological characteristics of alcohol, particularly red wine, could interfere with the athero-thrombotic process and contribute to increase the plausibility for the protective effects of alcohol on cardiovascular diseases. However, the results of meta-analyses also demonstrate harmful effects in relation with dose and pattern of alcohol consumption. In regard to the available scientific data, alcohol consumption cannot be include in the recommendations for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand alcohol should not be prohibited when consumption remains mild to moderate.

  12. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  13. [Valvular heart diseases in the aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, S

    1988-01-01

    A total of 458 cases (11.5%) with valvular heart diseases in the aged (greater than or equal to 60 years) were found among 4,000 consecutive autopsies. They included 204 cases (45%) of aortic regurgitation (AR), 171 cases (37%) of mitral regurgitation (MR), followed by 45 (10%) of aortic stenosis (AS) and 27 cases (6%) of mitral stenosis (MS). As an etiology of the valvular diseases, degenerative type was found in 195 cases (43%), ischemic origin in 91 cases (20%), followed by inflammatory origin such as syphilitic in 51 and infective endocarditis in three, aortitis in two and rheumatic in 49 (11%). Congenital origin was also found in 18 cases (4%). Among various types of valvular diseases in the aged, degenerative AR was most frequently found in 140 cases, followed by MR due to papillary muscle dysfunction in 91 cases. The clinical characteristics in cases with valvular diseases were as follows: atrial fibrillation was prominent in MS; congestive heart failure was found in 60% of cases except those with degenerative AR; cardiac death was frequent in syphilitic and rheumatic AR; association of hypertension was found in 50% of cases with MR and degenerative AR. In this article the characteristics of the valvular heart disease in the aged and additionally its diagnosis and treatment were discussed.

  14. Simultaneous Non-contrast Angiography and intraPlaque hemorrhage (SNaP) imaging for carotid atherosclerotic disease evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Boernert, P.; Zhao, H.; Hippe, D.; Xihai Zhao; Balu, N.; Ferguson, M.S.; Hatsukami, T.S.; Xu, J.; Yuan, C.; Kerwin, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    A Simultaneous Non-contrast Angiography and intraPlaque hemorrhage (SNAP) MR imaging technique was proposed to detect both luminal stenosis and hemorrhage in atherosclerosis patients in a single scan. 13patients with diagnosed carotid atherosclerotic plaque were recruited after informed consent. All

  15. Increasing Numbers of Pregnant Women Also Have Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Increasing Numbers of Pregnant Women Also Have Heart Disease Multiple specialists may be needed to care for ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many more American women with heart disease are choosing to have babies, a new study ...

  16. Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166826.html Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility? Study finds ... 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, ...

  17. Too Few Women, Docs Understand Dangers of Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Too Few Women, Docs Understand Dangers of Heart Disease It kills more than all cancers combined, but ... 22, 2017 THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is the leading killer of U.S. women, but ...

  18. Ischaemic Heart Disease : Early Recognition and Risk Disparities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, I.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) comprises the principal clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease - myocardial infarction, stable and unstable angina pectoris, heart failure and sudden death - and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relentlessly growing burden of

  19. Study Challenges Touted Link Between Eczema and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Study Challenges Touted Link Between Eczema and Heart Disease Researcher now probing whether more severe cases of ... a link between eczema and increased risk of heart disease, researchers report. The findings challenge recent studies suggesting ...

  20. Sports participation in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); H. Boersma (Eric); Pelliccia, A. (Antonio); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: It is unclearwhether sports participation in adultswith repaired congenital heart disease is safe and has benefits. Methods: Congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients who underwent corrective surgery for Atrial Septal Defect, Ventricular Septal Defect, Pulmonary Stenosis,

  1. Women's Heart Disease: Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty Past Issues / ... Program, knowing that her personal risk factors for heart disease, including family history, were high. She watched her ...

  2. Statins May Prevent Atherosclerotic Disease in OSA Patients without Co-Morbidities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Benedetto, Michele De; Conte, Luana; De Nuccio, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive interruptions of breathing, causing Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH) that can be involved in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence showing a close relationship between OSA and atherosclerosis, even in patients who do not show co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, high levels of lowdensity lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), cigarette smoking and obesity, which can activate the endothelium. This endothelium activation due to CIH and specific to OSA seems to be dependent on a different pathway. The current first line therapy for OSA is the application of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), but it alone is not enough to reduce cardiometabolic risk in patients with OSA. In contrast, statins, via their pleiotropic property, might be able to change inflammation and early atherosclerosis, lipid profile and cardiovascular outcomes in OSA. The role of statins in OSA patients with or without any co-morbidities could potentially prevent coronary vascular risk and stroke and in the future, represent an additional treatment option along with CPAP therapy. Strengthening the prevention strategies against atherosclerosis in OSA should be one of the focal aims for healthcare programs of the future.

  3. The Emerging Epidemic of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Atherosclerotic Disease in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Koon K; Dokainish, Hisham

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its risk factors, which are major health burdens in high-income countries, are a growing problem in developing or lower-income countries, where the vast majority of CVD now occurs. Two case-control studies, INTERHEART and INTERSTROKE, which included a majority of patients from developing countries, were seminal in identifying common risk factors explaining the vast majority of risk for acute myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. The population-based Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study, which included > 150,000 participants, also with a majority from developing countries, found that although high-income countries were at highest cardiovascular (CV) risk, they had the lowest incidence of CVD and associated case-fatality rates, whereas patients in low-income countries had the lowest CV risk and yet the highest CVD and case-fatality rates. The PURE study also demonstrated relatively low rates of CV medicine use in high- and middle-income countries, but even lower rates in low-income countries, where these medicines were often either unavailable or unaffordable. The PURE study also demonstrated that control of CV risk factors and adherence to lifestyle modifications, although suboptimal globally, were poorest in low-income countries. Taken together, these data identify common CV risk factors requiring targeted, systematic, sustained, and effective interventions in developing countries to mitigate the emerging epidemic of CVD in these regions of the world. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement......Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors......, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial...

  5. ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND RENAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. I. Belyalov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ischemic heart disease (IHD with comorbid kidney dysfunction has more severe course and worse prognosis, regardless of the chosen therapeutic strategy for the treatment of coronary disease. Traits of diagnosis and treatment of IHD in patients with renal dysfunction, including end-stage kidney disease, are discussed. The analysis of the studies showed increasing difficulties in the diagnosis of IHD, and decrease in the effectiveness of drug and invasive treatment.Results of large randomized and observational studies can help to treat patients with IHD and comorbid renal dysfunction more effectively and safe. 

  6. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...... with the educational gradient in CHD in Norway. METHODS: In a cohort of 57 279 men born during 1949-1959, health survey information was linked to military conscription records of cognitive ability, to national educational data, to hospitalisation records from the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) project...

  7. [Activating blood circulation to remove stasis and therapeutic angiogenesis of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Xiong, Xing-jiang; Wang, Jie

    2013-11-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis comes into sight as a new strategy for coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CAHD). The therapeutic method of activating blood circulation to remove stasis has shown confirmative effect upon both fundamental researches and clinical trials of CAHD. Thus, the new proposition may provide a better treatment plan for CAHD to study on therapeutic angiogenesis with the therapeutic method of activating blood circulation to remove stasis. The author reviewed relevant theories and the latest researches, on the basis of combining diseases identification and syndrome typing, discussed the state quo and achievement of therapeutic angiogenesis in CAHD by Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) of activating blood circulation to remove stasis from fundamental and clinical researches and action mechanisms from standpoints of Chinese herbal compounds, single Chinese herb, effective herbal chemical composition, thus providing references for future researches.

  8. Evaluation of cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids in humans with stable atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theken, Katherine N; Schuck, Robert N; Edin, Matthew L; Tran, Bryant; Ellis, Kyle; Bass, Almasa; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Wu, Michael C; Hinderliter, Alan L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Stouffer, George A; Lee, Craig R

    2012-06-01

    Preclinical and genetic epidemiologic studies suggest that modulating cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism may have therapeutic utility in the management of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, predictors of inter-individual variation in CYP-derived eicosanoid metabolites in CAD patients have not been evaluated to date. Therefore, the primary objective was to identify clinical factors that influence CYP epoxygenase, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), and CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolism in patients with established CAD. Plasma levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS in a population of patients with stable, angiographically confirmed CAD (N=82) and healthy volunteers from the local community (N=36). Predictors of CYP epoxygenase, sEH, and CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolic function were evaluated by regression. Obesity was significantly associated with low plasma EET levels and 14,15-EET:14,15-DHET ratios. Age, diabetes, and cigarette smoking also were significantly associated with CYP epoxygenase and sEH metabolic activity, while only renin-angiotensin system inhibitor use was associated with CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolic activity. Compared to healthy volunteers, both obese and non-obese CAD patients had significantly higher plasma EETs (Ppatients, and demonstrate that biomarkers of CYP epoxygenase and sEH, but not CYP ω-hydroxylase, metabolism are altered in stable CAD patients relative to healthy individuals. Future studies are necessary to determine the therapeutic utility of modulating these pathways in patients with CAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ischemic heart disease and the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle modification is primary in cardiovascular (CV) disease prevention. A major contribution is the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), defined by two of seven components. Italian investigators determined a significant decrease in peripheral arterial disease of 56 % for a high score. Multiple specific CV risk factors are also favorably modified by the MedDiet. This includes beneficial effect on inflammation, vascular endothelium, and insulin resistance. There is also evidence that coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome are decreased. Benefit appears to extend to new migrants in France. The economics of dietary adherence are favorable with decreased total lifetime health costs. Although mixed nuts appear to be a major factor in the MedDiet, special emphasis goes to extra virgin olive oil. Benefit also extends to other noncommunicable diseases with a decrease in cancer, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Further quantitation of benefit and understanding of mechanisms involved in dietary benefit is essential.

  10. Epidemiology of valvular heart disease in a Swedish nationwide hospital-based register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andell, Pontus; Li, Xinjun; Martinsson, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Transitions in the spectrum of valvular heart diseases (VHDs) in developed countries over the 20th century have been reported from clinical case series, but large, contemporary population-based studies are lacking. METHODS: We used nationwide registers to identify all patients with a f......OBJECTIVE: Transitions in the spectrum of valvular heart diseases (VHDs) in developed countries over the 20th century have been reported from clinical case series, but large, contemporary population-based studies are lacking. METHODS: We used nationwide registers to identify all patients......; 47.2%), mitral regurgitation (MR; 24.2%) and aortic regurgitation (AR; 18.0%) contributing most of the VHD diagnoses. The majority of VHDs were diagnosed in the elderly (68.9% in subjects aged ≥65 years), but pulmonary valve disease incidence peaked in newborns. Incidences of AR, AS and MR were...... higher in men who were also more frequently diagnosed at an earlier age. Mitral stenosis (MS) incidence was higher in women. Rheumatic fever was rare. Half of AS cases had concomitant atherosclerotic vascular disease (48.4%), whereas concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation were common in mitral...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia or Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Dhruv S; Moran, Andrew E; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Ollendorf, Daniel A; Pearson, Steven D; Tice, Jeffrey A; Guzman, David; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2016-08-16

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors were recently approved for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and have potential for broad ASCVD prevention. Their long-term cost-effectiveness and effect on total health care spending are uncertain. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 inhibitors and their potential effect on US health care spending. The Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model, a simulation model of US adults aged 35 to 94 years, was used to evaluate cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 inhibitors or ezetimibe in heterozygous FH or ASCVD. The model incorporated 2015 annual PCSK9 inhibitor costs of $14,350 (based on mean wholesale acquisition costs of evolocumab and alirocumab); adopted a health-system perspective, lifetime horizon; and included probabilistic sensitivity analyses to explore uncertainty. Statin therapy compared with addition of ezetimibe or PCSK9 inhibitors. Lifetime major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or stroke), incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), and total effect on US health care spending over 5 years. Adding PCSK9 inhibitors to statins in heterozygous FH was estimated to prevent 316,300 MACE at a cost of $503,000 per QALY gained compared with adding ezetimibe to statins (80% uncertainty interval [UI], $493,000-$1,737,000). In ASCVD, adding PCSK9 inhibitors to statins was estimated to prevent 4.3 million MACE compared with adding ezetimibe at $414,000 per QALY (80% UI, $277,000-$1,539,000). Reducing annual drug costs to $4536 per patient or less would be needed for PCSK9 inhibitors to be cost-effective at less than $100,000 per QALY. At 2015 prices, PCSK9 inhibitor use in all eligible patients was estimated to reduce cardiovascular care costs by $29 billion over 5 years, but drug costs increased by an estimated $592 billion (a 38

  12. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  13. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  14. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-04-15

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Keeping children with congenital heart disease healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cathy S

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children with congenital heart disease healthy is vital to their long-term survival and quality of life. Nurse practitioners are in an excellent position to keep these sometimes fragile children healthy before, between, and after their cardiac surgeries. Primary care visits should address developmental morbidity. Referral for in-depth evaluations and intervention should be initiated for children with hemodynamically significant heart disease. Infants may also experience poor feeding. Nutritional guidance may include fortifying formulas or enteral tube feedings. Attention to immunization status and prevention of winter illnesses and endocarditis may reduce complications in this high-risk group of children. Copyright © 2011 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan CT; Shine AM; McMahon CJ

    2013-01-01

    Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmona...

  17. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khayyam-Nekouei, Zohreh; Neshatdoost, Hamidtaher; Yousefy, Alireza; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Manshaee, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although psychological factors play an important role in coronary heart diseases (CHD), it seems there is a need for more researches in this respect. The present study aimed to review psychological factors, including depression, anxiety and stress related to etiology and prognosis of CHD. METHODS This was a review on medical and psychological literatures, particularly in the years 1995-2012. RESULTS As protective factor or risk factor, psychological factors play an important role i...

  18. The global burden of congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Julien IE

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Although the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is similar worldwide, the burden of supporting these patients falls more heavily on countries with high fertility rates. In a country with a fertility rate of about eight per woman, the population has to support four times as many children with CHD as in a country with a fertility rate of two. Countries with the highest fertility rates tend to have the lowest incomes per capita, thus accentuating the disparity. Countries with h...

  19. False Heart Rate Feedback and the Perception of Heart Symptoms in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose It was

  20. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  1. [Stress echo and valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, J L

    2005-06-01

    Stress echo has already been validated in some forms of valvular heart disease, especially in calcific aortic stenosis with low cardiac output and dynamic mitral regurgitation (MR) of valvular heart disease. Stress Doppler haemodynamics is a term used to differentiate these new indications from that of segmental wall analysis of the left atrium in ischaemic heart disease. In calcific aortic stenosis with low output, the haemodynamics with low dose dobutamine allows assessment of the real severity of the aortic stenosis and identification of the rare cases with mild stenosis: the principal indication remains the assessment of operative risk and long-term prognosis by the study of left ventricular contractile reserve. In cases of ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the presence of mild mitral regurgitation (regurgitant surface area >20 mm2 at rest) is a poor prognostic factor. The dynamic character of mitral regurgitation is related to left ventricular remodelling which leads to deformation of the valvular apparatus (mitral tenting). Dynamic mitral regurgitation (regurgitant orifice area >13 mm2 on exercise) is a powerful prognostic factor, the role of which has recently been demonstrated in the genesis of acute pulmonary oedema. the other indications of stress haemodynamics are under validation, mainly the assessment of exercise capacity and valvular compliance in mitral stenosis or asymptomatic aortic stenosis.

  2. Challenges for heart disease stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoover-Plow J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-Plow, Yanqing GongDepartments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Joseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are the leading cause of death worldwide. The use of stem cells to improve recovery of the injured heart after myocardial infarction (MI is an important emerging therapeutic strategy. However, recent reviews of clinical trials of stem cell therapy for MI and ischemic heart disease recovery report that less than half of the trials found only small improvements in cardiac function. In clinical trials, bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood cells were used as the source of stem cells delivered by intracoronary infusion. Some trials administered only a stem cell mobilizing agent that recruits endogenous sources of stem cells. Important challenges to improve the effectiveness of stem cell therapy for CVD include: (1 improved identification, recruitment, and expansion of autologous stem cells; (2 identification of mobilizing and homing agents that increase recruitment; and (3 development of strategies to improve stem cell survival and engraftment of both endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. This review is an overview of stem cell therapy for CVD and discusses the challenges these three areas present for maximum optimization of the efficacy of stem cell therapy for heart disease, and new strategies in progress.Keywords: mobilization, expansion, homing, survival, engraftment

  3. [Sports in children with congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosser, Gilles; Moulin-Zinsch, Anne; Fischer-Atalla, Reem

    2017-05-01

    The practice of physical activity is one of the essential elements for health in general but also for the well-being and the quality of life. It is highly desirable to encourage physical activities in children with congenital heart diseases, taking into account all the benefits associated with this practice (quality of life, life expectancy) and this especially since these children often have limited capacity (due to their heart disease but also often by relative deconditioning). While there is a transient increase in risk of cardiac complications during intense activity, it would nevertheless be inappropriate to contra-indicate physical activities considering the well-known benefits in the medium and long term. The risks associated with the practice of physical activity must be assessed, on one hand, in terms of the severity of the heart disease, and on the other hand, on the nature and intensity of the activity. The stress test is here an essential tool because it helps to assess the physical capacity and cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise. The international recommendations for competitive sports generally give an appropriate advice for a specific situation but the practice of moderate activity or leisure sports which are highly desirable should not be neglected and be strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Progression of White Matter Lesion Volume and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease: The SMART-MR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Grool

    2011-01-01

    Results. Physical functioning (baseline: 44, 10th–90th percentile 29–55 improved, whereas mental functioning (baseline: 51, 10th–90th percentile 32–60 declined during followup. WML progression (highest quartile versus rest contributed to a stronger decline in mental functioning (B=−1.76, 95% CI −3.11 to −0.42, but did not influence changes in physical functioning. Conclusions. Progression of WML volume contributes to a decline in mental functioning in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease.

  5. Open repair management of a patient with aortic arch saccular aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, one vessel coronary artery disease and an isolated dissection of the abdominal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romolo, Harvey; Wartono, Dicky A; Suyuti, Sugisman; Herlambang, Bagus; Caesario, Michael; Sunu, Ismoyo

    2017-01-01

    Isolated saccular compared to fusiform aneurysm is considered to be a rare entity with challenges of its own. A 62-year-old female was diagnosed with a case of saccular aneurysm and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch. Additionally, she also had one vessel coronary artery disease and type B abdominal aortic dissection. She was then managed with open aortic arch repair and coronary artery bypass grafting. If required, elective endovascular repair will be done for the abdominal aorta on a later date.

  6. [Antiphospholipid syndrome in valvular heart diseases, ischemic heart disease and vascular thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, M; Brzezińska, A

    2000-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) leads to venous and arterial thrombosis, cardiac diseases, neurological, gastroenterological and dermatological complications. The role of antiphospholipid antibodies in genesis of thrombi by interaction with plasma clotting factors is well known. There is no evidence of their influence on valvular heart diseases or atherogenesis. This paper presents views and opinions about APS and related cardiovascular complications.

  7. Resurgery for recurrent heart valve diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-lei REN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the experience with resurgery for recurrent valvular heart diseases. Methods From June 2004 to June 2015, 28 patients (15 males and 13 females with ages ranging from 44 to 67 years (55.6±6.5 years with recurrent heart valve disease underwent resurgery. The reasons for resurgery included perivalvular leakage (7 cases, bioprosthetic valve decline (6 cases in mitral valve and 3 in tricuspid valve, mechanical prostheses dysfunction (2cases, infective endocarditis after valve replacement (2 cases, restenosis of repaired native valve (1 case, and severe tricuspid insufficiency after left-side valve surgery (7 cases. Resurgery included mitral valve replacement in 18 patients and tricuspid valve replacement in 10. All the patients underwent third or fourth or even fifth cardiac surgery for valve replacement. Results There were 2 hospital deaths with a mortality of 7.1% (2/28. The main causes of early-stage deaths were low cardiac output syndrome. The main postoperative complications were respiratory failure in 3, low cardiac output syndrome in 2, reexploration for bleeding in 2 and serious infectious shock in 1. All the patients were found with the great improvement in heart function and the re-implanted prostheses worked well during follow-up. Conclusions Although resurgery for recurrent heart valve disease poses a continuing challenge to cardiac surgeon, it could be performed with the satisfactory results. The keys to a successful cardiac resurgery include appropriate operational timing, refined surgical technique and reasonable perioperative managements. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.11

  8. High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticle Imaging in Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Leeper, MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Nanoparticles promise to advance the field of cardiovascular theranostics. However, their sustained and targeted delivery remains an important obstacle. The body synthesizes some “natural” nanoparticles, including high-density lipoprotein (HDL, which may home to the atherosclerotic plaque and promote cholesterol efflux. In a recent article published in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, investigators generated modified, radiolabeled HDL nanoparticles and confirmed they accumulated in atherosclerotic lesions from several different species. These approaches hold promise for the noninvasive diagnosis of vulnerable plaque and in the stratification of patients in whom HDL-mimetic therapy may have a clinical benefit. Key Words: atherosclerosis, HDL, imaging, nanoparticles, macrophages/monocytes

  9. Income and heart disease: Neglected risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstra, Mark; Rogers, Marla; Moraros, John

    2015-08-01

    To determine the unadjusted and adjusted effects of income on heart disease; its main disease intermediary, high blood pressure; and its main behavioural risk factors, smoking and physical inactivity. Random-digit dialing telephone survey collected through the Canadian Community Health Survey by Statistics Canada. Saskatchewan. A total of 27 090 residents aged 20 years and older; each health region in Saskatchewan was represented. Overall, 178 variables related to demographic characteristics, socioeconomic factors, behaviour, life stress, disease intermediaries, health outcomes, and access to health care were analyzed to determine their unadjusted and adjusted effects on heart disease. The mean age of the sample was 52.6 years. Women represented 55.9% of the sample. Most respondents were married (52.3%) and had some postsecondary or graduate education (52.5%). The mean personal income was $23 931 and the mean household income was $37 533. All models statistically controlled for age. Five covariates independently associated with heart disease included high blood pressure, household income of $29 999 or less per year, being a daily smoker, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with high blood pressure included being overweight or obese, being a daily smoker, household income of $29 999 or less per year, male sex, and being physically inactive. Five covariates independently associated with daily smoking included being a visible minority, household income of $29 999 or less per year, not being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, and male sex. Six covariates independently associated with physical inactivity included being a visible minority, being overweight or obese, education level of less than secondary school, male sex, household income of $29 999 or less per year, and being a daily smoker. Household income was strongly and independently associated with heart disease; its main disease

  10. [Clinical features of early newborn infants with congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoping; Mao, Liangyuan; Chen, Shaozhi

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the clinical feature of early newborn infants with congenital heart disease. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features of 477 newborn infants with congenital heart disease born within seven days out of 28 050 live births in Shaoxing women and children hospital from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2012. Infants with congenital heart disease were divided into single malformation group (240 cases), composite deformity group (199 cases) and multiple malformations group (38 cases). Differences of clinical feature were compared between the three groups. Atrial septal defect was the most malformation 91.6% (437/477) .Incidence of preterm birth was higher in newborn inants with congenital heart disease [512.23/10 000(134/2 616)] than infants without without congenital heart disease [134.86/10 000 (343/25 434) , P congenital heart disease groups was similar (P > 0.05) . The incidence of small for gestational age in congenital heart disease group (10.90%, 52/477) was also significantly higher than those without congenital heart disease group (5.91%, 1 630/27 573, P congenital heart disease of complex malformations, multiple malformations groups was higher than that in the single malformation group (P congenital heart disease. The incidence of preterm is higher in newborn infants with congenital heart disease. Complex and multiple malformations are linked with small for gestational age birth weight.

  11. Amyloid heart disease: genetics translated into disease-modifying therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Brett W; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Given increased awareness and improved non-invasive diagnostic tools, cardiac amyloidosis has become an increasingly recognised aetiology of increased ventricular wall thickness and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Once considered a rare disease with no treatment options, translational research has harnessed novel pathways and led the way to promising treatment options. Gene variants that contribute to amyloid heart disease provide unique opportunities to explore potential disease-modifying therapeutic strategies. Amyloidosis has become the model disease through which gene therapy using small interfering RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides has evolved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Relationship between congenital heart disease and bronchial dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shuang-Lin; Li, Ya-Jun; Huang, Ting; Tan, Li-Hua; Mei, Xi-Long; Sun, Jian-Ning

    2011-11-01

    To study the relationship of the incidence of bronchial dysplasia (bronchial anomalous origin and bronchial stenosis) with congenital heart disease. A total of 185 children with congenital heart disease or bronchial dysplasia were enrolled. Bronchial dysplasia was identified by the 64-MSCT conventional scanning or thin slice scanning with three-dimensional reconstruction. Forty-five children (25.3%) had coexisting bronchial dysplasia and congenital heart disease. The incidence rate of bronchial dysplasia in children with congenital heart disease associated with ventricular septal defect was higher than in those without ventricular septal defect (33.7% vs 15.0%; Pincidence rate of bronchial dysplasia between the children with congenital heart disease who had a large vascular malformation and who did not. Bronchial dysplasia often occurs in children with congenital heart disease. It is necessary to perform a tracheobronchial CT scanning with three-dimensional reconstruction to identify tracheobronchial dysplasia in children with congenital heart disease, especially associated with ventricular septal defect.

  13. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. [Nutritional index in heart diseases in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzotti, J A; Falha, S L; Nunes, M D

    1990-12-01

    To study heart disease in childhood aiming to know its incidence and consequences upon the nutritional status. Two-hundred patients were distributed in three groups: 1) 113 (56.5%) with congenital acyanotic form; 2) 19 (9.5%) with congenital cyanotic form and 3) 68 (34%) with acquired forms. All of them regularly visiting the ambulatory service of Paediatric cardiology of the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da USP from 1987 until 1990. The majority (92%) of the children (being 56% male and aging 5.1 +/- 0.4 years-old) showed nutritional indexes between 5 and 95 (percentile scale). The overall diagnosis distribution were: 1) ventricular septal defect (51 cases); 2) atrial septal defect (21 cases); 3) valvular diseases (21 cases); 4) arrhythmias (20 cases); 5) cardiac involvement of systemic diseases (20 cases); and 6) tetralogy complex (8 cases). Twelve patients (6%) were underscored (below percentile 5) and only 4 (2%) scored above percentile 95 (obese patients). The comparison of the mean indexes were found statistical different (p less than 0.05), being the cyanotic congenital forms the worst ones and the acquired forms the best one. Heart disease in childhood is associated to nutritional index deficits in the majority of the cases.

  15. Large Mammalian Animal Models of Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Camacho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the biological complexity of the cardiovascular system, the animal model is an urgent pre-clinical need to advance our knowledge of cardiovascular disease and to explore new drugs to repair the damaged heart. Ideally, a model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, a biological representative of human disease, and ethically sound. Although a larger animal model is more expensive and difficult to manipulate, its genetic, structural, functional, and even disease similarities to humans make it an ideal model to first consider. This review presents the commonly-used large animals—dog, sheep, pig, and non-human primates—while the less-used other large animals—cows, horses—are excluded. The review attempts to introduce unique points for each species regarding its biological property, degrees of susceptibility to develop certain types of heart diseases, and methodology of induced conditions. For example, dogs barely develop myocardial infarction, while dilated cardiomyopathy is developed quite often. Based on the similarities of each species to the human, the model selection may first consider non-human primates—pig, sheep, then dog—but it also depends on other factors, for example, purposes, funding, ethics, and policy. We hope this review can serve as a basic outline of large animal models for cardiovascular researchers and clinicians.

  16. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  17. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekatsu Yanai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To more fully understand the anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, future studies, preferably with larger numbers of subjects, will be performed.

  18. [Adhesion molecules and mononuclear cell subpopulations in the coronary and pulmonary arteries of patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumachenko, P V; Ivanova, A G; Belokon, E V; Akchurin, R S

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactor disease, in which dysfunction of the endothelium leads to the emergence of its adhesion molecules. to investigate the expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules PECAM (CD31), ICAM, and VCAM, as well as adherent endothelial T cells and monocytes. The material examined was en face pulmonary and coronary artery samples taken during autopsies (10 men), and en face specimens obtained from the coronary artery fragments taken from coronary heart disease patients during endarterectomy (37 men). This investigation used antibodies to the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and PECAM and those to CD3, CD4, CD8 T-cells and CD68 monocytes. The endothelial cells in the atherosclerotically intact coronary arteries had an elongated shape and were aligned along the blood flow. Those located above atheromas and fibroatheromas changed their shape from elongated to polygonal. Above the fatty streaks and atheromas, the reaction with antibodies to CD31 antigens became weaker at the edge of endothelial cells and disappeared in places. While the atherosclerotic process progressed, the reaction with the CD31 antigen at the edge of endothelial cells was similar in intensity to that on the surface of the endothelium. Adhesion of T cells and monocytes to the endothelium of coronary arteries increased as the atherosclerotic vascular process progressed. T cells and monocytes more often adhered to the endothelium at the sites where the endothelial cells contacted each other. Heterogeneity was found in the endothelial cells: their shape, the expression of adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of lymphocytes and monocytes to them changed during the progression of the atherosclerotic process.

  19. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-11-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context.

  20. Congenital heart disease in young adulthood and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Over 95% of children with congenital heart defects now reach adulthood and the number of adults with congenital heart disease is estimated to be at least 1.2 million in Europe alone. Despite major developments in diagnostic methods and treatment of congenital heart disease, cure is rarely achieved.

  1. Echocardiographic patterns of juvenile rheumatic heart disease at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic heart disease seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital Heart Unit. Subjects: Patients aged 20 years and less with echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease.

  2. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate VLDL and their remnants, and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development; but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population, and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease. PMID:21527746

  3. The Effects of Chronic Exercise on the Heart and on Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease. A Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    McAllister, F. F., R. Bertsch, and J. Jacobson. The accelerating effect of muscular exercise on experimental atherosclerosis. Arch Surg 80:54 (1959). 93. M...Lipid metabolism and muscular work. Fed Proc 26:1755 (1967). 98. Faris, A. W., F. M. Browning, and J. D. Ibach. The effect of physical training upon...total serum choleiterol levels and arterial distensibility of male ’hite rats. J Sports Med 11:24 (1971). 34 99. Rdb, rt, J. A., and A. LX"e-S

  4. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  5. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease Introduction A therapeutic cardiac catheterization is a procedure performed to treat your child’s heart defect. A doctor will use special techniques and ...

  6. T1 mapping in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    h-Ici, Darach O; Jeuthe, Sarah; Al-Wakeel, Nadya; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Kozerke, Sebastian; Messroghli, Daniel R

    2014-06-01

    A unique feature of cardiac magnetic resonance is its ability to characterize myocardium. Proton relaxation times, T1, T2, and T2* are a reflection of the composition of individual tissues, and change in the presence of disease. Research into T1 mapping has largely been focused in the study of cardiomyopathies, but T1 mapping also shows huge potential in the study of ischaemic heart disease. In fact, the first cardiac T1 maps were used to characterize myocardial infarction. Robust high-resolution myocardial T1 mapping is now available for use as a clinical tool. This quantitative technique is simple to perform and analyse, minimally subjective, and highly reproducible. This review aims to summarize the present state of research on the topic, and to show the clinical potential of this method to aid the diagnosis and treatment of patients with ischaemic heart disease. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  8. Congenital Heart Disease and General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe treatment of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has progressed vastly over the last five decennia. In the Netherlands, around 200,000 children are born each year, around 1,800 of whom have a CHD. This incidence – 6 – 8 per thousand live births – is reported to be similar round the world, making CHD the world’s commonest congenital anomaly. In the Netherlands, this high incidence and the improved treatment options both mean that the number of people surviving CHD is i...

  9. Myocardial Fibrosis in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Rahul H; Powell, Andrew J; Geva, Tal

    2016-05-25

    Myocardial fibrosis is common in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and has been associated with arrhythmias, decreased functional status, and adverse ventricular mechanics. There are multiple types of myocardial fibrosis that occur in response to different pathophysiologic stimuli. Recent advances in imaging technology have made detection and quantification of the types of myocardial fibrosis possible. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of myocardial fibrosis, examine the imaging techniques used to evaluate fibrosis, and discuss the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and clinical outcomes in CHD. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1300-1307).

  10. Cine MR imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Itoh, Akira; Miyatake, Kunio

    1989-01-01

    Cine MR Imaging was carried out using FLASH (fast low angle shot) which employes TE of 16 msec and TR of 30/similar to/40 msec. Regurgitant jet was visible as discrete area of low signal intensity extending from the incompetent valve into the respective cardiac chamber. In 20 patients with mitral regurgitation, the correlation of the length and area of mitral jet by cine MR and color doppler mapping was 0.74 and 0.71, respectively. Cine MR imaging is a promising modality for detection and quantification of valvular heart disease.

  11. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  12. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A coronary heart disease prediction model: the Korean Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Sun Ha; Jang, Yangsoo; Oh, Dong Joo; Oh, Byung-Hee; Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Seong-Wook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Mok, Yejin; Jung, Keum Ji; Kimm, Heejin; Yun, Young Duk; Baek, Soo Jin; Lee, Duk Chul; Choi, Sung Hee; Kim, Moon Jong; Sung, Jidong; Cho, BeLong; Kim, Eung Soo; Yu, Byung-Yeon; Lee, Tae-Yong; Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Yong-Jin; Oh, Jang-Kyun; Kim, Sung Hi; Park, Jong-Ku; Koh, Sang Baek; Park, Sat Byul; Lee, Soon Young; Yoo, Cheol-In; Kim, Moon Chan; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Park, Joo-Sung; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Gyu Jang; Woodward, Mark

    2014-05-21

    The objectives of this study were to develop a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk model among the Korean Heart Study (KHS) population and compare it with the Framingham CHD risk score. A prospective cohort study within a national insurance system. 18 health promotion centres nationwide between 1996 and 2001 in Korea. 268 315 Koreans between the ages of 30 and 74 years without CHD at baseline. Non-fatal or fatal CHD events between 1997 and 2011. During an 11.6-year median follow-up, 2596 CHD events (1903 non-fatal and 693 fatal) occurred in the cohort. The optimal CHD model was created by adding high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and triglycerides to the basic CHD model, evaluating using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) and continuous net reclassification index (NRI). The optimal CHD models for men and women included HDL-cholesterol (NRI=0.284) and triglycerides (NRI=0.207) from the basic CHD model, respectively. The discrimination using the CHD model in the Korean cohort was high: the areas under ROC were 0.764 (95% CI 0.752 to 0.774) for men and 0.815 (95% CI 0.795 to 0.835) for women. The Framingham risk function predicted 3-6 times as many CHD events than observed. Recalibration of the Framingham function using the mean values of risk factors and mean CHD incidence rates of the KHS cohort substantially improved the performance of the Framingham functions in the KHS cohort. The present study provides the first evidence that the Framingham risk function overestimates the risk of CHD in the Korean population where CHD incidence is low. The Korean CHD risk model is well-calculated alternations which can be used to predict an individual's risk of CHD and provides a useful guide to identify the groups at high risk for CHD among Koreans. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Histone methylations in heart development, congenital and adult heart diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Heart development comprises myocyte specification, differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. These processes are regulated by a group of core cardiac transcription factors in a coordinated temporal and spatial manner. Histone methylation is an emerging epigenetic mechanism for regulating gene transcription. Interplay among cardiac transcription factors and histone lysine modifiers plays important role in heart development. Aberrant expression and mutation of the histone lysine modifiers duri...

  15. Chronobiological considerations for exercise and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Greg; Drust, Barry; George, Keith; Reilly, Thomas; Waterhouse, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Although regular physical activity is beneficial for many clinical conditions, an acute bout of exercise might increase the risk of an adverse clinical event, such as sudden cardiac death or myocardial infarction, particularly in vulnerable individuals. Since it is also known that the incidence of these events peaks in the morning and that some cardiac patients prefer to schedule leisure-time physical activity before lunch, the question arises as to whether morning exercise is 'inherently' more risky than physical activity performed at other times of day. We attempt to answer this question by reviewing the relevant epidemiological data as well as the results of chronobiological and exercise-related studies that have concentrated on the pathophysiological mechanisms for sudden cardiac events. We also consider generally how chronobiology might impact on exercise prescription in heart disease. We performed a structured literature search in the PubMed and WEBofSCIENCE databases for relevant studies published between 1981 and 2004. The limited amount of published epidemiological data did not allow us to conclude that a bout of vigorous exercise in the morning increases the relative risk of either primary cardiac events in apparently healthy individuals, or secondary events in cardiac patients enrolled in supervised exercise programmes. Nevertheless, these data are not directly relevant to individuals who have a history of heart disease and perform uncontrolled habitual activities. It appears as though the influence of time of day on the cardiovascular safety of this type of exercise has not been examined in this population. There is evidence that several pathophysiological variables (e.g. blood pressure, endothelial function, fibrinolysis) vary in parallel with typical diurnal changes in freely chosen activity. Nevertheless, few studies have been designed to examine specifically whether such variables respond differently to a 'set' level of exercise in the morning

  16. [Anti-hypertensive therapies in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Komei; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-11-01

    Abstract Hypertension is the major cause of cardiovascular disease. Persistent hypertension leads to cardiovascular remodeling and resulted in heart diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, and arrhythmia. The presence of hypertension could also be a precipitating factor of heart diseases and form vicious cycle. Therefore, perfect blood pressure control is essential for the prevention of cardiovascular events. Additionally, it is ideal to choose anti-hypertensive agents, which have cardiovascular-protective effects as well as strong blood pressure-lowering effects. We herein describe anti-hypertensive therapies in patients with heart disease in accordance with JSH2014 and JCS guidelines.

  17. Dextrocardia in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offen, Sophie; Jackson, Dan; Canniffe, Carla; Choudhary, Preeti; Celermajer, David S

    2016-04-01

    Dextrocardia is rare in the general population, and may be associated with significant additional cardiac malformations. We aimed to identify the prevalence and patterns of additional cardiac defects, as well as the associated long-term morbidity and mortality, in adult patients with dextrocardia, in a specialised Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD) service. A retrospective study of patients with dextrocardia managed by our tertiary ACHD service, since January 2000, was performed. Medical records were reviewed and the National Death Index was consulted to confirm survival status. Of 3698 adults in our ACHD Service, 19 (0.5%) had dextrocardia. Mean follow-up duration was 7±7.5 years. The mean age at last review was 36.8±10.5 years (range 20-63 years). Situs was solitus in 14 (74%) and inversus in five (26%). Eleven patients (58%) had functional single ventricles, of whom five had atrioventricular (AV)-ventriculoarterial (VA) discordance and two had VA discordance only. Four patients with two ventricles had AV-VA discordance. All patients had at least one additional cardiac malformation. Fourteen patients (74%) required surgical intervention. Eleven patients (58%) underwent a Fontan-type operation. Five patients (26%) required ablation procedures for arrhythmia. One patient had infective endocarditis and two deaths occurred, both in patients who also had AV-VA discordance. Dextrocardia remains a rare finding in adults, even in a highly select group of patients with known congenital heart disease. Those with associated congenital heart abnormalities are likely to have complex lesions, which may require multiple surgical and medical interventions. Despite this, our series demonstrated that patients surviving to adulthood and then managed in an ACHD centre may have good medium-term survival. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by

  18. Drug Therapy for Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Jeffrey S.; Sharma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases (VHDs) are progressive. When not caused by acute comorbidities they are generally characterized by long asymptomatic phases during which hemodynamic severity may progress leading to morbidity and mortality. Treatment depends on VHD type and severity but when severe and symptomatic, usually involves mechanical intervention. Asymptomatic patients, and those who lack objective descriptors associated with high risk, are closely observed clinically with optimization of associated cardiovascular risk factors until surgical indications develop. Though often prescribed based on theory, no rigorous evidence supports pharmacological therapy in most chronic situations though drugs may be appropriate in acute valvular diseases, or as a bridge to surgery in severely decompensated patients. Herein, we examine evidence supporting drug use for chronic VHDs. PMID:26371236

  19. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; McEvoy, John W

    2017-07-01

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate...... the empirical evidence in this field. The purpose of this study was to review and quantify the impact of vital exhaustion on the development and progression of CHD. METHODS: Prospective and case-control studies reporting vital exhaustion at baseline and CHD outcomes at follow-up were derived from PubMed, Psyc...... by two authors. RESULTS: Thirteen prospective (n = 52,636) and three case-control (cases, n = 244; controls, n = 457) studies assessed vital exhaustion and could be summarized in meta-analyses. The pooled adjusted risk of CHD in healthy populations was 1.50 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1...

  2. The Role of Dermcidin Isoform 2: A Two-Faceted Atherosclerotic Risk Factor for Coronary Artery Disease and the Effect of Acetyl Salicylic Acid on It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwary Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are considered to be two major atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD. A stress-induced protein identified to be dermcidin isoform 2 of Mr. 11 kDa from blood plasma of hypertensive persons when injected (0.1 μM in rabbits increased the systolic pressure by 77% and diastolic pressure by 45% over the controls within 2 h. Ingestion of acetyl salicylic acid (150 mg/70 kg by these subjects reduced systolic (130 mm Hg and diastolic pressures (80 mm Hg with reduction of plasma dermcidin level to normal ranges (9 nM. The protein was found to be a potent activator of platelet cyclooxygenase and inhibited insulin synthesis. Aspirin was found to reduce hypertension by reduction of plasma dermcidin level, neutralized the effect of cyclooxygenase, and restored the pancreatic insulin synthesis through NO synthesis. These results indicated that dermcidin could be a novel atherosclerotic risk factor for its hypertensive and diabetogenic effects.

  3. Association of vitamin D deficiency with coronary artery disease in Mexican population: Genetics of atherosclerotic disease (GEA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bautista, Fabiola; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; Juárez-Rojas, Juan Gabriel; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the independent association between vitamin D deficiency (VDD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) in Mexican adult population. Matched case-control study. Data cardiovascular on risk factors, medication use, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking and vitamin D consumption were obtained. Biochemical variables, anthropometric and blood pressure were measured. 25(OH)D was quantified by chemiluminescence. We studied 250 patients with established CAD and 250 age-gender-body mass index (BMI) matched control subjects, with a mean age of 53 ± 6.1 years and BMI of 28 ± 3.5 kg/m(2). Deficiency of 25(OH)D was significantly higher in the control group (21.2 vs. 16%). Multiple logistic regression analysis did not show association between VDD and CAD (OR: 1.37 [0.08-23.2]). Multiple linear regression analysis also showed that statin use (b = 2.2; p = 0.004) and no alcohol use (b = -1.8; p = 0.03) significantly increased 25(OH)D levels. No independent association between VDD and the presence of coronary artery disease was found in Mexican adult population. The results suggest that treatment with statins and absence of alcohol consumption, might be the explanation for the higher concentrations of 25(OH)D observed in patients with CAD.

  4. Metabolic Modulators in Heart Disease: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They continue to be major burden on health care systems throughout the world, despite major advances made over the past 40 years in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat these debilitating diseases. A potential therapeutic approach that has been underutilized in treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure is "metabolic modulation." Major alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in ischemic heart disease and heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the heart. A metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency (oxygen consumed per work performed) and functional impairment in ischemic heart disease as well as in heart failure. This has led to the concept that optimizing energy substrate use with metabolic modulators can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, primarily by improving cardiac efficiency. Two approaches for metabolic modulator therapy are to stimulate myocardial glucose oxidation and/or inhibit fatty acid oxidation. In this review, the past, present, and future of metabolic modulators as an approach to optimizing myocardial energy substrate metabolism and treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure are discussed. This includes a discussion of pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation in the heart, as well as enzymes involved in ketone and branched chain amino acid catabolism in the heart. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emotional Problems in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases of childhood and the associated emotional problems are receiving major attention in the current pediatric practice. Adolescents with congenital heart diseases have significantly higher emotional problems compared to those without chronic illnesses. Early detection and management of emotional problems is essential to improve the quality of life of the adolescents with congenital heart diseases.

  6. Decline in mortality from heart disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Sjøl, Anette

    1995-01-01

    Mortality rates in Denmark from ischemic heart diseases (IHD), other heart diseases and unknown causes are presented for the period 1968-92. In all age groups, mortality from IHD is higher at the beginning of the period than at the end. For other heart disease, the plot of the mortality rate is U...... the validity of temporal changes within a country must be questioned....

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Indirect economic impacts of comorbidities on people with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Deborah J; Callander, Emily J; Shrestha, Rupendra N; Passey, Megan E; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J

    2014-01-01

     Few studies have assessed the effect of multiple health conditions among patients with heart disease, particularly the economic implications of having multiple conditions.  This study used a microsimulation model, Health&WealthMOD, to assess the effect of comorbidities on the labor force participation of 45-64-year-old Australians with heart disease, and the indirect economic costs to these individuals and government. For most comorbid conditions, there is a significant increase in the chance of an individual being out of the labor force, relative to those with heart disease alone. For example, individuals with heart disease and arthritis have more than 6-fold the odds of being out of the labor force relative to those with heart disease alone (OR 6.64, 95% CI: 2.46-17.95). People with heart disease and ≥1 comorbidities also receive a significantly lower income, pay less in taxation and receive more in government transfer payments than those with heart disease alone.  It is important to consider whether an individual with heart disease also has other health conditions, as individuals with comorbidities have inferior financial situations and are a greater burden on government finances than those with only heart disease.  (Circ J 2014; 78: 644-648).

  9. [Treatment of valvular heart diseases with catheterization techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Mika; Eskola, Markku; Rapola, Janne; Airaksinen, Juhani

    2013-01-01

    While valve surgery is an established form of treatment in significant valvular heart diseases, open heart surgery is not possible for all patients, owing to the risks involved. The incidence of valvular heart diseases increases sharply with age, and it is common that operative risks are overestimated due to age and associated diseases. This review deals with two catheter therapies that are in clinical use for valvular heart diseases: insertion of aortic valve prosthesis through a catheter and treatment of mitral valve insufficiency by clip implantation via the transvenous access.

  10. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... of coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed the original data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States and Europe to estimate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Over 6 to 10 years of follow-up, 5249 incident total coronary cases...... associated with risk of coronary heart disease....

  11. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Liver disease and heart failure: Back and forth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Michele; Tarantino, Nicola; Petrucci, Rossella; Tricarico, Lucia; Laonigro, Irma; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2017-10-31

    In their clinical practice, physicians can face heart diseases (chronic or acute heart failure) affecting the liver and liver diseases affecting the heart. Systemic diseases can also affect both heart and liver. Therefore, it is crucial in clinical practice to identify complex interactions between heart and liver, in order to provide the best treatment for both. In this review, we sought to summarize principal evidence explaining the mechanisms and supporting the existence of this complicate cross-talk between heart and liver. Hepatic involvement after heart failure, its pathophysiology, clinical presentation (congestive and ischemic hepatopathy), laboratory and echocardiographic prognostic markers are discussed; likewise, hepatic diseases influencing cardiac function (cirrhotic cardiomyopathy). Several clinical conditions (congenital, metabolic and infectious causes) possibly affecting simultaneously liver and heart have been also discussed. Cardiovascular drug therapy may present important side effects on the liver and hepato-biliary drug therapy on heart and vessels; post-transplantation immunosuppressive drugs may show reciprocal cardio-hepatotoxicity. A heart-liver axis is drafted by inflammatory reactants from the heart and the liver, and liver acts a source of energy substrates for the heart. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  15. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate as a marker for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayan, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction frequently present without evidence of cardiac-specific heart enzymes by laboratory analysis or specific pathologic electro-cardiogram findings. The current study analyzed the efficacy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate as an additional potential indicator for coronary heart disease, the aim being to enable quicker identification of patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction so that they can be more rapidly treated. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction who had undergone a heart catheter examination were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute coronary heart disease was made by the physician who performed coronary angiography. Patients without coronary heart disease were used as a control group. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured in all patients. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction and an inflammatory or tumor disease were excluded. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in 79 (58.09%) of 136 patients; 69 (50.74%) patients (95% confidence interval ±8.4%, 42.34%-59.14%) had coronary heart disease and a prolonged erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in ten (7.35%) patients (95% confidence interval ±4.39%, 2.96%-11.74%) without coronary heart disease by coronary angiography. The specificity of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate for coronary heart disease was 70.59% and the sensitivity was 67.65%. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be a useful additional diagnostic criterion for coronary heart disease.

  16. In vino veritas: alcohol and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph A

    2005-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies, numbering nearly 100, have documented an inverse association between alcohol consumption and vascular risk. The preponderance of evidence supports an independent beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate alcoholic beverage consumption on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is important to remember that observational data cannot prove causation; unmeasured or incompletely controlled confounding factors cannot be excluded. That said, most authorities now attribute a causal role to the relationship: moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of CHD, and current research centers on the mechanistic underpinnings and whether patterns of drinking are important. Here, I review the association between alcohol use and CHD risk, explore putative mechanisms, and make recommendations.

  17. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  18. Depression in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth E

    2008-11-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) have major depression and 20% have minor depression at any given point in the course of their illness. Depression causes significant psychological and social morbidity, and is a risk factor for further cardiac morbidity and mortality. Although there are many possible biological and behavioral mechanisms, the causal pathways through which depression increases the risk for cardiac events and death are not well understood. Despite the morbidity associated with depression, and the devastating impact it has on the quality of life of patients with CHD, it is underdiagnosed and often left untreated. This article describes screening techniques for use in primary care and cardiology settings, and discusses the safety and efficacy of available treatments for depression in patients with CHD.

  19. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large...... genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering...

  20. Diabetes & coronary heart disease: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K M Venkat; Tandon, Nikhil

    2010-11-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is currently the leading cause of death worldwide and together with diabetes, poses a serious health threat, particularly in the Indian Asian population. Risk factor management has evolved considerably with the continued emergence of new and thought-provoking evidence. The stream of laboratory- and population-based research findings as well as unresolved controversies may pose dilemmas and conflicting impulses in most clinicians, and even in our more well-informed patients. As results of the most recent clinical trials on glycaemic control for macrovascular risk reduction are woven into concrete clinical practice guidelines, this paper seeks to sort through unwieldy evidence, keeping these findings in perspective, to deliver a clearer message for the context of South Asia and cardio-metabolic risk management.

  1. Scintigraphic detection of inflammatory heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morguet, A.J. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Munz, D.L. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Kreuzer, H. (Dept. of Cardiology and Pulmonology, Centre of Internal Medicine, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Emrich, D. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Centre of Radiology, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the heart encompass myocarditis, endocarditis and pericarditis. This paper discusses the diagnostic potential of scintigraphy in these entities. In myocarditis, indium-111 antimyosin Fab imaging can visualize active myocyte damage and thus contribute substantially to the diagnosis. Antimyosin uptake is also seen in a large subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, indicating ongoing myocyte injury in these cases. In endocarditis, immunoscintigraphy using monoclonal technetium-99m-labelled antigranulocyte antibodies provides useful diagnostic information in patients with equivocal echocardiographic findings. Immunoscintigraphy seems to indicate the floridity of the inflammatory process in endocarditis and may be used to monitor antibiotic therapy. In pericarditis, the clinical value of scintigraphy has not been convincingly demonstrated. (orig.)

  2. Spinal cord stimulation for ischemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, J; De Jongste, M J L; Spincemaille, G; Staal, M J

    2007-01-01

    Ischemic disease (ID) is now an important indication for electrical neuromodulation (NM), particularly in chronic pain conditions. NM is defined as a therapeutic modality that aims to restore functions of the nervous system or modulate neural structures involved in the dysfunction of organ systems. One of the NM methods used is chronic electrical stimulation of the spinal cord (spinal cord stimulation: SCS). SCS in ID, as applied to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD), started in Europe in the 1970s and 1980s, respectively. Patients with ID are eligible for SCS when they experience disabling pain, resulting from ischaemia. This pain should be considered therapeutically refractory to standard treatment intended to decrease metabolic demand or following revascularization procedures. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of SCS on IHD and PVD by improving the quality of life of this group of severely disabled patients, without adversely influencing mortality and morbidity. SCS used as additional treatment for IHD reduces angina pectoris (AP) in its frequency and intensity, increases exercise capacity, and does not seem to mask the warning signs of a myocardial infarction. Besides the analgesic effect, different studies have demonstrated an anti-ischemic effect, as expressed by different cardiac indices such as exercise duration, ambulatory ECG recording, coronary flow measurements, and PET scans. SCS can be considered as an alternative to open heart bypass grafting (CABG) for patients at high risk from surgical procedures. Moreover, SCS appears to be more efficacious than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The SCS implantation technique is relatively simple: implanting an epidural electrode under local anesthesia (supervised by the anesthesist) with the tip at T1, covering the painful area with paraesthesia by external stimulation (pulse width 210, rate 85 Hz), and connecting this electrode to a

  3. A genetic future for coronary heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kate; Martin, Paul

    2008-04-01

    This paper is concerned with changing conceptions of genetic disease. It is based on an analysis of biomedical literature and focuses on the treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) in four published commentary papers. The aim of this analysis is to explore the ways in which CHD is constructed as genetic and the place of genetic discourses in the wider set of ideas that circulate about the disease. This analysis is then used to consider some of the claims of the geneticisation thesis (Lippman 1991, 1992). The analysis suggests that a genetic vision for understanding and managing CHD has emerged, which has many of the hallmarks of the geneticisation imagined by Lippman. However, a number of alternative and competing models of CHD are also supported within the biomedical discourse. These are related to the different disciplines with a stake in the field of CHD, and their struggles for authority. In conclusion, it is suggested that the geneticisation thesis, as a universal claim, is at odds with the diffuse and distributed nature of biomedical knowledge and practice. Rather than analysing geneticisation in a literal way, it may be more fruitful to see the thesis, itself, as a form of boundary work (Gieryn 1983).

  4. The diagnostic value of mean platelet volume in males with premature atherosclerotic coronary artery disease having stable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Malçok Gürel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate whether platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV could be new biomarkers addition to classical risk factors in premature coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods: Totally 124 male patients (mean age: 45.8±13.0 year; range of age: 27-78 year, with stable angina pectoris, were included. Clinical and laboratory findings (whole blood cell count, glucose, creatinine, lipid profile were recorded. Automatic blood counter was used for hematological parameters. Conventional coronary angiography was performed. Patients having acute coronary syndrome within the last six months, with severe valvular, structural or congenital heart disease, thyroid and hepatic dysfunction or signs of any infection were excluded. Results: The study population were separated into three groups by coronary angiography: 51 with stable CAD aged ≤40 years (premature CAD, 38 with stable CAD older than 40 (mature CAD and 35 with the normal coronary arteries (NCA. No significant difference was found in MPV values between premature CAD and mature CAD and also between premature CAD and NCA (p>0.05. A significant negative correlation was found between MPV and platelet count in premature CAD (r=-0.419, p=0.002. Both in premature CAD and mature CAD groups, higher MPV values was found in critical CAD subgroup than noncritical CAD subgroup, but the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in MPV between premature and mature male CAD patients compared to NCA group. A positive but non-significant correlation was found between the MPV values and the severity of CAD. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 381-385

  5. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2011 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Véronique L.; Go, Alan S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Adams, Robert J.; Berry, Jarett D.; Brown, Todd M.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Dai, Shifan; de Simone, Giovanni; Ford, Earl S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Fullerton, Heather J.; Gillespie, Cathleen; Greenlund, Kurt J.; Hailpern, Susan M.; Heit, John A.; Ho, P. Michael; Howard, Virginia J.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kittner, Steven J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Lichtman, Judith H.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Makuc, Diane M.; Marcus, Gregory M.; Marelli, Ariane; Matchar, David B.; McDermott, Mary M.; Meigs, James B.; Moy, Claudia S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mussolino, Michael E.; Nichol, Graham; Paynter, Nina P.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Sorlie, Paul D.; Stafford, Randall S.; Turan, Tanya N.; Turner, Melanie B.; Wong, Nathan D.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Summary Each year, the American Heart Association (AHA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and other government agencies, brings together the most up-to-date statistics on heart disease, stroke, other vascular diseases, and their risk factors and presents them in its Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update. The Statistical Update is a valuable resource for researchers, clinicians, healthcare policy makers, media professionals, the lay public, and many others who seek the best national data available on disease morbidity and mortality and the risks, quality of care, medical procedures and operations, and costs associated with the management of these diseases in a single document. Indeed, since 1999, the Statistical Update has been cited more than 8700 times in the literature (including citations of all annual versions). In 2009 alone, the various Statistical Updates were cited ≈1600 times (data from ISI Web of Science). In recent years, the Statistical Update has undergone some major changes with the addition of new chapters and major updates across multiple areas. For this year’s edition, the Statistics Committee, which produces the document for the AHA, updated all of the current chapters with the most recent nationally representative data and inclusion of relevant articles from the literature over the past year and added a new chapter detailing how family history and genetics play a role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Also, the 2011 Statistical Update is a major source for monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in the population, with a focus on progress toward achievement of the AHA’s 2020 Impact Goals. Below are a few highlights from this year’s Update. Death Rates From CVD Have Declined, Yet the Burden of Disease Remains High The 2007 overall death rate from CVD (International Classification of Diseases 10, I00–I99) was 251.2 per 100 000. The rates were 294

  6. Sequential segmental classification of feline congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scansen, Brian A; Schneider, Matthias; Bonagura, John D

    2015-12-01

    Feline congenital heart disease is less commonly encountered in veterinary medicine than acquired feline heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy. Understanding the wide spectrum of congenital cardiovascular disease demands a familiarity with a variety of lesions, occurring both in isolation and in combination, along with an appreciation of complex nomenclature and variable classification schemes. This review begins with an overview of congenital heart disease in the cat, including proposed etiologies and prevalence, examination approaches, and principles of therapy. Specific congenital defects are presented and organized by a sequential segmental classification with respect to their morphologic lesions. Highlights of diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis are offered. It is hoped that this review will provide a framework for approaching congenital heart disease in the cat, and more broadly in other animal species based on the sequential segmental approach, which represents an adaptation of the common methodology used in children and adults with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. How Is Heart Valve Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as surgery for adults who have aortic valve stenosis. Doctors often use balloon valvuloplasty to repair valve stenosis in infants and children. Replacing Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t ...

  9. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as surgery for adults who have aortic valve stenosis. Doctors often use balloon valvuloplasty to repair valve stenosis in infants and children. Replacing Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t ...

  10. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that are most sensitive to oxygen and nutrient deprivation. Some types of CHD allow blood clots to ... American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. The American Heart Association is a qualified ...

  11. Elevated cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, a major determinant of the atherogenic dyslipidemia, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in South Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Shirya; Sniderman, Allan; Melone, Michelle; Brown, Patrick E; Otvos, James D; Mente, Andrew; Schulze, Karleen; McQueen, Matthew J; Anand, Sonia S; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Why South Asians are at increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases compared with other ethnic groups is not fully understood. Atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia - hypertriglyceridemia, elevated numbers of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) - is more common in South Asians but the mechanisms responsible have not been explicated. Here we examined whether the circulating lipid transfer protein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), plays a role in the pathogenesis of the atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia among South Asians. CETP activity was determined by exogenous substrate assay in the serum of healthy, metabolically well-characterized individuals of South Asian and European descent (N = 244 and 238, respectively). Serum and lipoprotein lipids and apolipoproteins were measured and lipoprotein particle number and size were quantified via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the elements of the atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia were more severe in South Asians and CETP activity was significantly greater by 30% in South Asians compared with Europeans, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and waist circumference (p < 0.0001). CETP activity was directly associated with serum triglycerides and inversely with HDL-C in the whole population. CETP activity was also directly related to apoB and LDL particle number. Finally, increased CETP activity was associated with pro-atherogenic reductions in HDL and LDL particle size. We identified novel associations between elevated CETP activity and the triad of quantitative and qualitative lipoprotein abnormalities in the atherogenic dyslipidemia in South Asians, a major contributor of increased atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases in South Asians. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called ?coconut atrium?, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rhe...

  13. HEART SIZE IN PRIMARY MYOCARDIAL DISEASE*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-10

    Jul 10, 1971 ... Fig. 2. Relationship between left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (mmHg) and heart volume. Patients with mitral incompetence had disproportionately enlarged hearts for the degree of elevation of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The children had a small heart volume. D. 30 +-I--I--I--I--I--I--r. I. RAP'.

  14. Diet and heart disease. The role of fat, alcohol, and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziano, J M; Manson, J E

    1996-02-01

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that the Western diet plays a major role in atherogenesis. Clinicians are only now beginning to tease out the precise components of the diet that are harmful or beneficial. With respect to fat intake, it remains unclear whether it is the amount or type of fat that promotes atherosclerotic disease. There appears to be a consistent positive association of cholesterol, saturated fat, and possibly trans-fatty acid intake and atherosclerotic disease. Although there is general agreement that reducing intake of these dietary components would be beneficial, controversy remains on what should replace these harmful fats. Some researchers advocate massive reductions in total fat consumption with replacement with carbohydrates for everyone, whereas others recommend a Mediterranean-style diet, which replaces saturated animal fats with vegetable fats. Very low-fat diets have been shown to lower the chance of a heart attack among those with severe coronary artery disease, but for the majority of Americans who do not have obvious artery disease, there is no convincing evidence that a very low-fat diet is optimal. There may be other adverse health effects of this Asian diet, such as increased rates of hemorrhagic stroke. Further research is required to refine thinking on the optimal composition of fats in diet. The effects of alcohol consumption on chronic diseases are complex. The strength and consistency of the observational and experimental evidence strongly suggests a causal link between light to moderate alcoholic beverage consumption and reduced risks of CHD. These reductions in risk of CHD appear to be mediated largely by raising HDL cholesterol levels, although additional mechanisms remain possible and do not appear to be beverage specific. Maximal benefit in terms of CHD appears to be at the level of one drink per day. From a public policy standpoint, whether the benefits for CHD persist at heavy drinking levels or are attenuated is moot

  15. Adult Congenital Heart Disease with Focus on Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P.E. Ruys (Titia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe prevalence of Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) has been described to be 8,2 per 1000 live births in European countries.(1) Congenital heart disease is a collective term for a large number of different diagnoses with different anatomical substrate, complexity and prognosis. The most

  16. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005,...

  17. Nonfasting glucose, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; McCarthy, Mark I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI).......The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI)....

  18. Managing congenital heart disease and comorbidities – opening a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prognosis? Congenital heart disease and comorbidities. The birth incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is just less than 1%.1 Of these children, approximately 50 - 60% will require surgery. Between 25% and 30%2 of children with CHD will have some form of additional congenital lesion, a comorbidity or structural.

  19. [Passive smoking and the risk of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 10 years it has become clear that passive smoking is correlated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. The relative risk of 25-30% is comparable to that of lung cancer due to passive smoking. Since coronary heart disease is the most common cause of death, it is likely that

  20. Special Communication The spectrum of heart disease in adults in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related pathology, such as valvular heart disease following rheumatic fever or tuberculous pericardial effusion,8 and noncommunicable pathologies such as hypertensive heart disease or cor pulmonale. The information gained can lead to life-saving changes in management. This review will describe the spectrum of adult ...

  1. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  2. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  3. The trace elements in congenital cyanotic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Hegazi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Congenital cyanotic heart disease were associated with a highly significant decrease in the mean serum selenium and zinc levels, when compared with control group and non significant increase the mean serum copper levels. Changes in these trace elements suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial damage in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

  4. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-08-16

    Aug 16, 2013 ... PubMed | Google Scholar. 10. WHO. Therapeutic education of patients with coronary heart disease, Europe. 2005. www.euro.who.int/document/E88278.pdf. Accessed. March 15, 2011. 11. Racial, Ethnic and Socioeconomic Disparities in Multiple. Risk Factors for Heart Disease and Stroke, United States.

  5. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederend, I.; Jongbloed, M.R.M.; de Geus, J.C.N.; Blom, N.A.; ten Harkel, A.D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long

  6. [Clinical study of congenital heart disease accompanied by hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yun-Hua; Xiao, Qian; Wang, Jun-Sheng; Jiang, Yong-Guang

    2014-02-01

    To study the concurrence of congenital heart disease and hypospadias and the relationship between the two diseases. We investigated the incidence and types of congenital heart disease accompanied by hypospadias in male children received in our hospital from January 2002 to December 2012, compared them with those in the general population, and analyzed the correlation of different types of heart disease with the incidence rate of hypospadias. Of the 7 385 male children with congenital heart disease, 134 (1.81%) were found with hypospadias, with a significantly higher morbidity than in the general population (0.33% -0.40%) (P congenital heart abnormalities (21/972, 2.16%) than in the atrial septal defect (10/1 015, 0.99%) and patent ductus arteriosus (6/565, 1.06%) groups (P type of hypospadias among different heart disease groups (P > 0.05). Hypospadias is a common concurrent condition in male children with congenital heart disease. The incidence rate of hypospadias is related with the type of congenital heart disease, and the two conditions may have some common pathogenic or susceptive factors.

  7. Heart disease among children with HIV/AIDS attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are very few published studies of heart disease in HIV infected children living in sub-Saharan Africa, a region with more than 50% of the world's population of HIV infected patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, and describe the type and clinical presentation of heart disease among children ...

  8. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear.......Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  9. Changing Trend in Coronary Heart Disease in Nigeria | Nwaneli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the greatest cause of death in Western countries but reported to be rare in sub-Saharan Africa. There are suggestions that the incidence of coronary heart disease is rising in Nigeria as a result of many factors. This review looks at the burden of CHD in Nigeria and its risk ...

  10. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  11. Unstable atherosclerotic plaques contain T-cells that respond to Chlamydia pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, O. J.; van der Wal, A. C.; Houtkamp, M. A.; Ossewaarde, J. M.; Teeling, P.; Becker, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerotic lesions are characterized by an immune mediated chronic inflammation. Seroepidemiological studies support a relationship between atherosclerotic disease and infection with C. pneumoniae; an association further endorsed by immunocytochemical and DNA directed studies.

  12. Valvular Heart Disease in Adults: Management of Native Valve Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Hollenberg, Steven M

    2017-06-01

    Patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) should be treated for diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. They also should receive therapy for left ventricular dysfunction, undergo interval echocardiography, and participate in aerobic exercise. Valve replacement should be considered for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and syncope, presyncope, heart failure, angina, or severe AS with left ventricular dysfunction. Valve replacement is performed with open or transcatheter procedures; the latter are preferred for patients with high surgical risk. Patients with chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) should undergo open surgical replacement if they are symptomatic or are asymptomatic but have severe regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction. No transcatheter procedures currently are approved for AR. Patients with mitral stenosis (MS) should receive drugs for heart rate control and anticoagulation if they have atrial fibrillation. Invasive treatment involves valve replacement or percutaneous commissurotomy. Management of severe chronic mitral regurgitation consists of valve replacement or, for patients with high surgical risk, a percutaneous transcatheter procedure that clips the mitral leaflets together. When severe, tricuspid regurgitation can be managed with valve replacement. Pregnant patients with VHD require special management. Women with severe AS or MS should avoid becoming pregnant until VHD is managed definitively. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  13. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  14. Atrial tachyarrhythmia in adult congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbassi, Arsha; Nair, Krishnakumar; Harris, Louise; Wald, Rachel M; Roche, S Lucy

    2017-01-01

    The adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population continues to grow and most cardiologists, emergency room physicians and family doctors will intermittently come into contact with these patients. Oftentimes this may be in the setting of a presentation with atrial tachyarrhythmia; one of the commonest late complications of ACHD and problem with potentially serious implications. Providing appropriate initial care and ongoing management of atrial tachyarrhythmia in ACHD patients requires a degree of specialist knowledge and an awareness of certain key issues. In ACHD, atrial tachyarrhythmia is usually related to the abnormal anatomy of the underlying heart defect and often occurs as a result of surgical scar or a consequence of residual hemodynamic or electrical disturbances. Arrhythmias significantly increase mortality and morbidity in ACHD and are the most frequent reason for ACHD hospitalization. Intra-atrial reentrant tachycardia and atrial fibrillation are the most prevalent type of arrhythmia in this patient group. In hemodynamically unstable patients, urgent cardioversion is required. Acute management of the stable patient includes anticoagulation, rate control, and electrical or pharmacological cardioversion. In ACHD, rhythm control is the preferred management strategy and can often be achieved. However, in the long-term, medication side-effects can prove problematic. Electrophysiology studies and catheter ablation are important treatments modalities and in certain cases, surgical or percutaneous treatment of the underlying cardiac defect has a role. ACHD patients, especially those with complex CHD, are at increased risk of thromboembolic events and anticoagulation is usually required. Female ACHD patients of child bearing age may wish to pursue pregnancies. The risk of atrial arrhythmias is increased during pregnancy and management of atrial tachyarrhythmia during pregnancy needs specific consideration. PMID:28706585

  15. Psychosocial risk factors for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozier, Nick; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Colquhoun, David M; Bunker, Stephen J; Clarke, David M; Hare, David L; Hickie, Ian B; Tatoulis, James; Thompson, David R; Wilson, Alison; Branagan, Maree G

    2013-08-05

    In 2003, the National Heart Foundation of Australia published a position statement on psychosocial risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). This consensus statement provides an updated review of the literature on psychosocial stressors, including chronic stressors (in particular, work stress), acute individual stressors and acute population stressors, to guide health professionals based on current evidence. It complements a separate updated statement on depression and CHD. Perceived chronic job strain and shift work are associated with a small absolute increased risk of developing CHD, but there is limited evidence regarding their effect on the prognosis of CHD. Evidence regarding a relationship between CHD and job (in)security, job satisfaction, working hours, effort-reward imbalance and job loss is inconclusive. Expert consensus is that workplace programs aimed at weight loss, exercise and other standard cardiovascular risk factors may have positive outcomes for these risk factors, but no evidence is available regarding the effect of such programs on the development of CHD. Social isolation after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with an adverse prognosis. Expert consensus is that although measures to reduce social isolation are likely to produce positive psychosocial effects, it is unclear whether this would also improve CHD outcomes. Acute emotional stress may trigger MI or takotsubo ("stress") cardiomyopathy, but the absolute increase in transient risk from an individual stressor is low. Psychosocial stressors have an impact on CHD, but clinical significance and prevention require further study. Awareness of the potential for increased cardiovascular risk among populations exposed to natural disasters and other conditions of extreme stress may be useful for emergency services response planning. Wider public access to defibrillators should be available where large populations gather, such as sporting venues and airports, and as part of the response

  16. The ABCA1 gene R230C variant is associated with decreased risk of premature coronary artery disease: the genetics of atherosclerotic disease (GEA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Villarreal-Molina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ABCA1 genetic variation is known to play a role in HDL-C levels and various studies have also implicated ABCA1 variation in cardiovascular risk. The functional ABCA1/R230C variant is frequent in the Mexican population and has been consistently associated with low HDL-C concentrations. Although it has been associated with other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is not known whether it is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD. AIM: The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the ABCA1/R230C variant is associated with premature CAD in a case-control association study (GEA or Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease, and to explore whether BMI modulates the effect of the C230 allele on other metabolic traits using a population-based design. RESULTS: The C230 allele was significantly associated with both lower HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD as compared to controls (OR = 0.566; P(add = 1.499×10(-5. In addition, BMI modulated the effect of R230C on body fat distribution, as the correlation between BMI and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue (a metric of the propensity to store fat viscerally as compared to subcutaneously was negative in RR homozygous individuals, but positive in premenopausal women bearing the C230 allele, with a statistically significant interaction (P = 0.005. BMI-R230C interaction was also significant for triglyceride levels in women regardless of their menopausal status (P = 0.036. CONCLUSION: This is the first study assessing the effect of the R230C/ABCA1 variant in remature CAD. C230 was associated with both decreased HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD, and gender-specific BMI-R230C interactions were observed for different metabolic traits. These interactions may help explain inconsistencies in associations, and underscore the need to further analyze interactions of this functional and frequent variant with diet, exercise

  17. Periodontal Disease and Coronary Heart Disease Incidence: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Humphrey, Linda L; Fu, Rongwei; Buckley, David I; Freeman, Michele; Helfand, Mark

    2008-01-01

    .... Prospective cohort studies that assessed periodontal disease, Framingham risk factors, and coronary heart disease incidence in the general adult population without known CHD were reviewed and quality...

  18. Very low levels of microalbuminuria are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and death independently of renal function, hypertension, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Klaus; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the level of urinary albumin excretion (microalbuminuria), which is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and death, in the population. Microalbuminuria has been suggested as an atherosclerotic risk factor. However, the lower cutoff...... level of urinary albumin excretion is unknown. It is also unknown whether impaired renal function confounds the association. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the Third Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1992 to 1994, 2762 men and women 30 to 70 years of age underwent a detailed cardiovascular investigation program...... lipids. Lower levels of urinary albumin excretion were not associated with increased risk. CONCLUSIONS: Microalbuminuria, defined as urinary albumin excretion >4.8 microg/min (corresponding to approximately 6.4 microg/min during daytime), is a strong and independent determinant of coronary heart disease...

  19. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenh......HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...

  20. Increased arterial stiffness in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Reiner, Barbara; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Objective Central systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a measure of arterial stiffness and strongly associated with atherosclerosis and end-organ damage. It is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality than peripheral SBP. In particular, for children with congenital heart disease, a higher central SBP might impose a greater threat of cardiac damage. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare central SBP in children with congenital heart disease and in healthy counterparts. Patients and methods Central SBP was measured using an oscillometric method in 417 children (38.9% girls, 13.0 ± 3.2 years) with various congenital heart diseases between July 2014 and February 2017. The test results were compared with a recent healthy reference cohort of 1466 children (49.5% girls, 12.9 ± 2.5 years). Results After correction for several covariates in a general linear model, central SBP of children with congenital heart disease was significantly increased (congenital heart disease: 102.1 ± 10.2 vs. healthy reference cohort: 100.4 ± 8.6, p heart disease subgroups revealed higher central SBP in children with left heart obstructions (mean difference: 3.6 mmHg, p hearts after total cavopulmonary connection (mean difference: 2.1 mmHg, p = .015) compared with the reference. Conclusion Children with congenital heart disease have significantly higher central SBP compared with healthy peers, predisposing them to premature heart failure. Screening and long-term observations of central SBP in children with congenital heart disease seems warranted in order to evaluate the need for treatment.

  1. Myocardial mechanics of athletic hearts in comparison with diseased hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugishita, Y; Koseki, S; Matsuda, M; Yamaguchi, T; Ito, I

    1983-02-01

    Parameters of myocardial mechanics were measured by means of echocardiography in 31 competitive runners and 17 judo (Japanese wrestling) champions and were then compared with those in 25 normal control subjects, 15 patients with volume-overloaded (aortic regurgitation, AR) and 13 with pressure-overloaded (hypertension, HT) hearts, 14 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In runners, the ratio of left ventricular radius to wall thickness (R/Th) was maintained in the normal range, but fractional shortening (FS) and decreased slightly (p less than 0.01). Patients with decompensated DCM and AR had an increased R/Th (p less than 0.001) and a decreased FS (p less than 0.001). In judo champions, FS was maintained in the normal range, but R/Th had decreased (p less than 0.001). In patients with HT, R/Th had decreased slightly (p less than 0.05), but FS and peak systolic wall stress were maintained in the normal range. In patients with HCM, FS was maintained in the normal range, but R/Th had decreased (p less than 0.001). It is concluded that, at rest, hearts of runners are cardiomechanically similar to those of patients with compensated AR or DCM and probably have greater cardiac reserve, whereas hearts of judo champions are similar to those of HCM patients with inappropriate hypertrophy.

  2. Berberine ameliorates chronic kidney injury caused by atherosclerotic renovascular disease through the suppression of NFκB signaling pathway in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Impaired renal function in atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARD may be the result of crosstalk between atherosclerotic renovascular stenosis and amplified oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Berberine (BBR regulates cholesterol metabolism and exerts antioxidant effects. Accordingly, we hypothesized that BBR treatment may ameliorate ARD-induced kidney injury through its cholesterol-lowering effect and also suppression of the pathways involved in oxidative stress, inflammation and NFκB activation. METHODS: Male rats were subjected to unilateral renal artery stenosis with silver-irritant coil, and then fed with 12-week hypercholesterolemic diet. Rats with renal artery stenosis were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 6 each - ARD, or ARD+BBR - according to diet alone or in combination with BBR. Similarly, age-matched rats underwent sham operation and were also fed with hypercholesterolemic diet alone or in combination with BBR as two corresponding controls. Single-kidney hemodynamic metrics were measured in vivo with Doppler ultrasound to determine renal artery flow. The metrics reflecting hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, renal structure and function, inflammation and NFκB activation were measured, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control rats, ARD rats had a significant increase in urinary albumin, plasma cholesterol, LDL and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and a significant decrease in SOD activity. When exposed to 12-week BBR, ARD rats had significantly lower levels in blood pressure, LDL, urinary albumin, and TBARS. In addition, there were significantly lower expression levels of iNOS and TGF-β in the ARD+BBR group than in the ARD group, with attenuated NFκB-DNA binding activity and down-regulated protein levels of subunits p65 and p50 as well as IKKβ. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that BBR can improve hypercholesterolemia and redox status in the kidney, eventually ameliorating

  3. What happens to the heart in chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, E; Mark, P B

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The increased risk of cardiovascular disease seen in this population is attributable to both traditional and novel vascular risk factors. Risk of sudden cardiac or arrhythmogenic death is greatly exaggerated in chronic kidney disease, particularly in patients with end stage renal disease where the risk is roughly 20 times that of the general population. The reasons for this increased risk are not entirely understood and while atherosclerosis is accelerated in the presence of chronic kidney disease, premature myocardial infarction does not solely account for the excess risk. Recent work demonstrates that the structure and function of the heart starts to alter early in chronic kidney disease, independent of other risk factors. The implications of cardiac remodelling and hypertrophy may predispose chronic kidney disease patients to heart failure, arrhythmia and myocardial ischaemia. Further research is needed to minimise cardiovascular risk associated with structural and functional heart disease associated with chronic kidney disease.

  4. Exploring lifestyle changes in women with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Malene; Nielsen, Karina; Jensen, Peter Errboe

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a major cause of death for women worldwide, and thus it is important to focus on lifestyle changes to reduce the impact of the disease on women’s everyday lives. Nine women were interviewed using an explorative approach to describe women’s lifestyle changes after...... being diagnosed with IHD. Three major themes emerged; ‘Heart disease: A life-changing event’, ‘Social life – both inhibiting and promoting lifestyle changes’ and ‘Maintaining changes: An ongoing challenge and a conscious choice’. Ischemic heart disease caused anxiety, and the women strived to find...

  5. Developmental basis of adult cardiovascular diseases: valvular heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwald, Roger R; Norris, Russell A; Moreno-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Levine, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    In this chapter, we review the working hypothesis that the roots of adult valvular heart disease (VHD) lie in embryonic development. Valvulogenesis is a complex process in which growth factors signal the process of endocardium-to-mesenchyme transformation (EMT) resulting in formation of prevalvular "cushions." The post-EMT processes, whereby cushions are morphogenetically remolded into valve leaflets, are less well understood, but they require periostin. Mice with targeted deletion of periostin develop degenerative changes similar to human forms of VHD. Mitral valves are also abnormally elongated in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which plays an important role in clinical disease expression. However, the mechanism for this is unclear, but correlates with enhanced expression of periostin in a specific population of ventricular cells derived from the embryonic proepicardial organ, which accumulate at sites where valvular endocardial EMT is reactivated. Collectively, these findings suggest that developmental mechanisms underlie adult valve responses to genetic mutations in degenerative VHD and HCM.

  6. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  7. Coronary artery aneurysms and congestive heart failure--possible long-term course of Kawasaki disease in an adult--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y; Takayanagi, K; Inoue, T; Yamaguchi, H; Hayashi, T; Morooka, S; Takabatake, Y; Sato, Y

    1988-07-01

    Multiple coronary artery aneurysms, rarely seen in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease, can be frequently observed in children with Kawasaki disease. However, their long-term clinical courses still remain obscure. A thirty-nine-year-old male came to our clinic because of congestive heart failure. A left ventriculogram revealed highly reduced wall motion. A coronary angiogram showed left main trunk aneurysm with complete occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and ramification of the right coronary artery close to the ostium. Six months after discharge, he died suddenly. On autopsy, aneurysms were observed in the left main trunk and right coronary artery, together with an old anteroseptal myocardial infarction. Although he did not have a clear history of febrile disease in childhood, he was highly suspected to be a long-term survivor of Kawasaki disease because of the unique form and distribution of the coronary artery aneurysms.

  8. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Serra-Juh?, Clara; Cusc?, Ivon; Homs, A?da; Flores, Raquel; Tor?n, N?ria; P?rez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylat...

  9. Potential for stem cell use in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincott, Emma Siân; Burch, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This article reports on the evolving field of stem cell therapy and its impact on the management of cardiac pathology, in particular congenital heart disease. To date, stem cell therapy has focused on cardiomyoplasty for heart muscle disease, stem cell therapies are already in clinical use for these disorders. Research is now also supporting the potential role of stem cell therapy for congenital heart disease. In the future it may be possible to use stem cells to create cellular grafts and structures that may be surgically implanted into the disordered heart using bioengineering technology. Different types of stem cells have been evaluated and the identification of specific cardiac stem cells offers great potential. Preliminary animal studies investigating fetal cardiac therapies are also underway. These new directions for stem cell research provide exciting potential for the future management of congenital heart disease.

  10. Imaging of inflamed carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques with the use of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 scintigraphy in end-stage renal disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opalinska, Marta; Pach, Dorota; Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Glowa, Boguslaw; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Endocrinology, Cracow (Poland); Stompor, Tomasz [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Department of Nephrology, Hypertensiology and Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Olsztyn (Poland); Mikolajczak, Renata; Garnuszek, Piotr; Maurin, Michal; Karczmarczyk, Urszula [National Centre for Nuclear Research Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, Otwock (Poland); Fedak, Danuta [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Clinical Biochemistry, Cracow (Poland); Krzanowski, Marcin; Sulowicz, Wladyslaw [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Cracow (Poland); Rakowski, Tomasz [Jagiellonian University Medical School, 2nd Department of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology, Cracow (Poland)

    2012-04-15

    Identification of vulnerable plaques remains crucial for better cardiovascular risk assessment. At least 20% of inflammatory cells within unstable (vulnerable) plaques comprise T lymphocytes, which contain receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2); those receptors can be identified by scintigraphy with radiolabelled IL-2.The aim of this study was to identify the ''inflamed'' (vulnerable) plaques by scintigraphy using IL-2 labelled with {sup 99m}Tc in the selected, high cardiovascular risk group of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 28 patients (18 men, 10 women, aged 55.2 {+-} 9.6 years, 17 on peritoneal dialysis, 11 on haemodialysis) underwent common carotid artery (CCA) scintigraphy with the use of {sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-IL-2. In all cases, ultrasound examination of the CCA was performed and levels of selected proinflammatory factors, atherogenic markers and calcium-phosphate balance parameters were measured. Finally, the target to non-target (T/nT) ratio of IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques with intima-media thickness (IMT), classic cardiovascular risk factors and concentrations of the measured factors were compared. Increased {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques in 38/41 (91%) cases was detected. The median T/nT ratio of focal {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques was 2.35 (range 1.23-3.63). The mean IMT value on the side of plaques assessed by scintigraphy was 0.79 {+-} 0.18 mm (median 0.8, range 0.5-1.275). Correlations between T/nT ratio and homocysteine (R = 0.22, p = 0.037), apolipoprotein B (apoB) (R = 0.31, p = 0.008), apoB to apoA-I ratio (R = 0.29, p = 0.012) and triglyceride concentration (R = 0.26, p = 0.021) were detected. A lower T/nT ratio in patients with better parameters of nutritional status (haemoglobin, albumin, adiponectin) in comparison with patients with worse nutritional parameters (3.20 {+-} 0.5 vs 2.16 {+-} 0.68, p = 0.025) was revealed as well

  11. Perioperative infections in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murni, Indah K; MacLaren, Graeme; Morrow, Debra; Iyer, Parvathi; Duke, Trevor

    2017-12-01

    Perioperative infections have significant consequences for children with congenital heart disease (CHD), which can manifest as acute or chronic infection followed by poor growth and progressive cardiac failure. The consequences include delayed or higher-risk surgery, and increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. A systematic search for studies evaluating the burden and interventions to reduce perioperative infections in children with CHD was undertaken using PubMed. Limited studies conducted in low- to middle-income countries demonstrated the large burden of perioperative infections among children with CHD. Most studies focussed on infections after surgery. Few studies evaluated strategies to prevent preoperative infection or the impact of infection on decision-making around the timing of surgery. Children with CHD have multiple risk factors for infections including delayed presentation, inadequate treatment of cardiac failure, and poor nutrition. The burden of perioperative infections is high among children with CHD, and studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions to reduce these infections are lacking. As good nutrition, early corrective surgery, and measures to reduce nosocomial infection are likely to play a role, practical steps can be taken to make surgery safer.

  12. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemiology of valvular heart disease in a Swedish nationwide hospital-based register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andell, Pontus; Li, Xinjun; Martinsson, Andreas; Andersson, Charlotte; Stagmo, Martin; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Kristina; Smith, J Gustav

    2017-11-01

    Transitions in the spectrum of valvular heart diseases (VHDs) in developed countries over the 20th century have been reported from clinical case series, but large, contemporary population-based studies are lacking. We used nationwide registers to identify all patients with a first diagnosis of VHD at Swedish hospitals between 2003 and 2010. Age-stratified and sex-stratified incidence of each VHD and adjusted comorbidity profiles were assessed. In the Swedish population (n=10 164 211), the incidence of VHD was 63.9 per 100 000 person-years, with aortic stenosis (AS; 47.2%), mitral regurgitation (MR; 24.2%) and aortic regurgitation (AR; 18.0%) contributing most of the VHD diagnoses. The majority of VHDs were diagnosed in the elderly (68.9% in subjects aged ≥65 years), but pulmonary valve disease incidence peaked in newborns. Incidences of AR, AS and MR were higher in men who were also more frequently diagnosed at an earlier age. Mitral stenosis (MS) incidence was higher in women. Rheumatic fever was rare. Half of AS cases had concomitant atherosclerotic vascular disease (48.4%), whereas concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation were common in mitral valve disease and tricuspid regurgitation. Other common comorbidities were thoracic aortic aneurysms in AR (10.3%), autoimmune disorders in MS (24.5%) and abdominal hernias or prolapse in MR (10.7%) and TR (10.3%). Clinically diagnosed VHD was primarily a disease of the elderly. Rheumatic fever was rare in Sweden, but specific VHDs showed a range of different comorbidity profiles . Pronounced sex-specific patterns were observed for AR and MS, for which the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Determination of the prevalence of congenital heart disease in the patients admitted to the heart clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Shokoufeh Ahmadipour; Behzad Mohammadpour Ahranjani; Sara Daeichin; Zahra Mirbeig Sabzevari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) among the patients who refferred to the heart clinic so as to make an early and correct diagnosis. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study, all the patients admitted to the heart clinic who had symptoms or signs of CHD were included. The data were collected in one year based on the medical records. The main variables consisted of age, gender, history of folic acid consumption by the mother in ...

  15. Gut microbiota, diet, and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Julia M W; Esfahani, Amin; Singh, Natasha; Villa, Christopher R; Mirrahimi, Arash; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the gut microbiota is an area of growing interest, particularly for its link to improving and maintaining the systemic health of the host. It has been suggested to have potential to reduce risk factors associated with chronic diseases, such as elevated cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD). Diets of our evolutionary ancestors were largely based on plant foods, high in dietary fiber and fermentable substrate, and our gut microbiota has evolved against a background of such diets. Therapeutic diets that mimic plant-based diets from the early phases of human evolution may result in drug-like cholesterol reductions. In contrast, typical Western diets low in dietary fiber and fermentable substrate, and high in saturated and trans fatty acids, are likely contributors to the increased need for pharmacological agents for cholesterol reduction. The gut microbiota of those consuming a Western diet are likely underutilized and depleted of metabolic fuels, resulting in a less than optimal gut microbial profile. As a result, this diet is mismatched to our archaic gut microbiota and, therefore, to our genome, which has changed relatively little since humans first appeared. While the exact mechanism by which the gut microbiota may modulate cholesterol levels still remains uncertain, end products of bacterial fermentation, particularly the short chain fatty acids (i.e., propionate), have been suggested as potential candidates. While more research is required to clarify the potential link between gut microbiota and CHD risk reduction, consuming a therapeutic diet rich in plant foods, dietary fiber, and fermentable substrate would be a useful strategy for improving systemic health, possibly by altering the gut microbiota.

  16. Fibrosis-Related Gene Expression in Single Ventricle Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Stephanie J; Siomos, Austine K; Garcia, Anastacia M; Nguyen, Hieu; SooHoo, Megan; Galambos, Csaba; Nunley, Karin; Stauffer, Brian L; Sucharov, Carmen C; Miyamoto, Shelley D

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate fibrosis and fibrosis-related gene expression in the myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle with right ventricular failure. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on explanted right ventricular myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle disease and controls with nonfailing heart disease. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: single ventricle failing (right ventricular failure before or after stage I palliation), single ventricle nonfailing (infants listed for primary transplantation with normal right ventricular function), and stage III (Fontan or right ventricular failure after stage III). To evaluate subjects of similar age and right ventricular volume loading, single ventricle disease with failure was compared with single ventricle without failure and stage III was compared with nonfailing right ventricular disease. Histologic fibrosis was assessed in all hearts. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to identify differences in gene expression. Collagen (Col1α, Col3) expression is decreased in single ventricle congenital heart disease with failure compared with nonfailing single ventricle congenital heart disease (P = .019 and P = .035, respectively), and is equivalent in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, TIMP-3, and TIMP-4) are downregulated in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease (P = .0047, P = .013 and P = .013, respectively). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) are similar between nonfailing single ventricular heart disease and failing single ventricular heart disease, and between stage III heart disease and nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. There is no difference in the prevalence of right ventricular fibrosis by histology in subjects with single ventricular failure heart disease with right ventricular failure (18%) compared with those with normal right

  17. Atherosclerotic carotid plaque assessment with multidetector computed tomography angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. de Weert (Thomas)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis evaluates the role of MDCT angiography in 1) the depiction of atherosclerotic disease and subsequent luminal stenosis in the arteries that supplies the brain with blood, and 2) the assessment of atherosclerotic plaque features that have been related to plaque vulnerability.

  18. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, Pdisease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  19. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  20. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  1. A review of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dhaval R

    2011-01-01

    The nearly one-million estimated adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients in the United States now outnumber children with congenital heart disease (CHD). With continued improvement in survival due to surgical and medical management of patients born with CHD, there is an overall shift in the burden of care from childhood to adulthood. Due to this transitioning population, the probability of heart failure continues to increase with age and represents nearly one-quarter of all mortality in ACHD. Despite these sobering figures adult cardiologist and fellows continue to have limited exposure in the care of patients with congenital heart disease. The syndrome of heart failure represents a complex derangement of neurohormones, natriuretic peptides, and cytokines leading to progressive symptoms of exercise intolerance, dyspnea, and fatigue. Congenital heart patients represent a unique challenge in both categorization and protocol management of heart failure (HF). It remains unclear if the current four-stage ACC/AHA guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of HF in adults can serve as a meaningful framework for congenital heart patients. Additionally, widely used conventional HF therapy of beta-blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) have not demonstrated clear survival benefit in this population. Unfortunately, adequately powered and controlled randomized studies are grossly lacking and remain challenging to conduct. Nonetheless, a review of heart failure associated with ACHD is provided.

  2. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum

  3. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    OpenAIRE

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesio...

  4. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  5. Oral magnesium supplementation in adults with coronary heart disease or coronary heart disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Tavia W; Beckstrand, Renea L

    2009-12-01

    To review randomized control clinical trial (RCT) literature and prospective studies for the safety and efficacy of magnesium supplements in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or with CHD risk. Databases were searched using the keywords: magnesium, heart disease, endothelium, prevention, treatment, therapy, level, and supplement. There were no reports of adverse effects from magnesium supplementation in any of the studies. Subjects reporting lower dietary magnesium intake had significantly lower serum magnesium concentrations than those reporting higher dietary magnesium intake and, in some cases, had a significantly higher frequency of supraventricular beats. There was a modest relationship between dietary magnesium intake and a reduced risk of CHD in male subjects; however, there was no noted decrease in the development of CHD disease in women who had high magnesium intake. Magnesium is vital for many functions in the body and magnesium supplementation is safe. There is a possible association between a modestly lower risk of CHD in men and increased magnesium intake; therefore, it is reasonable to encourage diets high in magnesium as a potential means to lower the risk of CHD.

  6. Stress-induced heart symptoms and perceptual biases in patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study is to clarify whether biased symptom perception towards heart symptoms may explain a reduced quality of life in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD). The present study tested the hypothesis that the combination of ConHD and high trait anxiety

  7. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  9. Congenital and Acquired Valvular Heart Disease in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sarah A; Ward, Cary C

    2017-08-24

    The number of pregnancies complicated by valvular heart disease is increasing. This review describes the hemodynamic effects of clinically important valvular abnormalities during pregnancy and reviews current guideline-driven management strategies. Valvular heart disease in women of childbearing age is most commonly caused by congenital abnormalities and rheumatic heart disease. Regurgitant lesions are well tolerated, while stenotic lesions are associated with a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications. Management of symptomatic disease during pregnancy is primarily medical, with percutaneous interventions considered for refractory symptoms. Most guidelines addressing the management of valvular heart disease during pregnancy are based on case reports and observational studies. Additional investigation is required to further advance the care of this growing patient population.

  10. Association between kidney function and genetic polymorphisms in atherosclerotic and chronic kidney diseases: A cross-sectional study in Japanese male workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kubo

    Full Text Available Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been implicated in the predisposition to chronic kidney disease (CKD. Atherosclerotic disease is deeply involved in the incidence of CKD; however, whether SNPs related to arteriosclerosis are involved in CKD remains unclear. This study aimed to identify SNPs associated with CKD and to examine whether risk allele accumulation is associated with CKD.We conducted a cross-sectional study using data of 4814 male workers to examine the association between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and 59 candidate polymorphisms (17 CKD, 42 atherosclerotic diseases. We defined the genetic risk score (GRS as the total number of risk alleles that showed a significant association in this analysis and examined the relationship with CKD (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73m2. Multivariate logistic regression, discrimination by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI, and category-free net reclassification improvement (cNRI were evaluated.In total, 432 participants were categorized as having CKD. We found eight candidate SNPs with P value < 0.05 (CX3CR1 rs3732379, SHROOM3 rs17319721, MTP rs1800591, PIP5K1B rs4744712, APOA5 rs662799, BRAP rs3782886, SPATA5L1 rs2467853, and MCP1 rs1024611 in the multivariate linear regression adjusted for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose. Among these eight SNPs, BRAP rs3782886 and SPATA5L1 rs2467853 were significantly associated with eGFR (false discovery rate < 0.05. GRS was significantly associated with CKD (odds ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.26. C-statisics improved from 0.775 to 0.780 but showed no statistical significance. However, adding GRS significantly improved IDI and cNRI (0.0057, P = 0.0028, and 0.212, P < 0.001, respectively.After adjustment for clinical factors, kidney function was associated with BRAP rs3782886 and SPATA5L1 rs2467853 and the GRS for CKD that we

  11. Genetic assembly of the heart: implications for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D

    2001-01-01

    More children die from congenital heart defects (CHD) each year than are diagnosed with childhood cancer, yet the causes remain unknown. The remarkable conservation of genetic pathways regulating cardiac development in species ranging from flies to humans provides an opportunity to experimentally dissect the role of critical cardiogenic factors. Utilization of model biological systems has resulted in a molecular framework in which to consider the etiology of CHD. As whole genome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism data become available, identification of genetic mutations predisposing to CHD may allow preventive measures by modulation of secondary genetic or environmental factors. In this review, genetic pathways regulating cardiogenesis revealed by cross-species studies are reviewed and correlated with human CHD.

  12. Pattern and Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the pattern of Congenital Heart Diseases (CHD) in children referred to Ahmed Gasim Cardiac Center) in Khartoum. Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional, clinic based study conducted over a six months period. The children were referred to the Cardiac Centre because of suspected heart ...

  13. Serum zinc values in children with congenital heart disease | Sadoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Some children with congenital heart diseases (CHD) may have increased pulmonary blood flow that causes recurrent bronchopneumonia and congestive heart failure. Serum zinc is reduced in children with pneumonia and patients on diuretics. Objective: To evaluate the serum zinc level of children with CHD ...

  14. Underlying congenital heart disease in Nigerian children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Keyword: pneumonia, congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure. African Health Sciences 2013; 13(3): 607 - 612 ... study of acute respiratory infections among children in Northern Nigeria, the rate of pneumonia .... stenosis involved valvular and supravalvular membrane. Of the 14 patients with CHD, ...

  15. prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among primary school pupils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 January 2013. PREVALENCE OF RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE AMONG PRIMARY SCHOOL PUPILS IN MID-WESTERN NIGERIA .... valve leaflets. The evidence of valvular incompetence or stenosis was noted. Where there was regurgitation, the length of the regurgitant jet was measured. The function of the heart was ...

  16. Carcinoid heart disease secondary to ovarian tumour: a logical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... Carcinoid heart disease secondary to ovarian tumours is uncommon. The ovarian carcinoids do not have metastasis in the liver unlike gastrointestinal tumours. Hence the management priorities need to be different. We present a case in which removal of the primary tumour before heart surgery resulted in a ...

  17. Heartbeat sensitivity in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Simon; Karsdorp, Petra A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that patients with a congenital heart disease are sensitive regarding heartbeat perception, reflected in enhanced attention for heartbeat, estimation of own heart rate, and a vulnerability to become anxious by listening to heartbeat sounds. Twenty adults with a

  18. The Spectrum of Paediatric Congenital Heart Disease at The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality amongst infants and children globally. Complex heart lesions are more costly to manage than simple lesions. Geographical differences in the spectrum of CHD have been reported; knowledge of the spectrum of CHD provides a ...

  19. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Mygind, Naja Dam; Ali Qayyum, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Although, treatment of ischemic heart disease (IHD) has improved considerably within the last decades, it is still the main cause of death worldwide. Despite maximum treatment, many IHD patients suffer from refractory angina and heart failure, which severely limits their daily lives. Moreover, IHD...

  20. Carcinoid heart disease: two clinical cases and a review | Weinreich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, a multidisciplinary team approach has improved the prognosis and quality of life for patients with carcinoid heart disease. Therapy includes somatostatin analogues and treatment for heart failure, removal of primary or metastatic tumour deposits, valve replacement in the presence of valvular involvement, and ...