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Sample records for atherosclerotic heart disease

  1. Cysteinyl leukotriene signaling aggravates myocardial hypoxia in experimental atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobili, Elena; Salvado, M Dolores; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard; Castiglioni, Laura; Kastrup, Jens; Wetterholm, Anders; Tremoli, Elena; Hansson, Göran K; Sironi, Luigi; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT) are powerful spasmogenic and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases, in particular asthma. Here, we investigated whether cys-LT signaling, in the context of atherosclerotic heart disease, compromises the myocardial microcirculation and...

  2. The relationship between Hcy, LP(a), hs-CRP and coronary atherosclerotic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the relationship between homocysteine(Hcy), lipoprotein(a) [LP(a)], high sensitivity C-reactive protein(hs-CRP) and coronary atherosclerotic heart disease, coronary arteriographic finding-diagnosed 144 patients with coronary atherosclerosis were measured for Hcy LP(a) and hs-CRP levels in blood. The results showed that Hcy. LP(a) and hs-CRP levels of patients with coronary atherosclerosis were higher than those in controls, and were significantly associated with the number of attacked coronary artery branches. (P<0.01). As independent risk factors of atherosclerosis, Hcy, LP(a) and hs-CRP may play important roles in diagnosis and prognosis of coronary heart disease. (authors)

  3. Cysteinyl leukotriene signaling aggravates myocardial hypoxia in experimental atherosclerotic heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nobili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT are powerful spasmogenic and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases, in particular asthma. Here, we investigated whether cys-LT signaling, in the context of atherosclerotic heart disease, compromises the myocardial microcirculation and its response to hypoxic stress. To this end, we examined Apoe(-/- mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet and analysed the expression of key enzymes of the cys-LT pathway and their receptors (CysLT1/CysLT2 in normal and hypoxic myocardium as well as the potential contribution of cys-LT signaling to the acute myocardial response to hypoxia. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Myocardial biopsies from Apoe(-/- mice demonstrated signs of chronic inflammation with fibrosis, increased apoptosis and expression of IL-6, as compared to biopsies from C57BL/6J control mice. In addition, we found increased leukotriene C(4 synthase (LTC(4S and CysLT1 expression in the myocardium of Apoe(-/- mice. Acute bouts of hypoxia further induced LTC(4S expression, increased LTC(4S enzyme activity and CysLT1 expression, and were associated with increased extension of hypoxic areas within the myocardium. Inhibition of cys-LT signaling by treatment with montelukast, a selective CysLT1 receptor antagonist, during acute bouts of hypoxic stress reduced myocardial hypoxic areas in Apoe(-/- mice to levels equal to those observed under normoxic conditions. In human heart biopsies from 14 patients with chronic coronary artery disease mRNA expression levels of LTC(4S and CysLT1 were increased in chronic ischemic compared to non-ischemic myocardium, constituting a molecular basis for increased cys-LT signaling. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CysLT1 antagonists may have protective effects on the hypoxic heart, and improve the oxygen supply to areas of myocardial ischemia, for instance during episodes of sleep apnea.

  4. A MMP derived versican neo-epitope is elevated in plasma from patients with atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Genovese, Federica; Larsen, Lise Korsager;

    2013-01-01

    ELISA for detection of the fragment in plasma. VCANM was measured in plasma of patients with different levels of heart diseases. Patients experiencing I) acute coronary syndrome, II) stable ischemic heart disease and III) demonstrating high levels of coronary calcium deposits had significantly higher...... plasma levels of VCANM compared to a control group of individuals with no detectable coronary calcium deposits. VCANM was also detected by immunohistochemistry in coronary artery sections of patients with different degrees of atherosclerosis. VCANM ability to separate patients with atherosclerotic...

  5. Endogenous Bioactive Peptides as Potential Biomarkers for Atherosclerotic Coronary Heart Disease

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    Tsutomu Hirano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with high medical costs and rates of disability. It is therefore important to evaluate the use of cardiovascular biomarkers in the early diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD. We have screened a variety of recently identified bioactive peptides candidates in anticipation that they would allow detection of atherosclerotic CAD. Especially, we have focused on novel anti-atherogenic peptides as indicators and negative risk factors for CAD. In vitro, in vivo and clinical studies indicated that human adiponectin, heregulin-β1, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, and salusin-α, peptides of 244, 71, 30, and 28 amino acids, respectively, attenuate the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions by suppressing macrophage foam cell formation via down-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1. Circulating levels of these peptides in the blood are significantly decreased in patients with CAD compared to patients without CAD. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed that salusin-α is a more useful biomarker, with better sensitivity and specificity, compared with the others for detecting CAD. Therefore, salusin-α, heregulin-β1, adiponectin, and/or GLP-1, alone or in various combinations, may be useful as biomarkers for atherosclerotic CAD.

  6. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

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    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  7. Heparin need of the patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease during cardiopulmonary bypass. Comparison of cyanotic, acyanotic, rheumatic and atherosclerotic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babacan, M K; Tasdemir, O; Yakut, C; Zorlutuna, Y; Karagöz, H; Göl, K; Bayazit, K

    1989-01-01

    Four groups of patients were studied. Group I: Congenital cyanotic heart disease (CCHD), consisting of 24 subjects aged 5 to 28 (1.4); 18 males and 4 females. Group II: Acyanotic congenital heart disease (ACHD), consisting of 34 patients aged 5 to 42 (20.1); 17 males and 17 females. Group III: Rheumatic heart disease (RHD), consisting of 30 patients aged 11-54 (42.4); 9 males and 21 females. Group IV: Atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD), consisting of 35 patients aged 36 to 65 (49.2); 33 males and 2 females. The haematocrit value (Hct) was the highest in the CCHD group. Total amount of heparin (mg/kg) used during cardiopulmonary bypass was 5.4 in CCHD, 4.66 in ACHD, 4.8 in RHD and 4.6 in AHD group. Mean protamine values was 4.02; 4; 4.03; and 4 respectively. Although the difference of Hct value was statistically different between CCHD and RHD group (p less than 0.001), heparin need was not (p less than 0.1). One-way analysis of variance (F test) showed no difference for heparin need between the four groups (F3.119 = 0.64). Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) showed a positive correlation (r = 0.36 and r = 0.25) with heparin need in CCHD group but no correlation was found in RHD group. PMID:2745517

  8. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  9. Natural History of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    YuehuaPu

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease was very common among stroke patients of Asians, Blacks, and Hispanics ancestry. Furthermore, stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) have higher recurrence rate of cerebral ischemia and death than those without ICAS. However, the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease is still in controversy. Most of the studies were retrospective and randomized controlled trial of drugs. This review summarized the prognosis of symptomati...

  10. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  11. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  13. Human urotensin II promotes hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Arita, Shigeko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Suguro, Toshiaki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Hongo, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Human urotensin II (U-II), the most potent vasoconstrictor undecapeptide identified to date, and its receptor (UT) are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of U-II with particular reference to its role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of U-II gene (S89N) are associated with onset of essential hypertension, type II diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance in the Asian population. Plasma U-II levels are elevated in patients with vascular endothelial dysfunction-related diseases such as essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Chronic infusion of U-II enhances atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. In human atherosclerotic plaques from the aorta and coronary and carotid arteries, U-II is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs) and lymphocytes, whereas UT is expressed at high levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. U-II stimulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in human ECs as chemoattractant for monocytes, and accelerates foam cell formation by up-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages. U-II produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activation in human VSMCs, and stimulates VSMC proliferation with synergistic effects when combined with ROS, oxidized LDL, and serotonin. Clinical studies demonstrated increased plasma U-II levels in accordance with the severity of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension and that of coronary artery lesions in patients with ischemic heart disease. Here, we summarize the key roles of U-II in progression of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

  14. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults, examines the relationship between consuming too much added sugar and the risk of heart disease death. When it Comes to Blood Pressure, Make Control ...

  15. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need.......1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate...

  16. Endovascular revascularization for aortoiliac atherosclerotic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vikas; Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic iliac artery disease is increasingly being treated with endovascular techniques. A number of new stent technologies can be utilized with high long-term patency, including self-expanding stents, balloon-expandable stents, and covered stents, but comparative data on these stent types and in more complex lesions are lacking. This article provides a review of currently available iliac stent technologies, as well as complex procedural aspects of iliac artery interventions, including approaches to the treatment of iliac bifurcation disease, long segment occlusions, choice of stent type, and treatment of iliac artery in-stent restenosis. PMID:27099509

  17. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart disease ...

  18. Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease and Anxiety Disorder%冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病和焦虑障碍的相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昭君

    2011-01-01

    冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病(简称冠心病)是被公认的心身疾病,焦虑障碍是最常见的情绪障碍之一,两者常合并存在.焦虑障碍对冠心病的影响机制目前尚未十分明确,但有不少假说提示焦虑障碍严重影响冠心病的发生、发展及预后.治疗可通过三种方法进行干预,即药物治疗、心理社会干预和运动疗法.临床医师往往仅给予冠心病患者二级预防,对焦虑障碍的识别率不高,造成误诊、漏诊,使患者的疗效欠佳.现就冠心病和焦虑障碍的相关联系、发病机制及治疗方面的研究予以综述.%Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease has been accepted as a psychosomatic disorder whilst anxiety disorder is one of the most frequently emotional disturbances.The two disorders often occur concurrently.The mechanism of anxiety disorder complicating coronary heart disease remains unclear until now.However, many hypotheses propose that anxiety disorder seriously influence the occurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart disease.The treatment may inovlve the intervention through three levels, namely, pharamcological treatment, sociopsychological intervention, and sports therapy.Clinicians often only give the second-level prevention to coronary heart disease patients.The recognition of anxiety disorder is not adequate.The consequent nisdiagnosis and missed diagnosis results in a poor treatment outcome.This article reviews the association of anxiety disorder with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease, pathogenesis,and treatment.

  19. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  20. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary heart ...

  1. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SyedIHussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  2. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies. PMID:27082149

  3. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  4. 冠心病患者实施同型半胱氨酸检测的临床意义%Clinical significance of the Homocysteine testing in the Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伦妙容

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significance of the Homocysteine testing in the Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease . Methods Choosing 53 cases of patients with the Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease for the experimental group,and 50 cases of healthy check-up for the control group,testing the Homocysteine,Creatine Kinase and MB Iso Enzyme of Creatine Kinase,analyze the results comprehensively. Results Compared with the control group, there were significantly higher of the experimental group of the Homocysteine,Creatine Kinase and MB Iso Enzyme of Creatine Kinase results(P 0.05). Clinical specimens correlation analysis results show that the Homocysteine and the correlation of clinical diagnosis result is good(Kappa=0.81). Conclusion There is a good indicators for the Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease diagnosis of the Homocysteine,which has good positive rate and clinical compliance.%目的:探讨同型半胱氨酸浓度水平的检测对于早期诊断急性心肌梗死的应用价值。方法选择2013年1月~2013年12月确诊为冠心病的患者53例为试验组,选择同期进行体检且结果显示为健康的50例为对照组,试验组和对照组均进行同型半胱氨酸、肌酸激酶、肌酸激酶同工酶的测定,对结果进行综合分析。结果试验组的患者血清同型半胱氨酸、肌酸激酶、肌酸激酶同工酶的浓度水平较对照组均有明显上升趋势,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);阳性检出率分析,试验组患者的的同型半胱氨酸、肌酸激酶和肌酸激酶同工酶的检测结果阳性率分别为84.91%(45/53)、81.13%(43/53)、83.02%(44/53),同型半胱氨酸检测结果阳性率分别与肌酸激酶、肌酸激酶同工酶两两比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);临床标本相关性分析,同型半胱氨酸检测结果和临床诊断结果的相关性好,Kappa值等于0.81。结论同型半胱氨酸是一种辅助诊断冠心病的

  5. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular heartbeats, called ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  6. Pregnancy loss and later risk of atherosclerotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension....

  7. Association between pregnancy losses in women and risk of atherosclerotic disease in their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Behrens, Ida; Bundgaard, Henning; Simonsen, Jacob; Melbye, Mads; Boyd, Heather Allison

    2016-01-01

    women with pregnancies in 1977-2008, and their parents (>1 million) and brothers (>435 000). We followed parents for incident ischaemic heart disease (IHD), myocardial infarction (MI), and cerebrovascular infarction (CVI), and brothers for a broader combined atherosclerotic endpoint. Using Cox...... regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for each outcome by history of pregnancy loss in daughters/sisters. Overall, parents whose daughters had 1, 2, and ≥3 miscarriages had 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.04], 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.11), and 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.19) times the rate of MI...... may have a common aetiologic mechanism. Women in families with atherosclerotic disease may be predisposed to pregnancy loss; conversely, pregnancy losses in first-degree relatives may have implications for atherosclerotic disease risk....

  8. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    K-CY McGrath; LS McRobb; AK Heather

    2008-01-01

    K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen ...

  9. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occurs when the heart is not able to pump blood through the body as well as it should. ... arteries. The pressure is highest when your heart pumps blood into your arteries – when it beats. It is ...

  10. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk and evidence-based management of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyajeet Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An elevated level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is directly associated with development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which may present as coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. The new cholesterol management guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association aim to address a comprehensive approach to prevent and reduce the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The new guidelines recommend initiation of heart healthy lifestyle modifications and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor ("statin" therapy in individuals who are at a high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. It is estimated that these guidelines could result in "statin" therapy for one in every three adults in the United States. This article presents a review of the current cholesterol management guidelines, recommendations from relevant randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses obtained from the searches in Medline/PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and publications from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service, and the United States Preventive Services Task Force.

  11. ATHEROSCLEROTIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Kizer, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70 to 74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus Diabetes Mellitus in older age deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age.

  12. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001104.htm Cyanotic heart disease ... heart disease refers to a group of many different heart defects that are present at birth (congenital). They result in a low blood oxygen level. ...

  13. Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease

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    ... Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Hypothyroidism and Heart Disease January 2014 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Alan ... hormone. Why does hypothyroidism increase your risk for heart disease? Both thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) are related ...

  14. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K-CY McGrath

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  15. 焦虑症与冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病的关系研究进展%The Research Developmenton on Relationship of Anxiety and Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳志勇

    2011-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease( CAHD )is closely associated with anxiety disorders,CAHD patients with a higher prevalence of anxiety disorders. Anxiety disorder is the development and prognosis of CAHD independent risk factor for cardiovascular system and is considered another important risk factor. Despite the large amount of evidence that the incidence of CAHD and anxiety disorders are independent prognostic factors,but the mechanism of interaction between the CAHD and anxiety disorders is not clear,CAHD patients with anxiety disorders with effective treatment programs,and treatment of anxiety can reduce incidence of CAHD and improve the prognosis of patients is uncertain currently.%冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病(CAHD)与焦虑症有着密切的关联,CAHD患者中焦虑症的发病率较高.焦虑症是CAHD发展和预后的独立危险因素,并被认为是心血管系统的另一种重要危险因素.尽管大量的证据显示,焦虑症是CAHD发病和预后的独立危险因素,但两者之间相互作用的机制仍不明确,CAHD伴焦虑症患者的有效治疗方案,以及治疗焦虑能否降低冠心病的发病以及改善CAHD患者的预后目前也不确定.

  16. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007188.htm Heart disease and women To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. People often do not consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the ...

  17. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  18. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  19. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  20. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  1. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. Changing ...

  2. Management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease after Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Sandra M S; Saad, Ahmed; Textor, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with occlusive atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial and the Stent Placement and Blood Pressure and Lipid-Lowering for the Prevention of Progression of Renal Dysfunction Caused by Atherosclerotic Ostial Stenosis of the Renal Artery (STAR) and ASTRAL. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Although hemodynamically significant, ARVD can reduce renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate; adaptive mechanisms preserve both cortical and medullary oxygenation over a wide range of vascular occlusion. Progression of ARVD to severe vascular compromise eventually produces cortical hypoxia, however, associated with active inflammatory cytokine release and cellular infiltration of the renal parenchyma. In such cases ARVD produces a loss of glomerular filtration rate that no longer is reversible simply by restoring vessel patency with technically successful renal revascularization. Each of these trials reported adverse renal functional outcomes ranging between 16 and 22% over periods of 2-5 years of follow-up. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of ARVD for clinical nephrologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials and experimental research. PMID:24723543

  3. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Beginning in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Young Mi

    2010-01-01

    Although the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, appear from middle age, the process of atherosclerosis can begin early in childhood. The early stage and progression of atherosclerosis in youth are influenced by risk factors that include obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking, and by the presence of specific diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and Kawasaki disease (KD). The existing evidence...

  4. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  5. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Apr 18,2016 Heart disease risk rises for everyone as they age, but ... women is seen about 10 years after menopause. Heart disease is the leading killer of women . Estrogen Levels ...

  6. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  7. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease risk factors causes coronary MVD. Although death rates from heart disease have dropped in the last 30 years, they ... stopped her "dead in her tracks." Jennifer reminds us how heart disease takes too many of our moms, sisters, and ...

  8. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  9. Early identification of atherosclerotic disease by noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; Lois, Fátima; Franco, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase further, which will be associated with a substantial economic burden. High-risk or vulnerable plaques and, indirectly, the burden of atherosclerotic disease, are responsible for most major cardiovascular events. Most of the current prevention strategies are focused on identifying and managing the established risk factors (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity) for atherosclerosis. Another opportunity for further characterizing the population at high CVD risk would be to measure the occurrence and progression of subclinical (asymptomatic) atherosclerotic burden. The detection of subclinical atherosclerosis and high-risk plaques, if proven to predict cardiovascular events, may enable the establishment of earlier control of CVD risk factors and help preventing CVD. In this Review, we address the potential progress in CVD prevention brought about by the use of noninvasive imaging techniques to identify subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:20440291

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Huijun; Wang Jinnan; Li Rui; Ferguson Marina S; Kerwin William S; Dong Li; Canton Gador; Hatsukami Thomas S; Yuan Chun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the carotid vessel wall is one promi...

  11. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac Arrest • Cardiac Rehab • Cardiomyopathy • Cardiovascular Conditions of Childhood • Cholesterol • Congenital Heart Defects • Diabetes • Heart Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  12. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  13. Renal function and atherosclerotic renovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bax, L.

    2008-01-01

    Renovascular disease (RVD) is a potentially reversible cause of renal failure and renovascular hypertension. However, in the absence of definitive clinical trials, there is a lack of evidence regarding its optimal management. We first addressed the central role of renal function in cardiovascular disease (CVD) in part I of this thesis. Renal function seems to have a strong relationship with atherosclerosis, a generalized process which starts early in life. In patients with manifest vascular d...

  14. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  15. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  16. Women and Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹国如

    2005-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading killer of Americans. But it kills more women than men. The American Heart Association says heart disease and other cardiovascular (心血管的) disorders kill about five hundred thousand women a year. That is more than the next seven causes of death combined.

  17. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  18. Epigenetic Modulation in the treatment Atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela M Byrne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the single largest cause of death in the western world and its incidence is on the rise globally. Atherosclerosis, characterised by the development of atheromatus plaque, can trigger luminal narrowing and upon rupture result in myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Epigenetic mechanisms are a source of considerable research interest due to the role they play in gene regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation have been identified as potential drug targets in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. miRNAs are known to play a role in gene silencing, which has been widely investigated in cancer. In comparison, the role they play in cardiovascular disease and plaque rupture is not well understood. Nutritional epigenetic modifiers from dietary components, for instance sulforaphane found in broccoli, have been shown to suppress the pro-inflammatory response through transcription factor activation. This review will discuss current and potential epigenetic therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, focusing on the use of miRNAs and dietary supplements such as sulforaphane and protocatechuic aldehyde.

  19. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. PMID:26777261

  20. Dysfunctional HDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenson, Robert S; Brewer, H Bryan; Ansell, Benjamin J; Barter, Philip; Chapman, M John; Heinecke, Jay W; Kontush, Anatol; Tall, Alan R; Webb, Nancy R

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) protect against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from macrophages through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) pathways involved in reverse cholesterol transport. Factors that impair the availability of functional apolipoproteins or the activities of ABCA1 and ABCG1 could, therefore, strongly influence atherogenesis. HDL also inhibits lipid oxidation, restores endothelial function, exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions, and exerts anti-inflammatory actions in animal models. Such properties could contribute considerably to the capacity of HDL to inhibit atherosclerosis. Systemic and vascular inflammation has been proposed to convert HDL to a dysfunctional form that has impaired antiatherogenic effects. A loss of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative proteins, perhaps in combination with a gain of proinflammatory proteins, might be another important component in rendering HDL dysfunctional. The proinflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase induces both oxidative modification and nitrosylation of specific residues on plasma and arterial apolipoprotein A-I to render HDL dysfunctional, which results in impaired ABCA1 macrophage transport, the activation of inflammatory pathways, and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Understanding the features of dysfunctional HDL or apolipoprotein A-I in clinical practice might lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to atherosclerosis. PMID:26323267

  1. Erythrocyte membrane, plasma and atherosclerotic plaque lipid pattern in coronary heart disease Perfil lipídico de membrana de eritrocito, plasma y placa ateromatosa en la enfermedad coronaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia R. Lausada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze the lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque (AP, plasma and erythrocyte membrane (EM in patients with advanced coronary heart disease (CHD. AP were obtained through endarterectomy in 18 patients. Ten normolipemic healthy subjects were selected to obtain the normal lipid pattern profile. Total lipids of AP and EM were determined by HPTLC, and the fatty acid profile from AP, EM and plasma using TLC-FID. The relative amount of the lipid species analyzed in AP was in line with the data in the literature [phospholipids: 23.5 mol% ± 3.5; total cholesterol 68.9 mol% ± 7.9; triglyceride 7.6 mol% ± 3.4]. Plasma and EM from CHD patients compared to controls, showed a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids and an increase in saturated fatty acids leading to a decrease in the unsaturation index (plasma: 1.67 ± 0.06 vs. 1.28 ± 0.03, PEl objetivo fue analizar la composición lipídica de las membranas de eritrocitos (ME, plasma y placas ateromatosas (PA en pacientes con enfermedad coronaria avanzada (ECV. Las PA fueron obtenidas de endarterectomías coronarias de 18 pacientes. Fueron seleccionados 10 sujetos sanos, normolipémicos, como grupo control. Los lípidos totales de PA y ME se determinaron utilizando HPTLC, y el perfil de ácidos grasos de las PA, ME y plasma mediante TLC-FID. La cantidad relativa de las especies lipídicas obtenidas de las PA coinciden con la literatura [fosfolípidos 23.5 mol% ± 3.5; colesterol total 68.9 mol% ± 7.9; triglicéridos 7.6 mol% ± 3.4]. En el plasma y en las ME de los pacientes con ECV se observó, comparando con los pacientes controles, una disminución de los ácidos grasos poli-no saturados acompañado de un aumento de los ácidos grasos saturados que provocó el descenso del índice de instauración (plasma: 1.67 ± 0.06 vs. 1.28 ± 0.03, P<0.05; ME: 2.28 ± 0.04 vs. 1.25 ± 0.010, P<0.05 y el incremento del cociente AG saturados/insaturados (plasma: 0.35 ± 0.02 vs. 0

  2. Adult congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Morphet, John AM

    2006-01-01

    One million people over the age of 20 suffer from congenital heart disease in the United States. These adult patients can slip through the cracks of our medical system; many are too old to be cared for in most pediatric institutions by pediatric cardiologists and, unfortunately, most adult cardiologists are not trained in congenital heart disease. Therefore, it is important to identify the common lesions in adult congenital heart disease and how they should be managed. Acyanotic congenital he...

  3. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  4. Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and heart disease. The crowd formed a giant human heart in honor of National Wear Red Day, which ... Know the Symptoms. Take Action.” “Learn What a Heart Attack Feels Like—It Could Save Your Life” ... US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  5. Salusins: Potential Use as a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human salusin-α and salusin-β are related peptides produced from prosalusin. Bolus injection of salusin-β into rats induces more profound hypotension and bradycardia than salusin-α. Central administration of salusin-β increases blood pressure via release of norepinephrine and arginine-vasopressin. Circulating levels of salusin-α and salusin-β are lower in patients with essential hypertension. Salusin-β exerts more potent mitogenic effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and fibroblasts than salusin-α. Salusin-β accelerates inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Human macrophage foam cell formation is stimulated by salusin-β but suppressed by salusin-α. Chronic salusin-β infusion into apolipoprotein E-deficient mice enhances atherosclerotic lesions; salusin-α infusion reduces lesions. Salusin-β is expressed in proliferative neointimal lesions of porcine coronary arteries after stenting. Salusin-α and salusin-β immunoreactivity have been detected in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, with dominance of salusin-β in macrophage foam cells, VSMCs, and fibroblasts. Circulating salusin-β levels increase and salusin-α levels decrease in patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that salusin-β and salusin-α may contribute to proatherogenesis and antiatherogenesis, respectively. Increased salusin-β and/or decreased salusin-α levels in circulating blood and vascular tissue are closely linked with atherosclerosis. Salusin-α and salusin-β could be candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Houlberg; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  7. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about ... well-being. Does menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) prevent heart disease? Once you reach menopause, your ovaries stop making ...

  8. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Coronary Heart Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause serious complications. However, if you ... changes and medicines, go to "How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?" Work closely with your doctor to control ...

  9. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  10. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  11. Evaluation and percutaneous management of atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease (PVD) of the lower extremities deprives a person of the ability to exercise to their satisfaction, later of the ability to perform the activities of their daily life, and finally of their legs themselves. Peripheral vascular disease has long been managed by the vascular surgeon utilizing endarterectomy and peripheral arterial bypass. Patient acceptance of nonsurgical, percutaneous procedures such as percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) is high. Increased utilization of these procedures has led to improved techniques and adjuncts to therapy, as well as more critical review of long-term results. This article will review the evaluation and nonoperative management of PVD, with an emphasis on the newer modalities of management presently being investigated

  12. Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Mail Close www.diabetes.org > Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Women Share: Print Page Text Size: A A ... heart-and-circulation, In this section Living With Diabetes Treatment and Care Women Coronary Heart Disease Sexual Health Women and ...

  13. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Apr 18,2016 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  14. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it will help control some of your heart disease risk factors. Eat a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Choose lean proteins, such as chicken, fish, beans, and legumes. Eat low-fat dairy ...

  15. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features ... say if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Taking Aspirin Take your aspirin with food and water. This ...

  16. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  17. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the number one killer in the United States - heart disease and stroke.  Created: 9/3/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  18. Anthocyanins and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanins are red, blue, and purple pigments distributed throughout nature, and in our diet. One potential health benefit of dietary anthocyanins is protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence for beneficial effects of anthocyanins with respect to heart disease comes from epidemio...

  19. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Diabetes Educators JDRF American Heart Association MedlinePlus Diabetes Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 293 KB). Alternate Language URL Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Page Content On this ...

  20. Lyme Disease and the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Lyme Disease and the Heart Peter J. Krause and Linda ... in a few cases. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Disease The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has ...

  1. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic inflammatory joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; van Halm, V P; Nurmohamed, M T

    2016-05-15

    Inflammatory joint disorders (IJD), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (ASp) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), are prevalent conditions worldwide with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. IJD are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) disease-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we present an overview of the literature. Standardised mortality ratios are increased in IJD compared with the general population, that is, RA 1.3-2.3, ASp 1.6-1.9 and PsA 0.8-1.6. This premature mortality is mainly caused by atherosclerotic events. In RA, this CV risk is comparable to that in type 2 diabetes. Traditional CV risk factors are more often present and partially a consequence of changes in physical function related to the underlying IJD. Also, chronic systemic inflammation itself is an independent CV risk factor. Optimal control of disease activity with conventional synthetic, targeted synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs decreases this excess risk. High-grade inflammation as well as anti-inflammatory treatment alter traditional CV risk factors, such as lipids. In view of the above-mentioned CV burden in patients with IJD, CV risk management is necessary. Presently, this CV risk management is still lacking in usual care. Patients, general practitioners, cardiologists, internists and rheumatologists need to be aware of the substantially increased CV risk in IJD and should make a combined effort to timely initiate CV risk management in accordance with prevailing guidelines together with optimal control of rheumatic disease activity. CV screening and treatment strategies need to be implemented in usual care. PMID:26888573

  2. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease Updated:May 20,2016 View an animation of ... call 9-1-1. Risk Factors and Coronary Heart Disease Major risk factors that can't be changed ...

  3. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970296 Evaluating the degree of pulmonary vascularlesions in congenital heart disease with selective pul-monary angiography. PAN Shiwei(潘世伟), et al.Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. Chin JCardiol 1997; 25(1): 39-41. Objective: To evaluate the degree of pulmonary vas-

  4. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  5. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Stroke This information in Spanish ( en español ) Heart disease: Know your risk Are you at risk for ... risk factors Return to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov ...

  6. FastStats: Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Heart Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... the U.S. Morbidity Number of adults with diagnosed heart disease: 27.6 million Percent of adults with diagnosed ...

  7. The role of neuropeptide Y in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenliang; Song, Zhiyuan; Lin, Shu

    2016-10-01

    With average life expectancy rising greatly, the incidence rate of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) has significantly increased. The heart disease has now become the number one killer that threatens the global population health, the second is stroke. It will be of great significance to investigate the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ASCVD in order to promote effective prevention and treatment. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) has now been discovered for more than thirty years and is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. By combining with certain receptors, NPY performs a variety of physiological functions, including the regulation of food intake, cardiovascular effects, development, hormonal secretion, sexual behavior, biological rhythms, temperature and emotion. In ASCVD, increased peripheral NPY was involved in the pathophysiological process of atherosclerosis through affecting the vascular endothelial dysfunction, the formation of foam cells, the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the local inflammatory response of plaques and the activation and aggregation of platelets. Via central and/or the peripheral nervous system, increased NPY was associated with dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and smoking which are all risk factors for ASCVD. In this review, we summarize the role of neuropeptide Y in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:27389447

  8. SELECTINS IN CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROTIC DISEASE:A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李远方; 胡健

    2001-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic lesions appears to be inflammatory in nature. It involves the recruitment of blood monocytes to the vascular endothelium, followed by intimal infiltration. Monocytes differentiate to macrophages, then internalize lipids to form foam cells, thus develop fatty streak lesion. A wide range of adhesion molecules governs these interactions between cells, among these molecules are selectins. Selectins mediate the first step in leukocyte adhesion at sites of inflammation or injury, characterized by rolling and tethering

  9. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes or prediabetes ... can help prevent future health problems. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way our ...

  10. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Karina W

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  11. Cohort study of predictive value of urinary albumin excretion for atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Yokoyama, H; Mathiesen, E;

    1996-01-01

    atherosclerotic vascular disease during follow up of 2457 person year. Elevated urinary albumin excretion was significantly predictive of atherosclerotic vascular disease (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.18) per 5 mg increase in 24 hour urinary albumin excretion, P = 0.002). Predictive effect...

  12. The relationship of H-type hypertension and renal insufficiency in coronary heart disease patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑卫峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the relationship between Htype hypertension and renal insufficiency in patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease(CHD)and chronic heart failure(CHF).Methods 100 CHD patients with both hypertension and CHF were chosen in our hospital from January 2011 to July 2013.Left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF)was measured with echocardiography and estimated glomerular filtration rate(e GFR)was calculated with the simplified modification of diet in renal

  13. Relationship between vascular endothelium and periodontal disease in atherosclerotic lesions: Review article

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco; Aurélio; Lumertz; Saffi; Mariana; Vargas; Furtado; Carisi; Anne; Polanczyk; Márlon; Munhoz; Montenegro; Ingrid; Webb; Josephson; Ribeiro; Cassio; Kampits; Alex; Nogueira; Haas; Cassiano; Kuchenbecker; R?sing; Eneida; Rejane; Rabelo-Silva

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease. Recent studies suggest that periodontal infection and the ensuing increase in the levels of inflammatory markers may be associated with myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease. The present article aimed at reviewing contemporary data on the pathophysiology of vascular endothelium and its association with periodontitis in the scenario of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Quantifying the Importance of Interleukin-6 for Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Danesh, John; Kaptoge, Stephen; Mann, Andrea G; Sarwar, Nadeem; Wood, Angela; Angleman, Sara B.; Wensley, Frances; Higgins, Julian P. T; Lennon, Lucy; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Rumley, Ann; Whincup, Peter H.; Lowe, Gordon D.O.; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2008-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the leading cause of death among adults in developed countries, kills one person in the US every minute. With age, “atherosclerotic plaques”—deposits of fats, calcium, and various cellular waste products—coat the walls of arteries, causing them to narrow and harden, interrupting blood flow through the body. When this occurs in the coronary arteries, which nourish the heart muscle, the end result is CHD. If a plaque breaks off the arte...

  15. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter ... introduced as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness in 2002 by the NHLBI. The Red ...

  16. Women and Heart Disease: Sharing Advice from the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women and Heart Disease Sharing Advice From The Heart Past Issues / Spring ... gowns in an effort to raise awareness that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women. ...

  17. Living with heart disease and angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000576.htm Living with heart disease and angina To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Coronary artery disease - living with Heart Disease and Angina Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a ...

  18. Other Possible Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk Heart Health and Stroke Other possible heart disease risk factors Related information Depression fact sheet Stress ... Return to top More information on Other possible heart disease risk factors Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart ...

  19. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages Past Issues / Winter ... weeks of a heart attack. For Women with Heart Disease: About 6 million American women have coronary heart ...

  20. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  1. Epidemiology of rheumatic heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Imamoglu, A.; Ozen, S

    1988-01-01

    We compared the incidence of rheumatic heart disease in elementary schoolchildren from low and high socioeconomic groups; children from one of the schools were rescreened 10 years later. The results showed that the incidence of rheumatic heart disease was significantly higher in low socioeconomic group but it is gradually declining.

  2. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other infections with strep bacteria that progress to rheumatic fever can cause heart valve disease. When the body tries to fight the strep ... you feel better before the medicine is gone. Heart valve disease caused by rheumatic fever mainly affects older adults who had strep ...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fetterman, Jessica L.; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G.; Brown, Jamelle A.; Kyle P. Feeley; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A.; Berk, Brittany D.; Weisbrod, Robert M.; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Approach and results ...

  4. Severe supraaortal atherosclerotic disease resembling Takayasu’s Arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Kis

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Bernhard Kis1,2, Thomas Liebig3,4, Peter Berlit11Department of Neurology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen, Germany; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Department of Neuroradiology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen, Germany; 4Department of Neuroradiology, Technical University of Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: We report a case of a 64 year-old man whose clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings strikingly resembled those found in Takayasu’s Arteritis which is characterized by the triad of absent radial pulses, ischemic retinopathy, and carotid sinus hyperreflexia causing syncopes. Angiographically, the patient exhibited severe atherosclerotic changes of the supraaortic large vessels. Stent-assisted angioplasty resulted in both clinical improvement and increased cerebral blood flow as measured by angiography and ultrasound.Keywords: Takayasu’s arteritis, atherosclerosis, angiography, stent, angioplasty

  5. Valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predicts of the patients with valvular heart disease it has improved substantially in the last 15 years.A better understanding of the appropriate programming of the surgery it is one of the key reasons .In general the surgery for the illness valvular stenosis it can take a long time until the appearance of the symptoms. Probably that in the future it progresses toward a conservation of the native valves in the patient.It will be beneficial because the valves modern prosthetic even have inherent risks .The aortic stenosis acquired it will follow requiring a valve prosthetic substitution .But the valvular disease it will be treated every time but by means of procedures that keep the native valves.They include the lung autograft for the aortic stenosis ,The balloonla commissurectomy with ball for the mitral stenosis ,the aortic valvular repair for aortic inadequacy .This procedures will make that the surgery is but attractive eliminating the risks associated with the prosthetics.The continuous advances in the valuation non invasive of the aortic and mitral valves, the of the appropriate selection moment for the derivation for surgical treatment, the improves of the surgical techniques for the valvular substitution and reconstruction and the very recent advances in less aggressive surgical focuses they should combine to improve the patients' perspectives with cardiopatia valvular

  6. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Liang [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Bu-Lang [Department of Medical Research Shijiazhuang First Hospital, Hebei Medical University (China); Li, Tian-Xiao, E-mail: litianxiaod@163.com [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Li, Zhao-Shuo [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  7. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  8. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions critical congenital heart disease critical congenital heart disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a ...

  9. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors? Coronary heart disease risk factors are ... high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others. Heart Disease Risk Factors 09/30/2011 This video—presented ...

  10. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated? Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated with lifestyle changes, medicines, and ... treating DHD include: Controlling diabetes and any other heart disease risk factors you have, such as unhealthy blood ...

  11. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease: Know your risk Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? ... overall health. Return to top More information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from ...

  12. Psychological Language on Twitter Predicts County-Level Heart Disease Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Schwartz, Hansen Andrew; Kern, Margaret L.; Park, Gregory; Labarthe, Darwin R.; Merchant, Raina M.; Jha, Sneha; Agrawal, Megha; Dziurzynski, Lukasz A.; Sap, Maarten; Weeg, Christopher; Larson, Emily E.; Ungar, Lyle H.; Martin E. P. Seligman

    2015-01-01

    Hostility and chronic stress are known risk factors for heart disease, but they are costly to assess on a large scale. We used language expressed on Twitter to characterize community-level psychological correlates of age-adjusted mortality from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD). Language patterns reflecting negative social relationships, disengagement, and negative emotions—especially anger—emerged as risk factors; positive emotions and psychological engagement emerged as protective factors...

  13. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: New Insights From Epidemiology, Genetics, and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-02-19

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need to reduce levels to no advice on treatment. New insight in epidemiology now suggests that these lipoproteins, marked by high triglycerides, are strong and independent predictors of ASCVD and all-cause mortality, and that their cholesterol content or remnant cholesterol likewise are strong predictors of ASCVD. Of all adults, 27% have triglycerides >2 mmol/L (176 mg/dL), and 21% have remnant cholesterol >1 mmol/L (39 mg/dL). For individuals in the general population with nonfasting triglycerides of 6.6 mmol/L (580 mg/dL) compared with individuals with levels of 0.8 mmol/L (70 mg/dL), the risks were 5.1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all-cause mortality. PMID:26892957

  14. Update on the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease: A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Komotar, Ricardo J.; Kellner, Christopher P.; Raper, Daniel M; Strozyk, Dorothea; Higashida, Randall T.; Meyers, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) contributes to a significant number of ischemic strokes. There is debate in the recent literature concerning the impact of the location of stenosis in ICAD on outcome. Some reports have suggested that disease processes and outcomes vary by vessel location, potentially altering the natural history and indications for intervention. Here we have performed a comprehensive, critical review of the natural history of ICAD by vessel in an attempt to assess ...

  15. Atherosclerotic disease and risk factor modification in Saudi Arabia: a call to action

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Omran M

    2012-01-01

    Mohammed Al-OmranThe Peripheral Vascular Disease Research Chair and Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaPurpose: Atherosclerotic disease (AD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and in Saudi Arabia. Intensive risk reduction therapy plays a major role in reducing adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with AD. The level of awareness of this important fact amongst physicians (family physicians, general inte...

  16. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin

  17. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin of great

  18. Ischemic heart disease induces upregulation of endothelin receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Szok, Delia; Tajti, Janos; Vecsei, Laszlo; Edvinsson, Lars; Malmsjö, Malin

    2004-01-01

    Endothelin has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. The aims were to quantify endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptor mRNA levels in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure and...... significantly higher in arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease (0.23+/-0.04 and 0.35+/-0.06) as compared to congestive heart failure (0.09+/-0.02 and 0.07+/-0.01) and controls (0.08+/-0.02 and 0.08+/-0.01). After organ culture, the endothelin ETB receptor mRNA levels were elevated, and the...... sarafotoxin 6c-induced vasoconstriction was more efficacious. Increased endothelin receptor activity may contribute to the increased vascular tone and development of atherosclerotic disease in ischemic heart disease in man....

  19. RANOLAZINE IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    V. P. Lupanov

    2015-01-01

    Study results of a new anti-anginal drug (an inhibitor of sodium channels — ranolazine) are presented. Indications, contraindications, major clinical trials of the drug in patients with ischemic heart disease are considered.

  20. RANOLAZINE IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Lupanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Study results of a new anti-anginal drug (an inhibitor of sodium channels — ranolazine are presented. Indications, contraindications, major clinical trials of the drug in patients with ischemic heart disease are considered.

  1. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or other ...

  2. What Are Heart Disease and Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What Are Heart Disease and Stroke? Updated:Dec 8,2015 There are ... include: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heart disease Atrial fibrillation (Abnormal heart rhythm) Call 9-1- ...

  3. Myocardial bridging: retrospective analysis and scintigraphic testing of patients with no angiographically significant atherosclerotic coronary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Luz, A.C.; J. Silveira; P. Palma; Cyrne-Carvalho, H.; Albuquerque, A.; I. Amorim; Gomes, L.

    2006-01-01

    Rev Port Cardiol. 2006 Apr;25(4):397-406. Myocardial bridging: retrospective analysis and scintigraphic testing of patients with no angiographically significant atherosclerotic coronary disease. [Article in English, Portuguese] Luz A, Silveira J, Palma P, Carvalho HC, Albuquerque A, Amorim I, Gomes L. SourceServiço de Cardiologia, Hospital Geral de Santo António, Porto, Portugal. Abstract INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: The clinical relevance of myocardial bri...

  4. Advances in immune-modulating therapies to treat atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Prediman K Shah

    2014-01-01

    In addition to hypercholesterolemia, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms play a critical role in atherogenesis, thus making immune-modulation therapy a potentially attractive way of managing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. These immune-modulation strategies include both active and passive immunization and confer beneficial reduction in atherosclerosis. Preclinical studies have demonstrated promising results and we review current knowledge on the complex role of the immune system and...

  5. Erythrocyte Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC): diagnostic and therapeutic implications in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Chalikias, Georgios K; Tziakas, Dimitrios N; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease. The last three decades efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that are implicated in the process of atherogenesis and plaque development. Chemokines are crucial mediators in every step of this process. Additionally, cellular components of the peripheral blood have been proved important mediators in the formation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. However, until recently data were mostly focusing on leukocytes and plate...

  6. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... Smoking Tips for Friends and Family of Quitters Workplace Health Employer Resources Workplace Health Index Recognition & Awards ...

  7. Comparison of 3D TOF MRA with Contrast Enhanced MRA in Intracranial Atherosclerotic Occlusive Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared diagnostic performance of 3D Time of flight MRA with contrast-enhanced MRA to detect and quantify intracranial atherosclerotic occlusive disease. From April 2007 to December 2009, we enrolled 95 patients with clinically suspected intracranial atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease who had undergone 3D TOF-MRA and CE MRA at 1.5T or 3T with DSA. Two radiologists analyzed the post-processed images using a maximum intensity projection. Intracranial vessels were categorized as distal internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery or vertebrobasillar artery. We graded the degree of stenosis and assigned subjects to one of three groups: low grade occlusion (50% stenosis using DSA as a reference standard. CE MRA had 94.2% sensitivity, 88.1% specificity, 51% positive predictive value, 99.1% negative predictive value and 88.8% diagnostic accuracy for detecting >50% stenosis; In contrast, 3D TOF-MRA showed 94.2% sensitivity, 91.6.1% specificity, 59.8% positive predictive value, 99.1% negative predictive value and 91.9% diagnostic accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity of CE MRA were not significantly different than sensitivity and specificity of 3D TOF MRA (p >0.05). 3D TOF-MRA provides comparable diagnostic performance with CE-MRA for diagnosis intracranial atherosclerotic disease

  8. High-Density Lipoprotein Mimetics: a Therapeutic Tool for Atherosclerotic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Masahiro; Higaki, Yasuki; Saku, Keijiro; Uehara, Yoshinari

    2016-04-01

    Clinical trials and epidemiological studies have revealed a negative correlation between serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events. Currently, statin treatment is the standard therapy for cardiovascular diseases, reducing plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. However, more than half of the patients have not been able to receive the beneficial effects of this treatment.The reverse cholesterol transport pathway has several potential anti-atherogenic properties. An important approach to HDL-targeted therapy is the optimization of HDL cholesterol levels and function in the blood to enhance the removal of circulating cholesterol and to prevent or mitigate inflammation that causes atherosclerosis. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors increase HDL cholesterol levels in humans, but whether they reduce the risk of atherosclerotic diseases is unknown. HDL therapies using HDL mimetics, including reconstituted HDL, apolipoprotein (Apo) A-IMilano, ApoA-I mimetic peptides, or full-length ApoA-I, are highly effective in animal models. In particular, the Fukuoka University ApoA-I-mimetic peptide (FAMP) effectively removes cholesterol via the ABCA1 transporter and acts as an anti-atherosclerotic agent by enhancing the biological functions of HDL without elevating HDL cholesterol levels.Our literature review suggests that HDL mimetics have significant atheroprotective potential and are a therapeutic tool for atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:26830201

  9. Association of Atherosclerotic Peripheral Arterial Disease with Adiponectin Genes SNP+45 and SNP+276: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sorana D. Bolboacă; Doru Pamfil; Gherman, Claudia D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We hypothesized that adiponectin gene SNP+45 (rs2241766) and SNP+276 (rs1501299) would be associated with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Furthermore, the association between circulating adiponectin levels, fetuin-A, and tumoral necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease was investigated. Method. Several blood parameters (such as adiponectin, fetuin-A, and TNF-α) were measured in 346 patients, 226 with atherosclero...

  10. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  11. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  12. ALOHA to women's heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Kimberly J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the American Heart Association, ALOHA program. ALOHA is a multidisciplinary approach to helping lay people and clinicians determine the best course of action for managing cardiac risk factors in women. ALOHA, an acronym that stands for designated interventions based on individualized assessment of patients, along with the Framingham risk assessment calculator, allows health care providers with their patients to individualize treatment for heart disease and management of risk factors. PMID:16699352

  13. Nuclear medicine and coronary artery disease: evaluation of tracers of myocardial perfusion and vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary artery disease is one of the primary cause of mortality worldwide. Nuclear medicine is the major imaging technique for diagnosis and following of this disease. perfusion: nowadays, major radioactive agents used in clinical practice are myocardial perfusion tracers. The reference tracer is thallium-201. However, 201Tl presents some drawbacks. 99mTcn-noet has been proposed for its replacement. This study shows that in contrast with previous studies realized in vitro on cardio myocytes, verapamil, an l-type calcium channel inhibitor, does not inhibit myocardial fixation of 99mTcn-noet in vivo in dog. This data is in agreement with the hypothesis of a non specific endothelial fixation of this tracer. Moreover, this study shows that as a pure tracer of myocardial perfusion, 99mTcn-noet can also be used to assess myocardial viability on a model of myocardial chronic infarction in rat. atherosclerosis: disruption of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is the main event leading to coronary accidents. The second part of this study concerns the evaluation of new potential tracers of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in an experimental model of rabbit with an inheritable hypercholesterolemia. The four tracers evaluated (b2702(r), b2702-I, b2702-Tc and Tc-raft-b2702) are synthetic peptides comprising the residues 75-84 of hla-b2702, a molecule known to link vcam-1, an adhesion molecule expressed in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. The autoradiography studies show that all tracers accumulate within atherosclerotic plaque expressing vcam- and that. i-b2702 shows the best plaque/control fixation ratio. (author)

  14. Clinical Trials and Statistics in Cardiology Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomečková, Marie

    Prague : EuroMISE, 2004 - (Zvárová, J.; Hanzlíček, P.; Peleška, J.; Přečková, P.; Svátek, V.; Valenta, Z.). s. 28 ISBN 80-903431-0-4. [International Joint Meeting EuroMISE 2004. 12.04.2004-16.04.2004, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : atherosclerosis * clinical trials Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  15. MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease has increased over the last years. Cardiac MRI is the only imaging modality that provides 'one stop shop' assessment. Information about ventricular function, myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability can be obtained in a single cardiac MRI session. Additionally, Cardiac MRI has become a gold standard method in evaluation of myocardial viability and in assessment of ventricular mass and function. As a result, cardiac MRI enable radiologist to comprehensively assess ischemic heart disease. The aim of this presentation is to provide the reader a state-of-the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study ischemic heart disease patients.

  16. Lipid-Altering Therapies and the Progression of Atherosclerotic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipids play a key role in the progression of atherosclerosis, and lipid-lowering therapies have been studied for 30 years in coronary disease. Measurement of the progression of atherosclerosis through carotid intima-media thickness, coronary mean lumen diameter, and, mostly recently, intravascular ultrasound is generally accepted. This article reviews the role of lipid-lowering therapies in changing the rate of atherosclerosis progression in the coronary and carotid circulations. Statins are the primary therapy used to reduce atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, including strokes and transient ischemic attacks, and have benefits in reducing events in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. In contrast, data for other agents, including fibrates and nicotinic acid, in reducing the progression of atherosclerosis are less extensive and not as well known. There is increasing interest in optimizing the whole lipid profile, as this might deliver extra benefits over and above statin therapy alone. Initial proof of this concept has recently come from studies that measured the progression of atherosclerosis and showed that adding nicotinic acid to statin therapy and, more directly, infusion of high-density lipoprotein-like particles reduced progression and indeed might induce regression of the disease. It is likely that the management of significant carotid stenosis will become ever more drug focused and will be customized to the lipid profile of each patient with intervention reserved only for late-stage symptomatic disease

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern level of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) development already allows its routine use (with proper indications) in coronary heart disease patients for studies of heart morphology and functions, performance of stress tests for evaluation of myocardial perfusion and contractile function. Coronary MRA and some other new MR techniques are close to its wide-scale clinical application. It has been shown that cardiac MRI is a valuable tool for detection of postinfarction scars, aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, septal defects, mural thrombi and valvular regurgitations. Due to intrinsic advantages of the method it is of special value when these pathological conditions cannot be fully confirmed or excluded with echocardiography. MRI is recognized as the best imaging method for quantification of myocardial thickness, myocardial mass, systolic myocardial thickening, chamber volumes, ejection fraction and other parameters of global and regional systolic and diastolic function. MRI is used in studies of cardiac remodeling in postinfarction patients. The most attractive areas for cardiovascular applications of MRI are assessment of myocardial perfusion and non-invasive coronary angiography. Substantial progress has been achieved in these directions. There are some other new developments in studies of coronary artery disease with MRI. High-resolution MR is used for imaging and quantification of atherosclerotic plaque composition in vivo. Intravascular MR devices suitable for performing imaging-guided balloon angioplasty are created. But before MRI will be widely accepted by the medical community as a important cardiovascular imaging modality several important problems have to be solved. Further technical advances are necessary for clinical implementation of all major diagnostic capabilities of cardiac MRI. The subjective obstacles for growth of clinical applications of cardiac MRI are lack of understanding of its possibilities and benefits both by clinicians and

  18. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah;

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR......) appreciably increases homocysteine levels, so "Mendelian randomization" studies using this variant as an instrumental variable could help test causality....

  19. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  20. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Systemic Atherosclerotic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of aortic arch calcification, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, with rotator cuff tendinosis and tears given the hypothesis that decreased tendon vascularity is a contributing factor in the etiology of tendon degeneration. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients ages 50 to 90 years who had a shoulder MRI and a chest radiograph performed within 6 months of each other. Chest radiographs and shoulder MRIs from 120 patients were reviewed by two sets of observers blinded to the others' conclusions. Rotator cuff disease was classified as tendinosis, partial thickness tear, and full thickness tear. The presence or absence of aortic arch calcification was graded and compared with the MRI appearance of the rotator cuff. The tendon tear grading was positively correlated with patient age. However, the tendon tear grading on MRI was not significantly correlated with the aorta calcification scores on chest radiographs. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between aorta calcification severity and tendon tear grading. In conclusion, rotator cuff tears did not significantly correlate with aortic calcification severity. This suggests that tendon ischemia may not be associated with the degree of macrovascular disease

  1. The anatomy and pathophysiology of extracranial atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brain is supplied by two pairs of arteries, the large carotid arteries anteriorly and the vertebral arteries (so called because they are so close to the vertebral column) posteriorly. All four arteries enter the skull at the base of the brain and are connected in the arterial circle of Willis, a unique safety device that permits arterial blood to cross from one side to the other, in case of need, or from front to back or back to front. When one inflow artery is narrowed or occluded, flow increases via other inflow arteries to maintain pressure and flow within the circle. This collateral circulation is also assisted by inflow to the circle through the orbit. When needed, arterial blood reaches the circle of Willis from the face by traversing the orbit in reverse direction. In unusual circumstances, blood in the circle of Willis can leave the brain and flow down the vertebral artery-the so-called ''vertebral steal.'' The authors provide a detailed description of the anatomy, particularly as it affects the signs, symptoms, and noninvasive diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease

  2. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program Funded States History of PCNASP PCNASP Metrics/Data Elements PCNASP Logic Model 2015 PCNASP FOA DP15-1514 WISEWOMAN Sodium Reduction in Communities Building GIS Capacity for Chronic Disease Surveillance Highlights Reports Chronic ...

  3. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  4. Urinary albumin excretion. An independent predictor of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Johnsen, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S;

    1999-01-01

    ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a population-based cohort. In 1983, urinary albumin and creatinine levels were measured, along with the conventional atherosclerotic risk factors, in 2085 consecutive participants without IHD, renal disease, urinary tract infection, or diabetes mellitus. The participants......Cross-sectional studies suggest that an increased urinary albumin excretion rate is associated with cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to analyze prospectively whether the urinary albumin-to -creatinine (A/C) ratio can independently predict......, 1.3 to 3.9, P=0.002), and the 10-year disease-free survival decreased from 97% to 91% (P<0.0001) when microalbuminuria was present. An interaction between microalbuminuria and smoking was observed, and the presence of microalbuminuria more than doubled the predictive effect of the conventional...

  5. Evaluation of curative effect of interventional therapy for chronic simple atherosclerotic occlusive disease of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the efficacy and influencing factors of interventional therapy for chronic atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremity. Methods: 56 cases of simple atherosclerotic occlusive disease of lower extremity were divided into 3 types according to the location of occlusion, including 17 cases of abdominal aorta-iliac artery, 18 cases of iliac-femoral artery, and 21 cases of femoropopliteal inferior genicular artery. Catheter and guide were combined with blunt dissection and subtle banding were used to dredge the occluded vessels, and the stents were implanted when interlayer appeared. Results: After the treatment, 46 cases of occlusion were dredged (82.1%), 6 cases remained occluded with the same symptoms (10.7%), and 4 cases had severer symptoms (7.1%). Among the 46 successful cases, there were 16 cases of abdominal aorta-iliac artery (94.1%), 16 cases of iliac-femoral artery (88.9%) and 14 cases of femoropopliteal inferior genicular artery (66.6%). There was no statistical difference between the abdominal aorta-iliac artery cases and iliac-femoral artery cases (P>0.05), but the rate of abdominal aorta-iliac artery was higher than that of femoropopliteal inferior aorta-iliac artery (P0.05), but there were significant differences between the first two types and the third type (P<0.05). Compared with the 14 dredged cases (71.4%), 7 cases (33.3%) of undredged femoropopliteal inferior genicular artery cases had richer compensatory circulation(P<0.05). Conclusion: It is safe and effective to treat simple atherosclerotic occlusive disease of the lower extremity with interventional therapy. The location and length of occlusion and the abundance of compensatory circulation have effects on the therapy. (authors)

  6. Antibiotic trials for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey L; Muhlestein, Joseph B

    2004-01-01

    The possibility has been raised in recent years that infection might contribute as an inflammatory stimulus to chronic "noninfectious" degenerative diseases. Within the past decade, serious attention has been given to the possibility of bacterial vectors as causal factors of atherosclerosis. To date, the greatest amount of information has related to the intracellular organism Chlamydia pneumoniae. This interest has been stimulated by the frequent finding of bacterial antigens and, occasionally, recoverable organisms, within human atherosclerotic plaque. Indirect evidence for and against the benefit of anti-Chlamydia antibiotic agents comes from epidemiologic studies. Given the potential for confounding in observational studies, prospective, randomized intervention trials are required. These antibiotic trials have generated enthusiastic expectations for proving (or disproving) the infectious-disease hypothesis of atherosclerosis and establishing new therapies. However, these expectations have been tempered by important limitations and uncertainties. Negative outcomes can be explained not only by an incorrect hypothesis but also by inadequate study size or design or by an ineffective antibiotic regimen. In contrast, if studies are positive, the hypothesis still is not entirely proved, because a nonspecific anti-inflammatory effect or an anti-infective action against other organisms might be operative. The clinical trial data to date have not provided adequate support for the clinical use of antibiotics in primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. New and innovative experimental approaches, in addition to traditionally designed antibiotic trials, should be welcome in our attempts to gain adequate insight into the role of infection in atherosclerosis and its therapy. PMID:15061624

  7. Use of secondary preventive medications in patients with atherosclerotic disease in urban China: a cross-sectional study of 16 860 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; HUNDEI Wuhan-bilige; CHEN Zheng-ming; CHEN Fang; Jemma C Hopewell; Elsa Valdes-Marquez; Martin Landray; JIANG Li-xin; CHEN Yi-ping; LI Xi; Jane Armitage; FENG Fang; LIU Jia-min; GAO Yan; ZHANG Hai-bo; ZHANG Dan

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite considerable improvements in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease in various populations over the last few decades,there are still limited data about long-term treatment patterns among patients with various atherosclerotic vascular conditions in China,especially the use of statin therapy.Methods Between June 2007 and October 2009,16 860 patients aged 50-80 years with established history of atherosclerotic vascular disease (coronary heart disease (CHD),atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease (CVD),or peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) from 51 hospitals in 14 cities of China were screened for a large randomized trial.Detailed information about current use of statins and various other treatments was recorded and analyzed by prior disease history,adjusting for various baseline characteristics.Results Among the 16 860 patients,the mean age was 63 years and 74% were male.Overall,78% of the patients had documented CHD,40% had CVD,5% had PAD and 21% reported more than one condition.The median time from initial diagnosis of vascular disease to screening was 18 months.At screening,the proportions who took various treatments were 83% for antiplatelet agents,49% for beta-blockers,47% for statins and 28% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.The proportion treated with statin was much higher in CHD than in CVD or PAD patients (61% vs.10% vs.22% respectively) and decreased significantly with time from initial diagnosis.Simvastatin (mainly 20 mg) and atorvastatin (mainly 10 mg) each accounted for about 40% of total statin use.Conclusions In urban China,there is still significant underuse of various proven secondary preventive therapies,with particularly low use of statins in patients with ischaemic stroke.

  8. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patientinstructions/000775.htm Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart disease often develops over time. You may have early ...

  9. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are ...

  10. How Can Heart Disease be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Heart Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay coronary heart disease (CHD). Your risk for CHD increases with the ...

  11. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and ... heart disease and they are less likely to die from heart disease. In general, Asian American adults have lower rates of being overweight or obese, lower rates of ...

  12. Screening Tests for Women Who Have Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Handbook for Women FOR WOMEN WHO HAVE HEART DISEASE If you have heart disease, it is extremely ... flow and any blockages. COULD YOU HAVE HIDDEN HEART DISEASE? Many women have undiagnosed heart disease—even after ...

  13. Association of Atherosclerotic Peripheral Arterial Disease with Adiponectin Genes SNP+45 and SNP+276: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia D. Gherman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We hypothesized that adiponectin gene SNP+45 (rs2241766 and SNP+276 (rs1501299 would be associated with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Furthermore, the association between circulating adiponectin levels, fetuin-A, and tumoral necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in patients with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease was investigated. Method. Several blood parameters (such as adiponectin, fetuin-A, and TNF-α were measured in 346 patients, 226 with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD and 120 without symptomatic PAD (non-PAD. Two common SNPs of the ADIPOQ gene represented by +45T/G 2 and +276G/T were also investigated. Results. Adiponectin concentrations showed lower circulating levels in the PAD patients compared to non-PAD patients (P0.05. Conclusion. The results of our study demonstrated that neither adiponectin SNP+45 nor SNP+276 is associated with the risk of PAD.

  14. Plasma proteome profiling of atherosclerotic disease manifestations reveals elevated levels of the cytoskeletal protein vinculin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Mickley, Hans; Saaby, Lotte; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Lambrechtsen, Jess; Rasmussen, Lars M; Overgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    atherosclerotic diseases, and 4) individuals with an acute coronary syndrome. Immunoassays and SRM-MS were used for single patient verification of candidate proteins. Proteins involved in cardiovascular diseases i.e. serum amyloid protein A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] displayed...... identify proteins with altered concentrations in plasma samples from four groups: 1) Individuals without cardiovascular symptoms and without the presence of coronary calcium, 2) individuals without cardiovascular symptoms, but with high amounts of coronary calcium, 3) individuals operated because of......Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease of the arterial wall that is recognized as the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. There is an eminent need for better biomarkers that can aid in patient care before the onset of the first cardiovascular event. We used quantitative proteomics to...

  15. [Hemodynamic features assessment in submental and facial arteries in patients with early atherosclerotic disease of brachycephalic arteries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadtochiĭ, A G; Grudianov, A I; Avraamova, T V

    2014-01-01

    By ultrasonicduplex scanning nature estimated haemodynamics in the arteriessubmentalis and facial of patients with early signs of atherosclerotic changes in the brakhiotsefalarteries and periodontal pathology of different stages - for perfection of prophylaxis of periodontal diseases by the means of investigation of prophylaxis vascular diseases. It was established, that influence of risk factors is more important than the age of patients. PMID:25588335

  16. MRI of ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRS) and spectroscopy (MRS) can provide information concerning morphology, function, tissue characterization and metabolism in ischaemic heart disease. Currently MRI is used to define the presence and extent of infarctions and to demonstrate complications of infarction such as left ventricular true and false aneurysm formation and mural thrombus. The role of MRI up to the current time has been limited by its inability to differentiate between ischaemic and normal myocardium. MR contrast media will be needed fully to exploit the capabilities of MRI in the diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease. 2 Classes of contrast media have the potential to expand the efficacy of MRI: T1 relaxation enhancing agents increase signal intensity on T1-weighted images and magnetic susceptibility agents decrease or erase signal from tissue on T2-weighted, gradient echo and echoplanar images. The agents currently being tested include: manganese dipyridoxal diphosphate, gadolinium-DTPA-BMA, and dysprosium DTPABMA. These contrast agents have been used to accomplish the following goals in the MRI of ischaemic heart disease: 1.Delineation of the myocardial ischaemic region and the jeopardized region produced by acute coronary occlusion; 2.Improved discrimination between normal and infarcted myocardium; 3.Distinction between occlusive and reperfused myocardial infarctions; 4.Differentiation between reversible and irreversible myocardial injury for reperfused myocardial regions. (author). 21 refs.; 7 figs

  17. [Adipokines: adiponectin, leptin, resistin and coronary heart disease risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Barbara; Jegier, Anna

    2005-01-01

    lesions. Correlation between resistin concentration and the extent of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary vessels has also been found. The disturbances in secretion, function and balance of adiponectin, leptin and resistin are to be considered not only a link between visceral adiposity and cardiovascular risk but also independent risk factor of coronary heart disease. PMID:16521924

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people who have diabetic heart disease (DHD) ... when it's given right after symptoms occur. Coronary Heart Disease A common symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD) ...

  19. Prognosis of non-significant coronary atherosclerotic disease detected by coronary artery tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Although studies have shown high diagnostic accuracy of coronary tomography (CT) in detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), data on the prognostic value of this method in patients with no significant coronary obstruction are limited. Objective: To evaluate the value of CT in predicting adverse events in patients with suspected CAD and no significant coronary obstruction. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 440 patients between January 2008 and July 2013 by MDCT, diagnosed with no significant obstruction or no atherosclerotic coronary obstruction with an average follow-up of 33 months. The outcomes evaluated were: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina associated with hospitalization or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: Of the 440 patients studied, 295 (67%) were men with mean age 55.9 ± 12.0 years. Non-significant obstruction was found in 152 (35%) of the patients and there were 49 (11%) outcomes. In the multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model, the predictors of clinical outcomes were non-significant obstruction on CT (hazard ratio 3.51; 95% CI 1.73 - 7.8; p <0.01), age and hypertension. Non-significant obstruction on CT was associated with adverse clinical outcomes and survival analysis showed a significant difference (log-rank 24.6; p <0.01) in predicting these outcomes. Conclusion: The detection of non-significant atherosclerotic obstruction by CT was associated with the presence of adverse events in patients with suspected CAD, which may prove useful in the risk stratification of these patients. (author)

  20. Prognosis of non-significant coronary atherosclerotic disease detected by coronary artery tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Siqueira, Bruna Pinto; Guimaraes, Carolina Camargos Braichi; Cruz, David Filipe Silva; Guimaraes, Leiziane Assuncao Alves; Lima, Maicom Marcio Perigolo, E-mail: marciovlbarros@gmail.com [Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana, Vespasiano, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira [Universidade de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz [Hospital Materdei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Introduction: Although studies have shown high diagnostic accuracy of coronary tomography (CT) in detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), data on the prognostic value of this method in patients with no significant coronary obstruction are limited. Objective: To evaluate the value of CT in predicting adverse events in patients with suspected CAD and no significant coronary obstruction. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 440 patients between January 2008 and July 2013 by MDCT, diagnosed with no significant obstruction or no atherosclerotic coronary obstruction with an average follow-up of 33 months. The outcomes evaluated were: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina associated with hospitalization or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: Of the 440 patients studied, 295 (67%) were men with mean age 55.9 ± 12.0 years. Non-significant obstruction was found in 152 (35%) of the patients and there were 49 (11%) outcomes. In the multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model, the predictors of clinical outcomes were non-significant obstruction on CT (hazard ratio 3.51; 95% CI 1.73 - 7.8; p <0.01), age and hypertension. Non-significant obstruction on CT was associated with adverse clinical outcomes and survival analysis showed a significant difference (log-rank 24.6; p <0.01) in predicting these outcomes. Conclusion: The detection of non-significant atherosclerotic obstruction by CT was associated with the presence of adverse events in patients with suspected CAD, which may prove useful in the risk stratification of these patients. (author)

  1. Doctors' knowledge, attitudes, and compliance with 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setia S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sajita Setia,1 Selwyn Sze-Wang Fung,2 David D Waters3 1Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2Regional Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte Ltd, Hong Kong; 3Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Purpose: There is an unmet need for strategies to prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in Singapore. The main objective of this study was to investigate Singapore physicians’ response to the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA guidelines for treatment of cholesterol and their impact on clinical practice. Methods: This survey was conducted in two stages, qualitative and quantitative. Physicians were initially screened on the basis of an initial screener questionnaire, and eligible physicians were then included in the study. Results: Qualitative (n=19 and quantitative (n=66 surveys were completed by eligible physicians from Singapore. Physicians were less familiar with the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines (35% as compared with the Singapore Ministry of Health (MoH lipid guidelines 2006 (49%. Of the physicians whose opinion was sought on the ACC/AHA guidelines, more than 50% disagreed with the definition of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy; recommendation of atorvastatin 40–80 mg and rosuvastatin 20–40 mg as medications for high-intensity statin therapy; and classification of individuals who would benefit from moderate- to high-intensity statin therapy. Most physicians assumed that Asians may be intolerant to high-intensity statin therapy. Conclusion: Although embracing the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines in clinical practice is expected to provide better clinical care to patients, our study revealed high reluctance by physicians, especially in the use of high-dose statins. However, ACC/AHA guidelines can be easily adopted in Asia as there is a wealth of data available for atorvastatin in primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with

  2. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. PMID:27451323

  3. Comparative efficacy of the statins in preventing and treating of the coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Shalaev; Z.M. Safiullina; L.V. Kremneva; O.V. Abaturova

    2010-01-01

    The possibility to stabilize and reverse the atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries due to therapy with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin was demonstrated in recent studies. The advantage of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy compared with standard therapy is proven in patients with both stable and acute forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD). Pleiotropic effects, in particular, effect on endothelial function, ability to reduce the blood level of C-reactive protein are important in the statin...

  4. Usefulness of Serum Cathepsin L as an Independent Biomarker in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yingxian; Li, Xiangping; Peng, Daoquan; Tan, Zheng; Liu, Hongmin; Qing, Yingnan; Xue, Yanqiong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Higher levels of cysteinyl cathepsin L were detected in human atherosclerotic lesions than in healthy aortas. However, a link between human coronary heart disease (CHD) and systemic cathepsin L levels remains unknown. A total of 137 volunteers with diagnosed acute and previous myocardial infarction (MI) and stable and unstable angina pectoris in addition to 48 controls were asked to undergo coronary angiography. Serum cathepsin L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, and lipi...

  5. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF THE STATINS IN PREVENTING AND TREATING OF THE CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    S. V. Shalaev; Z. M. Safiullina; L. V. Kremneva; O. V. Abaturova

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to stabilize and reverse the atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries due to therapy with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin was demonstrated in recent studies. The advantage of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy compared with standard therapy is proven in patients with both stable and acute forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD). Pleiotropic effects, in particular, effect on endothelial function, ability to reduce the blood level of C-reactive protein are important in the statin...

  6. Recreational music-making alters gene expression pathways in patients with coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bittman, Barry; Croft, Daniel T.; Brinker, Jeannie; van Laar, Ryan; Marina N. Vernalis; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychosocial stress profoundly impacts long-term cardiovascular health through adverse effects on sympathetic nervous system activity, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerotic development. Recreational Music Making (RMM) is a unique stress amelioration strategy encompassing group music-based activities that has great therapeutic potential for treating patients with stress-related cardiovascular disease. Material/Methods Participants (n=34) with a history of ischemic heart disea...

  7. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Espanol Image Library Campaign Materials The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease ... on how to choose and cook low-fat foods, get more physical activity, and achieve a healthy ...

  8. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... assess the severity of your heart valve disease. Cardiac MRI Cardiac MRI uses a powerful magnet and radio waves to make detailed images of your heart. A cardiac MRI image can confirm information about valve defects or ...

  9. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Funded States History of PCNASP PCNASP Metrics/Data Elements PCNASP Logic Model 2015 PCNASP FOA DP15- ... Insurance Million Hearts® Clinical Quality Measures (CQM) Dashboard Data Trends & Maps Printed Atlases Heart Disease Hospitalizations Among ...

  10. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  11. Brain and heart disease studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of important studies completed during the past year using the Donner 280-crystal positron ring tomograph are summarized in this article. Using rubidium-82, images of a brain tumor and an arteriovenous malformation are described. An image demonstrating methionine uptake in a patient with schizophrenia and an image reflecting sugar metabolism in the brain of a man with Alzheimer's disease are also included. Uptake of rubidium-82 in subjects before and after exercise is being investigated. The synthesis of new radiopharmaceuticals and the development of a new synthesis for C-taurine for use in the study of metabolism in the human heart are also being studied

  12. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Mi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines. PMID:27482251

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease? A common symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD) ... and Symptoms of Heart Problems Related to Coronary Heart Disease Some people who have CHD have no signs ...

  14. Significance of ultrasound evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaque for diagnosing ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid artery is the main source for craniocerebral blood supply. Its intimal plaque formation and arterial stenosis degree both are the risk factors for ischemic cerebrovascular disease.Therefore, the close relationship of carotid atherosclerotic plaque and ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and ultrasound evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaque have become the hot spot in studying ischemic cerebrovascular disease.OBJECTIVE: This study was to detect the degree of carotid atherosclerosis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease patients by ultrasonography, and to analyze the situation of carotid atherosclerosis and its relationship with clinic.DESIGN: Clinical randomized concurrent control experiment.SETTING: Lintong Convalescent Hospital of Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 60 outpatients and inpatients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, 42 males and 18 females, admitted to Lintong Convalescent Hospital of Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between January 2006 and December 2006 were involved in the patient group. They met the diagnosis criteria of ischemic cerebrovascular disease constituted by the 4th Cerebrovascular Disease Conference in 1996, and were confirmed to suffer from ischemic cerebrovascular disease by skull CT and MRI. Another 20 subjects who received healthy examination concurrently in the same hospital, 12 males and 8 females, were involved in the control group. Informed consents of detected items were obtained from involved subjects.METHODS: The plaque thickness of mid portion, distal end and crotch of common carotid artery (CCA),internal carotid artery (ICA), external carotid artery (ECA) and vertebral artery (VA) of involved subjects,who received health examination was separately detected with color Doppler ultrasonograph (HDI-5000).Then, total integral of plaque was calculated. The intima-media thickness (IMT) was measured with two-dimensional ultrasonography. The inner diameter

  15. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  16. Heart Valve Disease among Patients with Hyperprolactinaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  17. Gender differences in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Engelfriet; B.J.M. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To assess gender differences in morbidity, mortality and patient management among adults born with a heart defect. Methods and results. The database of the European Heart Survey on adult congenital heart disease was explored. This contains data on 4110 patients with one of eight congenita

  18. Indications for Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Siân Pincott, E; Burch, M

    2011-01-01

    In this review we have looked at indications for cardiac transplantation in congenital heart disease. An outline of the general principles of the use of transplant as a management strategy both as a first line treatment and following other surgical interventions is discussed. We explore the importance of the timing of patient referral and the evaluations undertaken, and how the results of these may vary between patients with congenital heart disease and patients with other causes of end-stage...

  19. PET Imaging of Atherosclerotic Disease: Advancing Plaque Assessment from Anatomy to Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas R; Tarkin, Jason M; Chowdhury, Mohammed M; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Rudd, James H F

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. It is now widely recognized that the disease is more than simply a flow-limiting process and that the atheromatous plaque represents a nidus for inflammation with a consequent risk of plaque rupture and atherothrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction or stroke. However, widely used conventional clinical imaging techniques remain anatomically focused, assessing only the degree of arterial stenosis caused by plaques. Positron emission tomography (PET) has allowed the metabolic processes within the plaque to be detected and quantified directly. The increasing armory of radiotracers has facilitated the imaging of distinct metabolic aspects of atherogenesis and plaque destabilization, including macrophage-mediated inflammatory change, hypoxia, and microcalcification. This imaging modality has not only furthered our understanding of the disease process in vivo with new insights into mechanisms but has also been utilized as a non-invasive endpoint measure in the development of novel treatments for atherosclerotic disease. This review provides grounding in the principles of PET imaging of atherosclerosis, the radioligands in use and in development, its research and clinical applications, and future developments for the field. PMID:27108163

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Disease? The signs and symptoms of coronary heart disease ( ... will have signs and symptoms of the disease. Heart Disease Signs and Symptoms The illustration shows the major ...

  1. Heart disease in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashournia, Hamoun; Johansen, Frank Ted; Folkestad, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    described, less is known about the effects of decreased collagen on other organs. In the heart, collagen type 1 is present in the heart valves, chordae tendineae, annuli fibrosi and the interventricular septum. It is thus likely that the heart is affected in OI. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic...... commonly reported heart diseases amongst the patients with OI were valvulopathies and increased aortic diameter. Findings in the large case series and the cross-sectional studies were broadly similar to each other. CONCLUSION: The findings support the hypothesis that patients with OI have increased risk of...... heart disease compared to healthy controls. It is biologically plausible that patients with OI may have an increased risk of developing heart disease, and valve disease in particular....

  2. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart work harder and affect its ability to pump blood. Overview How the Heart Valves Work At the ... into the atria. As the ventricles contract, they pump blood through the pulmonary and aortic valves. The pulmonary ...

  3. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or higher or Taking medication for elevated blood glucose levels Source: Grundy SM, et al. Diagnosis and Management of the Metabolic Syndrome: An American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung,and Blood Institute Scientific Statement. Circulation. 2005;112: ...

  4. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of fiber daily for every 1,000 calories consumed. Foods high in fiber may help lower blood ... that go to your heart. Your blood supplies oxygen and other materials your heart needs for normal ...

  5. Atherosclerotic disease and risk factor modification in Saudi Arabia: a call to action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Omran M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Al-OmranThe Peripheral Vascular Disease Research Chair and Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaPurpose: Atherosclerotic disease (AD is the leading cause of death worldwide and in Saudi Arabia. Intensive risk reduction therapy plays a major role in reducing adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with AD. The level of awareness of this important fact amongst physicians (family physicians, general internists, cardiologists and vascular surgeons in managing these patients in Saudi Arabia is not currently known. This study was conducted to examine the perceptions and knowledge of risk reduction therapy in patients with AD amongst physicians in Saudi Arabia in two clinical presentations; coronary artery disease (CAD and peripheral artery disease (PAD.Materials and methods: We conducted a cross-sectional self-administered survey of 897 physicians at different hospitals in four provinces in Saudi Arabia.Results: The recommended targets of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, blood glucose, and blood pressure in patients with CAD and PAD were known as 40% and 36%; 70% and 66%; and 32% and 28% of physicians, respectively. The initiation of antiplatelet medications, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, statins, and nicotine replacement therapy for smokers in patients with CAD and PAD were recommended by 98% and 97%; 52% and 34%; 61% and 56%; and 50% and 43% of physicians, respectively. Compared to other specialties, cardiologists had the lowest threshold for initiating risk reduction therapy, whereas vascular surgeons had the highest threshold.Conclusion: The level of physician awareness of atherosclerosis risk reduction therapy across Saudi Arabia has revealed knowledge and action gaps. A call to action to implement effective strategies to encourage health professionals to use risk reduction therapy and increase public awareness is needed

  6. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Apr 18, ... of getting those diseases are even higher for African-Americans. The good news is, African-Americans can ...

  7. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  8. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Conceição Maria Martins de Lemos; David William Moraes; Lucia Campos Pellanda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective: The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method: This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institu...

  9. Noninvasive imaging in the assessment and prevention of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear cardiology can all help prevent coronary heart disease. Echocardiography can identify asymptomatic individuals who are at risk of coronary disease and who should receive aggressive preventative therapy by providing data on the carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. The calcium score is an independent predictor of cardiac events that influences clinical risk scores such as the Framingham risk score. By using multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for coronary angiography, it is possible to visualize both the lumen and vessel walls of coronary arteries and to discriminate between calcified and noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque before invasive coronary angiography is performed. With nuclear cardiology, the functional effects of atherosclerotic lesions can be evaluated by assessing perfusion and ventricular function simultaneously

  10. Whole-body MR vascular screening detects unsuspected concomitant vascular disease in coronary heart disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) patients often show atherosclerotic vascular disease in other vascular territories. We evaluated how often whole-body MR imaging detects concomitant arterial pathologies in CHD patients, and how often these pathologies were not known to the patients previously. Of 4,814 participants in the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, 327 reported CHD (i.e., previous coronary bypass surgery, angioplasty); of those, 160 patients (mean age 66.4 years) were examined using MR of the brain, the heart (excluding the coronary arteries), and whole-body MR angiography. The prevalence of each vascular pathology was assessed, correlated to the others and compared to patients' histories. Of the 160 CHD patients, 16 (10%) showed MR signs of stroke, and 77 (48.1%) had a stenosis >50% in at least one extracerebral peripheral artery (other than the coronaries), including 28 (17.5%) with relevant renal artery stenoses, and 20 (12.5%) with relevant extracerebral internal carotid artery stenoses. False negative histories were reported in 12 of 81 cases with myocardial infarctions, and in 11 of 16 cases with cerebrovascular infarctions. This whole-body atherosclerosis MR screening program allows previously unknown concomitant vascular disease to be detected in coronary heart disease patients. Its prospective value should be assessed in further studies. (orig.)

  11. Whole-body MR vascular screening detects unsuspected concomitant vascular disease in coronary heart disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, Susanne C.; Nuefer, Michael; Gizewski, Elke; Wanke, Isabel; Ladd, Mark E.; Forsting, Michael [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Debatin, Joerg F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Stang, Andreas [Martin-Luther University, Medical Faculty, Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biometry and Informatics, Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Bromen, Katja [DG INFSO, European Commission, Brussels (Belgium); Moebus, Susanne; Joeckel, Karl-Heinz [University Hospital, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Essen (Germany); Doerfler, Arnd [University of Erlangen Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Benemann, Jens [University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Essen (Germany); Erbel, Raimund; Schmermund, Axel [University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Essen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) patients often show atherosclerotic vascular disease in other vascular territories. We evaluated how often whole-body MR imaging detects concomitant arterial pathologies in CHD patients, and how often these pathologies were not known to the patients previously. Of 4,814 participants in the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study, 327 reported CHD (i.e., previous coronary bypass surgery, angioplasty); of those, 160 patients (mean age 66.4 years) were examined using MR of the brain, the heart (excluding the coronary arteries), and whole-body MR angiography. The prevalence of each vascular pathology was assessed, correlated to the others and compared to patients' histories. Of the 160 CHD patients, 16 (10%) showed MR signs of stroke, and 77 (48.1%) had a stenosis >50% in at least one extracerebral peripheral artery (other than the coronaries), including 28 (17.5%) with relevant renal artery stenoses, and 20 (12.5%) with relevant extracerebral internal carotid artery stenoses. False negative histories were reported in 12 of 81 cases with myocardial infarctions, and in 11 of 16 cases with cerebrovascular infarctions. This whole-body atherosclerosis MR screening program allows previously unknown concomitant vascular disease to be detected in coronary heart disease patients. Its prospective value should be assessed in further studies. (orig.)

  12. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease? In the United States, coronary heart disease (CHD) ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  13. To Stent or Not to Stent? Update on Revascularization for Atherosclerotic Renovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noory, Elias; Sritharan, Kaji; Zeller, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is increasingly encountered in clinical practice. The two most common etiologies are fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and atherosclerotic renal artery disease (ARAS), with the latter accounting for the vast majority of cases. Significant RAS activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and is associated with three major clinical syndromes: ischemic nephropathy, hypertension, and destabilizing cardiac syndromes. Over the past two decades, advancements in diagnostic and interventional techniques have led to improved detection and the widespread use of endovascular renal artery revascularization strategies in the management of ARAS. However, renal artery stenting for ARAS remains controversial. Although several studies have demonstrated some benefit with renal artery revascularization, this has not been to the extent anticipated or predicted. Moreover, these trials have significant flaws in their study design and are hampered with inherent bias which make their interpretation challenging. In this review, we evaluate the existing body of evidence and offer an approach to the management of patients with ARAS in light of the current literature. From the data provided, identification of subgroup of patients, namely, those with a hemodynamically significant RAS in the context of progressive renal insufficiency and/or deteriorating arterial hypertension, seems possible and may derive clinical benefit from ARAS stent revascularization. Appropriate patient selection is therefore the key and more robust studies are required. PMID:27130448

  14. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  15. Progression of White Matter Lesion Volume and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease: The SMART-MR Study

    OpenAIRE

    Grool, Anne M; Yolanda van der Graaf; Witkamp, Theo D.; Vincken, Koen L.; Mali, Willem P. T. M.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Mechanisms influencing the course of physical and mental functioning after an atherosclerotic event are unclear. We examined effects of white matter lesion (WML) activity on changes in functioning in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease. Methods. In 486 patients (58 ± 9 years) of the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) study, volumetric WML measurements on 1.5T MRI were performed at baseline and 3.9 ± 0.4 years followup. Functioning...

  16. [Indications for surgery for valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Marcel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Baldus, Stephan; Rudolph, Volker

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demographic change, chronic valvular heart disease becomes increasingly important - especially age-related primary diseases of the aortic and mitral valve as well as secondary diseases of the mitral and tricuspid valve caused by other age-related cardiac disorders. Medical treatment is limited to symptom relief by use of diuretics. Specific drugs or drugs with a prognostic benefit are not available. Thus, valve repair or replacement are the key options for treatment of relevant valvular heart disease. While open heart surgery was the only approach for a long time, interventional, catheter-based therapies have evolved in the last decade. This article describes up-to-date recommendations on indications for surgery for the most prevalent valvular heart diseases in adults - aortic stenosis, and aortic, mitral and tricuspid regurgitation). PMID:26583817

  17. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Bom; A.C. Zomer; A.H. Zwinderman; F.J. Meijboom; B.J. Bouma; B.J.M. Mulder

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart failur

  18. The Myth of “The Vulnerable Plaque”: Transitioning from a Focus on Individual Lesions to Atherosclerotic Disease Burden for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular science community has pursued the quest to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in patients for decades, hoping to prevent acute coronary events. However, despite major advancements in imaging technology that allow visualization of rupture-prone plaques, clinical studies have not demonstrated improved risk prediction compared to traditional approaches. Considering the complex relationship between plaque rupture and acute coronary event risk suggested by pathology studies and confirmed by clinical investigations, these results are not surprising. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a multifaceted hypothesis of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Managing patients at risk of suffering acute coronary events mandates a greater focus on the atherosclerotic disease burden, rather than on features of individual plaques. PMID:25601032

  19. U.S. Heart Disease Deaths Shifting South

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for heart disease. And social conditions -- from poverty and low education levels, to racial injustice -- are ... up in the heart arteries and can eventually cause a heart attack. But there is also heart ...

  20. Genetic Neural Approach for Heart Disease Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilakshi P. Waghulde

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Data mining techniques are used to explore, analyze and extract data using complex algorithms in order to discover unknown patterns in the process of knowledge discovery. Heart disease is a major life threatening disease that cause to death and it has a serious long term disability. The time taken to recover from heart disease depends on patient’s severity. Heart disease diagnosis is complex task which requires much experience and knowledge. Nowadays, health care industry contain huge amount of health care data, which contain hidden information. Advanced data mining techniques along with computer generated information are used for appropriate results. Neural Network is widely used tool for predicting heart diseases diagnosis. A Heart Disease Prediction System is developed using Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm. This system calculates the number of hidden nodes for neural network which train the network with proper selection of neural network architecture and uses the global optimization of genetic algorithm for initialization of neural network. For prediction, the system uses 12 parameters such as sex, age, blood cholesterol etc. From the result, it is found that genetic neural approach predicts the heart disease upto 98% accuracy.

  1. How Is Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a Healthy Weight Web site. Stress and Depression Research shows that getting upset or angry can ... health. Share your story with other women on Facebook . The Heart Truth campaign offers a variety of ...

  2. What Causes Diabetic Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're on medicine to treat high blood sugar). It's unclear whether these risk factors have a common cause or are mainly related by their combined effects on the heart. Obesity seems to set the stage for metabolic syndrome. ...

  3. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groin (upper thigh), or neck. The tube is threaded into your coronary arteries, and the dye is ... awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, and blood diseases. Individual studies ...

  4. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Sep 16, ... be life-threatening. It’s a condition known as sleep apnea, in which the person may experience pauses ...

  5. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B;

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events. It is....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...... difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  6. Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factors is likely why the rates of heart disease are coming down. These factors include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, overweight and obesity. The rates of high blood pressure and abnormal cholesterol haven' ...

  7. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  8. Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Air Pollution and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 ... routine or in a less populated place, tiny pollution particles in the air can lead to big ...

  9. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  10. Biomarkers in kidney and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maisel, Alan S.; Katz, Nevin; Hillege, Hans L.; Shaw, Andrew; Zanco, Pierluigi; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Anand, Inder; Anker, Stefan D.; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; House, Andrew A.; Mankad, Sunil; McCullough, Peter; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ronco, Federico; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    There is much symptomatic similarity between acute kidney disease and acute heart disease. Both may present with shortness of breath and chest discomfort, and thus it is not surprising that biomarkers of acute myocardial and renal disease often coexist in many physicians' diagnostic work-up schedule

  11. Rheumatic heart disease with triple valve involvement

    OpenAIRE

    BRAMBATI, MATTEO; LAURENZI, PIER FRANCESCO; MARLETTA, FIORANGELA; MANINA, GIORGIA; COMINA, DENISE PROVVIDENZA; PRESTON, NGAMBE MANDI; CASSETTI, GIUSEPPINA; MERLO, CHIARA; Volpi, Michele; MUSSO, ROBERTA; LA ROCCA, ROBERTO

    2013-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is a postinfectious, nonsuppurative sequela of pharyngeal infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, or Group A β hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS). Of the associated symptoms, only damage to the heart’s valvular tissue, or rheumatic heart disease (RHD), can become a chronic condition leading to congestive heart failure, stroke, endocarditis, and death. ARF is the most common cause of cardiac disease in children in developing countries. A joint meeting o...

  12. 10.8.Rheumatic heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920083 A preliminary study of cell immunefunction in rheumatic heart disease.YANG Qi(杨奇),et al.Res Lab Cardiovasc Dis,Luzhou MedColl Hosp,Sichuan.Chin Cir J 1991; 6 (5): 392-394.Cell immune function of forty one patients withrheumatic heart disease (RHD),forty four withRHD and rheumatic fever (RF) and fifty normal

  13. Energy expenditure in congenital heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, J S; Hindmarsh, P C; Scrimgeour, C M; Rennie, M J; Preece, M A

    1994-01-01

    Growth failure is a well recognised consequence of severe congenital heart disease. Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) was investigated in eight infants with severe congenital heart disease to determine whether an increase in this parameter is an important factor in their failure to thrive, and to estimate the energy intake that would be required to allow normal growth. The infants were studied over a seven day period before surgery using the doubly labelled water method. Growth failure wa...

  14. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  15. Commonly Asked Questions about Children and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... routine ultrasound heart rhythm abnormality family history of congenital heart disease a problem in another organ of the fetus ... important that a cardiologist who is knowledgeable about congenital heart disease be involved in your child’s care indefinitely. Specialized ...

  16. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  17. Relationship between changes in coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden measured by intravascular ultrasound and cardiovascular disease outcomes: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Carol; Quek, Ruben G W; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Ross, Janine; Kleijnen, Jos; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Kassahun, Helina; Wong, Nathan D; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Objective Evidence from coronary imaging studies suggests an association between increased atherosclerotic plaque burden and cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the relationship between coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden changes measured by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and CVD outcomes. Research design and methods Rigorous systematic review methodology was used to identify prospective studies of any design assessing the relationship between atherosclerotic plaque volume (percentage or total atheroma volume [PAV or TAV]) changes and CVD outcomes, using multivariable analyses. Main outcome measures CVD outcomes including major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs). Results Literature searches from inception to February 2015 retrieved 6958 records after de-duplication. From these four studies (14 papers) were included. One study reported a significantly lower rate of CVD outcomes associated with a greater reduction in PAV (hazard ratio [HR] 0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07-0.83). One study reported that large plaque volume was significantly associated with a greater risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) (HR 1.73, 95% CI: 1.02-2.96). Similarly, a third study reported a significant increase in MACE with an increase in baseline PAV (HR 1.51, 95% CI: 1.06-2.51). Only one potentially inadequately powered Japanese study did not find a statistically significant relationship between PAV changes and MACE. Conclusions The current evidence suggests an independent and statistically significant association between increases in coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden measured by IVUS and greater long-term risk of future CVD outcomes. However, this evidence comes from a limited number of studies which mainly focus on Japanese populations and populations after PCI. Further large prospective studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26949994

  18. Multi Parametric Approach Using Fuzzification on Heart Disease Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Upasana Juneja*1; Deepti Dhingra2

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to define a fuzzy based prediction system that will accept the patient basic information as well as the symptoms as input and identify the chances of heart disease. Heart Disease Prediction System is the system that helps to predict the heart disease mainly cardiovascular. The importance of heart disease prediction system can be visualized from the fact that heart disease is one of the diseases that causes highest mortality rate. The present system hel...

  19. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood flow in the heart, such as a cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) stress test. Cardiac MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ... this disorder, including blood tests, EKG, echo, and cardiac MRI. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video All of ...

  20. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of transportation and lack of health insurance. Those factors can make early diagnoses and management of risks difficult, said Martha L. Daviglus, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiovascular epidemiologist at Northwestern University and University of Illinois and an American Heart ...

  1. Pregnancy outcomes in women with heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hua; XU Ji-wen; ZHAO Xu-dong; YE Tai-yang; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Qi-de

    2010-01-01

    Background As the Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center, our hospital has accumulated a large number of clinical data of pregnant women with heart disease. This paper is a retrospective analysis of 1142 pregnancies in women with heart disease so as to evaluate the maternal and fetal outcomes of these patients.Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out for pregnancies in 1142 women with heart disease who delivered in Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center between 1993 and 2007.Results In this study, main heart diseases in pregnancy were arrhythmia (n=359, 31.4%), congenital heart disease (CHD; n=291,25.5%), and myocarditis and its sequelae (n=284, 24.9%); based on the functional classification criteria of New York Heart Association (NYHA), more than half (n=678, 59.4%) of patients were classified NYHA Class Ⅰ; pregnant women in NHYA Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ (n=951, 83.3%) commonly had arrhythmia, myocarditis and its sequelae, while those in NHYA Class Ⅲ-Ⅳ (n=191, 16.7%) mainly had CHD, rheumatic heart disease (RHD), cardiopathy induced by hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy, and peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Cardiac failure occurred in 97 (8.5%)patients, and 8 (0.7%) maternal deaths and 12 (1.1%) perinatal deaths were reported in this study. Compared with those in NHYA Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ, women in NHYA Class Ⅲ-Ⅳ had a significantly lower gestational age at birth (P <0.05), lower birth weight (P <0.01), and higher incidence of preterm delivery, small for gestational age and perinatal death (P <0.01). The incidence of cardiac failure in pregnant women with cardiopathy induced by hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy and PPCM was relatively high, with a rate of 80% and 52.2%, respectively. After cardiac operation, 131(90.3%) women were in classified NHYA Class Ⅰ-Ⅱ and 14 (9.7%) in NHYA Class Ⅲ-Ⅳ.Conclusions Arrhythmia is the type of heart disease that has a highest incidence in patients with heart

  2. Probucol prevents early coronary heart disease and death in the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI/apolipoprotein E double knockout mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Anne; Zhang, Songwen; Miettinen, Helena E.; Ebrahim, Shamsah; Holm, Teresa M.; Vasile, Eliza; Mark J Post; Yoerger, Danita M.; Picard, Michael H.; Joshua L. Krieger; Andrews, Nancy C.; Simons, Michael; Krieger, Monty

    2003-01-01

    Mice with homozygous null mutations in the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B, type I) and apolipoprotein E genes fed a low-fat diet exhibit a constellation of pathologies shared with human atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD): hypercholesterolemia, occlusive coronary atherosclerosis, myocardial infarctions, cardiac dysfunction (heart enlargement, reduced systolic function and ejection fraction, and ECG abnormalities), and premature death (mean a...

  3. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF THE STATINS IN PREVENTING AND TREATING OF THE CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to stabilize and reverse the atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries due to therapy with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin was demonstrated in recent studies. The advantage of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy compared with standard therapy is proven in patients with both stable and acute forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD. Pleiotropic effects, in particular, effect on endothelial function, ability to reduce the blood level of C-reactive protein are important in the statins mode of action. Risk reduction of cardiovascular complications and slow down of atherosclerosis progression in patients with IHD was significantly associated with decrease in levels of both atherogenic lipids and C-reactive protein.

  4. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  5. Coronary heart disease at altitude.

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, J K

    1994-01-01

    In the past, it has been assumed that some basic physiologic responses to altitude, exposure in coronary patients are comparable to those in normal young subjects. In fact there are similar changes in sympathetic activation, heart rate, and blood pressure early after ascent, with decrements in plasma volume, cardiac output, and stroke volume as acclimatization proceeds. These responses are described, and experience with coronary patients is reviewed. During the 1st 2 to 3 days at altitude, co...

  6. Lipocalin (LCN 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Oberoi

    Full Text Available Lipocalin (LCN 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans.In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1 and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr-/- mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients as determined by coronary angiography.Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression.

  7. Genetic risk profiles for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tikkanen, Emmi

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major burden for public health worldwide. Several factors are known to be associated with the disease risk, including high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and blood pressure. The established risk factors do not, however, fully predict an individual s risk for the disease. In recent years, new candidate risk factors, including genetic markers, have been extensively studied. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mapped over 40 genetic...

  8. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease. PMID:23246401

  9. Heart ischemic disease and longevity: unsolved problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova T.Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to estimate clinical signs and course of coronary heart disease in long-livers and centenarians. Material and Methods. The study included overall population of Saratov — Engels agglomeration's long-livers (>=90 years old, n=198. Results. The rates of major clinical forms of coronary heart disease were detected: atrial fibrillation — 10.6%, chronic heart failure (with preserved ejection fraction — 10.1 % and angina — 5.1 %. Myocardial infarction was verified in 9.6% of long-livers. Myocardial scar criteria prevailed over myocardial infarction history. Received data corroborated dissolving phenomena of coronary heart disease and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in long-livers. Gender differences in electrophysiological parameters were detected in long-livers. Centenarians with the history of myocardial infarction preserved a satisfactory level of physical activity. Conclusion. Received data confirm a presence of an excessive security: prevention of coronary heart disease manifestation and progression in longevity. Long-livers should be considered as a natural model of an antiatherogenic factors and mechanisms.

  10. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  11. Psychological Language on Twitter Predicts County-Level Heart Disease Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Schwartz, Hansen Andrew; Kern, Margaret L.; Park, Gregory; Labarthe, Darwin R.; Merchant, Raina M.; Jha, Sneha; Agrawal, Megha; Dziurzynski, Lukasz A.; Sap, Maarten; Weeg, Christopher; Larson, Emily E.; Ungar, Lyle H.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Hostility and chronic stress are known risk factors for heart disease, but they are costly to assess on a large scale. We used language expressed on Twitter to characterize community-level psychological correlates of age-adjusted mortality from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD). Language patterns reflecting negative social relationships, disengagement, and negative emotions—especially anger—emerged as risk factors; positive emotions and psychological engagement emerged as protective factors. Most correlations remained significant after controlling for income and education. A cross-sectional regression model based only on Twitter language predicted AHD mortality significantly better than did a model that combined 10 common demographic, socioeconomic, and health risk factors, including smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Capturing community psychological characteristics through social media is feasible, and these characteristics are strong markers of cardiovascular mortality at the community level. PMID:25605707

  12. A genetic marker for rheumatic heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, C N; Halim, K; Al-Orainey, I; Al-Nozha, M; al-Aska, A K

    1987-01-01

    The frequency of antigen types (A, B, C, and DR) in an unselected group of 25 patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and an unselected group of 15 patients with acute rheumatic fever was compared with that in a group of 100 healthy volunteers. All patients and controls were Arabs of Saudi origin. Only the frequency of HLA-DR4 was significantly different in the controls and the patient groups--controls 12%, chronic rheumatic heart disease 72%, acute rheumatic fever 53%, both patient gro...

  13. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan;

    2014-01-01

    et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al...... Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... and predicting the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  15. Pattern of pediatric heart diseases in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the pattern, age distribution and relative incidence of heart diseases in pediatric patients aged 16 years and less. Design: A five-year analysis of all children undergoing echocardiography for possible heart disease in a single center. Setting: Tertiary referral center for pediatric and adult cardiac services in the central and southern Punjab, Pakistan. Patients and Methods: Data of all new children undergoing detailed echocardiography was reviewed for type of lesion age at presentation and gender. Results: over a period of five years, (may 1996 to April 2001), 7400 patients underwent echocardiography. Of these, 6620 had cardiac lesions while 780 patients were normal and excluded from the study. Of 6620 patients, 4184 (63.2%) had congenital heart defects (CHD) while 2335 (35.3%) acquired heart disease (AHD) and 101 (1.5%) were placed in miscellaneous group. Of CHD, ventricular septal defect was the most common lesion (32% of all patients with CHD), followed by atrial septal defects (13.2%) and persistent arterial dust (12.8%). Majority was males (65%) and the mean age of presentation was 5.8 years for acyanotic and 4.8 years for cyanotic heart defects. Tetralogy of fallout was the most common cyanotic lesion (16.06%) with mean age of presentation being 4.2 years. The relative incidence of patients with critical health lesions was much less and only 586 patients (14%) were under the age of one year at presentation. Children presenting less than one month of age were only 3% (127 patients). Amongst AHD, 71.5% (1670) had rheumatic heart disease (RHD) while 24.5% (572) had mycocardial disease,clinically diagnosed as myocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy. The mean age of presentation for myocarditis was 2.3 year and majority was clustered in the months of March, April, September and October. Amongst RHD, mitral regurgitation was the commonest lesion: 681 patients(40.8%), followed by mixed lesion of mitral and aortic regurgitation in 382 patients

  16. Computerized screening of children congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Amir A; Hancq, Joel; Dutoit, Thierry; Gharehbaghi, Arash; Kocharian, Armen; Kiani, A

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated screening of congenital heart diseases in children through heart sound analysis techniques. Our method relies on categorizing the pathological murmurs based on the heart sections initiating them. We show that these pathelogical murmur categories can be identified by examining the heart sound energy over specific frequency bands, which we call, Arash-Bands. To specify the Arash-Band for a category, we evaluate the energy of the heart sound over all possible frequency bands. The Arash-Band is the frequency band that provides the lowest error in clustering the instances of that category against the normal ones. The energy content of the Arash-Bands for different categories constitue a feature vector that is suitable for classification using a neural network. In order to train, and to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we use a training data-bank, as well as a test data-bank, collectively consisting of ninety samples (normal and abnormal). Our results show that in more than 94% of cases, our method correctly identifies children with congenital heart diseases. This percentage improves to 100%, when we use the Jack-Knife validation method over all the 90 samples. PMID:18718691

  17. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stine Andersen; Asger Andersen; Jens Erik Nielsen-Kudsk

    2016-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent a rapidly growing patient group. Dysfunction of the right ventricle is often present, and right heart failure constitutes the main cause of death. Heart failure therapies used in acquired left heart failure are often initiated in adults with right heart failure due to congenital heart disease, but the right ventricle differs substantially from the left ventricle, and the clinical evidence for this treatment strategy is lacking. In this review,...

  18. Whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to stratify symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic burden in patients with isolated cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Duce, Suzanne L.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Belch, Jill J. F.; Struthers, Allan D.; Helen M Colhoun; Houston, J. Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to use whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (WB CVMR) to assess the heart and arterial network in a single examination, so as to describe the burden of atherosclerosis and subclinical disease in participants with symptomatic single site vascular disease. Methods: 64 patients with a history of symptomatic single site vascular disease (38 coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 cerebrovascular disease, 17 peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) underwen...

  19. Whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to stratify symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic burden in patients with isolated cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Duce, Suzanne L.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Belch, Jill J. F.; Struthers, Allan D.; Helen M Colhoun; Houston, J. Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to use whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (WB CVMR) to assess the heart and arterial network in a single examination, so as to describe the burden of atherosclerosis and subclinical disease in participants with symptomatic single site vascular disease. Methods 64 patients with a history of symptomatic single site vascular disease (38 coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 cerebrovascular disease, 17 peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) underwent ...

  20. Ischaemic heart disease and Cag A strains of Helicobacter pylori in the Caerphilly heart disease study

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, A.; Risley, P; Markus, H; Butland, B.; Strachan, D.; Elwood, P; MENDALL, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To look for the presence of the more virulent strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) in men who developed ischaemic heart disease over a 10 year period and in controls.
DESIGN—The Caerphilly prospective heart disease study recruited 2512 men aged 45-59 years during 1979-83. Western blot analysis or enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed on serum taken from those who subsequently died of ischaemic heart disease, or developed non-fatal myocardial infarction, to det...

  1. Assessment of functional capacity through oxygen consumption in patients with asymptomatic probable heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro Rodrigues

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO2peak of healthy individuals with asymptomatic individuals with probable heart disease. METHODS: Ninety-eight men were evaluated. They were divided into two groups: 1 39 healthy individuals (group N with an age range of 50±4.6 years; and 2 59 asymptomatic individuals with signs of atherosclerotic and/or hypertensive heart disease (group C with an age range of 51.9±10.4 years. In regard to age, height, body surface area, percentage of fat, lean body mass, and daily physical activity, both groups were statistically similar. Environmental conditions during the ergometric test were also controlled. RESULTS: Maximal aerobic power (watts, VO2peak, maximal heart rate, and maximal pulmonary ventilation were lower in group C (p<0.01 than in group N; weight, however, was lower in group N (p=0.031 than in group C. Differences in the respiratory gas exchange index, heart rate at rest, and the maximal double product of the two groups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Signs of probable heart disease, even though asymptomatic, may reduce the functional capacity, perhaps due to the lower maximal cardiac output and/or muscle metabolic changes.

  2. Endometriosis Linked to Heart Disease in Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epidemiologic research in reproductive medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Missmer said the study found an association between endometriosis and the risk of heart disease, but can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. She believes this is the first study to ...

  3. Education and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard;

    2013-01-01

    Educational-related gradients in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mediation by behavioral risk factors are plausible given previous research; however this has not been comprehensively addressed in absolute measures. Questionnaire data on health behavior of 69,513 participants, 52 % women, from...

  4. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or discomfort in the muscles of your feet, calves, or thighs. Symptoms that usually appear during walking ... If you have any signs of heart disease, call your health care ... to see if the symptoms go away or dismiss them as nothing. Call ...

  5. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride...

  6. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, ...

  7. Adult-Onset Asthma to Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma has been associated with atherosclerotic disease in several studies with some evidence that this association may be limited to women. However, most previous studies have failed to account for the heterogeneity of asthma subtypes. We previously reported increased carotid intima medial thickne...

  8. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  9. Histopathologic Characteristics of Atherosclerotic Coronary Disease and Implications of the Findings for the Invasive and Noninvasive Detection of Vulnerable Plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Jagat; Nakano, Masataka; Virmani, Renu; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Petersen, Rita; Newcomb, Robert; Malik, Shaista; Fuster, Valentin; Finn, Aloke V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to identify histomorphologic characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques and to determine the amenability of some of these components to be used as markers for invasive and noninvasive imaging. Background Rupture of the atherosclerotic plaques is responsible for the majority of acute coronary events, and the culprit lesions demonstrate distinct histopathologic features. It has been tacitly believed that plaque rupture (PR) is associated with angiographically minimally occlusive lesions. Methods We obtained 295 coronary atherosclerotic plaques, including stable (fibroatheroma [FA]; n = 105), vulnerable (thin-cap fibroatheroma [TCFA]; n = 88), and disrupted plaques (plaque rupture [PR]; n = 102) from the hearts of 181 men and 32 women who had died suddenly. The hierarchical importance of fibrous cap thickness, percent luminal stenosis, macrophage area, necrotic core area, and calcified plaque area was evaluated by using recursive partitioning analysis. Because clinical assessment of fibrous cap thickness is not possible by noninvasive imaging, it was excluded from the second set of partitioning analysis. Results Thickness of the fibrous cap emerged as the best discriminator of plaque type; the cap thickness measured 84-μm cap thickness. Although the majority of TCFA were found in the 54- to 84-μm thickness group, those with <54-μm thickness were more likely to show <74% luminal stenosis (area under the curve: FA, 1.0; TCFA, 0.89; PR, 0.90). After exclusion of cap thickness, analysis of the plaque characteristics revealed macrophage infiltration and necrotic core to be the 2 best discriminators of plaque types (area under the curve: FA, 0.82; TCFA, 0.58; PR, 0.72). More than 75% cross-section area stenosis was seen in 70% of PR and 40% of TCFA; only 5% PR and 10% TCFA were <50% narrowed. Conclusions This postmortem study defines histomorphologic characteristics of vulnerable plaques, which may help develop imaging strategies for

  10. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Häggström, J.; Pedersen, H. D.; Åblad, B.; Nilsen, H. Y.; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  11. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  12. Coronary heart disease and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamermer, Yusuf; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of coronary artery disease in female patients is increasing due to changing lifestyle patterns including cigarette smoking, diabetes and stress. Since women are delaying childbearing until older age, acute coronary syndrome will more frequently occur during pregnancy. Although rare, acute coronary syndrome during pregnancy often has devastating consequences. It is associated with increased maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity compared with the nonpregnant situation. Furthermore, it constitutes an important problem for the patient and the treating physician, because the selection of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is greatly influenced not only by maternal, but also by fetal safety. PMID:19804311

  13. Coronary heart disease after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease after radiotherapy (RT) for peptic ulcer disease. Methods and materials: Peptic ulcer disease patients treated with RT (n = 1859) or by other means (n = 1860) at the University of Chicago Medical Center between 1936 and 1965, were followed through 1997. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with the expected numbers from the general population rates. During RT, 5% of the heart was in the treatment field and the remainder of the heart mostly received scattered radiation. A volume-weighted cardiac dose was computed to describe the average tissue dose to the entire organ. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to analyze the CHD and cerebrovascular disease risk associated with RT, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: Greater than expected CHD mortality was observed among the irradiated patients. The irradiated patients received volume-weighted cardiac doses ranging from 1.6 to 3.9 Gy and the portion of the heart directly in the field received doses of 7.6-18.4 Gy. The CHD risk increased with the cardiac dose (p trend = 0.01). The cerebrovascular disease risk was not associated with the surrogate carotid dose. Conclusion: The excess CHD risk in patients undergoing RT for peptic ulcer disease decades previously indicates the need for long-term follow-up for cardiovascular disease after chest RT

  14. Dietary manipulation and social isolation alter disease progression in a murine model of coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nakagawa-Toyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with a deficiency in the HDL receptor SR-BI and low expression of a modified apolipoprotein E gene (SR-BI KO/ApoeR61(h/h called 'HypoE' when fed an atherogenic, 'Paigen' diet develop occlusive, atherosclerotic coronary arterial disease (CHD, myocardial infarctions (MI, and heart dysfunction and die prematurely (50% mortality ~40 days after initiation of this diet. Because few murine models share with HypoE mice these cardinal, human-like, features of CHD, HypoE mice represent a novel, small animal, diet-inducible and genetically tractable model for CHD. To better describe the properties of this model, we have explored the effects of varying the composition and timing of administration of atherogenic diets, as well as social isolation vs. group housing, on these animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HypoE mice were maintained on a standard lab chow diet (control until two months of age. Subsequently they received one of three atherogenic diets (Paigen, Paigen without cholate, Western or control diet for varying times and were housed in groups or singly, and we determined the plasma cholesterol levels, extent of cardiomegaly and/or survival. The rate of disease progression could be reduced by lowering the severity of the atherogenic diet and accelerated by social isolation. Disease could be induced by Paigen diets either containing or free of cholate. We also established conditions under which CHD could be initiated by an atherogenic diet and then subsequently, by replacing this diet with standard lab chow, hypercholesterolemia could be reduced and progression to early death prevented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HypoE mice provide a powerful, surgery-free, diet-'titratable' small animal model that can be used to study the onset of recovery from occlusive, atherosclerotic CHD and heart failure due to MI. HypoE mice can be used for the analysis of the effects of environment (diet, social isolation on a variety of features of

  15. Clinical Study on Effect of Garlicin in Stabilizing the Carotid Artery Atherosclerotic Plaque in Patients with Primary Hypertension and Coronary Artery Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen-li; KE Yuan-nan; SHI Zai-xiang; WANG Ying; CHEN Li; JU Gao; FAN Shu-ying

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of garlicin in treating carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque (CAAP) in patients with primary hypertension and coronary heart disease (PHT-CHD). Methods: Seventynine patients with PHT-CHD were randomly divided into the treated group (39 patients) treated with garlicin and fosinopril and the control group (40 patients) treated with fosinopril alone. The change of CAAP was evaluated by high frequency ultrasonic examination every six months, and the changes of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured by ELISA, with the observation proceeding for 52 weeks totally. Results: By the end of the experiment, the number of complex plaques, Crouse integrals, intima-media thickness, serum ICAM-1 and hs-CRP were significantly lower in the treated group than those in the control group with significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion; Garlicin could stabilize CAAP to a certain extent and shows a definite vascular protective effect in patients with PHT-CHD.

  16. The changing state of surgery for adult congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Monro, J

    2005-01-01

    The number of patients with adult congenital heart disease is expected to increase by 25% during this decade, so that by 2010 there will be more patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease over 16 years of age than under

  17. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke Improving care can save more lives Recommend ... death among all ages. Problem Many deaths from heart disease and stroke can be prevented. What do we ...

  19. "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Your ... a condition that also increases the chance of heart disease and stroke. High blood pressure is especially common ...

  20. Women's Heart Disease: Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Cindy Parsons and Follow the Fifty Past Issues / ... Program, knowing that her personal risk factors for heart disease, including family history, were high. She watched her ...

  1. Women, Men Share Similar Symptoms of Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of stroke, an inactive lifestyle, history of depression and a family history of early onset heart disease. Women also ... risk factors that are more common in women -- depression, inactivity, and family history of early onset heart disease -- are not ...

  2. Lonely, Isolated People May Be Prone to Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Isolated People May Be Prone to Heart Disease, Stroke Study found social isolation raised the risk by ... face a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, researchers report. Social isolation raised that risk by ...

  3. Impact of Replacing the Pooled Cohort Equation With Other Cardiovascular Disease Risk Scores on Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Waqas T; Michos, Erin D; Flueckiger, Peter; Blaha, Michael; Sandfort, Veit; Herrington, David M; Burke, Gregory; Yeboah, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    The increase in statin eligibility by the new cholesterol guidelines is mostly driven by the Pooled Cohort Equation (PCE) criterion (≥7.5% 10-year PCE). The impact of replacing the PCE with either the modified Framingham Risk Score (FRS) or the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) on assessment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk assessment and statin eligibility remains unknown. We assessed the comparative benefits of using the PCE, FRS, and SCORE for ASCVD risk assessment in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Of 6,815 participants, 654 (mean age 61.4 ± 10.3; 47.1% men; 37.1% whites; 27.2% blacks; 22.3% Hispanics; 12.0% Chinese-Americans) were included in analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) and decision curve analysis were used to compare the 3 risk scores. Decision curve analysis is the plot of net benefit versus probability thresholds; net benefit = true positive rate - (false positive rate × weighting factor). Weighting factor = Threshold probability/1 - threshold probability. After a median of 8.6 years, 342 (6.0%) ASCVD events (myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, fatal or nonfatal stroke) occurred. All 4 risk scores had acceptable discriminative ability for incident ASCVD events; (AUC [95% CI] PCE: 0.737 [0.713 to 0.762]; FRS: 0.717 [0.691 to 0.743], SCORE (high risk) 0.722 [0.696 to 0.747], and SCORE (low risk): 0.721 [0.696 to 0.746]. At the ASCVD risk threshold recommended for statin eligibility for primary prevention (≥7.5%), the PCE provides the best net benefit. Replacing the PCE with the SCORE (high), SCORE (low) and FRS results in a 2.9%, 8.9%, and 17.1% further increase in statin eligibility. The PCE has the best discrimination and net benefit for primary ASCVD risk assessment in a US-based multiethnic cohort compared with the SCORE or the FRS. PMID:27445216

  4. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena;

    2014-01-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors......, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial...... fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement...

  5. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...... with the educational gradient in CHD in Norway. METHODS: In a cohort of 57 279 men born during 1949-1959, health survey information was linked to military conscription records of cognitive ability, to national educational data, to hospitalisation records from the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway...

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. PMID:26471823

  7. Interleukin-18 Gene Polymorphism in Patients with and without Atherosclerotic Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghaderi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Several studies have revealed that inflammation plays an important role in development of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD and its other manifestations. IL-18 is a pleiotropic cytokine that enhances Th1( T helper 1 or Th2( T helper 2 immune response depending on its cytokine milieu and genetic background. It strongly induces formation of plaques in patients with CAD. Variations in the IL-18 gene found to influence both levels of IL-18 and clinical outcomes in individuals with history of heart disease. To investigate the association of two IL-18 promoter gene polymorphisms at -607C/A and -137G/C positions with CAD, and some CAD risk factors such as diabetes, arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cigarette smoking and obesity.Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted by the salting out method from the peripheral arterial blood of 280 patients with CAD documented by coronary angiography (143 with a documented history of myocardial infarction termed positive MI and 137 without myocardial infarction designated negative MI and 140 age- sex matched persons with a normal coronary angiography (control group.The genotype of both CAD and control groups were assessed by ASP-PCR method. Arlequin program was used for gametic phase estimation and haplotype analysis.Results: There was no significant difference between patient and control groups either allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic for both variants (p>0.05. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between IL-18 genotypes and CAD risk factors in the patient group (P>0.05. Conclusion: These results suggest that the investigated IL-18 gene promoter polymorphisms at -607C/A and -137G/C positions are not associated with genetic susceptibility to CAD in southern Iran.

  8. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Risk of Death, Ischemic Stroke, and Cardiac Complications in Patients With Atherosclerotic Disease The Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease-Magnetic Resonance (SMART-MR) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.A. Conijn; R.P. Kloppenborg; A. Algra; W.P.T.M. Mali; L.J. Kappelle; K.L. Vincken; Y. van der Graaf; M.I. Geerlings

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cerebral small vessel disease may be related to vascular and nonvascular pathology. We assessed whether lacunar infarcts and white matter lesions on MRI increased the risk of vascular and nonvascular death and future vascular events in patients with atherosclerotic disease. Me

  9. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  10. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  11. 10.7.Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930270 Clinical analysis of rupture of aorticsinus aneurysm in 30 cases.ZHANG Yuwei (张玉威),et al.Instit Cardiovasc Dis,Dept Med,Shenyang Milit General Hosp,PLA.Chin Cir J1993;8(1):30—31.Rupture of aortic sinus aneurysm is a rarecongenital heart disease.It is sometimes misdi-agnosed and treated because of no typical symp-toms and signs.30 cases with rupture of a-neurysm of aortic sinus were studied.Clinicaldata suggested that the disease could be firstlynoticed when the healthy male aged 20~40years developed suddenly chest pain or extreme-ly uncomfortable feeling with gradually increas-ing heart dysfunction low—frequency harsh andsuperficial continuous precordial murmurs.Chest X-ray exhibited enlargement of heartand asymmetry of pulmonary plethora.ECG

  12. [Chronic ischaemic heart disease in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Gómez Huelgas, Ricardo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Calderón, Alberto; Vidán, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this manuscript to take into account the peculiarities and specific characteristics of elderly patients with chronic ischaemic heart disease from a multidisciplinary perspective, with the participation of the Spanish Society of Cardiology (sections of Geriatric Cardiology and Ischaemic Heart Disease/Acute Cardiovascular Care), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians and the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology. This consensus document shows that in order to adequately address these elderly patients a comprehensive assessment is needed, which includes comorbidity, frailty, functional status, polypharmacy and drug interactions. We conclude that in most patients medical treatment is the best option and that this treatment must take into account the above factors and the biological changes associated with aging. PMID:27102136

  13. Data Mining of Atherosclerotic Plaque Transcriptomes Predicts STAT1-Dependent Inflammatory Signal Integration in Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Sikorski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaque development involves multiple extra- and intra-cellular signals engaging cells from the immune system and from the vasculature. Pro-inflammatory pathways activated by interferon gamma (IFNγ and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 ligands are profoundly involved in plaque formation and have been shown to involve cross-talk in all atheroma-interacting cell types leading to increased activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1 and elevated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. Here we demonstrate that in Gene Expression Omnibus repository (GEO deposited microarray datasets, obtained from human coronary and carotid atherosclerotic plaques, a significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory genes can be detected. Moreover, increased expression of multiple chemokines, adhesion molecules and matrix-remodeling molecules was commonly detected in both plaque types and correlated with the presence of putative STAT1 binding sites in their promoters, suggesting strong involvement of STAT1 in plaque development. We also provide evidence to suggest that STAT1-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB or STAT1-interferon-regulated factor (IRF regulatory modules are over-represented in the promoters of these inflammatory genes, which points to a possible contribution of IFNγ and TLR4 cross-talk in the process of atherogenesis. Finally, a subset of these genes encodes for secreted proteins that could serve as a basis of a non-invasive diagnostic assay. The results of our in silico analysis in vitro provide potential evidence that STAT1-dependent IFNγ-TLR4 cross-talk plays a crucial role in coronary and carotid artery plaque development and identifies a STAT1-dependent gene signature that could represent a novel diagnostic tool to monitor and diagnose plaque progression in human atherosclerosis.

  14. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    N. E. Zakirova; R. G. Oganov; A. N. Zakirova; M. P. Plotnikova; G. M. Salakhova

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP) in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD).Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC)-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. E...

  15. The right side in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schuuring, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased dramatically during the past years, due to the successes of cardiac surgery. At present, nearly all of these children with CHD can be operated at young age and more than 90% reach adulthood. At adult age, however, many patients with CHD are at risk of complications. This thesis focused on the right sided complications often seen in patients with CHD, the implications on survival, the various treatment options availa...

  16. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan CT; Shine AM; McMahon CJ

    2013-01-01

    Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass...

  17. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmona...

  18. Aerobic exercise in coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Moholdt, Trine Tegdan

    2010-01-01

    Physical inactivity is recognised as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Healthy subjects who exercise have lower all-cause and CHD mortality compared to inactive. Also in subjects with already established CHD, being physically active seems to be associated with reduced mortality, but less data exist. Especially, the amount and intensity of exercise required for risk reduction in CHD patients is not yet fully resolved. With data from a population based prospective cohort study, th...

  19. Evaluation of neonates with congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tokel, Kürşad; Saygılı, Arda; Mercan, Şükrü; Varan, Birgül; Gürakan, Berkan; Aşlamacı, Sait

    2001-01-01

    From April 1995 to June 1999 190 neonates with congenital heart disease underwent medical interventional and surgical treatment in our institution The symptoms physical findings and cardiac diagnoses of patients were retrospectively analysed in four age groups according to age at admission: before 3 days 3 14 days 14 28 days and 28 42 days The results of interventional catheterization medical and surgical treatment and complications were also investigated The mean age at admission was 19 2 ± ...

  20. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khayyam-Nekouei, Zohreh; Neshatdoost, Hamidtaher; Yousefy, Alireza; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Manshaee, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although psychological factors play an important role in coronary heart diseases (CHD), it seems there is a need for more researches in this respect. The present study aimed to review psychological factors, including depression, anxiety and stress related to etiology and prognosis of CHD. METHODS This was a review on medical and psychological literatures, particularly in the years 1995-2012. RESULTS As protective factor or risk factor, psychological factors play an important role i...

  1. The Right Heart in Congenital Heart Disease, Mechanisms and Recent Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Guihaire, Julien; Haddad, François; Mercier, Olaf; Murphy, Daniel J.; Wu, Joseph C; Fadel, Elie

    2012-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, the right heart may support the pulmonary or the systemic circulation. Several congenital heart diseases primarily affect the right heart including Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great arteries, septal defects leading to pulmonary vascular disease, Ebstein anomaly and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. In these patients, right ventricular dysfunction leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. In this paper, our objective is t...

  2. Evaluation of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Francesca; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana

    2016-03-01

    The clinical approach to adults with congenital heart diseases (ACHDs) is unique in cardiovascular medicine because these patients encompass a broad range of presentations. Each patient, despite having similar diagnosis, will be anatomically and physiologically unlike others within ACHD population, in relation to the type of repair, age at repair, associated defects, with specific long-term risk factors and complications. Furthermore, as many patients will not complain of symptoms, clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing must also be based on the underlying main diagnostic category, with complete standardized lesion-specific clinical protocols, investigating all known risk factors specific for each congenital heart disease and performed as part of screening for significant long-term complications. The first part of this review will focus on clinical history, physical examination, and the most important diagnostic testing in ACHD population. The second part of the article will focus on some clinical issues we have to face in our daily practice, such as heart failure, cyanosis, and pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, as survival rates of ACHD population continue to improve and patients with this condition live longer, we will briefly report on a new clinical concern regarding the impact of acquired morbidities like coronary artery disease that appear to be of greater importance in defining outcome in older patients with ACHD. PMID:26957402

  3. PREGNANCY WITH HEART DISEASE - FETOMATERNAL OUTCOMEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the maternal and fetal outcome of pregnancies complicated by cardiac disease in a developing country. METHODS: A prospective analysis was carried out of 40 pregnancies in women with cardiac disease who delivered at 28 weeks of gestation and beyond from June 2009 to May 2010 at a tertiary care center in the eastern part of India. RESULTS: Rheumatic heart disease (n=28 , 70% with isolated mitral stenosis (n=21 was the predominant cardiac problem. Septal defects were the most common form of congenital heart disease (n=10. In 28 (13.52% women , the diagnosis of cardiac disease was made during pregnancy. Patients in NYHA class I/II (n=29 , 72.5% had fewer maternal complications and their babies had a higher birth weight than those in NYHA class III/IV (n=11 , 27.5%. Cardiac complications were noted in 27 (67.5% patients. Commonest complication developing during pregnancy , labor and puerperium was congestive cardiac failure (n=14 , 35%. Maternal mortality was noted in 3 patients (7.5% , 2 of which were due to cardiac failure and pulmonary edema . Six patients (15% delivered preterm and thirteen patients (32.5% had low birth weight babies . There were three neonatal deaths and one stillborn. CONCLUSIONS: Rheumatic heart disease was the predominant type. Patients in NYHA class I /II had a better maternal and fetal outcome than those in NYHA class III/IV. Surgically treated women tolerate pregnancy well. Vaginal delivery was safer and caesarean section should be reserved only for obstetric indications. Maternal and perinatal outcom e can be improved by team approach at tertiary care center .

  4. How Is Heart Valve Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called a valve-in-valve procedure. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes to Treat Other Related Heart Conditions To ... your doctor may advise you to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes, such as: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for ...

  5. Octopus around heart: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, Rohan Pravinbhai; Beedkar, Amey; Maske, Mahendra; Talaviya, Bhavesh; Washimkar, Sunil; Deshmukh, Pradeep; Deshpande, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Left main coronary aneurysm is extremely rare entity under umbrella of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Epidemiological and clinical data are lacking to guide management strategy. The case described here is of 72 years old male who presented with SIHD (stable ischemic heart disease). Coronary angiography revealed coronary artery aneurysm involving left main. Out of less than 50 cases reported worldwide, most cases deal with non-atherosclerotic causes of left main coronary artery aneur...

  6. The Economic Burden of Inflammatory Heart Disease in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Seul-Ki; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Oh, In-Hwan; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Eun-Jung

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The incidence of inflammatory heart diseases is not yet as high as those of other cardiovascular diseases; however, inflammatory heart diseases do have relatively high mortality rate. Therefore, update information on the economic burden of inflammatory heart diseases are necessary in order to appropriate policy making on these diseases. Materials and Methods This study used a number of resources to obtain data, national health insurance statistics, the Korean Health ...

  7. Antiplatelet Management for Coronary Heart Disease: Advances and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Michael; Morneau, Kathleen; Hoang, Vu; Virani, Salim; Jneid, Hani

    2016-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death in the USA. CHD accounts for 48 % of all cardiovascular mortality or approximately one of every seven deaths. Disruption of atherosclerotic plaques-usually by rupture or erosion-and superimposed thrombosis can result in acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death. Silent plaque disruption may also occur and result in coronary plaque progression and ultimately the symptomatic manifestations of stable CHD. Antiplatelet agents remain the cornerstone therapy for acute thrombotic coronary syndromes and are essential for thromboprophylaxis against these events in patients with stable CHD. Antiplatelet drugs are also important adjunct therapies during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as they mitigate equipment-associated thrombotic complications that are partially induced by iatrogenic plaque rupture by interventionalists during balloon angioplasty in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Since the introduction of clopidogrel, there has been considerable development in this field with at least three novel P2Y12 antagonists approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) over the past decade. Rapidly accumulating evidence is helping to guide the optimal duration of treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy after stenting, especially with the newer drug-eluting stents. More data are also emerging on the hazards and long-term safety of these agents. It is therefore prudent for clinicians to remain current on treatment options and recent advances in this area. We herein review current and emerging antiplatelet therapies and summarize their characteristics and indications of use as well as challenges and areas of ongoing research. PMID:27139709

  8. Cardiovascular disease – coronary heart disease – qualitative research

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide (World Health Organisation, 2008). This study focuses coronary heart disease and the management of lifestyle changes in prevention and ongoing treatment. In doing this, cardiac rehabilitation most useful. Through this process, individuals may experience a variety of issues, which may influence their overall health status. Despite the importance of rehabilitation being acknowledged, there is need for a...

  9. Dental disease and risk of coronary heart disease and mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    DeStefano, F.; Anda, R F; Kahn, H. S.; Williamson, D F; Russell, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate a reported association between dental disease and risk of coronary heart disease. SETTING--National sample of American adults who participated in a health examination survey in the early 1970s. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study in which participants underwent a standard dental examination at baseline and were followed up to 1987. Proportional hazards analysis was used to estimate relative risks adjusted for several covariates. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence of morta...

  10. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  11. Prognosis by C-reactive protein and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels in stable coronary heart disease during 15 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, N; Kragelund, C.; Steffensen, R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Elevated CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 associate with increased risk of cardiovascular events, possibly because these plasma proteins mark vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. We tested the hypothesis that levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-9...... associate with prognosis in patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured baseline plasma CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in 1090 patients with stable coronary heart disease and as the primary composite endpoint detected incident unstable angina, myocardial infarction and...

  12. Environmental stress, reactivity and ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, D S; Raisen, S E

    1988-03-01

    This article provides an overview of work in two areas of biobehavioural research: the effects of environmental stress and the role of psychophysiologic reactivity in the development of ischaemic heart disease. Attention is given first to evidence that low socio-economic status, low social support, and occupational settings characterized by high demands and low levels of control over the job are associated with increased coronary risk. Also discussed is a promising animal primate model of social stress and its role in development of coronary atherosclerosis. Next, we discuss physiological responsiveness (reactivity) to emotional stress, which is being studied as a marker of processes involved in the development of cardiovascular disease. Stress and psychophysiological reactivity constitute promising targets for research on biobehavioural antecedents of coronary disease and for clinical intervention studies. However, further evidence is needed before these variables can be regarded as proven coronary risk factors. PMID:3129010

  13. Republished: drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-03-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:23417686

  14. Drug-induced valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Bernard; Droogmans, Steven; Rosenhek, Raphael; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (DIVHD) was first described in the 1960s. Initially, associations with ergot derivatives used for migraine prevention, or with anorectic drugs, were described. Drugs used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and endocrine diseases, like hyperprolactinemia, may also induce VHD. More recently, the use of 3,4-methylendioxymetamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') and benfluorexhave been found to be associated with DIVHD. Although some of these drugs were withdrawn from the market, several cases of patients requiring valve surgery even years after the cessation of therapy have been reported. DIVHD is not infrequent, may be severe, and has been described in association with several drugs. Even after drug cessation, long-term implications of this type of VHD may persist. The present review underlines the need for a careful evaluation of the associated clinical and echocardiographic risk factors to allow early recognition so as not to delay appropriate management. PMID:22875739

  15. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease Introduction A therapeutic cardiac catheterization is a procedure performed to treat your child’s heart defect. A doctor will use special techniques and ...

  16. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact ... Vintage 2003 Postcensal Population Estimates from NCHS. The American Indian and Alaska Native Population There are approximately 4. ...

  17. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  18. MYOCARDIAL REMODELING IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Zakirova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the myocardial remodeling features in patients with stable angina depending on disease severity and experienced myocardial infarction (MI.Material and methods. 148 male patients with stable angina were examined and randomized into 3 groups (G1-G3. 52 patients of G1 had angina of I-II functional class (FC. 49 patients of G2 had angina of III FC, and 47 patients of G3 had angina of IV FC. History of MI had 79,5, 87.2 and 92.6% of patients in G1, G2 and G3 respectively. 35 healthy men were included into control group. Coronarography, bicycle ergometry and 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Left ventricular (LV function and remodeling was assessed with echocardiography.Results. G3 patients had LV eccentric hypertrophy as a result of postinfarction cardiosclerosis which accompanied with LV systolic dysfunction, a myocardial stress increasing and LV spherification. G1 patients had no any significant disorders of LV systolic function.Conclusion. Severe ischemic heart disease is associated with a dysadaptive remodeling unlike mild ischemic heart disease, which is associated with an adaptive myocardial remodeling.

  19. Cardiac stem cells in patients with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Huang, Lan

    2013-01-01

    The heart has been regarded as a terminally differentiated organ for decades. There are numerous indicators for the potency of myocardial regeneration, which opens up new avenues for the treatment of heart disease. Cardiac stem cells (CSCs) have been discovered in the human heart and they play a vital role in myocardial regeneration. This review discusses the distribution, properties and proliferation of CSCs in the myocardium of patients with heart disease. Additionally, the potency of myoca...

  20. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  1. Screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Matthew E; Kochilas, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    Screening for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) was added to the United States Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Since that time, CCHD screening with pulse oximetry has become nearly universal for newborns born in the United States. There are various algorithms in use. Although the goal of the screening program is to identify children who may have CCHD, most newborns who have a low oxygen saturation will not have CCHD. Further study is needed to determine optimal guidelines for CCHD screening in special settings such as the neonatal intensive care unit, areas in high altitude, and home births. PMID:26876122

  2. Myocardial disease,anemia and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald S Silverberg; Dov Wexler; Adrian Iaina; Doron Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Many patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) fail to respond to maximal CHF therapy and progress to end stage CHF with many hospitalizations, very poor quality of life, end stage renal failure, or die of cardiovascular complications within a short time. One factor that has generally been ignored in many of these patients is the fact that they are often anemic.The anemia is due mainly to renal failure but also to the inhibitory effects of cytokines on the bone marrow. Anemia itself may further worsen the cardiac function and make the patients resistant to standard CHF therapies. Indeed anemia has been associated with increased severity of CHF, increased hospitalization, worse cardiac function and functional class, higher doses of diuretics,worsening of renal function and reduced quality of life. In both controlled and uncontrolled studies the correction of the anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) and oral or Ⅳ iron is associated with improvement in all these parameters. EPO itself may also play a direct role in improving the heart unrelated to the improvement of the anemia. Anemia may also play a role in the worsening of coronary heart disease even without CHF.

  3. The heart in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsianos E.V.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cardiovascular involvement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been occasionally reported, mainly in the form of case reports. Endocardium derangement in IBD involves endocarditis and subendocardial abscess. Endocarditis may occur as a result of septicemia or due to the prolonged use of total parental nutrition (TPN catheters or/and immunosuppression. The cause of endocarditis may be bacterial or fungal and require surgery in several cases. Prophylaxis for endocarditis in selected IBD patients is discussed. Myocarditis or perimyocarditis in IBD is reported as an autoimmune phenomenon during bowel disease excacerbations or as a side-effect of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA formulations. Ulcerative colitis (UC patients seem to be at a higher risk for this complication compared to Crohn�s disease (CD patients. Myocardial infarctions, selenium deficiency during TPN, the role of prolonged steroid use and the association with giant cell myocarditis are topics which need further analysis. Pericardium involvement seems to be the most frequent type of cardiovascular complication in IBD caused by drugs (5-ASA, azathioprine, cyclosporine, pericardio-colonic fistulas or unknown causes (idiopathic and it may occasionally be the disease presenting symptom. Coronary artery status and other factors for cardiovascular risk, such as smoking, hyperlipidemia and exercise are also discussed. Electrocardiogram and ultrasonographic changes are not so uncommon and cardiogenic sudden death in IBD is reviewed. Intracavitary coagulation abnormalities, amyloidosis, heart failure and aortitis syndrome are topics included and discussed in this review. A list of tables contributes to a more systemic overview of this current knowledge. Key Words: heart, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, Crohn�s diseas

  4. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is prevalent in cardiorenal patients but not associated with left ventricular function and myocardial fibrosis as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, Mireille E.; van der Putten, Karien; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; de Vries, Jan J. J.; Cramer, Maarten J.; America, Yves G. C. J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Meiss, Louis; Doevendans, Pieter A. F. M.; Braam, Branko; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) is common in cardiovascular diseases and associated with hypertension, renal dysfunction and/or heart failure. There is a paucity of data about the prevalence and the role of ARAS in the pathophysiology of combined chronic heart failure (CHF)

  5. Angiographic estimation of atherosclerotic disease burden in a coronary artery fed by collaterals: a potential pitfall in decision for revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Tsigkas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Grigorios Tsigkas, Panagiota Mylona, Periklis Davlouros, Dimitrios AlexopoulosCardiology Department, University Hospital of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Despite the remarkable advances in revascularization strategies made during the last decade, a significant proportion of patients are excluded from either percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting because of unsuitable coronary anatomy. Diffuse severe coronary artery disease, small vessel caliber, chronic total occlusions, or extremely calcified vessels are frequent reasons for deferring revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. We present a case concerning a middle-aged asymptomatic patient who was treated successfully with percutaneous coronary intervention due to a chronic total occlusion lesion of the left anterior descending artery. Coronary angiography is an inadequate method for the estimation of the burden of atherosclerotic disease in an artery fed by collaterals. Assessment of any residual antegrade flow, and ipsilateral and contralateral collateral filling of the segments distal to the occlusion with invasive or noninvasive techniques, could affect the appropriate decision-making by physicians.Keywords: collaterals, percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, ischemia, revascularization, chronic total occlusion 

  6. Valvular heart disease in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuily, Stéphane; Huttin, Olivier; Mohamed, Shirine; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Selton-Suty, Christine; Wahl, Denis

    2013-04-01

    Heart valve disease (HVD) is the most frequent cardiac manifestation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), with prevalence of 30 %. The definition is based on the presence of thickening or vegetation of the valves (mainly mitral and aortic) as described by Libman and Sacks for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Transthoracic and/or transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE and TEE, respectively) enable early and accurate diagnosis and help avoid misdiagnosis as rheumatic valve disease. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in SLE patients is associated with a threefold greater risk of HVD, confirming the crucial importance of these antibodies in the pathogenic process, leading to thrombotic manifestations on valves because of hypercoagulability. Natural history is characterized by worsening of HVD over time with an increased risk for stroke. APS patients undergoing valve-replacement surgery are at high risk of thrombotic and bleeding complications. Thus aPL-associated HVD has affects clinical management of APS patients. PMID:23456852

  7. [Adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabitz, R G; Kaemmerer, H; Mohr, F-W

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a few decades ago, today most patients with congenital heart disease reach adulthood after intervention or reparative surgery. As complete correction is generally not possible, a patient population with great complexity and a particular challenge to medical management is rising and a regular follow-up is mandatory. The aim of care is the timely recognition of residual or associated problems. Frequency and intensity of follow-up examinations depend on type and complexity of the lesion. The standard repertoire at follow-up consists of a specific history, clinical examination, ECG, Holter-monitoring, exercise tests, and echocardiography. Depending on the indication, cardio-MRI, CT scan, and sophisticated cardiac catheterization may become necessary. Long-term complications like rhythm disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, or heart failure are frequent, despite optimal care. Acute complications like arrhythmias, infective endocarditis, cerebral events, cerebral abscesses, aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and bleeding have to be recognized early and treated appropriately. Additional focus has to be placed on counseling and management of noncardiac disease and surgery, pregnancy and delivery, exercise at work and in private life, driving, and insurance issues. Training and certification of physicians as well as the establishment of specialized centers will help to ensure high quality health care for the affected patient population. PMID:23318541

  8. Cardiac MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable progress has been made in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cine MRI is recognized as the most accurate method for evaluating ventricular function. Late gadolinium-enhanced MRI can clearly delineate subendocardial infarction, and the assessment of transmural extent of infarction on MRI is widely useful for predicting myocardial viability. Stress myocardial perfusion MRI allows for detection of subendocardial myocardial ischemia, and the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion MRI is superior to stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). In recent years, image quality, volume coverage, acquisition speed and arterial contrast of 3-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have been substantially improved with use of steady-state free precession sequences and parallel imaging techniques, permitting the acquisition of high-quality, whole-heart coronary MRA within a reasonably short imaging time. It is now widely recognized that cardiac MRI has tremendous potential for the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. However, cardiac MRI is technically complicated and its use in clinical practice is relatively limited. With further improvements in education and training, as well as standardization of appropriate study protocols, cardiac MRI will play a central role in managing patients with CAD. (author)

  9. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005...... nonrandomized study, our data suggest that patients with carcinoid heart disease who undergo hepatic resection have decreased cardiac progression and improved prognosis. Eligible patients should be considered for hepatic surgery Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  10. Decline in mortality from heart disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Sjøl, Anette

    1995-01-01

    Mortality rates in Denmark from ischemic heart diseases (IHD), other heart diseases and unknown causes are presented for the period 1968-92. In all age groups, mortality from IHD is higher at the beginning of the period than at the end. For other heart disease, the plot of the mortality rate is U......-shaped for the age groups 65-84 and > or = 85, but first decreases and is then constant for the age group 30-64. There are an increasing number of deaths from symptomatic heart disease. For the group of unknown causes, the rates are increasing for all sex and age groups. The relationship between deaths from...

  11. Study the relationship between adiponectin and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hui Yang; Li-Xin Zhao; Yan-Hong Lu; Xiao-Jun Li; Jun Shi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study whether adiponectin in serum of patients with coronary heart disease is reduced, and compare with the test results in total cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), blood glucose (GLU), C-reactive protein (CRP). Method: We selected 80 cases of coronary heart disease patients as the experimental group, 50 healthy subjects as control group. The coronary heart disease group compared with the control group, we know the changes of adiponectin in coronary heart disease group and compared coronary heart disease group with control group in test results of blood lipid, blood glucose, C-reactive protein. Results: Adiponectin in coronary heart disease group was (0.47±0.09) mg/L, which decreased significantly comparing to control group’s level (t=-18.4, P<0.001), HDL-C in coronary heart disease group was (1.24±0.04) mmol/L, which decreased significantly comparing to control group’s level (t=-27.67, P<0.001). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: The level’s adiponectin in patients of coronary heart disease dropped, which lead to hypoadiponectinemia, Hypoadiponectinemia may be one of the risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  12. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS......: During a period of 2 years, 3587 patients admitted to hospital because of heart failure were included in this study. All patients were examined by echocardiography and the presence of AF was recorded. Follow-up was available for 8 years. Twenty four percent of those discharged alive from hospital had AF...... without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  13. A vital role for complement in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena; Espevik, Terje; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne; Mollnes, Tom E; Hovland, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Heart diseases are common and significant contributors to worldwide mortality and morbidity. During recent years complement mediated inflammation has been shown to be an important player in a variety of heart diseases. Despite some negative results from clinical trials using complement inhibitors, emerging evidence points to an association between the complement system and heart diseases. Thus, complement seems to be important in coronary heart disease as well as in heart failure, where several studies underscore the prognostic importance of complement activation. Furthermore, patients with atrial fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement system is crucial for the protozoa-host interaction. Thus, complement activation appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of a diverse range of cardiac conditions. Determination of the exact role of complement in the various heart diseases will hopefully help to identify patients that might benefit from therapeutic complement intervention. PMID:25037633

  14. Transcriptional atlas of cardiogenesis maps congenital heart disease interactome

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xing; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Hartjes, Katherine A.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Olson, Timothy M; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian heart development is built on highly conserved molecular mechanisms with polygenetic perturbations resulting in a spectrum of congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, knowledge of cardiogenic ontogeny that regulates proper cardiogenesis remains largely based on candidate-gene approaches. Mapping the dynamic transcriptional landscape of cardiogenesis from a genomic perspective is essential to integrate the knowledge of heart development into translational applications that accelerat...

  15. Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Their Association With Hospital Mortality Among Patients With First Myocardial Infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction)

    OpenAIRE

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertens...

  16. Data on the lipoprotein (a), coronary atherosclerotic burden and vulnerable plaque phenotype in angiographic obstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Chin, Diana; Scalone, Giancarla; Panebianco, Mario; Abbolito, Sofia; Cosentino, Nicola; Jacoangeli, Francesca; Refaat, Hesham; Gallo, Giovanna; Salerno, Gerardo; Volpe, Massimo; Crea, Filippo; De Biase, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    Lipoprotein Lp(a) represents an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, its association with CAD burden and lipid rich plaques prone to rupture in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) still remains unknown. These data aim to investigate the association among serum Lipoprotein(a) (Lpa) levels, coronary atherosclerotic burden and features of culprit plaque in patients with ACS and obstructive CAD. For his reason, a total of 500 ACS patients were enrolled for the angiographic cohort and 51 ACS patients were enrolled for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) cohort. Angiographic CAD severity was assessed by Sullivan score and by Bogaty score including stenosis score and extent index, whereas OCT plaque features were evaluated at the site of the minimal lumen area and along the culprit segment. In the angiographic cohort, Lp(a) was a weak independent predictor of Sullivan score (p30 md/dl) compared to patients with lower Lp(a) levels (<30 md/dl) exhibited a higher prevalence of lipidic plaque at the site of the culprit stenosis (P=0.02), a wider lipid arc (p=0.003) and a higher prevalence of thin-cap fibroatheroma (p=0.004). PMID:27158659

  17. Serum homocysteine as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Homocysteine (Hcy) is an intermediate formed during the catabolism of sulphur containing essential amino acid, methionine and Less than one percent of tHcy is found as the free form. Development of atherosclerotic changes and thrombo-embolism are common features in patients with homocysteinuria. This study was conducted to assess the relationship of Hcy and coronary heart disease (CHD) in our population. Methods: The cross-sectional analytical study was carried out at the Department of Biochemistry, Hazara University Mansehra and Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad. A total of 80 subjects were included in this study and were divided into 2 groups. Cases Group consisted of 40 patients who had confirmed Myocardial Infarction (MI) coming for routine follow-up (first re-visit) after the acute attack. Control Group consisted of 40 matching healthy individuals. Demographic data including age, gender, dietary habits, height and weight as documented in preformed proforma. Blood pressure was taken in sitting posture. Serum total Hcy were measured. Data was entered into computer using SPSS 16.0 for analysis. Results: The mean age of the cases was 59.68+-8.06 (30-70) years and that of the controls was 58.93+-6.93 (48-76) years. The average BMI of cases was 27.70+-3.61 Kg/m2 and of the controls was 25.66+-2.98 Kg/m2. This increase of BMI from controls to cases was statistically significant (p<0.050). The mean systolic BP of the cases was 153.88+-11.90 mmHg in comparison with 142.62+-11.65 mmHg for the controls. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Mean tHcy level of the cases was 17.15+-4.45 micro mol/l while that of controls was 12.20+-2.53 micro mol/l. There is a statistically significant difference between cases and controls with respect to Hcy levels (p<0.001). Conclusion: Plasma tHcy level has a powerful predictor value of CHD and routine screening for elevated Hcy concentrations is advisable especially for individuals who manifest

  18. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, ...

  19. The Hippo pathway in heart development, regeneration, and diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qi; LI Li; Zhao, Bin; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The heart is the first organ formed during mammalian development. A properly sized and functional heart is vital throughout the entire lifespan. Loss of cardiomyocytes due to injury or diseases leads to heart failure, which is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, regenerative potential of the adult heart is very limited. The Hippo pathway is a recently identified signaling cascade that plays an evolutionarily conserved role in organ size control by inhibiting cell pr...

  20. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A;

    2004-01-01

    intake had a lower CHD incidence. Compared with subjects who did not take supplemental vitamin C, those who took >700 mg supplemental vitamin C/d had a relative risk of CHD incidence of 0.75 (0.60, 0.93; P for trend risk......BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...... of antioxidant vitamins and CHD risk. DESIGN: A cohort study pooling 9 prospective studies that included information on intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids, and vitamin C and that met specific criteria was carried out. During a 10-y follow-up, 4647 major incident CHD events occurred in 293 172 subjects who were...

  1. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael A

    2014-03-11

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. PMID:24620001

  2. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  3. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  4. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential. PMID:26957336

  5. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ineke Nederend; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Blom, Nico A; Arend D. J. ten Harkel

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that...

  6. Coconut Atrium in Long-Standing Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Onishi, Takahisa; Idei, Yuka; Otsui, Kazunori; Iwata, Sachiyo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ozawa, Toru; Domoto, Koji; Takei, Asumi; Inamoto, Shinya; Inoue, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 76 Final Diagnosis: Rheumatic valvular heart disease Symptoms: Breathlessness and leg edema Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Medical treatment for heart failure Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Complete calcification of the left atrium (LA) is called “coconut atrium”, which decreases the compliance of LA, leading to the elevation of LA pressure that is transmitted to the right-side of the heart. The pathogenesis of LA calcification in patients with rhe...

  7. Acute non-atherosclerotic ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in an adolescent with concurrent hemoglobin H-Constant Spring disease and polycythemia vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekarat Rattarittamrong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a major complication of polycythemia vera (PV and also a well-known complication of thalassemia. We reported a case of non-atherosclerotic ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI in a 17- year-old man with concurrent post-splenectomized hemoglobin H-Constant Spring disease and JAK2 V617F mutation-positive PV. The patient initially presented with extreme thrombocytosis (platelet counts greater than 1,000,000/μL and three months later developed an acute STEMI. Coronary artery angiography revealed an acute clot in the right coronary artery without atherosclerotic plaque. He was treated with plateletpheresis, hydroxyurea and antiplatelet agents. The platelet count decreased and his symptoms improved. This case represents the importance of early diagnosis, awareness of the increased risk for thrombotic complications, and early treatment of PV in patients who have underlying thalassemia with marked thrombocytosis.

  8. 3D-NMR angiography of atherosclerotic carotid and vertebral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography was performed as part of a routine brain examination, and to assess the potential of MRA as a noninvasive modality to display the peripheral carotid and the vertebral artery in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. (author). 8 refs.; 3 figs

  9. Aortopathy associated with congenital heart disease: A current literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients born with congenital heart disease, dilatation of the aorta is a frequent feature at presentation and during follow-up after surgical intervention. This review provides an overview of the pathologies associated with aortopathy, and discusses the current knowledge on pathophysiology, evolution, and treatment guidelines of the aortic disease associated with congenital heart defects

  10. Aortopathy associated with congenital heart disease: A current literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien Francois

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients born with congenital heart disease, dilatation of the aorta is a frequent feature at presentation and during follow-up after surgical intervention. This review provides an overview of the pathologies associated with aortopathy, and discusses the current knowledge on pathophysiology, evolution, and treatment guidelines of the aortic disease associated with congenital heart defects.

  11. Nonfasting glucose, ischemic heart disease, and myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; McCarthy, Mark I;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI).......The purpose of this study was to test whether elevated nonfasting glucose levels associate with and cause ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI)....

  12. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G;

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear.......Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  13. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David;

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  14. Aortopathy associated with congenital heart disease: a current literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Katrien Francois

    2015-01-01

    In patients born with congenital heart disease, dilatation of the aorta is a frequent feature at presentation and during follow-up after surgical intervention. This review provides an overview of the pathologies associated with aortopathy, and discusses the current knowledge on pathophysiology, evolution, and treatment guidelines of the aortic disease associated with congenital heart defects.

  15. Interleukin-18 Gene Polymorphism in Patients with and without Atherosclerotic Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    A Ghaderi; Erfani, N.; MR Haghshenas; MJ ZibaeeNezhad; AR Abdi; Shayan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Background:Several studies have revealed that inflammation plays an important role in development of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and its other manifestations. IL-18 is a pleiotropic cytokine that enhances Th1( T helper 1) or Th2( T helper 2) immune response depending on its cytokine milieu and genetic background. It strongly induces formation of plaques in patients with CAD. Variations in the IL-18 gene found to influence both levels of IL-18 and clinical outcomes in individuals with histor...

  16. Incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xue-yong; LI Xiao-feng; L(U) Xiao-dong; LIU Ying-long

    2009-01-01

    Background The incidence of congenital heart disease has been studied in developed countries for many years, but rarely in the mainland of China. Fetal echocardiographic screening for congenital heart disease was first performed in Beijing in the early 2000s, but the impact was not clear. The current study was undertaken to determine the incidence of congenital heart disease in Beijing, China and to estimate the impact of fetal echocardiography on the incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease.Methods The study involved all infants with congenital heart disease among the 84 062 total births in Beijing during the period of January 1 and December 31, 2007. An echocardiographic examination was performed on every baby suspected to have congenital heart disease, prenatally or/and postnatally.Results A total of 686 infants were shown to have congenital heart disease among 84 062 total births. The overall incidence was 8.2/1000 total births. Mothers of 128 of 151 babies diagnosed prenatally were chosen to terminate the pregnancy. Two of the 151 infants died in utero. A specific lesion was identified for each infant and the frequencies of lesions were determined for each class of infants (total births, stillbirths and live births). The incidence of congenital heart disease in stillbirths and live births was 168.8/1000 and 6.7/1000, respectively. The difference between the incidence of total birth and the incidence of live birth was statistically significant (P<0.001).Conclusions The incidence of liveborn congenital heart disease in Beijing is within the range reported in developed countries. Fetal echocardiography reduce significantly the incidence of livebom congenital heart disease.

  17. Impact of chemical elements on heart failure progression in coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherniavsky Aleksander

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The high prevalence, poor prog-nosis of patients with coronary heart disease with chronic heart failure determine the relevance of the study pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of this pathology. Researches of the trace element metabolism in the myocardium are scarce. With this in mind, an attempt was made to analyze the relationship of macro and trace elements metabolism with the functional state of the myocardium in coronary heart disease patients against the background of chronic heart failure progression. Methods and Results. To study the content of the chemical elements (S, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr in the myocardium of 43 patients with coronary heart disease, use was made of X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation. While doing autopsy, 43 samples of left ventricle myocardium were taken off the cardiac callosity. Myocardium samples were subjected to histological examination. Dynamics of macro and trace elements content in the myocardium reflects the development of energy deficiency and disorders of myocardial microcirculation with a decrease of systolic myocardial function. Structural/functional disorders in the myocardium of the left ventricle of patients with coronary heart disease that accompany the progression of chronic heart failure are associated with profound changes of metabolic processes in heart muscle. Conclusions. The structural/ functional changes accompanying chronic heart failure progression are associated with wide variations of metabolic processes in the myocardium, which could be evaluated by the content of chemical elements in tissue.

  18. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  19. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes

  20. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Characterize Inflammatory Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fei; Dai, Xiaohu; Beebe, Tyler; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Predicting metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions has remained an unmet clinical need. We hereby developed an electrochemical strategy to characterize the inflammatory states of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Using the concentric bipolar microelectrodes, we sought to demonstrate distinct Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (...

  1. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate as a marker for coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayan J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Josef YayanDepartment of Internal Medicine, Vinzentius Hospital, Landau, GermanyBackground: Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction frequently present without evidence of cardiac-specific heart enzymes by laboratory analysis or specific pathologic electrocardiogram findings. The current study analyzed the efficacy of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate as an additional potential indicator for coronary heart disease, the aim being to enable quicker identification of patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction so that they can be more rapidly treated.Methods: Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction who had undergone a heart catheter examination were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute coronary heart disease was made by the physician who performed coronary angiography. Patients without coronary heart disease were used as a control group. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was measured in all patients. Patients with angina pectoris or myocardial infarction and an inflammatory or tumor disease were excluded.Results: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in 79 (58.09% of 136 patients; 69 (50.74% patients (95% confidence interval ±8.4%, 42.34%–59.14% had coronary heart disease and a prolonged erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was prolonged in ten (7.35% patients (95% confidence interval ±4.39%, 2.96%–11.74% without coronary heart disease by coronary angiography. The specificity of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate for coronary heart disease was 70.59% and the sensitivity was 67.65%.Conclusion: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be a useful additional diagnostic criterion for coronary heart disease.Keywords: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, coronary angiography

  2. From Heart Health Promotion to Chronic Disease Prevention: Contributions of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Robinson, MA

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The Canadian Heart Health Initiative began in 1987 as an 18-year undertaking to address the epidemic of cardiovascular disease in Canada. There is growing recognition in Canada of the need for an integrated approach to prevention that addresses common risks for many chronic diseases. Context Research and intervention activities of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative have shifted toward chronic disease prevention and health promotion. This study explores the contributions of the Canadian Heart Health Initiative to document how single-disease strategies can evolve into integrated chronic disease prevention efforts. Methods Key informant interviews were conducted with project researchers and health system stakeholders from seven Canadian Heart Health Initiative provincial projects. A review of provincial health policy documents was also performed.Consequences Findings indicate that the Canadian Heart Health Initiative projects contributed to public health capacity development, including coalition and partnership building, and development of health knowledge and resource infrastructure. The Canadian Heart Health Initiative projects helped put chronic disease prevention issues onto local and provincial health agendas and provided community-based models to help develop public health policies. Interpretation Experience with the Canadian Heart Health Initiative shows the need for integrated health programs to build on existing infrastructure. Other requirements for integrated chronic disease prevention programs include shared goals, partnerships at various policy levels and in multiple sectors, ongoing information sharing, and funding that is flexible and long-term.

  3. Computed tomography for imaging of pediatric congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital abnormalities of development. In general, echocardiography and cardiac catheter angiography are considered the gold standard for the evaluation of congenital heart disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has become an important supplementary imaging modality because of its ability to provide an accurate morphological and functional evaluation. The role of cardiac computed tomography in the imaging of patients with congenital heart disease is becoming increasingly more important due to the development of low radiation dose protocols and improvements in the spatial and temporal resolution. In the preoperative depiction and follow-up after surgical repair of congenital heart diseases, cardiac computed tomography provides detailed information of the heart, the venous and arterial pulmonary circulation as well as systemic arteries. This article reviews the technical aspects of cardiac CT and the modification of examination protocols according to the expected pathology and patient age. The potentials and limitations of the various radiation dose reduction strategies are outlined. (orig.)

  4. Role of Wnt signaling in heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Vasco Sequeira

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure has a major social-economic impact in our society. Despite major advances in the understanding of this pathology, the mechanisms of its development, as well as its pathophysiology, remain unclear. Therefore, it is our priority to clarify how extra- and intracellular factors are able to modulate heart function. Several pathways and/or factors had already been associated with different phases of heart failure development namely TGF-β, IGF, calcineurin, several GPCRs...

  5. Potential therapeutic role of microRNAs in ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroli, Annalisa; Cardillo, Maria Teresa; Galea, Roberto; Biasucci, Luigi M

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most important cause of death and illness in the western world. Atherosclerosis constitutes the single most important contributor to CVD. miRNAs are small ribonucleic acids (RNAs) that negatively regulate gene expression on the post-transcriptional level by inhibiting mRNA translation or promoting mRNA degradation. Several studies demonstrated that miRNAs dysregulation have a key role in the disease process and, focusing on atherosclerotic disease, in every step of plaque formation and destabilization. These data suggest a possible therapeutic application of miRNA modulation, in particular dysregulated miRNAs can be modulated in disease process antagonizing miRNAs up-regulated and increasing miRNAs down-regulated. In this review we summarize the miRNA therapeutic techniques (antimiR, mimics, sponges, masking, and erasers) underlining their therapeutic advantages and evaluating their risks and challenges. In particular, the use of miRNA modulators as a therapeutic approach opens a novel and fascinating area of intervention in the therapy of ischemic heart disease. PMID:23490563

  6. [Prevention of coronary heart disease: smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, T; Meinertz, T

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Germany, claiming over 110,000 lives a year because it directly increases the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, emphysema and a variety of cancers. The overwhelming majority of smokers begin tobacco use before they reach adulthood. Among those young people who smoke, the average age is now 13-14. In Germany, about 39% of male and 31% of female adults (age 18-60 years) continue to smoke, despite information about the unequivocally negative health consequences of smoking. The exact mechanisms of smoking-related vascular disease are not yet known. Smoking causes acute hemodynamic alterations such as increase in heart rate, systematic and coronary vascular resistance, myocardial contractility, and myocardial oxygen demand. These short-term effects could lower the ischemic threshold in smokers with coronary artery disease and contribute to the increased risk for acute cardiovascular events. Endothelial damage is thought to be an initiating event in atherosclerosis and early studies have demonstrated that long-term smoking has direct toxic effects with structural changes of human endothelial cells. Recent research has shown the importance of the functional role of the endothelium in regulating vascular tone, platelet-endothelial interactions, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation via synthesis and release of a variety of substances such as nitric oxide. There is strong evidence that smoking leads to endothelial dysfunction mainly by increased inactivation of nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals. Smoking also increases oxidative modification of LDL and is associated with lower HDL plasma levels. Smoking induces a systemic inflammatory response with increased leukocyte count and elevation of the C-reactive protein level. Importantly, the prothrombotic effects of smoking have been repeatedly demonstrated to cause alterations in platelet function, imbalance of

  7. Questions and Answers: The NIH Trial of EDTA Chelation Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Trial of EDTA Chelation Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease Preliminary results from the Trial to Assess Chelation ... and complete it. Study Background What is coronary heart disease? Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  8. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. PMID:25690504

  9. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Zakirova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. Endothelial vasodilating function was assessed by endothelium-dependent (EDVD and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDVD of brachial artery. Vasoconstrictive function was assessed by the level of endothelin (ET-1. Endothelial adhesive function was evaluated by plasma concentration of intracellular adhesion molecules – JCAM-1, VCAM-1 and Е-selectin.Results. Normal EDVD and EIDVD were observed in patients with AP of FC-II. The more severe FC of AP the more prominent endothelial vasodilating dysfunction was revealed as well as the higher levels of ET-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules. Patients with AP of FC-IV had hyperexpression of JCAM-1, VCAM-1, Е-selectin and ET-1 and low levels of EDVD and EIDVD.Conclusion. Progression of IHD related with growing endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction.

  10. Right ventricular failure in congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Kuk Cho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite developments in surgical techniques and other interventions, right ventricular (RV failure remains an important clinical problem in several congenital heart diseases (CHD. RV function is one of the most important predictors of mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. RV failure is a progressive disorder that begins with myocardial injury or stress, neurohormonal activation, cytokine activation, altered gene expression, and ventricular remodeling. Pressure-overload RV failure caused by RV outflow tract obstruction after total correction of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary stenosis, atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, and systemic RV failure after the Fontan operation. Volume-overload RV failure may be caused by atrial septal defect, pulmonary regurgitation, or tricuspid regurgitation. Although the measurement of RV function is difficult because of many reasons, the right ventricle can be evaluated using both imaging and functional modalities. In clinical practice, echocardiography is the primary mode for the evaluation of RV structure and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used for evaluating RV structure and function. A comprehensive evaluation of RV function may lead to early and optimal management of RV failure in patients with CHD.

  11. Curbing Inflammation in the Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto B. Evora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modern concept considers acute coronary syndrome as an autoinflammatory disorder. From the onset to the healing stage, an endless inflammation has been presented with complex, multiple cross-talk mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, and organ levels. Inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction has been well documented since the 1940s and 1950s, including increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the C-reactive protein analysis, and the determination of serum complement. It is surprising to note, based on a wide literature overview including the following 30 years (decades of 1960, 1970, and 1980, that the inflammatory acute myocardium infarction lost its focus, virtually disappearing from the literature reports. The reversal of this historical process occurs in the 1990s with the explosion of studies involving cytokines. Considering the importance of inflammation in the pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease, the aim of this paper is to present a conceptual overview in order to explore the possibility of curbing this inflammatory process.

  12. Radionuclide angiocardiography in cogential heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In detecting, localizing and quantitating cardiac shunts, radionuclide angiocardiography has been known to be a simple and safe method compared with oxymetry method. To ascertain the availability of the results obtained by radionuclide angiocardiography for the evaluation of patients with cardiac shunt, author compared the Qp/Qs ratios(pulmonary to systemic flow ratios) obtained by radionuclide angiocardiography with the results of oximetry method in 40 patients with left to right shunt, and also compared the results of radionuclide angiocardiography examined before and after shunt operation in 8 patients. The results were as follows: 1) Of the 161 patients examined radionuclide angiocardiography, 98 were thought to have cardiac shunts: right to left shunt in 27, left to right shunt in 71. Of the 71 patients who had left to right shunt, 40 who were examined with both radionuclide angiocardiography and oxymetry has following congenital heart disease: VSD in 21, ASD in 9 and PDA in 10. 2) Comparison of Qp/Qs ratios obtained during radionuclide angiocardiography and oxymetry revealed good correlation(linear regression analysis yielded correlation coefficient of 0.80) in 32 patients whose Qp/Qs ratio obtained during oxymetry were below 3.0, but very poor correlation in 8 patients whose Qp/Qs ratios were above 3.0 3) Radionuclide angiocardiography is a relatively safe and simple method in postoperative evaluation of patients with cardiac shunt. (Author)

  13. Radionuclide Angiocardiography in Cogenital Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In detecting, localizing and quantitating cardiac shunts, radionuclide angiocardiography has been known to be a simple and safe method compared with oxymetry method. To ascertain the availability of the results obtained by radionuclide angiocardiography for the evaluation of patients with cardiac shunt, author compared the Qp/Qs ratios (pulmonary to systemic flow ratios) obtained by radionuclide angiocardiography with the results of oxymetry method in 40 patients with left to right shunt, and also compared the results of radionuclide angiocardiography examined before and after shunt operation in 8 patients. The results were as follows: 1) Of the 161 patients examined radionuclide angiocardiography, 98 were thought to have cardiac shunts: right to left shunt in 27, left to right shunt in 71. Of the 71 patients who had left to right shunt, 40 who were examined with both radionuclide angiocardiography and oxymetry had following congenital heart disease: VSD in 21, ASD in 9 and PDA in 10. 2) Comparison of Qp/Qs ratios obtained during radionuclide angiocardiography and oxymetry revealed good correlation (linear regression analysis yielded correlation coefficient of 0.80) in 32 patients whose Qp/Qs ratio obtained during oxymetry were below 3.0, but very poor correlation in 8 patients whose Qp/Qs ratios were above 3.0. 3) Radionuclide angiocardiography is a relatively safe and simple method in postoperative evaluation of patients with cardiac shunt.

  14. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD.Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia.Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families.Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%.Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis.

  15. Familial congenital heart disease in Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Endah Rahayuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD may occur in several members of a family. Studies have shown that familial genetic factor play a role in CHD. Objective To identify familial recurrences of CHD in families with at least one member treated for CHD in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung Indonesia. Methods In this descriptive study, subjects were CHD patients hospitalized or treated from January 2005 to December 2011. We constructed family pedigrees for five families. Results During the study period, there were 1,779 patients with CHD. We found 5 families with 12 familial CHD cases, consisting of 8 boys and 4 girls. Defects observed in these 12 patients were tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, persistent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, tricuspid atresia, pulmonary stenosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Persistent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently observed defect (4 out of 12 subjects. None of the families had a history of consanguinity. The recurrence risk of CHD among siblings was calculated to be 0.67%, and the recurrence risk of CHD among cousins was 0.16%. Conclusion Familial CHD may indicate the need for genetic counseling and further pedigree analysis. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:173-6.

  16. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  17. The current status of primary prevention in coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pater Cornel

    2001-01-01

    Abstract During the second part of the twentieth century, research advances caused a substantial decline in the rate of coronary heart disease. The decline lasted from the mid-1960s until the early 1990s and occurred primarily in Western countries. However, an unfavourable trend in coronary heart disease related mortality has gradually developed during the 1990s, with cardiovascular diseases anticipated to remain the main cause of overall mortality for the foreseeable future. The present pape...

  18. Drug-induced valvular heart disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejak, Michel; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Numerous reports have shown an unquestionable association between fibrotic valve disease and the following drugs: ergot alkaloids (such as methysergide and ergotamine), ergot-derived dopaminergic agonists (such as pergolide and cabergoline) and drugs metabolized into norfenfluramine (such as fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine and benfluorex). This review focuses on different aspects of drug-induced valvular heart disease: historical background; echocardiographic features; different drugs recognized as being responsible for valvular heart disease; and pathophysiology. PMID:23769407

  19. IgM antibody level against proinflammatory bacterial peptidoglycan is inversely correlated with extent of atherosclerotic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.O. Nijhuis; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda); M.J. Melief; A.H. Schoneveld (Arjan); D.P.V. de Kleijn (Dominique); J.D. Laman (Jon); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Atherosclerosis may lead to acute clinical events by rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. Previously, we demonstrated that peptidoglycan (PGN), a major cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria that induces production of proinflammatory cytokines through TLR2 an

  20. Estimating clinical morbidity due to ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure: the future rise of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Bonneux, Luc; Barendregt, Jan,; Meeter, K.J.; Bonsel, Gouke; Maas, Paul

    1994-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES. Many developed countries have seen declining mortality rates for heart disease, together with an alleged decline in incidence and a seemingly paradoxical increase in health care demands. This paper presents a model for forecasting the plausible evolution of heart disease morbidity. METHODS. The simulation model combines data from different sources. It generates acute coronary event and mortality rates from published data on incidences, recurrences, and lethalities of d...

  1. EVALUATION OF PREGNANCY OUTCOME IN HEART DISEASE COMPLICATING PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahalakshmi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To evaluate the maternal and foetal outcome in pregnancies complicated by heart disease. METHODS A retrospective evaluation of 62 pregnant cardiac patients, who were managed in a tertiary care centre over a period of one year (January 2015 to December 2015, regarding the incidence, aetiology of cardiac disease, obstetric and cardiac complications, maternal and foetal outcome. RESULTS The incidence of heart disease in pregnancy in the present study is 0.9%. Rheumatic heart disease (Mitral stenosis is still the predominant cause (44 cases, 71% of heart disease in pregnancy followed by congenital heart disease (11 cases, 17.7%. In miscellaneous group, peripartum cardiomyopathy (9 cases, 14.5% is the leading cause. Maternal and foetal outcome was poor in NYHA functional class III and IV. Most of the women delivered vaginally (33 cases, 51.6%, spontaneous in onset and at term gestation. However, 12 cases (37.5% delivered prematurely; 30.7% of cases had cardiac complications during the present study. Maternal mortality was high (11.3%. There were 7 cases of maternal death. All of these patients were in NYHA class III and IV, unbooked, presenting for the first time and with the complications. CONCLUSION The study concludes pregnancy in women with heart disease not only poses a risk of maternal mortality and also morbidity due to heart failure, stroke and cardiac arrhythmias and foetus is also affected with prematurity, Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR and risk of perinatal mortality.

  2. Comparative assessment of the diets of healthy individuals, subjects with preclinical coronary heart disease and patients with severe heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    92 males aged 26 to 55 (28 healthy individuals, 45 persons with preclinical coronary heart disease and 19 patients with functional class 1-2 coronary heart disease) were examined to study the peculiarities and dietary patterns of persons with a high physical working capacity and having no typical clinical signs of the disease. All persons were subjected to a complex examination which included questionnarire, myocardial scintigraphy with 201Tl at a maximum physical loading, echocardiography, coronaroangiography. Certain dietary peculiarities are established in persons with preclinical coronary heart disease

  3. Pregnancy in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defects. Major advances in open-heart surgery have led to rapidly evolving cohorts of adult survivors and the majority of affected women now survive to childbearing age. The risk of cardiovascular complications during pregnancy and peripartum depend

  4. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... minutes of stretching or moving around to warm up your muscles and heart before exercising. Allow time to cool ... weight training may improve your strength and help your muscles ... you. But keep in mind they do not help your heart like aerobic ...

  5. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance In Adults With Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Partington, Sara L.; Valente, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of adults with congenital heart disease are referred for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the congenital heart anatomy, prior surgical interventions, and the development of an imaging focus for each individual patient plays a crucial role when performing a successful cardiac magnetic resonance imaging examination. The following manuscript focuses on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging considerations of three specific conotruncal congenital heart lesions: tetr...

  6. Effects of congenital heart disease on brain development

    OpenAIRE

    McQuillen, Patrick S.; Goff, Donna A.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Brain and heart development occurs simultaneously in the fetus with congenital heart disease. Early morphogenetic programs in each organ share common genetic pathways. Brain development occurs across a more protracted time-course with striking brain growth and activity-dependent formation and refinement of connections in the third trimester. This development is associated with increased metabolic activity and the brain is dependent upon the heart for oxygen and nutrient delivery. Congenital h...

  7. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Trevisan; Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa; Dayane Bohn Koshiyama; Tatiana Diehl Zen; Giorgio Adriano Paskulin; Paulo Ricardo G Zen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of les...

  8. Challenges Facing Nurse-Led Disease Management for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Paul L; Sisk, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    The positive results of several randomized controlled trials of nurse-led disease management (DM) for heart failure have led to considerable growth in the use of DM programs in such patients. However, many aspects of the protocols used in randomized trials of DM for heart failure have differed, and there are still significant gaps in our knowledge of what makes DM work and for whom. Four important unresolved issues are: (i) what components of multifaceted DM protocols for heart failure are ef...

  9. Arterial hypertension, microalbuminuria, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S;

    2000-01-01

    , diabetes mellitus, and renal or urinary tract disease. Untreated arterial hypertension or borderline hypertension was present in 204 subjects, who were followed until 1993 by the National Hospital and Death Certificate Registers with respect to development of ischemic heart disease. During 1978 person...... hypertensive subjects. In 1983 and 1984, blood pressure, urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio, plasma total and HDL cholesterol levels, body mass index, and smoking status were obtained in a population-based sample of 2085 subjects, aged 30 to 60 years, who were free from ischemic heart disease......-years, 18 (9%) of the hypertensive subjects developed ischemic heart disease. Microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio above the upper decile (1.07 mg/mmol), was the strongest predictor of ischemic heart disease, with an unadjusted relative risk of 4.2 (95% CI 1.5 to 11.9, P=0...

  10. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S;

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope or...

  11. Relation of Serum Adiponectin Levels to Number of Traditional Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and All-Cause Mortality and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (from the Copenhagen City Heart Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Pedersen, Sune H;

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin exerts anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects and appears to protect against arteriosclerosis. Accordingly, an association between low concentrations of plasma adiponectin and cardiovascular (CV) disease has been demonstrated in several studies. In contrast, elevated plasma adi...... nonfatal myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke (n = 502). High adiponectin was inversely associated with an increasing number of traditional CV risk factors (p...... adiponectin has been associated with increased mortality and an increasing number of major adverse CV events (MACE). Because of these conflicting results, the true role of adiponectin remains to be elucidated. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we prospectively followed up 5,624 randomly selected men and...

  12. Identification of mouse heart transcriptomic network sensitive to various heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Eui; Park, Inju; Cha, Hyeseon; Rho, Seong-Hwan; Park, Woo Jin; Cho, Chunghee; Kim, Do Han

    2008-05-01

    Exploring biological systems from highly complex datasets is an important task for systems biology. The present study examined co-expression dynamics of mouse heart transcriptome by spectral graph clustering (SGC) to identify a heart transcriptomic network. SGC of microarray data produced 17 classified biological conditions (called condition spectrum, CS) and co-expression patterns by generating bi-clusters. The results showed dynamic co-expression patterns with a modular structure enriched in heart-related CS (CS-1 and -13) containing abundant heart-related microarray data. Consequently, a mouse heart transcriptomic network was constructed by clique analysis from the gene clusters exclusively present in the heart-related CS; 31 cliques were used for constructing the network. The participating genes in the network were closely associated with important cardiac functions (e. g., development, lipid and glycogen metabolisms). Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database indicates that mutations of the genes in the network induced serious heart diseases. Many of the tested genes in the network showed significantly altered gene expression in an animal model of hypertrophy. The results suggest that the present approach is critical for constructing a heart-related transcriptomic network and for deducing important genes involved in the pathogenesis of various heart diseases. PMID:18320566

  13. Acute Non-Atherosclerotic ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in an Adolescent with Concurrent Hemoglobin H-Constant Spring Disease and Polycythemia Vera

    OpenAIRE

    Ekarat Rattarittamrong; Lalita Norasetthada; Adisak Tantiworawit; Chatree Chai-Adisaksopha; Sasinee Hantrakool; Thanawat Rattanathammethee; Pimlak Charoenkwan

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis is a major complication of polycythemia vera (PV) and also a well-known complication of thalassemia. We reported a case of non-atherosclerotic ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in a 17- year-old man with concurrent post-splenectomized hemoglobin H-Constant Spring disease and JAK2 V617F mutation-positive PV. The patient initially presented with extreme thrombocytosis (platelet counts greater than 1,000,000/μL) and three months later developed an acute STEMI. Coronar...

  14. Progression of White Matter Lesion Volume and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Symptomatic Atherosclerotic Disease: The SMART-MR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Grool

    2011-01-01

    Results. Physical functioning (baseline: 44, 10th–90th percentile 29–55 improved, whereas mental functioning (baseline: 51, 10th–90th percentile 32–60 declined during followup. WML progression (highest quartile versus rest contributed to a stronger decline in mental functioning (B=−1.76, 95% CI −3.11 to −0.42, but did not influence changes in physical functioning. Conclusions. Progression of WML volume contributes to a decline in mental functioning in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease.

  15. Concomitant atherosclerotic disease detected by whole-body MR angiography in relation to coronary artery calcification in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) show a high prevalence for concomitant atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD). On the other hand, PAD seems to be an additional risk factor for cardiac events. We evaluated the correlation between arterial pathologies as found in whole-body MR angiography and coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and multislice CT (MSCT). Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-eight patients (161 men; 67 women) with suspicion for CAD/known CAD underwent whole-body contrast-enhanced MR angiography (wb-ce-MRA) and EBCT/MSCT. An atherosclerosis index was calculated for each patient Index = sum n=140wi with wi being the grading of the stenosis of the iten of 40 arteria segments (grade: 0 - no plaque; 1 - plaque - ≤ 50 % stenosis; 2 - > 50 % stenosis - ≤ 90 % stenosis; 3 - > 90 % stenosis - < 100 % stenosis; 4 - occlusion). Correlations between CAC and atherosclerosis index were performed. Results: Wb-ce MRA and CAC correlate only moderately in this population. An atherosclerosis index 8 renders a positive predictive value for a CAC 100 of 63.3 %. Conclusion: An atherosclerosis index as defined in this study does not fully correlate with the extent of CAD as revealed by catheter angiography or EBCT/MSCT, but it might theoretically mirror the increased risk by PAD. It thus might be a promising complementary parameter for the prediction of cardiac events. Future studies need to show its possible additional predictive impact.

  16. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-02-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of /sup 99m/Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure.

  17. Who Is at Risk for Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it will raise your blood pressure. Stress or Depression Stress may play a role in causing CHD. ... health. Share your story with other women on Facebook . The Heart Truth campaign offers a variety of ...

  18. Rheumatic heart disease in Tennessee: An overlooked diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shahana A; Exil, Vernat

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease, already a major burden in low- and middle-income countries, is becoming an emerging problem in high-income countries. Although acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease have almost been eradicated in areas with established economies, the emergence of this problem may be attributable to the migration from low-income to high-income settings. Between 2010 and 2012, we diagnosed a cluster of rheumatic heart disease cases in children from the Middle Tennessee area. The goal of this report is to increase awareness among clinicians as the incidence and prevalence of acute rheumatic fever remain relatively significant in large US metropolitan areas. Although acute rheumatic fever is seasonal, a high suspicion index may lead to the early diagnosis and prevention of its cardiac complications. Furthermore, screening procedures may be recommended for populations at risk for rheumatic heart disease in endemic areas, and active surveillance with echocardiography-based screening might become very important. PMID:27489643

  19. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from...... clinicians observing trends in the physical appearance of patients with ischemic heart disease. Following these early observations numerous epidemiological studies have reported these associations. Since the prevalences of both visible aging signs and ischemic heart disease have a strong correlation with......, and are mostly speculative. As a consequence of inconsistent findings and lack of mechanistic explanations for the observed associations with ischemic heart disease, consensus on the clinical importance of these visible aging signs has been lacking. The aim of this review is for each of the visible...

  20. Comparative analysis of myocardial revascularization methods for ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinkeev M.S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature is devoted to the comparative analysis of clinical researches of efficiency and frequency of complications after application of surgical and medicamentous methods of treatment of coronary heart disease.

  1. Mortality from Pulmonary Heart Disease in Japan, 1979–2006

    OpenAIRE

    Sakuma, Masahito; Nakanishi, Norifumi; Shirato, Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In Japan, there have been no reports on the time-trends of mortality rates from pulmonary heart disease without pulmonary embolism (PHD). Our aim was to examine the annual changes of mortality in Japan.

  2. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Cifková, R.; Lánská, V.; O'Flaherty, M.; Critchley, J.A.; Holub, J.; Janský, P.; Zvárová, Jana; Capewell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2014), s. 829-839. ISSN 2047-4873 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : coronary heart disease * Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA * coronary heart disease management * coronary heart disease mortality * coronary heart disease risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.319, year: 2014

  3. Self-Management of Heart Disease in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh-Hohnbaum, Anh-Luu T.; Marshall, Lia; Villa, Valentine M.; Lee, Gi

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association estimates that 81% of people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 years old or older. The leading risk health behaviors include physical inactivity, poor diet, smoking and binge drinking. Using the 2011–2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), this study looked at how self-management, which includes a plan developed by a medical professional and the confidence to manage one’s disease, may decrease negative risk behaviors in older adults. The presence ...

  4. Seasonality and Coronary Heart Disease Deaths in United States Firefighters

    OpenAIRE

    Mbanu, Ibeawuchi; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Peeples, Lynne; Stallings, Leonard A; Kales, Stefanos N

    2007-01-01

    United States firefighters have a high on-duty fatality rate and coronary heart disease is the leading cause. Seasonality affects the incidence of cardiovascular events in the general population, but its effects on firefighters are unknown. We statistically examined the seasonal and annual variation of all on-duty coronary heart disease deaths among US firefighters between 1994 and 2004 using the chi-square distribution and Poisson regression model of the monthly fatality counts. We also exam...

  5. Diagnostic Value of Fetal Echocardiography for Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ya-Fei; Zeng, Xian-Ling; Zhao, En-Fa; Lu, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prenatal diagnosis of fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) has been shown to have a significant effect on prenatal and postnatal management and outcomes. However, the factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy and which pregnant trimester is the most adaptive for fetal heart disease remain uncertain despite of extensive researches. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of echocardiography for detecting CHD and potential influence factors. We searched Chinese Biom...

  6. Hyperuricemia in Congenital Heart Diseases: True or Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    A Zavarehi; ATabib; M Meraji; P Nakhostin Davari; MY Arabi Mghadam; AA Shahmohamadi; SR Miri

    2006-01-01

    Background: Uric acid has been shown to be increased in congenital heart diseases (CHD) and Eisenmenger syndrome. The present study was undertaken to investigate the incidence of hyperuricemia, renal dysfunction and the exacerebrating factors in congenital heart diseases (CHD). Methods: We studied prospective cross sectionaly 500 patients, aged one month to 18 years. Blood for serum uric acid, hemoglobin (Hb), hamatocrit (Hct), arterial blood gas (ABG), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (...

  7. Sedentary lifestyle and state variation in coronary heart disease mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeager, K K; Anda, R F; Macera, C A; Donehoo, R S; Eaker, E D

    1995-01-01

    Using linear regression, the authors demonstrated a strong association between State-specific coronary heart disease mortality rates and State prevalence of sedentary lifestyle (r2 = 0.34; P = 0.0002) that remained significant after controlling for the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension, smoking, and overweight among the State's population. This ecologic analysis suggests that sedentary lifestyle may explain State variation in coronary heart disease mortality and reinforces the need to incl...

  8. Appetite suppressants and valvular heart disease - a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Background Although appetite suppressants have been implicated in the development of valvular heart disease, the exact level of risk is still uncertain. Initial studies suggested that as many as 1 in 3 exposed patients were affected, but subsequent research has yielded substantially different figures. Our objective was to systematically assess the risk of valvular heart disease with appetite suppressants. Methods We accepted studies involving obese patients treated with any of the following a...

  9. The Role of Septal Perforators and “Myocardial Bridging Effect” in Atherosclerotic Plaque Distribution in the Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Roleder, Marcin; Niedziela, Jacek; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Osadnik, Tadeusz; Głowacki, Jan; Mirota, Kryspin; Poloński, Lech

    2015-01-01

    Summary The distribution of atherosclerotic plaque burden in the human coronary arteries is not uniform. Plaques are located mostly in the left anterior descending artery (LAD), then in the right coronary artery (RCA), circumflex branch (LCx) and the left main coronary artery (LM) in a decreasing order of frequency. In the LAD and LCx, plaques tend to cluster within the proximal segment, while in the RCA their distribution is more uniform. Several factors have been involved in this phenomenon...

  10. Local blood pressure associates with the degree of luminal stenosis in patients with atherosclerotic disease in the middle cerebral artery

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yuanliang; Peng, Wenjia; Teng, Zhongzhao; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Hong, Bo; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying atherosclerotic ischemic events within the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is unclear. High structural stress induced by blood pressure might be a potential aetiology as plaque rupture occurs when such mechanical loading exceeds its material strength. To perform reliable analyses quantifying the mechanical loading within a plaque, the local blood pressure is needed. However, data on MCA blood pressure is currently lacking. In this study, the arterial pressure proximal to...

  11. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Ferrari, Roberto; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke

    2014-01-01

    minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... those without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients who had stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  12. [The role of chronic dental bacterial infections in the aetiopathogenesis of ischaemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypułkowska, Jadwiga; Lyszczarz, Robert; Błazowska, Katarzyna

    2002-01-01

    Chronic dental infections, even of low intensity, may cause the development of atherosclerotic changes in arteries, that lead to coronary heart disease. There are many risk factors for atherosclerosis, but the most important are endothelium function disturbances, platelets activation and oxidative changes of plasmatic lipoproteins. Among factors that can induce the epithelium lesions bacterial factor may play an important role. In consequence of the bacterial cell breakdown place the release of endotoxins takes, that lead directly to the damage of endothelial cells. Apart from this direct effect endotoxins activate the fagocytes releasing superoxide reactive radicals, that cause lesions of endothelium. Probably the most widespread chronic bacterial infections in human are the diseases of periodontium and teeth and their inflammatory complications. Oral cavity is colonized by 300-400 bacterial species. In the case of dental bacterial infections bacteriemia occurs after such procedures as tooth extraction, endodontic treatment, therapeutic and hygienic interventions on periodontal tissues. The results of many investigations show the relationship between the oral status (dental and periodontal diseases as chronic oral infections) and disorders of cardiovascular system. PMID:17474623

  13. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  14. Association of cardiac ausculatory findings with coronary heart disease mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet B. Croft

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Relationships between cardiac murmurs detected during physical examination and coronary heart disease mortality among the general population are not well described. Aims: To assess the relationship between cardiac murmurs detected during physical examination and coronary heart disease mortality. Methods and Results: This relationship was examined with Cox regression analyses of data from 7990 adults, aged 30–75 years, from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Mortality Study (1976–1992. Covariates included age, race, sex, history of CVD, diabetes, probable left ventricular hypertrophy, serum cholesterol, body mass index, blood pressure, and smoking status. During 16.8 follow-up years, there were 457 deaths from coronary heart disease (CHD (ICD-9 410–414 and 661 deaths from diseases of the heart (ICD-9 390–398, 402, 404, 410–414, 415–417, 420–429. A systolic murmur was present in 420 persons and a diastolic murmur was present in 56 persons at baseline. Persons with a heart murmur were at increased risk of death from CHD (relative risk=1.7, 95% confidence interval=1.2, 2.5 and from diseases of the heart (RR=2.2, 95% CI=1.6, 2.9 after multivariate adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Similar results were observed when murmur intensity (i.e., murmur grade was accounted for. Conclusions: These results suggest that the presence of a heart murmur may be associated with an increased risk for mortality from both CHD and diseases of the heart.

  15. Transplant coronary heart disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jentzer JC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacob C Jentzer,1 Gavin W Hickey,1 Sameer J Khandhar2,3 1Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn-Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV remains one of the leading causes of death and graft failure after heart transplantation. A variety of causes, including donor heart characteristics, recipient risk factors, and immune-mediated influences, are associated with developing CAV. In this review, we will focus on the pathophysiology of developing CAV and various methods to screen for this condition. The pathogenesis of CAV likely involves repeated injuries to the endothelium from a variety of factors such as cellular-mediated rejection, and alloimmune factors, including antibody-mediated injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury at time of transplant, cytomegalovirus infections, immunosuppression medications, systemic inflammation, and traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. Patients with significant CAV are often asymptomatic, and therefore early detection by routine screening prior to graft dysfunction is crucial. There are a variety of invasive, noninvasive, and blood tests that have been studied as screening methods, and we will discuss the role of each of these in this review article. Although some treatment regimens have been established for CAV, this is an area where further studies and research are necessary.Keywords: cardiac allograft vasculopathy, orthotopic heart transplantation, intra-vascular imaging

  16. Cereal grains and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truswell, A S

    2002-01-01

    Cereal grains and their products provide around 30% of total energy intake in British adults, (much more than any of the other major food groups). Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the largest single cause of death in Britain and many other Western countries. This review examines the question whether there is a relation between cereal consumption and CHD. Several of the nutrients in cereals have known potential for reducing risk factors for CHD: the linoleic acid, fibre, vitamin E, selenium and folate. Cereals also contain phytoestrogens of the lignan family and several phenolic acids with antioxidant properties. Processing generally reduces the content of these nutrients and bioprotective substances. Although cereals at the farm gate are very low in salt, processed cereal foods, eg bread and some breakfast cereals, are high-salt foods and thus could contribute to raising blood pressure. Human experiments have clearly shown that oat fibre tends to lower plasma total and LDL cholesterol but wheat fibre does not. Rice bran and barley may also lower cholesterol but most people do not eat enough barley to have an effect. Cereal foods with low glycaemic index such as pasta and oats are beneficial for people with diabetes and might lower plasma lipids. Between 1996 and 2001 an accumulation of five very large cohort studies in the USA, Finland and Norway have all reported that subjects consuming relatively large amounts of whole grain cereals have significantly lower rates of CHD. This confirms an earlier report from a small British cohort. The protective effect does not seem to be due to cholesterol-lowering. While cohort studies have shown this consistent protective effect of whole grain cereals, there has been (only one) randomised controlled secondary prevention trial of advice to eat more cereal fibre. In this there was no reduction of the rate of reinfarction. The trial had some weaknesses, eg there were eight different diets, compliance was not checked objectively

  17. Direct association between diet and the stability of human atherosclerotic plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Gonçalves; Elisavet Andersson Georgiadou; Sören Mattsson; Göran Skog; Luís Pedro; José Fernandes e Fernandes; Nuno Dias; Gunnar Engström; Jan Nilsson; Kristina Stenström

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean diet has been suggested to explain why coronary heart disease mortality is lower in southern than northern Europe. Dietary habits can be revealed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) measurement of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in biological tissues. To study if diet is associated with human plaque stability, atherosclerotic plaques from carotid endarterectomy on 56 patients (21 Portuguese and 35 Swedish) were analysed by IRMS and histology. Plaque components affect...

  18. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  19. Incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Böhm, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Worldwide, the numbers of women who have a pre-existing cardiovascular disease or develop cardiac problems during pregnancy are increasing and, due to the lack of evidenced-based data, this provides challenges for the treating physician. Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is a complex topic as women can present either pre- or post-partum, due to a pre-existing heart disease such as operated on or unoperated on congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, chronic hypertension, or familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Women often present with symptoms and signs of acute heart failure. On the other hand, there are diseases which are directly related to pregnancy, such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and peripartum cardiomyopathy, or where pregnancy increases risk of a disease as, for example, the risk of myocardial infarction. These diseases can have long-term implications to the life of the affected women and their families. There is, in particular, a paucity of data from developing countries of this unique disease pattern and its presentations. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the incidence and prevalence of pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease in women presenting pre- or post-partum. PMID:24459193

  20. Preventing Heart Disease - At Any Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... Smoking Tips for Friends and Family of Quitters Workplace Health Employer Resources Workplace Health Index Recognition & Awards ...

  1. Settling the 'Score' with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Technology and medicine forged a bond in 1986 when a group of dedicated NASA scientists, University of Southern California (USC) medical professors, and a Dutch cardiologist joined forces to prevent heart attacks, using ultrasound images of astronauts blood-flow patterns and the supercomputer depended upon to orchestrate the "Star Wars" Strategic Defense Initiative.

  2. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... for age-adjustment. What about race and Hispanic origin? Race and Hispanic origin are reported separately on ...

  3. Quantitative evaluation of lipid concentration in atherosclerotic plaque phantom by near-infrared multispectral angioscope at wavelengths around 1200 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a primary cause of critical ischemic diseases like heart infarction or stroke. A method that can provide detailed information about the stability of atherosclerotic plaques is required. We focused on spectroscopic techniques that could evaluate the chemical composition of lipid in plaques. A novel angioscope using multispectral imaging at wavelengths around 1200 nm for quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques was developed. The angioscope consists of a halogen lamp, an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) camera, 3 optical band pass filters transmitting wavelengths of 1150, 1200, and 1300 nm, an image fiber having 0.7 mm outer diameter, and an irradiation fiber which consists of 7 multimode fibers. Atherosclerotic plaque phantoms with 100, 60, 20 vol.% of lipid were prepared and measured by the multispectral angioscope. The acquired datasets were processed by spectral angle mapper (SAM) method. As a result, simulated plaque areas in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms that could not be detected by an angioscopic visible image could be clearly enhanced. In addition, quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaque phantoms based on the lipid volume fractions was performed up to 20 vol.%. These results show the potential of a multispectral angioscope at wavelengths around 1200 nm for quantitative evaluation of the stability of atherosclerotic plaques.

  4. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekatsu Yanai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To more fully understand the anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, future studies, preferably with larger numbers of subjects, will be performed.

  5. Congenital heart disease screening: which referral factors are most important

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the referral factors for fetal echocardiography which are associated with congenital cardiac defects in the fetus. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Radiology Department, CMH, Rawalpindi, from January 2007 to November 2010. Methodology: All patients referred for fetal echocardiography with one or more risk factors for the development of congenital heart disease, and those patients with incidental discovery of congenital heart disease on antenatal ultrasound were evaluated. Patients with no risk factors who were found to have normal fetal echocardiography were excluded from the study. Univariate logistic regression analysis was carried out for each variable. The variables with statistical significance of less than 0.05 were subjected to multivariate logistic regression. Fetal echocardiographic diagnosis was taken as the dependent variable and all other variables were the independent variables. Results: Two hundred and sixty four patients were evaluated by fetal echocardiography for congenital heart disease. The statistically significant factor was detection of congenital heart disease on routine ultrasound examination. Conclusion: A routine obstetric scan should include evaluation of the heart with four-chamber and base-of-heart views to exclude cardiac anomalies. A cardiac anomaly picked up on routine ultrasound scan is the most important indication for referral for fetal echocardiography. Fetal arrhythmias and echogenic focus in the left ventricle do not have a significant association with structural cardiac malformation. (author)

  6. Concomitant atherosclerotic disease detected by whole-body MR angiography in relation to coronary artery calcification in patients with coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seng, K.; Schlosser, T.; Barkhausen, J.; Ladd, S.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Breuckmann, F.; Geckeis, K.; Schmermund, A.; Erbel, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Abt. fuer Kardiologie, Westdeutsches Herzzentrum Essen; Budde, T.; Hoefs, C. [Krupp Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany). Abt. fuer Kardiologie

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) show a high prevalence for concomitant atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD). On the other hand, PAD seems to be an additional risk factor for cardiac events. We evaluated the correlation between arterial pathologies as found in whole-body MR angiography and coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and multislice CT (MSCT). Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-eight patients (161 men; 67 women) with suspicion for CAD/known CAD underwent whole-body contrast-enhanced MR angiography (wb-ce-MRA) and EBCT/MSCT. An atherosclerosis index was calculated for each patient Index = sum {sub n=1}{sup 40}w{sub i} with w{sub i} being the grading of the stenosis of the i{sup ten} of 40 arteria segments (grade: 0 - no plaque; 1 - plaque - {<=} 50 % stenosis; 2 - > 50 % stenosis - {<=} 90 % stenosis; 3 - > 90 % stenosis - < 100 % stenosis; 4 - occlusion). Correlations between CAC and atherosclerosis index were performed. Results: Wb-ce MRA and CAC correlate only moderately in this population. An atherosclerosis index 8 renders a positive predictive value for a CAC 100 of 63.3 %. Conclusion: An atherosclerosis index as defined in this study does not fully correlate with the extent of CAD as revealed by catheter angiography or EBCT/MSCT, but it might theoretically mirror the increased risk by PAD. It thus might be a promising complementary parameter for the prediction of cardiac events. Future studies need to show its possible additional predictive impact.

  7. Applications of cardiac MRI in pediatric heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the value of magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric heart diseases. Methods: Ninety-seven cases received cardiac MR scanning in this present study. The age range was 2 day to 13 years including 62 boys and 35 girls, the median age was 6 years. They were performed on h 5 T scanner with cardiac phased-array coil and VCG. Results: Eighty-five of the 97 cases were positive. Those positive findings included cardiomyopathy in 41 cases, congenital heart disease in 20 cases, constrictive pericarditis in 4 cases, pericardiac effusions with or without other cardiovascular diseases in 17 cases, cardiac tumor in 2 cases,thrombus in 3 cases and in 5 other cases. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI is an excellent imaging modality for the anatomical and functional abnormalities of pediatric heart diseases. (authors)

  8. Heart-lung transplantation for end-stage heart disease with Eisenmenger's syndrome: report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi; XIONG Mai; WANG Zhi-ping; YIN Sheng-li; WU Zhong-kai; XU Ying-qi; TANG Bai-yun; YAO Jian-ping; CHEN Guang-xian

    2009-01-01

    @@ From September 2006 to January 2007, 2 patients with end-staged heart and lung disease (congenital disease, Eisenmenger's syndrome, severe pulmonary artery hypertension and heart failure) underwent heart and lung transplantation (HLT) at the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.

  9. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  10. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Butterworth, Adam S; Freitag, Daniel F;

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied ...

  11. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J.A.; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, he...

  12. Heart disease in infants of diabetic mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Kulaylat, N.; Narchi, Hassib

    2000-01-01

    Congenital anomalies occur more commonly in infants born to diabetic mothers, and cardiac defects predominate. Although respiratory problems are also frequently found in those infants, they need to be differentiated from cardiovascular problems that such patients may also have, which include cardiovascular maladaptation to extra-uterine life, congenital heart defects and hypertrophic septal cardiomyopathy. A high index of suspicion is required as the specific management may vary and digoxin, ...

  13. The Role of Dermcidin Isoform 2: A Two-Faceted Atherosclerotic Risk Factor for Coronary Artery Disease and the Effect of Acetyl Salicylic Acid on It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwary Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and diabetes mellitus are considered to be two major atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD. A stress-induced protein identified to be dermcidin isoform 2 of Mr. 11 kDa from blood plasma of hypertensive persons when injected (0.1 μM in rabbits increased the systolic pressure by 77% and diastolic pressure by 45% over the controls within 2 h. Ingestion of acetyl salicylic acid (150 mg/70 kg by these subjects reduced systolic (130 mm Hg and diastolic pressures (80 mm Hg with reduction of plasma dermcidin level to normal ranges (9 nM. The protein was found to be a potent activator of platelet cyclooxygenase and inhibited insulin synthesis. Aspirin was found to reduce hypertension by reduction of plasma dermcidin level, neutralized the effect of cyclooxygenase, and restored the pancreatic insulin synthesis through NO synthesis. These results indicated that dermcidin could be a novel atherosclerotic risk factor for its hypertensive and diabetogenic effects.

  14. Normoxic and Hyperoxic Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cyanotic congenital heart disease comprises a diverse spectrum of anatomical pathologies. Common to all, however, is chronic hypoxia before these lesions are operated upon when cardiopulmonary bypass is initiated. A range of functional and structural adaptations take place in the chronically hypoxic heart, which, whilst protective in the hypoxic state, are deleterious when the availability of oxygen to the myocardium is suddenly improved. Conventional cardiopulmonary bypass delivers hyperoxic...

  15. Progress in gene therapy of dystrophic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Y.; Duan, D.

    2012-01-01

    The heart is frequently afflicted in muscular dystrophy. In severe cases, cardiac lesion may directly result in death. Over the years, pharmacological and/or surgical interventions have been the mainstay to alleviate cardiac symptoms in muscular dystrophy patients. Although these traditional modalities remain useful, the emerging field of gene therapy has now provided an unprecedented opportunity to transform our thinking/approach in the treatment of dystrophic heart disease. In fact, the pre...

  16. Accuracy of Pulse Oximetry in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Abbasi, Reza; Ajami, Gholam Hossein; BORZEE, Mohammad; Cheriki, Sirous; SOLTANI, Manuchehr

    2010-01-01

    Background: Detection of arterial oxygen saturation in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) can be helpful for their management. Methods: We compared oxygen saturation and heart rate detected by pulse oximeter with the data of cardiac catheterization in order to determine the reliability and pitfalls of pulse oximetry (PO) in pediatric patients with CHD. 110 patients with different cyanotic and acyanotic CHD who were referred for right and left sided cardiac catheterizat...

  17. Work stress and coronary heart disease: what are the mechanisms?

    OpenAIRE

    Chandola, Tarani; Britton, Annie,; Brunner, Eric; Hemingway, Harry; Malik, Marek; Kumari, Meena; Badrick, Ellena; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To determine the biological and behavioural factors linking work stress with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and results: A total of 10 308 London-based male and female civil servants aged 35–55 at phase 1 (1985–88) of the Whitehall II study were studied. Exposures included work stress (assessed at phases 1 and 2), and outcomes included behavioural risk factors (phase 3), the metabolic syndrome (phase 3), heart rate variability, morning rise in cortisol (phase 7), and incident...

  18. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Alievi Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months. Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001. The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042, child's age (P=0.001 and income per capita (P=0.019. Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up.

  19. “Mitochondrial remodeling” in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saotome M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Masao Saotome,1 György Hajnóczky,2 Hideki Katoh,1 Hiroshi Satoh,1 Hideharu Hayashi11Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan; 2Department of Pathology, Anatomy, and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Coronary heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in advanced countries. Despite remarkable developments and achievements in the field of coronary intervention, such as percutaneous catheter intervention and coronary bypass surgery, the mortality from coronary heart disease remains high because of lack of effective cardioprotective therapy against ischemia/reperfusion injury after coronary recanalization. The mitochondria play a crucial role in determination of cell death in ischemia/reperfusion injury, and furthermore provide myocardial protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury by ischemic preconditioning. Functional and structural alterations in the mitochondria help to decide cell death and survival, and many investigations have been conducted to explore the pathophysiological mechanisms of “mitochondrial remodeling” to gain clues regarding ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the pathophysiological role of bidirectional (detrimental and defensive “mitochondrial remodeling” via which cell death or survival is determined in coronary heart disease. Further, we discuss clinical trials of mitochondria-targeted treatment in patients with coronary heart disease.Keywords: coronary heart disease, mitochondrial remodeling, mitochondrial dynamics

  20. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  1. Cardiac image modelling: Breadth and depth in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; McCulloch, Andrew D; Nash, Martyn P; Pontre, Beau; Young, Alistair A

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of large-scale imaging studies and big health data, and the corresponding growth in analytics, machine learning and computational image analysis methods, there are now exciting opportunities for deepening our understanding of the mechanisms and characteristics of heart disease. Two emerging fields are computational analysis of cardiac remodelling (shape and motion changes due to disease) and computational analysis of physiology and mechanics to estimate biophysical properties from non-invasive imaging. Many large cohort studies now underway around the world have been specifically designed based on non-invasive imaging technologies in order to gain new information about the development of heart disease from asymptomatic to clinical manifestations. These give an unprecedented breadth to the quantification of population variation and disease development. Also, for the individual patient, it is now possible to determine biophysical properties of myocardial tissue in health and disease by interpreting detailed imaging data using computational modelling. For these population and patient-specific computational modelling methods to develop further, we need open benchmarks for algorithm comparison and validation, open sharing of data and algorithms, and demonstration of clinical efficacy in patient management and care. The combination of population and patient-specific modelling will give new insights into the mechanisms of cardiac disease, in particular the development of heart failure, congenital heart disease, myocardial infarction, contractile dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction. PMID:27349830

  2. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    OpenAIRE

    Hidekatsu Yanai; Hiroki Adachi; Hisayuki Katsuyama; Hidetaka Hamasaki; Akahito Sako

    2015-01-01

    Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To ...

  3. Detection of Fungal Elements in Atherosclerotic Plaques Using Mycological, Pathological and Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid MASOUMI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to detect fungi in atherosclerotic plaques and investigate their possible role in atherosclerosis.Methods: Coronary atherosclerotic plaques specimen were obtained from patients with atherosclerosis. Direct exami-nation, culture, histopathology study, PCR and sequencing were performed to detect/identify the mycotic elements in the plaques. Age, sex, smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of heart diseases and diabetes were considered and data were analyzed using Chi Square test by SPSS version 15.Results: A total of 41 specimens were analyzed. Direct examination for fungal elements was negative in all cases but in culture only one specimen grew as a mold colony. The presence of fungal elements were confirmed in 6 and 2 tissue sections stained by Gomori methenamine silver and Hematoxylin and Eosin methods, respectively. Using PCR, 11 cases were positive for fungi. The DNA sequence analysis of six positive specimens which were randomly selected revealed fungi as Candida albicans (n=3, Candida guilliermondii (n=2 and Monilia sp. (n=1.Conclusion: A significant association between the presence of fungi in atherosclerotic plaques and severity of athero-genesis and atherosclerotic disease was not found. This could be due to limited numbers of patients included in our study. However, the presence of fungal elements in 26.8% of our specimens is considerable and the results does not exclude the correlation between the presence of fungi with atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

  4. Heart valve disease: investigation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Myerson Saul G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a valuable investigative tool in many areas of cardiac medicine. Its value in heart valve disease is less well appreciated however, particularly as echocardiography is a powerful and widely available technique in valve disease. This review highlights the added value that CMR can bring in valve disease, complementing echocardiography in many areas, but it has also become the first-line investigation in some, such as pulmonary valve di...

  5. Hybrid Workflow Policy Management for Heart Disease Identification

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Youn, Chan-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    As science technology grows, medical application is becoming more complex to solve the physiological problems within expected time. Workflow management systems (WMS) in Grid computing are promising solution to solve the sophisticated problem such as genomic analysis, drug discovery, disease identification, etc. Although existing WMS can provide basic management functionality in Grid environment, consideration of user requirements such as performance, reliability and interaction with user is missing. In this paper, we propose hybrid workflow management system for heart disease identification and discuss how to guarantee different user requirements according to user SLA. The proposed system is applied to Physio-Grid e-health platform to identify human heart disease with ECG analysis and Virtual Heart Simulation (VHS) workflow applications.

  6. Hybrid Workflow Policy Management for Heart Disease Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As science technology grows, medical application is becoming more complex to solve the physiological problems within expected time. Workflow management systems (WMS in Grid computing are promisingsolution to solve the sophisticated problem such as genomic analysis, drug discovery, disease identification, etc. Although existing WMS can provide basic management functionality in Grid environment, consideration of user requirements such as performance, reliability and interaction with user is missing. In this paper, we proposehybrid workflow management system for heart disease identification and discuss how to guarantee different user requirements according to user SLA. The proposed system is applied to Physio-Grid e-health platform to identify human heart disease with ECG analysis and Virtual Heart Simulation (VHS workflow applications.

  7. AIR TRAVEL FOR INFANTS WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarsh Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : It is well documented that, healthy person can tolerate the cabin environment of a commercial airline which is pressurized to the level of 5000 ft. however this environment brings profound physiological changes in patients with cardiovascular dise a se. With rise in number of patients travelling internationally for treatment of cardiac problems especially infants travelling by air for congenital heart disease treatment has increased in the recent time and is evident by the reports of medical incidents involving infants with congenital heart disease onboard . (1 Though the IATA medical manual mentions that adult patients with Esenminger Syndrome should not undertake air travel . (2 This article examines the case for infants with congenital heart diseases as there have been no previous studies reported

  8. Risk factors for congenital heart diseases in Alexandria, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matched case control study has been conducted in the children's hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt, during 2 years-period, aiming at investigating the risk factors for the occurrence of congenital heart diseases. Our results showed that the significant risk factors for developing any type of congenital heart disease and ventricular septal defects were: older paternal age at birth, positive consanguinity, positive family history, female sex hormones, irradiation, hazardous maternal occupation, diabetes mellitus and suburban or rural residence. However, some environmental/teratogenic factors were not implicated in the etiology of atrial septal defects or pulmonary stenosis. These findings strongly suggest that environmental factors vary according to the specific type of congenital heart disease. This study emphasizes on the need to instruct the public about the importance of pre-marital counselling and the deleterious effects of various teratogens in the environment

  9. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease. PMID:26886381

  10. AN INTELLIGENT FUZZY BASED SCHEME TO ANALYZE HEART DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeru Anand

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research work is to define some fuzzy based ruleset to identify the patient disease based on person medical related information. This information includes the person age, calestrol level, heart beat and blood pressure. In this work these four characters of a patient are studied and presented in theform of fuzzy rule. As the fuzzy rule is applied on these characteristics collectively and based on it the decision about the heart disease is taken. Any of the medical diagnostic application cannot return true results; there are always some chances of perception while dealing with medical area. Even though theyobtained results shows that effective use of application for the initial prediction of heart disease based on user characteristics.

  11. Decision Support in Heart Disease Prediction System using Naive Bayes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Subbalakshmi,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Data Mining refers to using a variety of techniques to identify suggest of information or decision making knowledge in thedatabase and extracting these in a way that they can put to use in areas such as decision support, predictions, forecasting and estimation. The healthcare industry collects huge amounts of healthcare data which, unfortunately, are not “mined” to discover hidden information for effective decision making. Discovering relations that connect variables in a database is the subject of data mining. This research has developed a Decision Support in Heart Disease Prediction System (DSHDPS using data mining modeling technique, namely, Naïve Bayes. Using medical profiles such as age, sex, blood pressure and blood sugar it can predict the likelihood of patients getting a heart disease. It is implemented as web based questionnaire application. It can serve a training tool to train nurses and medical students to diagnose patients with heart disease.

  12. Type A Behaviours and Heart Disease: Epidemiological and Experimental Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bennett

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically examines three strands of evidence that concern the relationship between type A behaviours and coronary heart disease; prospective epidemiological studies of healthy populations, studies of those at high risk for coronary heart disease, and angiographic studies of atherosclerosis. The first of these would seem to provide the strongest test. Methodological and conceptual issues mean that the results of studies using the other methods should be interpreted with care. It is concluded that there is relatively strong evidence of an association between Type A behaviour as measured by Structured Interview and coronary heart disease. Hostility and anger appear to be the most powerful determinants of CHD. However, it is likely that they interact with other type A behaviours and related environmental factors in determining risk.

  13. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth;

    2011-01-01

    moderate/severe MR and in HF compared to CKCS with no/minimal and mild MR (all P<0.02). Another 10 HRV variables showed the same groupwise differences (all P<0.02), except that the difference between CKCS with mild MR and CKCS with moderate/severe MR did not reach statistical significance. Minimum HR, mean......HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of...... Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short...

  14. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    OpenAIRE

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital he...

  15. The diagnostic value of mean platelet volume in males with premature atherosclerotic coronary artery disease having stable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Malçok Gürel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate whether platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV could be new biomarkers addition to classical risk factors in premature coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods: Totally 124 male patients (mean age: 45.8±13.0 year; range of age: 27-78 year, with stable angina pectoris, were included. Clinical and laboratory findings (whole blood cell count, glucose, creatinine, lipid profile were recorded. Automatic blood counter was used for hematological parameters. Conventional coronary angiography was performed. Patients having acute coronary syndrome within the last six months, with severe valvular, structural or congenital heart disease, thyroid and hepatic dysfunction or signs of any infection were excluded. Results: The study population were separated into three groups by coronary angiography: 51 with stable CAD aged ≤40 years (premature CAD, 38 with stable CAD older than 40 (mature CAD and 35 with the normal coronary arteries (NCA. No significant difference was found in MPV values between premature CAD and mature CAD and also between premature CAD and NCA (p>0.05. A significant negative correlation was found between MPV and platelet count in premature CAD (r=-0.419, p=0.002. Both in premature CAD and mature CAD groups, higher MPV values was found in critical CAD subgroup than noncritical CAD subgroup, but the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in MPV between premature and mature male CAD patients compared to NCA group. A positive but non-significant correlation was found between the MPV values and the severity of CAD. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 381-385

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Hemodynamically Significant Coronary Heart Disease: Where to Start?

    OpenAIRE

    Runge, Marschall S.; Subramanian, Natrajan; Stouffer, George A.

    2005-01-01

    In the U.S. and all industrialized countries, more deaths result from heart attack and stroke than from any other cause. Increasingly it is proposed that many cardiac events occur following the rupture of minor, non-hemodynamically significant atherosclerotic plaque. Indeed many policy makers and some physicians have questioned the importance of traditional screening and treatment strategies for hemodynamically significant coronary artery lesions. As an alternative, it has been suggested that...

  17. Severe Brown Fat Lipoatrophy Aggravates Atherosclerotic Process in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Óscar; Díaz-Castroverde, Sabela; García-Gómez, Gema; Fernández, Silvia; Benito, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and is characterized by abnormal accumulation of adipose tissue, including perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). However, brown adipose tissue (BAT) activation reduces visceral adiposity. To demonstrate that severe brown fat lipoatrophy might accelerate atherosclerotic process, we generated a new mouse model without insulin receptor (IR) in BAT and without apolipoprotein (Apo)E (BAT-specific IR knockout [BATIRKO];ApoE(-/-) mice) and assessed vascular and metabolic alterations associated to obesity. In addition, we analyzed the contribution of the adipose organ to vascular inflammation. Brown fat lipoatrophy induces visceral adiposity, mainly in gonadal depot (gonadal white adipose tissue [gWAT]), severe glucose intolerance, high postprandial glucose levels, and a severe defect in acute insulin secretion. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice showed greater hypertriglyceridemia than the obtained in ApoE(-/-) and hypercholesterolemia similar to ApoE(-/-) mice. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice, in addition to primary insulin resistance in BAT, also showed a significant decrease in insulin signaling in liver, gWAT, heart, aorta artery, and thoracic PVAT. More importantly, our results suggest that severe brown fat lipoatrophy aggravates the atherosclerotic process, characterized by a significant increase of lipid depots, atherosclerotic coverage, lesion size and complexity, increased macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory markers expression. Finally, an increase of TNF-α and leptin as well as a decrease of adiponectin by BAT, gWAT, and thoracic PVAT might also be responsible of vascular damage. Our results suggest that severe brown lipoatrophy aggravates atherosclerotic process. Thus, BAT activation might protect against obesity and its associated metabolic alterations. PMID:27414981

  18. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined. PMID:22686063

  19. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  20. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  1. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  2. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. PMID:24656111

  3. Thigh circumference and risk of heart disease and premature death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Frederiksen, Peder

    2009-01-01

    of follow-up for total death. RESULTS: A small thigh circumference was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases and total mortality in both men and women. A threshold effect for thigh circumference was evident, with greatly increased risk of premature death...... circumference seems to be associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease or premature death. The adverse effects of small thighs might be related to too little muscle mass in the region. The measure of thigh circumference might be a relevant anthropometric measure to help general practitioners in...... early identification of individuals at an increased risk of premature morbidity and mortality....

  4. The application of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the value of transcatheter closure procedure in congenital heart diseases. Methods: Transcatheter closure was performed in 12 patients with congenital heart diseases including 6 ventricular septal defect (VSD), 4 atrial septal defect (ASD), 2 patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), by the Amplatzer occlusion device under local or general anesthesia. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients outcoming with the disappearance of cardiac murmur. All of them could get out of the bed within 6 to 12 hours postoperatively, and were discharged from hospital after 4 to 6 days. Conclusions: Transcatheter treatment of congenital cardiac defects by Amplatzer occlusion device is less traumatic, with good effect, simultaneously

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder in the wake of heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Helle; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that patients after a cardiac event may be at risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article reviews studies looking at PTSD as a sequel of heart disease with a focus on prevalence, risk factors, and future research directions.......There is increasing recognition that patients after a cardiac event may be at risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article reviews studies looking at PTSD as a sequel of heart disease with a focus on prevalence, risk factors, and future research directions....

  6. Predicting Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The FINRISK Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Peltonen, Markku; Puska, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The FINRISK risk calculator predicts 10-year risk for coronary heart disease, stroke incidence, and their combination. The model is based on 10-year cohort follow-up from 3 different cohorts in 1982, 1987, and 1992 from a random population sample in 3 areas in Finland. Coronary heart disease, stroke, and their combination are predicted by smoking, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, diabetes, and family history. The Internet-based calculator is commonly used in Finland in health services to assess the need for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia treatment and is used also in patients' counseling. PMID:27242089

  7. Under pressure: pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Harrison W.; Simon Gibbs

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of PH, but its natural history is not well understood. PH-LHD is diagnosed by right heart catheterisation with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure >15 mmHg. The primary causes of PH-LHD are left ventricular dysfunction of systolic and diastolic origin, and valvular disease. Prognosis is poor and survival rates are low. Limited progress has been made ...

  8. Heart conduction disturbance: an HLA-B27 associated disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, A J; ten Wolde, S; Sedney, M.I.; de Vries, R R; Dijkmans, B A

    1991-01-01

    In recent studies from Sweden an increased prevalence of HLA-B27 associated diseases and of HLA-B27 was found in an unselected group of men with permanently implanted pacemakers and with a heart block. Furthermore, a significantly increased prevalence of HLA-B27 was found in men with a pacemaker who had no clinical or radiological signs of HLA-B27 associated disease. To obtain more insight into the association between HLA-B27 and heart block, and the possible role of HLA-B27 in causing this b...

  9. Significance of MR imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the diagnostic impact of MR imaging in congenital heart disease, the authors used a 0.5- or 1.5-T magnet to examine 85 patients. Multisection spin-echo images were obtained in three planes. Diagnoses included atrial septal defect, trilogy and tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular septal defect, transposition (seven), single ventricle, and other complex disorders. Compared with other noninvasive techniques, MR imaging allowed a much better visualization of anatomic structures and the relationship of great vessels to shunt lesions in complex congenital heart disease. In 53 (63%) of 85 patients, MR imaging made a major contribution to establishing or modifying diagnoses

  10. Ryanodine receptors as pharmacological targets for heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco SANTONASTASI; Xander H T WEHRENS

    2007-01-01

    Calcium release from intracellular stores plays an important role in the regulationof muscle contraction and electrical signals that determine the heart rhythm. Theryanodine receptor (RyR) is the major calcium (Ca2+) release channel required forexcitation-contraction coupling in the heart. Recent studies have demonstratedthat RyR are macromolecular complexes comprising of 4 pore-forming channelsubunits, each of which is associated with regulatory subunits. Clinical andexperimental studies over the past 5 years have provided compelling evidencethat intracellular Ca2+release channels play a pivotal role in the development ofcardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. Changes in the channel regulation andsubunit composition are believed to cause diastolic calcium leakage from thesarcoplasmic reticulum, which could trigger arrhythmias and weaken cardiaccontractility. Therefore, cardiac RyR have emerged as potential therapeutic tar-gets for the treatment of heart disease. Consequently, there is a strong desire toidentify and/or develop novel pharmacological agents that may target these Ca2+signaling pathways. Pharmacological agents known to modulate RyR in the heart,and their potential application towards the treatment of heart disease are dis-cussed in this review.

  11. Costs of heart disease and risk behaviour: implications for expenditure on prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Davidsen, Michael; Madsen, Mette; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Sørensen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    , physical inactivity and smoking among future heart patients were estimated with the same method. RESULTS: Individuals with heart disease cost the healthcare system on average 3,195 (p<0.0001) per person-year more than individuals without heart disease. The attributable cost of unhealthy lifestyle factors...... among individuals at risk of heart disease was about 11%-16% of the attributable cost of heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Heart disease incurs significant additional costs to the healthcare sector, and more so if heart patients have a history of leading an unhealthy life. Consequently, strategies to prevent...

  12. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  13. The ACC/AHA 2013 guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: the good the bad and the uncertain: a comparison with ESC/EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kausik K; Kastelein, John J P; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Nicholls, Stephen J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ballantyne, Christie M; Catapano, Alberico L; Reiner, Željko; Lüscher, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most important public health problem of our time in both Europe and the rest of the world, accounting for the greatest expenditure in most healthcare budgets. Achieving consistency of clinical care, incorporating new evidence and their synthesis into practical recommendations for clinicians is the task of various guideline committees throughout the world. Any change in a set of guidelines therefore can have far reaching consequences, particularly if they appear to be at variance with the existing guidelines. The present article discusses the recent American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines 2013 on the control of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults. When compared with the ESC/EAS guidelines on lipid modification in 2011, the ACC/AHA guidelines of 2013 differ markedly. Specifically, (i) the scope is limited to randomized trials only, which excludes a significant body of data and promotes essentially a statin centric approach only; (ii) the abolition of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets in favour of specific statin regimens that produce a 30-50% reduction in LDL-C we believe will confuse many physicians and miss the opportunity for medication adherence and patient engagement in self-management; (iii) the absence of target LDL-C levels in very high-risk patients with high absolute risk or residual risk factors will discourage clinicians to consider the addition of lipid modification treatments and individualize patient care; (iv) a reduction in the threshold for treatment in primary prevention will result in a greater number of patients being prescribed statin therapy, which is potentially good in young patients with high life time risk, but will result in a very large number of older patients offered therapy; and (v) the mixed pool risk calculator used to asses CVD risk in the guidelines for primary prevention has not

  14. Tuning flux: autophagy as a target of heart disease therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Morales, Cyndi R.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite maximum medical and mechanical support therapy, heart failure remains a relentlessly progressive disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process of cellular cannibalization, has been implicated in virtually all forms of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, its role is context dependent, antagonizing or promoting disease depending on the circumstance. Here, we review current understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of heart failure and explore this pathway as a target of therapeutic intervention. Recent findings In preclinical models of heart disease, cardiomyocyte autophagic flux is activated; indeed, its role in disease pathogenesis is the subject of intense investigation to define mechanism. Similarly, in failing human heart of a variety of etiologies, cardiomyocyte autophagic activity is upregulated, and therapy, such as with mechanical support systems, elicits declines in autophagy activity. However, when suppression of autophagy is complete, rapid and catastrophic cell death occurs, consistent with a model in which basal autophagic flux is required for proteostasis. Thus, a narrow zone of ‘optimal’ autophagy seems to exist. The challenge moving forward is to tune the stress-triggered autophagic response within that ‘sweet spot’ range for therapeutic benefit. Summary Whereas we have known for some years of the participation of lysosomal mechanisms in heart disease, it is only recently that upstream mechanisms (autophagy) are being explored. The challenge for the future is to dissect the underlying circuitry and titrate the response into an optimal, proteostasis-promoting range in hopes of mitigating the ever-expanding epidemic of heart failure. PMID:21415729

  15. HEMODYNAMIC INSIGNIFICANT CAROTID ARTERIES STENOSIS AND RISK OF EMBOLIC STROKE IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Semenova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess a risk of vascular embolism in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and hemodynamic insignificant asymptomatic carotid stenosis.Material and methods. 100 patients with IHD were examined. Ultrasound scanning of the main cranial arteries and transcranial Dopplerography was performed in all patients as well as lipid spectrum, fibrinogen level and blood D-diameter concentration were evaluated.Results. 165 carotid atherosclerotic plaques (AP were detected in patients with IHD independently on angina severity. In IHD patients with nonhomogeneous hypoechogenic AP microembolic signals (MES were revealed in 44,78%, with nonhomogeneous hyperechogenic AP - in 25%, with homogeneous hypoechogenic AP - in 4,16% of patients. MES were not recorded in patients with homogeneous hyperechogenic AP. There were not relations between MES and parameters of lipid spectrum as well as fibrinogen and Ddiameter plasma levels.Conclusion. Thus, during transcranial dopplerographic monitoring MES were recorded in the third part (27,9% of IHD patients with hemodynamically insignificant carotid arteries stenosis. MES were predominantly observed in patients with nonhomogeneous AP especially with hypoechogenic components.

  16. Ischemic heart disease in workers at Mayak PA: latency of incidence risk after radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Simonetto

    Full Text Available We present an updated analysis of incidence and mortality from atherosclerotic induced ischemic heart diseases in the cohort of workers at the Mayak Production Association (PA. This cohort constitutes one of the most important sources for the assessment of radiation risk. It is exceptional because it comprises information on several other risk factors. While most of the workers have been exposed to external gamma radiation, a large proportion has additionally been exposed to internal radiation from inhaled plutonium. Compared to a previous study by Azizova et al. 2012, the updated dosimetry system MWDS-2008 has been applied and methods of analysis have been revised. We extend the analysis of the significant incidence risk and observe that main detrimental effects of external radiation exposure occur after more than about 30 years. For mortality, significant risk was found in males with an excess relative risk per dose of 0.09 (95% CI: 0.02; 0.16 [Formula: see text] while risk was insignificant for females. With respect to internal radiation exposure no association to risk could be established.

  17. Endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in children with irreversible pulmonary hypertension due to congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess endothelial dysfunction and the risk for coronary atherosclerosis in children with irreversible pulmonary hypertension due to congenital heart disease (CHD). The study included 18 cyanotic patients (the mean age was 12.28 ± 3.26 years) who developed irreversible pulmonary hypertension due to cyanotic and acyanotic CHDs, and 18 control patients (the mean age was 11.78 ± 3.00 years). Study groups were compared for flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) and atherosclerotic risk factors. Compared to the control group, the mean FMD was significantly reduced in the cyanotic group (5.26 ± 2.42% and 9.48 ± 2.60%, respectively; P-value < 0.001). No significant difference was observed between the groups in CIMT (0.41 ± 0.08 mm and 0.39 ± 0.06 mm, respectively; P-value = 0.299). The levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein–cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein–cholesterol were statistically significantly lower compared tothe control group (P-value = 0.001, 0.006 and 0.014, respectively), whereas no statistically significant difference was found in the levels of high-density lipoprotein–cholesterol and triglycerides (P-value = 0.113 and 0.975, respectively). Systemic endothelial dysfunction in children with irreversible pulmonary hypertension due to CHD was noted but there was no increased risk for atherosclerosis

  18. Prevention of rheumatic Fever and heart disease: nepalese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Prakash Raj; Wyber, Rosemary

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a major public health problem in Nepal that affects young children and adolescents. Historically, many young people suffered severe valvular disease and died awaiting heart valve replacement. For some years, the Nepal Heart Foundation (NHF) advocated for a more comprehensive program to reduce the burden of RHD. In 2007, the government of Nepal announced funding for an RHD control program to be implemented by the NHF. The core focus of the program was to deliver antibiotics for the secondary prophylaxis of RHD. The NHF has developed a program of community awareness, free medication, RHD register development, health worker training, guideline development, and clinical audit. These services are being implemented with expanding geographic scope. This paper provides a narrative overview of the Nepalese experience designing, implementing, and beginning to evaluate this program. Challenges and successes relevant to register-based programs are highlighted. PMID:25690503

  19. Families of children with congenital heart disease: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Holly; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Hanson, Cherissa C; Swanson, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    In 2000 and 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched two initiatives to encourage treatment innovations and research on children with heart disease and their families. Since then, no systematic reviews have examined the evidence regarding the impacts of having a child with congenital heart disease (CHD) on families. This review synthesized key findings regarding families of children with CHD, critiqued research methods, described what has been done, and provided recommendations for future inquiry. Databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, Family & Society Studies Worldwide, Women's Studies International, and PsycINFO. The literature search followed the PRISMA guidelines. As a result, ninety-four articles were reviewed. Four major themes were derived: parents' psychological health, family life, parenting challenges, and family-focused interventions. In conclusion, while they found parents having psychological symptoms, researchers did not explore parents' appraisals of what led to their symptoms. Research is needed to explore parents' experiences and expectations. PMID:26404115

  20. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part II: Acyanotic Congenital Heart Disease and Extracardiac Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-06-01

    Acyanotic heart disease constitutes a significant majority of patient who may present with non-cardiac symptoms. Either they are detected incidentally or present with respiratory complaints. Equipped with knowledge of anatomy by echocardiography and radiographic methods described in previous part of this presentation, diagnosis may be confidently attempted. On plain radiography acyanotic congenital heart diseases have variable appearance depending upon severity of disease. Cardiac size, chamber enlargement and pulmonary vascular pattern are key elements. Typically left to right shunts with large volume flow are associated with pulmonary plethora. Plain radiography has an important role in detecting manifestation of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Severe stenosis of pulmonary valve is associated with pulmonary oligemia. Small intra-cardiac shunts and anomalies of coronary arteries generally present with normal cardiac size and pulmonary arterial pattern. Disease spectrum presented in this illustration demands thorough scrutiny of pulmonary, osseous and abdominal abnormalities. This section illustrates some commonly encountered spectrum of acyanotic cardiac disease. PMID:27504381

  1. PET/MR Imaging in Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischpler, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid PET/MR imaging is a complex imaging modality that has raised high expectations not only for oncological and neurologic imaging applications, but also for cardiac imaging applications. Initially, physicians and physicists had to become accustomed to technical challenges including attenuation correction, gating, and more complex workflow and more elaborate image analysis as compared with PET/CT or standalone MR imaging. PET/MR imaging seems to be particularly valuable to assess inflammatory myocardial diseases (such as sarcoidosis), to cross-validate PET versus MR imaging data (eg, myocardial perfusion imaging), and to help validate novel biomarkers of various disease states (eg, postinfarction inflammation). PMID:27593250

  2. Grover's Disease after Heart Transplantation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanbattista Ippoliti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grover's disease is a transient acantholytic dermatosis of unknown cause, manifesting clinically as a papular skin eruption that is usually located on the anterior chest and abdomen. Histologically characterized by an acantholytic pattern, it has been associated with numerous disorders, including hematologic malignancies, chronic renal failure, and HIV infection, as well as with chemotherapy and bone marrow and/or kidney transplant. Evaluation of followup and treatment is often complicated by spontaneous remission and the occasionally fluctuant course of the disease. Here we report the case of a patient with sudden onset of Grover's disease after heart transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of Grover's disease as diagnosed after heart transplantation.

  3. Even "Healthy" Smokers Have Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史梦

    1998-01-01

    本文自称是“网虫”的史梦小姐在Monday July 13从网上拷下后通过email发给我们的。吸烟有害健康,这已是一个老话题。我们仍愿将此文在本专栏推出。美国人还在对这个“老话题”做认真的不懈的研究,并不断有所发现。 有些吸烟者被认为,或自认为是"Healthy"Smokers,其实,这是一个错误的感觉而已。本文集中研究了吸烟者的血管内壁的变化,并指出:… the arteries of smokers don’t dilate properly, which can raise their blood pressure and increase the riskof a heart attack or stroke. 文章的另一个可贵之处在于, 虽然加州大学的博士作了潜心研究, 并有所发现, 但是他们仍然谦虚地认为: they did not yet understand how smoking interfereswith the arteries.

  4. Should Global Burden of Disease Estimates Include Depression as a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter Amanda J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study estimates the premature mortality and disability of all major diseases and injuries. In addition it aims to quantify the risk that diseases and other factors play in the aetiology of disease and injuries. Mental disorders and coronary heart disease are both significant public health issues due to their high prevalence and considerable contribution to global disease burden. For the first time the Global Burden of Disease Study will aim to assess mental disorders as risk factors for coronary heart disease. We show here that current evidence satisfies established criteria for considering depression as an independent risk factor in development of coronary heart disease. A dose response relationship appears to exist and plausible biological pathways have been proposed. However, a number of challenges exist when conducting a rigorous assessment of the literature including heterogeneity issues, definition and measurement of depression and coronary heart disease, publication bias and residual confounding. Therefore, despite some limitations in the available data, it is now appropriate to consider major depression as a risk factor for coronary heart disease in the new Global Burden of Disease Study.

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study a...

  6. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  7. Coping Behaviors of Parents with Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobino, Jane

    The study addresses parental coping patterns of children with congenital heart disease in the state of Hawaii. Attention was given to geography and ethnicity as well as parental and child characteristics as factors impacting on the coping pattern. Telephone interviews with parents (N=32) obtained data concerning parent characteristics, their…

  8. Hematologic Abnormalities in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Chamanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cyanotic heart disease may have an acceptable quality of life. However, they are invariably prone to several complications. The aim of this study is search about hematologic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study every cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who was referred to the adult congenital heart disease clinic was selected and asked of any possible hyperviscosity symptoms, gingival bleeding, Epistaxis, hemoptysis, hypermenorrhagia and gouty arthritis irrespective of their age, gender and primary diagnosis in a six-month period. In this regard, 02 saturation was obtained via pulse oximetry, an abdominal ultrasound was done in order to discover any gallstones and lab tests including CBC, coagulation parameters (bleeding time(BT,clotting time(CT, prothrombin time(PT,international ratio( INR, Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were provided as well. Results:  A total of 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the patients was 22.44±5.72 with a minimum of 15 and the maximum of 46 years old. Twenty two (34.4% of them were female and 45(65.6% were male. Conclusion: Our patients had less hyperuricemia, there is no correlation between hyperviscosity symptoms and haematocrit level and an inverse correlation between the Ferritin level and hyperviscosity symptoms were seen.  

  9. Predicting the effect of prevention of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Priority setting in public health policy must be based on information on the effectiveness of alternative preventive and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study is to predict the effect on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Denmark of reduced exposure to the risk factors...

  10. Heart Disease Management by Women: Does Intervention Format Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noreen M.; Janz, Nancy K.; Dodge, Julia A.; Lin, Xihong; Trabert, Britton L.; Kaciroti, Niko; Mosca, Lori; Wheeler, John R.; Keteyian, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of two formats of a program (Women Take PRIDE) to enhance management of heart disease by patients was conducted. Older women (N = 575) were randomly assigned to a group or self-directed format or to a control group. Data regarding symptoms, functional health status, and weight were collected at baseline and at 4, 12,…

  11. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Sanne Ae; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Wood, Angela M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among...

  12. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Koyak

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a major cause of hospital admissions and morbidity in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Furthermore, the leading cause of death in adults with CHD is sudden cardiac death (SCD) of presumed arrhythmic aetiology. The main objectives of this thesis were to identify risk factor

  14. Ankylosing spondylitis and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essers, Ivette; Stolwijk, Carmen; Boonen, Annelies;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), including the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared with population controls. METHODS: All patients with...

  15. Echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, Sjoerd Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a decreased left ventricular (LV) function after myocardial infarction has demonstrated to be of considerable clinical importance. In this thesis, the role of 2D echocardiography to evaluate LV function in ischemic heart disease was investigated. In the first part of the thesis, rece

  16. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins. PMID:7582364

  17. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei;

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  18. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Michel M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; van der Harst, Pim; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more consiste

  19. Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne U; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn;

    2004-01-01

    In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30-71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models use...

  20. Pregnancy in women with valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stout, Karen K; Otto, Catherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with valvular disease who desire pregnancy or are already pregnant require specialised care. Ideally, women undergo preconceptual counselling that addresses any procedures needed to decrease the risks of pregnancy, including valve replacement, if the patient has symptoms at baseline. Management during pregnancy includes replacing any contraindicated medications with safer alternatives, optimising loading conditions, careful monitoring and aggressive treatment of any exacerbating fact...

  1. Chagas Heart Disease Pathogenesis: One Mechanism or Many?

    OpenAIRE

    Bonney, Kevin M.; David M. Engman

    2008-01-01

    Chagas heart disease (CHD), caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis in the world. The etiology of CHD is unclear and multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the proposed mechanisms of CHD pathogenesis and evaluates the historical significance and evidence supporting each. Although the majority of CHD-related pathologies are currently attributed to parasite persistence in...

  2. Dietary Quality after Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Unal Ozturk; Onder Ozturk; Perran Toksoz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dietary saturated fat and cholesterol are the cause of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Objectives: This study aimed to assess diet quality after diagnosis of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Patients and Methods: This descriptive study was performed on 242 patients with diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome admitted to a coronary care unit in a cardiology clinic between December 2005 and December 2006. The study questionnaire, including questions about personal inf...

  3. Remnant cholesterol as a cause of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD), on its definition, measurement, atherogenicity, and levels in high risk patient groups; in addition, present and future pharmacological approaches to lowering remnant cholesterol levels...... are considered. Observational studies show association between elevated levels of remnant cholesterol and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even when remnant cholesterol levels are defined, measured, or calculated in different ways. In-vitro and animal studies also support the contention that elevated...

  4. Benefits of smoking cessation for coronary heart disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Adi Hidayat

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence increases with age and is frequently higher in the elderly.(1) Therefore prevention of CVD in the elderly through management of risk factors is important in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several risk factors of CVD that can be modified, such as smoking, physical activity, and unhealthy diet. Cessation of smoking is the most potent measure to prevent thousands of CVD events and death

  5. Markers of Inflammation and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Sarwar; Thompson, Alexander J.; Emanuele Di Angelantonio

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of global mortality, with coronary heart disease (CHD) its major manifestation. Although inflammation, the body’s response to noxious stimuli, is implicated in several stages of CHD development, the relevance of circulating levels of markers of inflammation to CHD risk remains uncertain. This review summarizes available epidemiological evidence for four emerging inflammatory markers implicated in CHD (fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-asso...

  6. Previous Heart Disease Complications And Hypertension In Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Nayer Pishnamaz; Roghayeh Fakhry; Elham Porshahbaz; Razieh Parizad; Shahin Imani

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s)Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy with incidence of 3/7% are one of the most severe complications. Cardiovascular diseases are apparent in 2% of the pregnancies. Physiologic changes during pregnancy intensify the underlying disorders and the severity of this problem. Researches indicate that pregnant women with heart disease greatly confront unfavorable maternal and fetal outcomes with increased risk of abortion, intra uterine fetal death, preterm labor and intra uterine growth ...

  7. Clinical Significance of Serum Bilirubin Detection of Patient with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Li; LUO Rui; ZHUANG Diankui

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the relation between serum bilirubin and coronary heart disease.Methods Compare the level of serum bilirubin among patients with coronary heart disease, patients with other disease and normal persons. Results The level of serum bilirubin of patients with coronary heart disease is higher than that of normal persons. Conclusion The reduction of density of serum bilirubin is one of the independent risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  8. Clinical Significance of Serum Bilirubin Detection of Patient with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOLi; LUORui; ZHUANGDiankui

    2004-01-01

    To explore the relation between serum bilinabin and eoronary heart disease Methods Compare the level of serum bilinabin among patients with eoronary heart disease, patients with other disease and normal persons. Results The level of serum bilinabin of patients with coronary heart disease is higher than that of normal persons. Conclusion The reduction of density of serum bihrubin is one of the independent risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  9. Risk of ischemic heart disease in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, Sarah C.; Ewertz, Marianne; McGale, Paul;

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain.......Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain....

  10. Antibiotic Trials for Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility has been raised in recent years that infection might contribute as an inflammatory stimulus to chronic “noninfectious” degenerative diseases. Within the past decade, serious attention has been given to the possibility of bacterial vectors as causal factors of atherosclerosis. To date, the greatest amount of information has related to the intracellular organism Chlamydia pneumoniae. This interest has been stimulated by the frequent finding of bacterial antigens and, occasionall...

  11. Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Puliafico, Shannon B.; Penn, Marc S.; Silver, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in Americans. After myocardial infarction, significant ventricular damage persists despite timely reperfusion and pharmacological management. Treatment is limited, as current modalities do not cure this damage. In the past decade, stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising therapeutic solution to restore myocardial function. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety and beneficial effects in patients suffering from acute myocardial infarc...

  12. Berberine ameliorates chronic kidney injury caused by atherosclerotic renovascular disease through the suppression of NFκB signaling pathway in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Impaired renal function in atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARD may be the result of crosstalk between atherosclerotic renovascular stenosis and amplified oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis. Berberine (BBR regulates cholesterol metabolism and exerts antioxidant effects. Accordingly, we hypothesized that BBR treatment may ameliorate ARD-induced kidney injury through its cholesterol-lowering effect and also suppression of the pathways involved in oxidative stress, inflammation and NFκB activation. METHODS: Male rats were subjected to unilateral renal artery stenosis with silver-irritant coil, and then fed with 12-week hypercholesterolemic diet. Rats with renal artery stenosis were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 6 each - ARD, or ARD+BBR - according to diet alone or in combination with BBR. Similarly, age-matched rats underwent sham operation and were also fed with hypercholesterolemic diet alone or in combination with BBR as two corresponding controls. Single-kidney hemodynamic metrics were measured in vivo with Doppler ultrasound to determine renal artery flow. The metrics reflecting hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, renal structure and function, inflammation and NFκB activation were measured, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control rats, ARD rats had a significant increase in urinary albumin, plasma cholesterol, LDL and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and a significant decrease in SOD activity. When exposed to 12-week BBR, ARD rats had significantly lower levels in blood pressure, LDL, urinary albumin, and TBARS. In addition, there were significantly lower expression levels of iNOS and TGF-β in the ARD+BBR group than in the ARD group, with attenuated NFκB-DNA binding activity and down-regulated protein levels of subunits p65 and p50 as well as IKKβ. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that BBR can improve hypercholesterolemia and redox status in the kidney, eventually ameliorating

  13. Behaviour Problems in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As more children survive with congenital heart diseases, management of their behavioural problems are becoming increasingly important. In this article we aim to review the current status of knowledge on this aspect. Children with congenital heart diseases have more behavioural problems compared to children without chronic illnesses. Behavioural problems in children can be classified into externalizing behaviours and internalizing behaviours. Externalizing behaviours are marked by defiance, impulsivity, hyperactivity, disruptiveness, aggression and antisocial features. Internalizing behaviours are evidenced by withdrawal, dysphoria and anxiety. Boys with congenital heart diseases have more externalizing problems compared to girls. Preoperative hypoxia as well as peri and postoperative cardiocirculatory insufficiency can lead to internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems in future. High treatment intensity and palliative interventions are associated with poor behavioral outcomes. Children who underwent open heart surgery at very young age are prone to develop attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder on reaching school age. A comprehensive approach in this field is essential, so that effective early interventions and guidance can be planned.

  14. Stem cells:An eventual treatment option for heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph; C; Bilgimol; Subbareddy; Ragupathi; Lakshmanan; Vengadassalapathy; Nathan; S; Senthil; Kali-muthu; Selvakumar; M; Ganesan; Sadananda; Rao; Manjunath

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are of global excitement for various diseases including heart diseases. It is worth to understand the mechanism or role of stem cells in the treatment of heart failure. Bone marrow derived stem cells are commonly practiced with an aim to improve the function of the heart. The majority of studies have been conducted with acute myocardial infarction and a few has been investigated with the use of stem cells for treating chronic or dilated cardiomyopathy. Heterogeneity in the treated group using stem cells has greatly emerged. Ever increasing demand for any alternative made is of at most priority for cardiomyopathy. Stem cells are of top priority with the current impact that has generated among physicians. However,meticulous selection of proper source is required since redundancy is clearly evident with the present survey. This review focuses on the methods adopted using stem cells for heart diseases and outcomes that are generated so far with an idea to determine the best therapeutic possibility in order to fulfill the present demand.

  15. MYOCARDIAL REMODELING IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Zakirova; R.G. Oganov; N.E. Zakirova; G. R. Klochkova; F.S. Musina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the myocardial remodeling features in patients with stable angina depending on disease severity and experienced myocardial infarction (MI).Material and methods. 148 male patients with stable angina were examined and randomized into 3 groups (G1-G3). 52 patients of G1 had angina of I-II functional class (FC). 49 patients of G2 had angina of III FC, and 47 patients of G3 had angina of IV FC. History of MI had 79,5, 87.2 and 92.6% of patients in G1, G2 and G3 respectively. 35 healt...

  16. Association of heart block with uncommon disease States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Antonelli, Dante; Suleiman, Khaled; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-09-01

    A variety of diseases, other than the common Lev-Lenègre disease, are associated with cardiac conduction system abnormalities. These include acute processes, such as acute rheumatic fever, and other disorders, such as sarcoidosis, connective tissue disorders, neoplasms, and bacterial endocarditis with cardiac abscess formation. The purpose of the study is to raise awareness of these rare conditions. We present 10 adult patients (4 males and 6 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range: 19-69), with various rare diseases associated with heart block, who needed temporary or permanent pacemaker therapy in the past two decades. These conditions included acute rheumatic carditis, Wegener granulomatosis, cardiac involvement of metastatic breast cancer, bacterial endocarditis, sarcoidosis, S/P chest radiotherapy, and quadriplegia with syringomyelia postspinal cord injury, and adult congenital heart block. We conclude that patients with these disorders should be followed periodically, to allow for early detection and treatment of cardiac conduction disturbances, with pacemaker therapy. PMID:24436606

  17. Fatigue, General Health, and Ischemic Heart Disease in Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, Anette; Petersen, Inge; Mänty, Minna Regina;

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds.Fatigue has been shown to predict ischemic heart disease (IHD) and mortality in nonsmoking middle-aged men free of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of fatigue for IHD and general health in nondisabled individuals free of...... cardiovascular disease and older than 70 years. METHODS: The study population was drawn from The Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. In total, 1,696 participants were followed up for 2-10 years by questionnaires and 10-16 years through registries. Kaplan Meier, Cox Proportional Hazard and logistic......-related diagnoses, no use of heart medication, sustained good mobility, and participation at follow-up. IHD was defined as first hospitalization due to IHD (ICD10: I20-I25) or death due to IHD as primary cause. RESULTS: Participants without fatigue had higher chances of a sustained good general health at 2 (odds...

  18. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  19. Imaging of inflamed carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques with the use of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 scintigraphy in end-stage renal disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opalinska, Marta; Pach, Dorota; Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Glowa, Boguslaw; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Endocrinology, Cracow (Poland); Stompor, Tomasz [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Department of Nephrology, Hypertensiology and Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Olsztyn (Poland); Mikolajczak, Renata; Garnuszek, Piotr; Maurin, Michal; Karczmarczyk, Urszula [National Centre for Nuclear Research Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, Otwock (Poland); Fedak, Danuta [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Clinical Biochemistry, Cracow (Poland); Krzanowski, Marcin; Sulowicz, Wladyslaw [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Cracow (Poland); Rakowski, Tomasz [Jagiellonian University Medical School, 2nd Department of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology, Cracow (Poland)

    2012-04-15

    Identification of vulnerable plaques remains crucial for better cardiovascular risk assessment. At least 20% of inflammatory cells within unstable (vulnerable) plaques comprise T lymphocytes, which contain receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2); those receptors can be identified by scintigraphy with radiolabelled IL-2.The aim of this study was to identify the ''inflamed'' (vulnerable) plaques by scintigraphy using IL-2 labelled with {sup 99m}Tc in the selected, high cardiovascular risk group of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 28 patients (18 men, 10 women, aged 55.2 {+-} 9.6 years, 17 on peritoneal dialysis, 11 on haemodialysis) underwent common carotid artery (CCA) scintigraphy with the use of {sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-IL-2. In all cases, ultrasound examination of the CCA was performed and levels of selected proinflammatory factors, atherogenic markers and calcium-phosphate balance parameters were measured. Finally, the target to non-target (T/nT) ratio of IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques with intima-media thickness (IMT), classic cardiovascular risk factors and concentrations of the measured factors were compared. Increased {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques in 38/41 (91%) cases was detected. The median T/nT ratio of focal {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques was 2.35 (range 1.23-3.63). The mean IMT value on the side of plaques assessed by scintigraphy was 0.79 {+-} 0.18 mm (median 0.8, range 0.5-1.275). Correlations between T/nT ratio and homocysteine (R = 0.22, p = 0.037), apolipoprotein B (apoB) (R = 0.31, p = 0.008), apoB to apoA-I ratio (R = 0.29, p = 0.012) and triglyceride concentration (R = 0.26, p = 0.021) were detected. A lower T/nT ratio in patients with better parameters of nutritional status (haemoglobin, albumin, adiponectin) in comparison with patients with worse nutritional parameters (3.20 {+-} 0.5 vs 2.16 {+-} 0.68, p = 0.025) was revealed as well

  20. Women with Migraine May Face Higher Threat of Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women With Migraine May Face Higher Threat of Heart Disease, Stroke Researchers say it should be considered an ... headaches may have a slightly increased risk of heart disease or stroke, a new study suggests. "Migraine should ...