WorldWideScience

Sample records for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

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    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  2. Stress and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

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    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent major advances in medical science have introduced a wide variety of treatments against atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular diseases, which has led to a significant reduction in mortality associated with these diseases. However, atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of death. Furthermore, progress in medical science has demonstrated the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease to be complicated, with a wide variety of underlying factors. Among these factors, stress is thought to be pivotal. Several types of stress are involved in the development of cardiovascular disease, including oxidative stress, mental stress, hemodynamic stress and social stress. Accumulating evidence indicates that traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, including diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and smoking, induce oxidative stress in the vasculature. Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, atherogenesis, hypertension and remodeling of blood vessels. Meanwhile, mental stress is a well-known major contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular system is constantly exposed to hemodynamic stress by the blood flow and/or pulsation, and hemodynamic stress exerts profound effects on the biology of vascular cells and cardiomyocytes. In addition, social stress, such as that due to a lack of social support, poverty or living alone, has a negative impact on the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, there are interactions between mental, oxidative and hemodynamic stress. The production of reactive oxygen species is increased under high levels of mental stress in close association with oxidative stress. These stress responses and their interactions play central roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis-based cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, the pathophysiological and clinical implications of stress are discussed in this article.

  3. The gut microbiome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

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    Jie, Zhuye; Xia, Huihua; Zhong, Shi-Long

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to cardiovascular diseases. However, the composition and functional capacity of the gut microbiome in relation to cardiovascular diseases have not been systematically examined. Here, we perform a metagenome-wide association study on stools from 218 individuals...... with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD) and 187 healthy controls. The ACVD gut microbiome deviates from the healthy status by increased abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus spp. and, functionally, in the potential for metabolism or transport of several molecules important for cardiovascular......), with liver cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our data represent a comprehensive resource for further investigations on the role of the gut microbiome in promoting or preventing ACVD as well as other related diseases.The gut microbiota may play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the authors perform...

  4. ATHEROSCLEROTIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Kizer, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70 to 74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus Diabetes Mellitus in older age deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age. PMID:25453299

  5. The gut microbiome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

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    Jie, Zhuye; Xia, Huihua; Zhong, Shi-Long

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been linked to cardiovascular diseases. However, the composition and functional capacity of the gut microbiome in relation to cardiovascular diseases have not been systematically examined. Here, we perform a metagenome-wide association study on stools from 218 individuals...... health. Although drug treatment represents a confounding factor, ACVD status, and not current drug use, is the major distinguishing feature in this cohort. We identify common themes by comparison with gut microbiome data associated with other cardiometabolic diseases (obesity and type 2 diabetes......), with liver cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Our data represent a comprehensive resource for further investigations on the role of the gut microbiome in promoting or preventing ACVD as well as other related diseases.The gut microbiota may play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the authors perform...

  6. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

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    K-CY McGrath

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available K-CY McGrath1, LS McRobb1,2, AK Heather1,21Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 2Discipline of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  7. Diagnosis and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease: a review.

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    Mathew, Roy O; Bangalore, Sripal; Lavelle, Michael P; Pellikka, Patricia A; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Boden, William E; Asif, Arif

    2017-04-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, likely reflecting the presence of traditional risk factors. A greater distinguishing feature of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in CKD is the severity of the disease, which is reflective of an increase in inflammatory mediators and vascular calcification secondary to hyperparathyroidism of renal origin that are unique to patients with CKD. Additional components of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease that are prominent in patients with CKD include microvascular disease and myocardial fibrosis. Therapeutic interventions that minimize cardiovascular events related to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD, as determined by well-designed clinical trials, are limited to statins. Data are lacking regarding other available therapeutic measures primarily due to exclusion of patients with CKD from major trials studying cardiovascular disease. Data from well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to guide clinicians who care for this high-risk population in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease to improve clinical outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Salusins: Potential Use as a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

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    Kengo Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human salusin-α and salusin-β are related peptides produced from prosalusin. Bolus injection of salusin-β into rats induces more profound hypotension and bradycardia than salusin-α. Central administration of salusin-β increases blood pressure via release of norepinephrine and arginine-vasopressin. Circulating levels of salusin-α and salusin-β are lower in patients with essential hypertension. Salusin-β exerts more potent mitogenic effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and fibroblasts than salusin-α. Salusin-β accelerates inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Human macrophage foam cell formation is stimulated by salusin-β but suppressed by salusin-α. Chronic salusin-β infusion into apolipoprotein E-deficient mice enhances atherosclerotic lesions; salusin-α infusion reduces lesions. Salusin-β is expressed in proliferative neointimal lesions of porcine coronary arteries after stenting. Salusin-α and salusin-β immunoreactivity have been detected in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, with dominance of salusin-β in macrophage foam cells, VSMCs, and fibroblasts. Circulating salusin-β levels increase and salusin-α levels decrease in patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that salusin-β and salusin-α may contribute to proatherogenesis and antiatherogenesis, respectively. Increased salusin-β and/or decreased salusin-α levels in circulating blood and vascular tissue are closely linked with atherosclerosis. Salusin-α and salusin-β could be candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

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    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation...... in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all...

  10. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

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    Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Aims To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from...... genetic studies, prospective epidemiologic cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies, and randomized trials of LDL-lowering therapies. In clinical studies, plasma LDL burden is usually estimated by determination of plasma LDL cholesterol level (LDL-C). Rare genetic mutations that cause reduced LDL...... receptor function lead to markedly higher LDL-C and a dose-dependent increase in the risk of ASCVD, whereas rare variants leading to lower LDL-C are associated with a correspondingly lower risk of ASCVD. Separate meta-analyses of over 200 prospective cohort studies, Mendelian randomization studies...

  11. Estimating risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases in non-atherosclerotic Pakistani patients: Study conducted at National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi, Pakistan.

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    Ashraf, Tariq; Achakzai, Abdul Samad; Farooq, Fawad; Memon, Muhammad Anis; Mengal, Naeem; Abbas, Khawaja Yawar; Ishaq, Haroon; Mueed, Abdul

    2017-04-01

    To assess ten-year and lifetime estimated cardiovascular disease risks in non-atherosclerotic subjects. This cross-sectional study was carried out at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Karachi, from July 2014 to March 2015, and comprised male and female subjects with multi-ethnic background, aged 20-79 years and having non-atherosclerotic disease. SPSS 22 was used for data analysis. Of the 437 participants, 174(39.8%) were men and 263(60.2%) were women. The overall mean age was 42.65±11.45 years. The mean age of men was 43.3±12.1 years and that of women was 42.2±10.8 years. Moreover, ten-year and lifetime risk assessment rates were higher in men (50[28.2%] and 86[49.4%] respectively) compared to women (28[10.6%] and 84[31.9%], respectively). Urdu-speaking Pakistanis were found to be at higher risk from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  12. Mast cells in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease - Activators and actions.

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    Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2017-10-12

    Mast cells are potent actors involved in inflammatory reactions in various tissues, including both in the intimal and the adventitial layers of atherosclerotic arteries. In the arterial intima, the site of atherogenesis, mast cells are activated to degranulate, and thereby triggered to release an abundance of preformed inflammatory mediators, notably histamine, heparin, neutral proteases and cytokines stored in their cytoplasmic secretory granules. Depending on the stimulus, mast cell activation may also launch prolonged synthesis and secretion of single bioactive molecules, such as cytokines and derivatives of arachidonic acid. The mast cell-derived mediators may impede the functions of different types of cells present in atherosclerotic lesions, and also compromise the structural and functional integrity of the intimal extracellular matrix. In the adventitial layer of atherosclerotic coronary arteries, mast cells locate next to peptidergic sensory nerve fibers, which, by releasing neuropeptides may activate mast cells to release vasoactive compounds capable of triggering local vasoconstriction. The concerted actions of arterial mast cells have the potential to contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, and ultimately to destabilization and rupture of an advanced atherosclerotic plaque with ensuing atherothrombotic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Low circulating microRNA levels in heart failure patients are associated with atherosclerotic disease and cardiovascular-related rehospitalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Eline L.; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berezikov, Eugene; van der Meer, Peter; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Objective Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in both heart failure and atherosclerotic disease. The aim of this study was to examine associations between heart failure specific circulating miRNAs, atherosclerotic disease and cardiovascular-related outcome in patients with heart

  14. Renal glucosuria is not associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease outcome in a general Japanese community.

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    Tada, Hayato; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Sakata, Kenji; Yoneda, Takashi; Yasuda, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2017-06-01

    Renal glucosuria is defined as the excretion of detectable amounts of glucose in the urine without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Few data exist regarding the prevalence of renal glucosuria and its clinical impact on atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. This study included 47,842 subjects (16,913 men, 35.4%) aged ≥40 years who underwent the Japanese specific health checkup in Kanazawa City during 2014. We defined renal glucosuria as fulfillment of all of the following three criteria: 1) detectable glucosuria; 2) the absence of diabetes; 3) normal blood glucose (renal glucosuria and of factors associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and stroke, was assessed. The criteria for renal glucosuria were met by 665 (1.4%) subjects. Significantly higher proportions of subjects with renal glucosuria exhibited coronary artery disease, stroke, or either outcome than those without (14.9% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.0305; 9.9% vs. 6.9%, p = 0.00255; 22.3% vs. 17.0%, p = 4.0 × 10-4, respectively), but multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that renal glucosuria was not associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio [OR] = 0.940, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.748-1.171, not significant), stroke (OR = 1.122, 95% CI = 0.853-1.453, not significant), or atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (OR = 1.122, 95% CI = 0.853-1.453, not significant). These results indicate that the prevalence of renal glucosuria in the Japanese general population was 1.4%, and that renal glucosuria was not associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases per se. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: Innocent bystanders or partners in crime?

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    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-09

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline-based recommendations. These include regular CVD risk assessment, aggressive treatment of traditional CVD risk factors, and recognition of reduced CVD as an added benefit of strict inflammatory disease control. At present, chronic inflammatory diseases would appear to qualify as partners in crime and not merely innocent bystanders to CVD, but definite incremental contributions of inflammation versus effects of the complex interplay with other CVD risk factors may never be fully elucidated and for the foreseeable future, inflammation is posed to maintain its current position as both a marker and a maker of CVD, with clinical utility both for identification of patient at risk of CVD and as target for therapy to reduce CVD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Michael D. Shapiro

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol-rich, apolipoprotein B (apoB-containing lipoproteins are now widely accepted as the most important causal agents of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Multiple unequivocal and orthogonal lines of evidence all converge on low-density lipoprotein and related particles as being the principal actors in the genesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the fundamental role of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease and several other humoral and parietal factors that are required to initiate and maintain arterial degeneration. The biology of foam cells and their interactions with high-density lipoproteins, including cholesterol efflux, are also briefly reviewed.

  17. Magnesium in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and sudden death.

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    Singh, R B; Singh, V P; Cameron, E A

    1981-01-01

    Magnesium ions are important for maintaining the functional and structural integrity of the myocardium. Epidemiologic studies suggest that myocardial hypomagnecytia can predispose to sudden cardiac death and that hard water protective factor preventing heart attack could be magnesium. Recent studies show that infarcted portion of the myocardium has lowered magnesium content as compared to noninfarcted segment. Magnesium deficiency sensitises the myocardium to the toxic effect of various drugs, hypoxia etc. and magnesium administration is protective. The metabolic, biochemical and electrophysiologic effects of magnesium appear to be significant in treatment of myocardial ischaemia. Magnesium is a metal-coenzyme and activates adenosine-triphosphatase which may be inhibited by nonglucose fuels like lactate and free fatty acids. Magnesium deficiency may be responsible for the chronic electrical instability of the myocardium predisposing to sudden cardiac death. The acute precipitating stress dependent trigger which lie in the brain may also be related to magnesium. In addition to fast Na and Ca channels there could be a Mg-carrying transport system maintaining the electrical activity of the myocardium. There is sufficient evidence to suggest the use of magnesium salts against ischaemic heart disease and sudden cardiac death. Magnesium is cardioprotective and influences action potential duration, membrane potential and perhaps maintains the fast response. The therapeutic and prophylactic value of magnesium needs further assessment.

  18. Association Between Circulating Oxidized LDL and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies.

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    Gao, Shen; Zhao, Dong; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Fan; Han, Xueyu; Qi, Yue; Liu, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Although basic research has suggested that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, population observational studies have yielded conflicting results about the association between circulating ox-LDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of currently available observational studies to verify the association between circulating ox-LDL and ASCVD. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library from their inception to March 27, 2017, for nested case-control studies, case-cohort studies, and prospective cohort studies on the relationship between ox-LDL and ASCVD. Studies that did not assess the hazard ratio, relative risk, or odds ratio of ox-LDL or did not adjust for other risk factors, or those without examination of ox-LDL before collection of ASCVD occurrences were excluded. The summarized effect size was combined using fixed effect models. Subgroup analyses were performed on the basis of study quality, study design, definition of ASCVD events, effect size types, types of ox-LDL assay, ox-LDL contrast level, and whether low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was adjusted in a multivariate model. A total of 12 included studies consisted of 3 nested case-control studies, 1 case-cohort study, 5 hospital-based cohort studies, and 3 community-based cohort studies. The summary effect size of increased circulating ox-LDL was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.56-2.05) for ASCVD. Similar associations were shown in all subgroups. Our findings indicate that increased levels of circulating ox-LDL are associated with clinical ASCVD events. Further well designed community-based cohort studies or intervention studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea combined dyslipidemia render additive effect on increasing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases prevalence.

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    Cao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ping; He, Zhiqing; Yang, Jing; Liang, Chun; Ren, Yusheng; Wu, Zonggui

    2016-05-26

    Current study was designed to investigate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) combined dyslipidemia on the prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD). This was a cross-sectional study and subjects with documented dyslipidemia and without previous diagnosis of OSA were enrolled. Polysomnography was applied to evaluate apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Based on AHI value, subjects were classified into four groups: without OSA, mild, moderate and severe OSA groups. Clinical characteristics and laboratory examination data were recorded. Relationship between AHI event and lipid profiles was analyzed, and logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of OSA combined dyslipidemia on ASCVD prevalence. Totally 248 subjects with dyslipidemia were enrolled. Compared to the other 3 groups, subjects with severe OSA were older, male predominant and had higher smoking rate. In addition, subjects with severe OSA had higher body mass index, waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, and higher rates of overweight and obesity. Serum levels of fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, LDL-C and CRP were all significantly higher. ASCVD prevalence was considerably higher in subjects with severe OSA. AHI event in the severe OSA group was up to 35.4 ± 5.1 events per hour which was significantly higher than the other groups (P dyslipidemia plus no-OSA group (reference group), OSA enhanced ASCVD risk in subjects with dyslipidemia, regardless of OSA severity. After extensively adjusted for confounding variables, the odds of dyslipidemia plus mild-OSA was reduced to insignificance. While the effects of moderate- and severe-OSA on promoting ASCVD risk in subjects with dyslipidemia remained significant, with severe-OSA most prominent (odds ratio: 1.52, 95% confidence interval: 1.13-2.02). OSA combined dyslipidemia conferred additive adverse effects on cardiovascular system, with severe-OSA most prominent.

  20. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: New Insights From Epidemiology, Genetics, and Biology.

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    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-02-19

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need to reduce levels to no advice on treatment. New insight in epidemiology now suggests that these lipoproteins, marked by high triglycerides, are strong and independent predictors of ASCVD and all-cause mortality, and that their cholesterol content or remnant cholesterol likewise are strong predictors of ASCVD. Of all adults, 27% have triglycerides >2 mmol/L (176 mg/dL), and 21% have remnant cholesterol >1 mmol/L (39 mg/dL). For individuals in the general population with nonfasting triglycerides of 6.6 mmol/L (580 mg/dL) compared with individuals with levels of 0.8 mmol/L (70 mg/dL), the risks were 5.1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all-cause mortality. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Long-Term Risk of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in US Adults With the Familial Hypercholesterolemia Phenotype.

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    Perak, Amanda M; Ning, Hongyan; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Gooding, Holly C; Wilkins, John T; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-05

    Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) affects up to 1 in 200 individuals in the United States, but atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) outcomes of FH in the general US population have not been described. We therefore sought to evaluate long-term coronary heart disease (CHD) and total ASCVD risks in US adults with an FH phenotype. Using individual pooled data from 6 large US epidemiological cohorts, we stratified participants by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level at index ages from 20 to 79 years. For the primary analysis, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≥190 and definition. We used Cox regression models to assess covariate-adjusted associations of the FH phenotype with 30-year hazards for CHD (CHD death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) and total ASCVD (CHD or stroke). We included 68 565 baseline person-examinations; 3850 (5.6%) had the FH phenotype by the primary definition. Follow-up across index ages ranged from 78 985 to 308 378 person-years. After covariate adjustment, the FH phenotype was associated with substantially elevated 30-year CHD risk, with hazard ratios up to 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-21.7). Across index ages, CHD risk was accelerated in those with the FH phenotype by 10 to 20 years in men and 20 to 30 years in women. Similar patterns of results were found for total ASCVD risk, with hazard ratios up to 4.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-13.4). Alternative FH phenotype definitions incorporating family history, more stringent age-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol thresholds, or alternative lipid fractions decreased the FH phenotype prevalence to as low as 0.2% to 0.4% without materially affecting CHD risk estimates (hazard ratios up to 8.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-61.6). In the general US population, the long-term ASCVD burden related to phenotypic FH, defined by low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥190 mg/dL, is likely substantial. Our finding of CHD risk acceleration may aid

  2. Association of kidney stones with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease among adults in the United States: Considerations by race-ethnicity.

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    Glover, LaShaunta M; Bass, Martha Ann; Carithers, Teresa; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    There is a paucity of research examining the relationship between kidney stones and risk of cardiovascular disease while considering individuals of different race-ethnicities. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between history of kidney stones and increased odds of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (via the Pooled Cohort Equations) across race-ethnicity groups. 5571 participants aged 40-79 from the 2007-2012 cycles of the NHANES were used for this study. A history of kidney stones was collected from survey data. Predicted odds of having a 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) event was assessed from the Pooled Cohort Equations. After adjustments, having kidney stones was not associated with an increase odds of having an ASCVD event within the next 10-years (OR 1.03; 95% CI: 0.58-1.82, P=0.91). However, among non-Hispanic blacks, those with kidney stones had a 2.24 increased odds (OR 2.24; 95% CI: 1.08-4.66; P=0.03) of having an ASCVD event within the next 10-years when compared to non-Hispanic blacks with no history of a kidney stone. Kidney stones were associated with 10-year risk of a future ASCVD event among non-Hispanic blacks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Do the Effects of Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in PAD Patients Differ from Other Atherosclerotic Disease?

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    Poredos, Pavel; Jezovnik, Mateja Kaja

    2015-06-25

    Atherosclerosis is considered a generalized disease. Similar or identical etiopathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors are involved in various atherosclerotic diseases, and the positive effects of preventive measures on atherogenesis in different parts of the arterial system were shown. However, until know, great emphasis has been placed on the aggressive pharmacological management of coronary artery disease (CHD), while less attention has been devoted to the management of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), despite its significant morbidity and mortality. Data on the efficacy of preventive measures in PAD patients have mostly been gained from subgroup analyses from studies devoted primarily to the management of coronary patients. These data have shown that treatment of risk factors for atherosclerosis with drugs can reduce cardiovascular events also in patients with PAD. The effects of some preventive procedures in PAD patients differ from coronary patients. Aspirin as a basic antiplatelet drug has been shown to be less effective in PAD patients than in coronary patients. The latest Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration (ATC) meta-analysis demonstrates no benefit of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular events in PAD. Statins reduce cardiovascular events in all three of the most frequently presented cardiovascular diseases, including PAD to a comparable extent. Recent studies indicate that in PAD patients, in addition to a reduction in cardiovascular events, statins may have some hemodynamic effects. They prolong walking distance and improve quality of life. Similarly, angiotensin enzyme inhibitors are also effective in the prevention of cardiovascular events in coronary, cerebrovascular, as well as PAD patients and show positive effects on the walking capacity of patients with intermittent claudication. In PAD patients, the treatment of hypertension and diabetes also effectively prevents cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As PAD patients are at a highest risk

  4. Associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid intima-media thickness and manifest atherosclerotic vascular disease with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liira Helena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of atherosclerosis in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS has not previously been addressed in population studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of cardiovascular risk factors, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT, and clinical atherosclerotic diseases with CTS. Methods In this cross sectional study, the target population consisted of subjects aged 30 or over who had participated in the national Finnish Health Survey in 2000-2001. Of the 7977 eligible subjects, 6254 (78.4% were included in our study. Carotid IMT was measured in a sub-sample of subjects aged 45 to 74 (N = 1353. Results Obesity (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.1-5.4, high LDL cholesterol (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.6-9.1 for >190 vs. 200 vs. Conclusions Our findings suggest an association between CTS and cardiovascular risk factors in young people, and carotid IMT and clinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in older people. CTS may either be a manifestation of atherosclerosis, or both conditions may share similar risk factors.

  5. Treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in adults: Synopsis of the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline

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    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading U.S. cause of death, lost quality of life and medical costs. Nearly one in three Americans die from heart disease and stroke. Most ASCVD is preventable through a healthy lifestyle and effective treatment of cholesterol and blood pressure...

  6. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

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    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  7. Fixed-dose combination therapy for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

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    Bahiru, Ehete; de Cates, Angharad N; Farr, Matthew Rb; Jarvis, Morag C; Palla, Mohan; Rees, Karen; Ebrahim, Shah; Huffman, Mark D

    2017-03-06

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet ASCVD risk factor control and secondary prevention rates remain low. A fixed-dose combination of blood pressure- and cholesterol-lowering and antiplatelet treatments into a single pill, or polypill, has been proposed as one strategy to reduce the global burden of ASCVD. To determine the effect of fixed-dose combination therapy on all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal ASCVD events, and adverse events. We also sought to determine the effect of fixed-dose combination therapy on blood pressure, lipids, adherence, discontinuation rates, health-related quality of life, and costs. We updated our previous searches in September 2016 of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, ISI Web of Science, and DARE, HTA, and HEED. We also searched two clinical trials registers in September 2016. We used no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of a fixed-dose combination therapy including at least one blood pressure-lowering and one lipid-lowering component versus usual care, placebo, or an active drug comparator for any treatment duration in adults 18 years old or older, with no restrictions on presence or absence of pre-existing ASCVD. Three review authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted the data for this update. We evaluated risk of bias using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MD) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using fixed-effect models when heterogeneity was low (I2 50%) and random-effects models when heterogeneity was high (I2 ≥ 50%). We used the GRADE approach to evaluate the quality of evidence. In the initial review, we identified nine randomised controlled trials with a total of 7047 participants and four additional trials (n = 2012 participants; mean age range 62 to 63 years; 30% to 37% women) were included in this

  8. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. 1. Evidence from genetic, epidemiologic, and clinical studies. A consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ference, Brian A; Ginsberg, Henry N; Graham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results: We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence f...

  9. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. 1. Evidence from genetic, epidemiologic, and clinical studies. A consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian; Ray, Kausik K.; Packard, Chris J.; Bruckert, Eric; Hegele, Robert A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Raal, Frederick J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Watts, Gerald F.; Boren, Jan; Fazio, Sergio; Horton, Jay D.; Masana, Luis; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; van de Sluis, Bart; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Landmesser, Ulf; Laufs, Ulrich; Wiklund, Olov; Stock, Jane K.; Chapman, M. John; Catapano, Alberico L.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results: We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from

  10. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  11. The Emerging Epidemic of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Atherosclerotic Disease in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Koon K; Dokainish, Hisham

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its risk factors, which are major health burdens in high-income countries, are a growing problem in developing or lower-income countries, where the vast majority of CVD now occurs. Two case-control studies, INTERHEART and INTERSTROKE, which included a majority of patients from developing countries, were seminal in identifying common risk factors explaining the vast majority of risk for acute myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. The population-based Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study, which included > 150,000 participants, also with a majority from developing countries, found that although high-income countries were at highest cardiovascular (CV) risk, they had the lowest incidence of CVD and associated case-fatality rates, whereas patients in low-income countries had the lowest CV risk and yet the highest CVD and case-fatality rates. The PURE study also demonstrated relatively low rates of CV medicine use in high- and middle-income countries, but even lower rates in low-income countries, where these medicines were often either unavailable or unaffordable. The PURE study also demonstrated that control of CV risk factors and adherence to lifestyle modifications, although suboptimal globally, were poorest in low-income countries. Taken together, these data identify common CV risk factors requiring targeted, systematic, sustained, and effective interventions in developing countries to mitigate the emerging epidemic of CVD in these regions of the world. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Atorvastatin therapy modulates telomerase activity in patients free of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Strazhesko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background— Telomerase activity (TA is considered as the biomarker for cardiovascular aging and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies suggest a link between statins and telomere biology that may be explained by anti-inflammatory actions of statins and their positive effect on TA. Until now this effect has not been investigated in prospective randomized studies.We hypothesized that 12 months of atorvastatin therapy increased TA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.Methods—In a randomized, placebo-controlled study 100 hypercholesterolemic patients, aged 35–75 years, free of known cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 received 20 mg of atorvastatin daily or placebo for 12 months. TA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.Results—At study end 82 patients had sufficient peripheral blood mononuclear cells needed for longitudinal analysis. TA expressed as natural logarithms changed from 0.46±0.05 to 0.68±0.06 (p=0.004 in the atorvastatin group and from 0.67±0.06 to 0.60±0.07 (P=0.477 in the control group. In multiple regression analysis, atorvastatin therapy was the only independent predictor (p=0.05 of the changes in TA independently of markers of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Atorvastatin therapy was associated with increases in IL-6 within the normal range and a tendency towards reductionin blood urea.Conclusions—These initial observations suggest atorvastatin can act as telomerase activator and potentially as effective geroprotector.

  13. [Prevalence and extent of coronary artery calcification in an asymptomatic cardiovascular Mexican population: Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas-Romero, Carlos; López-Bautista, Fabiola; Rodas-Díaz, Marco A; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Kimura-Hayama, Eric; Juárez-Rojas, Juan G; Medina-Urrutia, Aida X; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo C; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Jorge-Galarza, Esteban

    The prevalence of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a specific marker of atherosclerosis, is unknown in Mexico. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and quantity of CAC and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in a Mexican population. CAC was measured by multidetector computed tomography in asymptomatic subjects who participated in the Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease study. Cardiovascular risk factors and medication were recorded. The sample included 1,423 individuals (49.5% men), aged 53.7±8.4 years. Those with CAC showed a higher prevalence of dyslipidaemia, diabetes, hypertension, and other risk factors. The prevalence of CAC>0 Agatston units was significantly higher among men (40%) than among women (13%). Mean values of CAC score increased consistently with increasing age and were higher in men than women in each age group. Age and high low density lipoprotein cholesterol were independently associated with prevalence of CAC>0 in men and women, while increasing systolic blood pressure in women and age in both genders showed an independent association with CAC extension. In the Mexican population the prevalence and extent of CAC were much higher in men than in women, and strongly increased with age. Independent predictors of CAC prevalence were age and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. The American Journal of Cardiology and Journal of Periodontology editors' consensus: periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedewald, Vincent E; Kornman, Kenneth S; Beck, James D; Genco, Robert; Goldfine, Allison; Libby, Peter; Offenbacher, Steven; Ridker, Paul M; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Roberts, William C

    2009-07-01

    This Editors' Consensus is supported by an educational grant from Colgate-Palmolive, Inc., New York, New York, and is based on a meeting of the authors held in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 9, 2009. Dr. Friedewald has received honoraria for speaking from Novartis, East Hanover, New Jersey. Dr. Kornman is a full-time employee and shareholder of Interleukin Genetics, Waltham, Massachusetts, which owns patents on genetic biomarkers for chronic inflammatory diseases. Dr. Genco is a consultant to Merck, Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. Dr. Ridker has received research support from AstraZeneca, Wilmington, Delaware; Novartis; Pfizer, New York, New York; Roche, Nutley, New Jersey; Sanofi-Aventis, Bridgewater, New Jersey; and Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois. Dr. Ridker has received non-financial research support from Amgen, Thousand Oaks, California. Dr. Ridker is a co-inventor on patents held by Brigham and Women's Hospital that relate to the use of inflammatory biomarkers in cardiovascular disease. Dr. Ridker is a research consultant for Schering-Plough, Kenilworth, New Jersey; Sanofi-Aventis; AstraZeneca; Isis, Carlsbad, California; Novartis; and Vascular Biogenics, Tel Aviv, Israel. Dr. Van Dyke is a co-inventor on patents held by Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, that relate to inflammation control, including consulting fees. Dr. Roberts has received honoraria for speaking from Merck, Schering-Plough, AstraZeneca, and Novartis. All other individuals in a position to control content disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia or Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Dhruv S; Moran, Andrew E; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Ollendorf, Daniel A; Pearson, Steven D; Tice, Jeffrey A; Guzman, David; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2016-08-16

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors were recently approved for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and have potential for broad ASCVD prevention. Their long-term cost-effectiveness and effect on total health care spending are uncertain. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 inhibitors and their potential effect on US health care spending. The Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model, a simulation model of US adults aged 35 to 94 years, was used to evaluate cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 inhibitors or ezetimibe in heterozygous FH or ASCVD. The model incorporated 2015 annual PCSK9 inhibitor costs of $14,350 (based on mean wholesale acquisition costs of evolocumab and alirocumab); adopted a health-system perspective, lifetime horizon; and included probabilistic sensitivity analyses to explore uncertainty. Statin therapy compared with addition of ezetimibe or PCSK9 inhibitors. Lifetime major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or stroke), incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), and total effect on US health care spending over 5 years. Adding PCSK9 inhibitors to statins in heterozygous FH was estimated to prevent 316,300 MACE at a cost of $503,000 per QALY gained compared with adding ezetimibe to statins (80% uncertainty interval [UI], $493,000-$1,737,000). In ASCVD, adding PCSK9 inhibitors to statins was estimated to prevent 4.3 million MACE compared with adding ezetimibe at $414,000 per QALY (80% UI, $277,000-$1,539,000). Reducing annual drug costs to $4536 per patient or less would be needed for PCSK9 inhibitors to be cost-effective at less than $100,000 per QALY. At 2015 prices, PCSK9 inhibitor use in all eligible patients was estimated to reduce cardiovascular care costs by $29 billion over 5 years, but drug costs increased by an estimated $592 billion (a 38

  16. Patient-Provider Communication and Health Outcomes Among Individuals With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease in the United States: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunrintemi, Victor; Spatz, Erica S; Di Capua, Paul; Salami, Joseph A; Valero-Elizondo, Javier; Warraich, Haider; Virani, Salim S; Blaha, Michael J; Blankstein, Ron; Butt, Adeel A; Borden, William B; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Ting, Henry; Krumholz, Harlan M; Nasir, Khurram

    2017-04-01

    Consumer-reported patient-provider communication (PPC) assessed by Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey in ambulatory settings is incorporated as a complementary value metric for patient-centered care of chronic conditions in pay-for-performance programs. In this study, we examine the relationship of PPC with select indicators of patient-centered care in a nationally representative US adult population with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The study population consisted of a nationally representative sample of 6810 individuals (aged ≥18 years), representing 18.3 million adults with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (self-reported or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition diagnosis) reporting a usual source of care in the 2010 to 2013 pooled Medical Expenditure Panel Survey cohort. Participants responded to questions from Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey that assessed PPC, and we developed a weighted PPC composite score using their responses, categorized as 1 (poor), 2 (average), and 3 (optimal). Outcomes of interest were (1) patient-reported outcomes: 12-item Short Form physical/mental health status, (2) quality of care measures: statin and ASA use, (3) healthcare resource utilization: emergency room visits and hospital stays, and (4) total annual and out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease patients reporting poor versus optimal were over 2-fold more likely to report poor outcomes; 52% and 26% more likely to report that they are not on statin and aspirin, respectively, had a significantly greater utilization of health resources (odds ratio≥2 emergency room visit, 1.41 [95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.81]; odds ratio≥2 hospitalization, 1.36 [95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.79]), as well as an estimated $1243 ($127-$2359) higher annual healthcare expenditure. This study reveals a strong relationship between PPC and patient-reported outcomes, utilization of

  17. Is carotid artery evaluation necessary for primary prevention in asymptomatic high-risk patients without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim GH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available GeeHee Kim,1 Ho-Joong Youn,2 Yun-Seok Choi,2 Hae Ok Jung,2 Wook Sung Chung,2 Chul-Min Kim1 1Department of Internal Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objective: Routine measurement of the carotid intima–media thickness is not recommended in recent clinical practice guidelines for risk assessment of the first atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD event (the definition of which includes acute coronary syndromes, a history of myocardial infarction, stable or unstable angina, coronary or other arterial revascularization, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or peripheral arterial disease presumed to be of atherosclerotic origin. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of carotid artery evaluation for primary prevention of ASCVD in asymptomatic high-risk patients visiting a teaching hospital.Methods: Eight hundred seventy-three patients (487 male [55.8%], mean age 59.4±11.5 years who were statin-naive and without ASCVD, which was proven by coronary angiography or coronary CT angiography, were enrolled in this study. The patients underwent carotid scanning in the Medical Department of St Mary’s Hospital from September 2003 to March 2009. ASCVD outcomes were evaluated for median follow-up of 1,402 days.Results: A total of 119 participants experienced ASCVD events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR] =1.026, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.002–1.050, P=0.033, history of smoking (HR =1.751, 95% CI =1.089–2.815, P=0.021, statin therapy (HR =0.388, 95% CI =0.205–0.734, P=0.004, and carotid plaques (HR =1.556, 95% CI =1.009–2.400, P=0.045 were associated with ASCVD events. In middle-aged group (45≤ age <65, n=473, history of smoking (HR =1.995, 95% CI =1.142–3.485, P=0.015, statin therapy (HR =0.320, 95% CI =0.131

  18. Periodontitis is an independent risk indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases among 60?174 participants in a large dental school in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Beukers, Nicky G F M; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; van Wijk, Arjen J; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ACVD) has been established in some modestly sized studies (35?years (period 1998?2013). A participant was recorded as having periodontitis based on diagnostic and treatment codes. Any affirmative answer for cerebrovascular accidents, angina pectoris and/or myocardial infarction labelled a participant as having ACVD. Other risk factors for ACVD, notably age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, hyper...

  19. Vorapaxar in atherosclerotic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Judy W M; Colucci, Vincent; Howard, Patricia A; Nappi, Jean M; Spinler, Sarah A

    2015-05-01

    To review the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of vorapaxar, a protease activator receptor-1 (PAR-1) antagonist, in the management of atherosclerotic diseases. Peer-reviewed clinical trials and review articles were identified from MEDLINE and Current Content database (both 1966 to December 31, 2014) using the search terms vorapaxar and protease activator receptor antagonist. A total of 30 clinical studies were identified (16 clinical trials, including subanalyses, 14 related to pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics and drug interactions). Two phase III clinical trials with vorapaxar have been published. In patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI), vorapaxar failed to significantly reduce the primary efficacy end point (composite of cardiovascular death, MI, stroke, recurrent ischemia with hospitalization, and urgent coronary revascularization). Conversely, in a study of secondary prevention for patients with cardiovascular disease, the composite end point of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke was significantly reduced. In both trials, the safety end points of major/minor bleeding were increased compared with placebo. In the secondary prevention trial, an increased incidence of intracranial hemorrhage led to the exclusion of patients with a prior history of stroke. Vorapaxar is approved for use with aspirin and/or clopidogrel in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in stable patients with peripheral arterial disease or a history of MI. However, the addition of vorapaxar to other antiplatelets can significantly increase the risk of bleeding. It is, therefore, essential to balance the need for further reduction of risk of thrombotic event with patient's individual bleeding risk. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The ACC/AHA 2013 pooled cohort equations compared to a Korean Risk Prediction Model for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keum Ji; Jang, Yangsoo; Oh, Dong Joo; Oh, Byung-Hee; Lee, Sang Hoon; Park, Seong-Wook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Yun, Young Duk; Choi, Sung Hee; Sung, Jidong; Lee, Tae-Yong; Kim, Sung Hi; Koh, Sang Baek; Kim, Moon Chan; Chang Kim, Hyeon; Kimm, Heejin; Nam, Chungmo; Park, Sungha; Jee, Sun Ha

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the performance of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) 2013 Pooled Cohort Equations in the Korean Heart Study (KHS) population and to develop a Korean Risk Prediction Model (KRPM) for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events. The KHS cohort included 200,010 Korean adults aged 40-79 years who were free from ASCVD at baseline. Discrimination, calibration, and recalibration of the ACC/AHA Equations in predicting 10-year ASCVD risk in the KHS cohort were evaluated. The KRPM was derived using Cox model coefficients, mean risk factor values, and mean incidences from the KHS cohort. In the discriminatory analysis, the ACC/AHA Equations' White and African-American (AA) models moderately distinguished cases from non-cases, and were similar to the KRPM: For men, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCs) were 0.727 (White model), 0.725 (AA model), and 0.741 (KRPM); for women, the corresponding AUROCs were 0.738, 0.739, and 0.745. Absolute 10-year ASCVD risk for men in the KHS cohort was overestimated by 56.5% (White model) and 74.1% (AA model), while the risk for women was underestimated by 27.9% (White model) and overestimated by 29.1% (AA model). Recalibration of the ACC/AHA Equations did not affect discriminatory ability but improved calibration substantially, especially in men in the White model. Of the three ASCVD risk prediction models, the KRPM showed best calibration. The ACC/AHA Equations should not be directly applied for ASCVD risk prediction in a Korean population. The KRPM showed best predictive ability for ASCVD risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Residual atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in statin-treated adults: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan D; Zhao, Yanglu; Quek, Ruben G W; Blumenthal, Roger S; Budoff, Matthew J; Cushman, Mary; Garg, Parveen; Sandfort, Veit; Tsai, Michael; Lopez, J Antonio G

    Residual atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk in statin-treated US adults without known ASCVD is not well described. To quantitate residual ASCVD risk and its predictors in statin-treated adults. We studied 1014 statin-treated adults (53.3% female, mean 66.0 years) free of clinical ASCVD in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. We examined ASCVD event rates by National Lipid Association risk groups over 11-year follow-up and the relation of standard risk factors, biomarkers, and subclinical atherosclerosis measures with residual ASCVD event risk. Overall, 5.3% of participants were at low, 12.2% at moderate, 60.3% at high, and 22.2% at very high baseline risk. Despite statin therapy, age- and race-standardized ASCVD rates per 1000 person-years for men and women were both 4.9 for low/moderate risk, 19.1 and 14.2 for high risk, and 35.6 and 26.7 for very high risk, respectively. Specific independent predictors of residual risk included current smoking, family history, diabetes, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein particle number, carotid intimal medial thickness, and especially coronary artery calcium score. Those on moderate- or high-intensity statins at baseline (compared with low intensity) had 39% lower risks and those who increased statin intensity 62% lower ASCVD event risks (P < .01). Residual risk of ASCVD remains high despite statin treatment and is predicted by specific risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. These findings may be helpful for identifying those at highest risk needing more aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids in humans with stable atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theken, Katherine N; Schuck, Robert N; Edin, Matthew L; Tran, Bryant; Ellis, Kyle; Bass, Almasa; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Wu, Michael C; Hinderliter, Alan L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Stouffer, George A; Lee, Craig R

    2012-06-01

    Preclinical and genetic epidemiologic studies suggest that modulating cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism may have therapeutic utility in the management of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, predictors of inter-individual variation in CYP-derived eicosanoid metabolites in CAD patients have not been evaluated to date. Therefore, the primary objective was to identify clinical factors that influence CYP epoxygenase, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), and CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolism in patients with established CAD. Plasma levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS in a population of patients with stable, angiographically confirmed CAD (N=82) and healthy volunteers from the local community (N=36). Predictors of CYP epoxygenase, sEH, and CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolic function were evaluated by regression. Obesity was significantly associated with low plasma EET levels and 14,15-EET:14,15-DHET ratios. Age, diabetes, and cigarette smoking also were significantly associated with CYP epoxygenase and sEH metabolic activity, while only renin-angiotensin system inhibitor use was associated with CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolic activity. Compared to healthy volunteers, both obese and non-obese CAD patients had significantly higher plasma EETs (Ppatients, and demonstrate that biomarkers of CYP epoxygenase and sEH, but not CYP ω-hydroxylase, metabolism are altered in stable CAD patients relative to healthy individuals. Future studies are necessary to determine the therapeutic utility of modulating these pathways in patients with CAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiovascular outcomes in patients with peripheral arterial disease as an initial or subsequent manifestation of atherosclerotic disease: Results from a Swedish nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvant, Birgitta; Hasvold, Pål; Kragsterman, Björn; Falkenberg, Mårten; Johansson, Saga; Thuresson, Marcus; Nordanstig, Joakim

    2017-08-01

    Long-term progression of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) as initial manifestation of atherosclerotic arterial disease is not well described. Cardiovascular (CV) risk was examined in different PAD populations diagnosed in a hospital setting in Sweden. Data for this retrospective cohort study were retrieved by linking data on morbidity, medication use, and mortality from Swedish national registries. Primary CV outcome was a composite of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke (IS), and CV death. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for describing risk and relative risk. Of 66,189 patients with an incident PAD diagnosis (2006-2013), 40,136 had primary PAD, 16,786 had PAD + coronary heart disease (CHD), 5803 had PAD + IS, and 3464 had PAD + IS + CHD. One-year cumulative incidence rates of major CV events for the groups were 12%, 21%, 29%, and 34%, respectively. Corresponding numbers for 1-year all-cause death were 16%, 22%, 33%, and 35%. Compared with the primary PAD population, the relative risk increase for CV events was highest in patients with PAD + IS + CHD (hazard ratio [HR], 2.01), followed by PAD + IS (HR, 1.87) and PAD + CHD (HR, 1.42). Despite being younger, the primary PAD population was less intensively treated with secondary preventive drug therapy. PAD as initial manifestation of atherosclerotic disease diagnosed in a hospital-based setting conferred a high risk: one in eight patients experienced a major CV event and one in six patients died within 1 year. Despite younger age and substantial risk of future major CV events, patients with primary PAD received less intensive secondary preventive drug therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. International differences in dialysis mortality reflect background general population atherosclerotic cardiovascular mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshino, Maki; Kuhlmann, Martin K.; Kotanko, Peter; Greenwood, Roger N.; Pisoni, Ronald L.; Port, Friedrich K.; Jager, Kitty J.; Homel, Peter; Augustijn, Hans; de Charro, Frank T.; Collart, Frederic; Erek, Ekrem; Finne, Patrik; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Ioannidis, George A.; Ivis, Frank; Leivestad, Torbjorn; Løkkegaard, Hans; Lopot, Frantisek; Jin, Dong-Chan; Kramar, Reinhard; Nakao, Toshiyuki; Nandakumar, Mooppil; Ramirez, Sylvia; van der Sande, Frank M.; Schön, Staffan; Simpson, Keith; Walker, Rowan G.; Zaluska, Wojciech; Levin, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    Existing national, racial, and ethnic differences in dialysis patient mortality rates largely are unexplained. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that mortality rates related to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in dialysis populations (DP) and in the background general populations

  5. New cholesterol guidelines for the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk: a comparison of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines with the 2014 National Lipid Association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhyaru, Bhavin B; Jacobson, Terry A

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and compares it with the 2014 National Lipid Association (NLA) Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia. The review discusses some of the distinctions between the guidelines, including how to determine a patient's atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, the role of lipoprotein treatment targets, the importance of moderate- and high-intensity statin therapy, and the use of nonstatin therapy in light of the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors and platelet aggregation inhibitors among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and depression or anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Douglas Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medications commonly used to treat heart disease, anxiety, and depression can interact resulting in an increased risk of bleeding, warranting a cautious approach in medical decision making. This retrospective, descriptive study examined the prevalence and the factors associated with the use of both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression. Methods: Respondents aged 22 years and older, alive throughout the study period, and diagnosed with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression (n = 1507 in years 2007 through 2013 of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey were included. The use of treatment was grouped as follows: selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Results: Overall, 16.5% used both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, 61.2% used selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and 22.3% used neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Respondents aged over 65 years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–3.45 and having a diagnosis of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–2.31 and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–3.27 were more likely to be prescribed the combination. Conclusion: The drug interaction was prevalent in patients who are already at higher risk of health disparities and worse outcomes thus requiring vigilant evaluation.

  7. Elevated cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, a major determinant of the atherogenic dyslipidemia, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in South Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Shirya; Sniderman, Allan; Melone, Michelle; Brown, Patrick E; Otvos, James D; Mente, Andrew; Schulze, Karleen; McQueen, Matthew J; Anand, Sonia S; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-04-01

    Why South Asians are at increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases compared with other ethnic groups is not fully understood. Atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia - hypertriglyceridemia, elevated numbers of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) - is more common in South Asians but the mechanisms responsible have not been explicated. Here we examined whether the circulating lipid transfer protein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), plays a role in the pathogenesis of the atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia among South Asians. CETP activity was determined by exogenous substrate assay in the serum of healthy, metabolically well-characterized individuals of South Asian and European descent (N = 244 and 238, respectively). Serum and lipoprotein lipids and apolipoproteins were measured and lipoprotein particle number and size were quantified via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the elements of the atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia were more severe in South Asians and CETP activity was significantly greater by 30% in South Asians compared with Europeans, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and waist circumference (p < 0.0001). CETP activity was directly associated with serum triglycerides and inversely with HDL-C in the whole population. CETP activity was also directly related to apoB and LDL particle number. Finally, increased CETP activity was associated with pro-atherogenic reductions in HDL and LDL particle size. We identified novel associations between elevated CETP activity and the triad of quantitative and qualitative lipoprotein abnormalities in the atherogenic dyslipidemia in South Asians, a major contributor of increased atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases in South Asians. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Genetic risks for cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafarmand, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), which involves the heart, brain, and peripheral circulation, is a major health problem world-wide. The development of atherosclerosis is a complex process, and several established risk factors are involved. Nevertheless, these established risk factors

  9. Moderate overweight is beneficial and severe obesity detrimental for patients with documented atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azimi, Aziza; Charlot, Mette Gitz; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is paradoxically associated with enhanced survival in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We explored this paradox further by examining the influence of obesity on survival in patients with verified atherosclerotic heart disease.......Obesity is paradoxically associated with enhanced survival in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We explored this paradox further by examining the influence of obesity on survival in patients with verified atherosclerotic heart disease....

  10. Assessing Level of Agreement for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Categorization Between Coronary Artery Calcium Score and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cardiovascular Prevention Guidelines and the Potential Impact on Treatment Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isma'eel, Hussain; Min, David; Al-Shaar, Laila; Hachamovitch, Rory; Halliburton, Sandra; Gentry, James; Griffin, Brian; Schoenhagen, Paul; Phelan, Dermot

    2016-11-15

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cardiovascular prevention guidelines use a new pooled cohort equation (PCE) to predict 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events which form the basis of treatment recommendations. Coronary artery calcium score (CACS) has been proposed as a means to assess atherosclerotic risk. We sought to study the level of agreement in predicted ASCVD risk by CACS and PCE-calculated models and the potential impact on therapy of additional CACS testing. We studied 687 treatment naive, consecutive patients (mean age 53.5 years, 72% men) who had a CACS study at our institution. Clinical and imaging data were recorded. ASCVD risk was calculated using the published PCE-based algorithm. CACS-based risk was categorized by previously published recommendations. Risk stratification comparisons were made and level of agreement calculated. In the cohort, mean ASCVD PCE-calculated risk was 5.3 ± 5.2% and mean CACS was 80 ± 302 Agatston units (AU). Of the intermediate PCE-calculated risk (5% to guidelines, 40% had a CACS of 0 AU and an additional 44% had CACS >0 but <100 AU. The level of agreement between the new PCE model of ASCVD risk and demonstrable coronary artery calcium is low. CACS testing may be most beneficial in those with an intermediate risk of ASCVD (PCE-calculated risk of 5% to <7.5%) where, in approximately half of patients, CACS testing significantly refined risk assessment primarily into a very low-risk category. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Periodontitis is an independent risk indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases among 60 174 participants in a large dental school in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukers, Nicky G F M; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; van Wijk, Arjen J; Loos, Bruno G

    2017-01-01

    The association between periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ACVD) has been established in some modestly sized studies (periodontitis has been studied directly; often tooth loss or self-reported periodontitis has been used as a proxy measure for periodontitis. Our aim is to investigate the adjusted association between periodontitis and ACVD among all individuals registered in a large dental school in the Netherlands (Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA)). Anonymised data were extracted from the electronic health records for all registered patients aged >35 years (period 1998-2013). A participant was recorded as having periodontitis based on diagnostic and treatment codes. Any affirmative answer for cerebrovascular accidents, angina pectoris and/or myocardial infarction labelled a participant as having ACVD. Other risk factors for ACVD, notably age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and social economic status, were also extracted. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the adjusted associations between periodontitis and ACVD. 60 174 individuals were identified; 4.7% of the periodontitis participants (455/9730) and 1.9% of the non-periodontitis participants (962/50 444) reported ACVD; periodontitis showed a significant association with ACVD (OR 2.52; 95% CI 2.3 to 2.8). After adjustment for the confounders, periodontitis remained independently associated with ACVD (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.39 to 1.81). With subsequent stratification for age and sex, periodontitis remained independently associated with ACVD. This cross-sectional analysis of a large cohort in the Netherlands of 60 174 participants shows the independent association of periodontitis with ACVD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Impact of National Health Checkup Service on Hard Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Events and All-Cause Mortality in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Yongsung; Lee, Chan Joo; Cho, Deok-Kyu; Cho, Yun-Hyeong; Shin, Dong-Ho; Ahn, Chul-Min; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2017-11-15

    Whether health checkups favorably impact the occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and all-cause mortality in the general population remains in debate. We investigated further the impact of health checkups on hard ASCVD events and all-cause mortality. We compared the occurrence of hard ASCVD events and all-cause deaths for 4 years starting in 2010 between participants who used the National Health Checkup Service (NHCS) more than twice and nonparticipants who never used the NHCS from 2006 to 2009. From the 342,594 survivors aged 40 to 69 years old in 2006 listed in the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort, a total of 55,275 pairs were selected by propensity matching. Hard ASCVD events were defined as the composite of myocardial infarction and stroke. In the 55,275 matched pairs, we found a significant association between the use of the NHCS and the reduction in hard ASCVD events (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.76 to 0.92, p medical care, including outpatient care and hospitalizations, and took more hypertension and dyslipidemia medications, whereas hospitalizations for more than 60 days were significantly more frequent in the nonparticipants. In the subgroup analysis, the reduction in hard ASCVD events for NHCS participants was significantly greater in patients without a previous history of dyslipidemia or who did not have outpatient care. In conclusion, the use of the NHCS was significantly associated with reduced hard ASCVD events and all-cause mortality in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Anacetrapib in Patients with Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowman, Louise; Hopewell, Jemma C; Chen, Fang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease remain at high risk for cardiovascular events despite effective statin-based treatment of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. The inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) by anacetrapib reduces LDL cholesterol...... vascular disease who were receiving intensive atorvastatin therapy and who had a mean LDL cholesterol level of 61 mg per deciliter (1.58 mmol per liter), a mean non-HDL cholesterol level of 92 mg per deciliter (2.38 mmol per liter), and a mean HDL cholesterol level of 40 mg per deciliter (1.03 mmol per...... was lower by 17 mg per deciliter (0.44 mmol per liter), a relative difference of -18%. There were no significant between-group differences in the risk of death, cancer, or other serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with atherosclerotic vascular disease who were receiving intensive statin...

  14. Plasma CTGF is independently related to an increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with atherosclerotic disease : the SMART study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Karin G.; Falke, Lucas L.; van Vuuren, Stefan H.; Leeuwis, Jan W.; Broekhuizen, Roel; Nguyen, Tri Q.; de Borst, Gert Jan; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Kok, Robbert J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/170678326; Goldschmeding, Roel; Visseren, Frank L.; Moll, F. L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a key role in tissue fibrogenesis and growing evidence indicates a pathogenic role in cardiovascular disease. Aim of this study is to investigate the association of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) with cardiovascular risk and mortality

  15. Impact of the cardiovascular system-associated adipose tissue on atherosclerotic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Grechko, Andrey V; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac obesity makes an important contribution to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. One of the important pathways of this contribution is the inflammatory process that takes place in the adipose tissue. In this review, we consider the role of the cardiovascular system-associated fat in atherosclerotic cardiovascular pathology and a non-atherosclerotic cause of coronary artery disease, such as atrial fibrillation. Cardiovascular system-associated fat not only serves as the energy store, but also releases adipokines that control local and systemic metabolism, heart/vascular function and vessel tone, and a number of vasodilating and anti-inflammatory substances. Adipokine appears to play an important protective role in cardiovascular system. Under chronic inflammation conditions, the repertoire of signaling molecules secreted by cardiac fat can be altered, leading to a higher amount of pro-inflammatory messengers, vasoconstrictors, profibrotic modulators. This further aggravates cardiovascular inflammation and leads to hypertension, induction of the pathological tissue remodeling and cardiac fibrosis. Contemporary imaging techniques showed that epicardial fat thickness correlates with the visceral fat mass, which is an established risk factor and predictor of cardiovascular disease in obese subjects. However, this correlation is no longer present after adjustment for other covariates. Nevertheless, recent studies showed that pericardial fat volume and epicardial fat thickness can probably serve as a better indicator for atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  17. [Clinical science relating atherosclerotic diseases and hypertriglyceridemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies and meta-analysis with triglyceride levels are revealing that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with coronary heart diseases independent of other coronary risk factors, although the direct effect of serum triglycerides to atherosclerotic lesion is still uncertain. Multiple genetic and environmental factors from familial hyperlipidemia to food and alcohol intake are implicated in elevating triglycerides. Especially, a number of investigators demonstrated a relationship between atherosclerotic diseases and postprandial hyperlipidemia, which may lead to nonfasting TG elevation. The purpose of this article is to review several clinical studies relating serum fasting and nonfasting triglyceride levels and coronary heart disease, and to discuss whether hypertriglyceridemia initiates atherosclerosis or plays a role as a biomarker for metabolic abnormalities.

  18. A prevalência cumulativa de fatores de risco para doença cardiovascular em adolescentes iranianos: IHHP-HHPC Cumulative prevalence of risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases in Iranian adolescents: IHHP-HHPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência cumulativa dos fatores de risco para a doença cardiovascular aterosclerótica numa amostra de adolescentes iranianos. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo transversal com 1000 meninas e 1000 meninos, com idade entre 11 e 18 anos, selecionados através de uma amostragem aleatória multietapas à base de conglomerados das áreas urbana e rural de três cidades iranianas. RESULTADOS: As taxas de prevalência de inatividade física, dislipidemia, tabagismo, pressão arterial alta e obesidade (índice de massa corporal >P95 foram 66,6, 23,7, 8,7, 5,7 e 2,2%, respectivamente. Dentre os indivíduos estudados, 79,1% apresentaram pelo menos um e 24,6% tiveram dois fatores de risco para doença cardiovascular. A prevalência de inatividade física foi significativamente menor entre os meninos que entre as meninas [53,9 contra 79,3%, respectivamente, OR IC95%, 0,44 (0,39-0,51]. A prevalência de tabagismo foi maior nos meninos que nas meninas [13,1 contra 4,2%, respectivamente, OR IC95%, 3,4 (2,4-4,9]. CONCLUSÃO: Considerando a alta prevalência de fatores de risco para doença cardiovascular em adolescentes, deve-se garantir intervenções que sejam adequadas à idade e sensíveis a aspectos culturais para que medidas preventivas possam ser tomadas em tempo hábil.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cumulative prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk factors in a representative sample of Iranian adolescents. METHODS: The subjects of this cross-sectional study were 1,000 girls and 1,000 boys, ages 11-18 years, selected by multi stage-random cluster sampling from urban and rural areas of three cities in Iran. RESULTS: The prevalence of physical inactivity, dyslipidemia, smoking, high blood pressure and obesity (body mass index >95th percentile were 66.6, 23.7, 8.7, 5.7 and 2.2%, respectively. Of subjects studied, 79.1% had at least one and 24.6% had two cardiovascular disease risk factors. The prevalence of physical

  19. [Essence of the Japan Atherosclerosis Society (JAS) Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases in Japan-2012 Version and Treatment Guide for Dyslipidemia 2013--Current Strategy for the Lipid Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Hidenori

    2014-09-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the most important risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD), and its management is very important for the prevention of ASCVD. In addition, the management of other major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, hypertension, and diabetes, is also important. Therefore, the comprehensive management of these major risk factors is key to prevent ASCVD. Among several types of primary dyslipidemia, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a very high-risk genetic disorder which causes premature coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, the early diagnosis of and treatment for FH are crucial. For the treatment of dyslipidemia, lifestyle modifications are the bases of ASCVD prevention. However, when lipid management goals are not achieved with lifestyle modification, we should consider pharmacological treatments, and statins are the drugs with the most abundant evidence to support LDL-C-lowering and ASCVD prevention.

  20. Collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-8 expressed in atherosclerotic carotid plaques is associated with systemic cardiovascular outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, W.; Moll, F.L.; Vink, A.; Spek, P.J. van der; Kleijn, D.P.V. de; Vries, J.-P.P.M. de; Verheijen, J.H.; Newby, A.C.; Pasterkamp, G.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and subsequent thrombus formation are the major cause of acute cardiovascular events. Local plaque markers may facilitate detection of the vulnerable plaque and help identify the patient at risk for cardiovascular events. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are

  1. Cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavagan, Thomas

    2002-06-01

    The primary care physician is in a position to advise patients on the efficacy of alternative and complementary therapies as they relate to cardiovascular diseases. Anti-oxidant vitamin supplementation has not been shown to be efficacious in decreasing cardiovascular events. N-3 fatty acids appear to be beneficial in secondary prevention of cardiovascular events but their use in primary prevention is not clear. Adoption of vegetable-based diets, including whole grains, can be recommended to decrease cardiovascular events, lower cholesterol and help lower blood pressure. For patients with hypercholesterolemia, cholestin, a red-yeast rice supplement, has been shown to be effective. Garlic supplements may have some mild cholesterol-lowering effect, but this effect is not significant enough to recommend clinically. Herbal therapies with hawthorn and ubiquinone (Q10) are of possible benefit in congestive heart failure. An integrated program of rigorous diet, exercise and stress reduction in motivated patients with cardiovascular disease may have value as an alternative to cardiovascular medications and surgical interventions.

  2. Cardiovascular disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    +2348153319600. ABSTRACT: Background: Cardiovascular disease is a global epidemic; the prevalence is currently stable in the developed world but .... that culminate in malnutrition are believed to predominate. However, urbanization of .... risk factors promotes migration of inflammatory cells from the circulation and the ...

  3. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed I Hussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Pregnancy loss and later risk of atherosclerotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension.......Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension....

  5. Effects of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events in patients receiving hemodialysis: the EValuation Of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David C; London, Gerard M; Parfrey, Patrick S; Block, Geoffrey A; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Dehmel, Bastian; Drüeke, Tilman B; Floege, Jürgen; Kubo, Yumi; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Goodman, William G; Moe, Sharon M; Trotman, Marie-Louise; Abdalla, Safa; Chertow, Glenn M; Herzog, Charles A

    2014-11-17

    Premature cardiovascular disease limits the duration and quality of life on long-term hemodialysis. The objective of this study was to define the frequency of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events attributable to atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic mechanisms, risk factors for these events, and the effects of cinacalcet, using adjudicated data collected during the EValuation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower CardioVascular Events (EVOLVE) Trial. EVOLVE was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial that randomized 3883 hemodialysis patients with moderate to severe secondary hyperparathyroidism to cinacalcet or matched placebo for up to 64 months. For this post hoc analysis, the outcome measure was fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events reflecting atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. During the trial, 1518 patients experienced an adjudicated cardiovascular event, including 958 attributable to nonatherosclerotic disease. Of 1421 deaths during the trial, 768 (54%) were due to cardiovascular disease. Sudden death was the most frequent fatal cardiovascular event, accounting for 24.5% of overall mortality. Combining fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, randomization to cinacalcet reduced the rates of sudden death and heart failure. Patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced fewer nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events (adjusted relative hazard 0.84, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.96), while the effect of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic events did not reach statistical significance. Accepting the limitations of post hoc analysis, any benefits of cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in the context of hemodialysis may result from attenuation of nonatherosclerotic processes. Unique identifier: NCT00345839. URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. [Cardiovascular disease and systemic inflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuende, José I; Pérez de Diego, Ignacio J; Godoy, Diego

    2016-01-01

    More than a century of research has shown that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process more than an infiltrative or thrombogenic process. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically and by imaging techniques, that systemic inflammatory diseases (in particular, but not exclusively, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus) increase the atherosclerotic process, and has a demonstrated pathophysiological basis. Furthermore, treatments to control inflammatory diseases can modify the course of the atherosclerotic process. Although there are no specific scales for assessing cardiovascular risk in patients with these diseases, cardiovascular risk is high. A number of specific risk scales are being developed, that take into account specific factors such as the degree of inflammatory activity. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Subclinical atherosclerotic vascular disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prospective hospital-based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chindhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an important non-communicable disease worldwide with a rising global incidence. COPD is associated with multiple co-morbidities. Patients with COPD are at increased risk of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in COPD. The present case-control study was designed to assess the relationship between sub-clinical atherosclerotic vascular diseases with COPD. Methods: It was a prospective case-control blinded observational study. There were 142 COPD patients and 124 age-and sex-matched controls without COPD and cardiovascular diseases. Frequency of sub-clinical atherosclerosis was assessed by the carotid B-mode duplex ultrasonography assessment of carotid wall intima medial thickness (IMT. Plaque was defined as IMT of more than 1.2 mm. Results: Prevalence of carotid plaqing was significantly higher amongst patients of COPD (38.7% compared to controls (13.7% , odds ratio 3.9, P < 0.0001. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed COPD as an independent predictor of carotid plaqing (r = 0.85, P < 0.023. Conclusion: The frequency of carotid plaqing is high in COPD patients. Carotid plaqing may be due to shared risk factors or the presence of low-grade systemic inflammation. Presence of increased CIMT and carotid plaqing in COPD patients identifies early atherosclerotic changes and future cardiovascular risk. Hence screening of CIMT should be a part of cardiovascular assessment in patients with COPD.

  8. Epigenetic Modulation in the treatment Atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela M Byrne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the single largest cause of death in the western world and its incidence is on the rise globally. Atherosclerosis, characterised by the development of atheromatus plaque, can trigger luminal narrowing and upon rupture result in myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. Epigenetic mechanisms are a source of considerable research interest due to the role they play in gene regulation. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation have been identified as potential drug targets in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. miRNAs are known to play a role in gene silencing, which has been widely investigated in cancer. In comparison, the role they play in cardiovascular disease and plaque rupture is not well understood. Nutritional epigenetic modifiers from dietary components, for instance sulforaphane found in broccoli, have been shown to suppress the pro-inflammatory response through transcription factor activation. This review will discuss current and potential epigenetic therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, focusing on the use of miRNAs and dietary supplements such as sulforaphane and protocatechuic aldehyde.

  9. Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Angela

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health Issue Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death in Canadian women and men. In general, women present with a wider range of symptoms, are more likely to delay seeking medial care and are less likely to be investigated and treated with evidence-based medications, angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft than men. Key Findings In 1998, 78,964 Canadians died from CVD, almost half (39,197 were women. Acute myocardial infarction, which increases significantly after menopause, was the leading cause of death among women. Cardiovascular disease accounted for 21% of all hospital admissions for Canadian women over age 50 in 1999. Admissions to hospital for ischemic heart disease were more frequent for men, but the mean length of hospital stay was longer for women. Mean blood pressure increases with age in both men and women. After age 65, however, high blood pressure is more common among Canadian women. More than one-third of postmenopausal Canadian women have hypertension. Diabetes increases the mortality and morbidity associated with CVD in women more than it does in men. Depression also contributes to the incidence and recovery from CVD, particularly for women who experience twice the rate of depression as men. Data Gaps and Recommendations CVD needs to be recognized as a woman's health issue given Canadian mortality projections (particularly heart failure. Health professionals should be trained to screen, track, and address CVD risk factors among women, including hypertension, elevated lipid levels, smoking, physical inactivity, depression, diabetes and low socio-economic status.

  10. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  11. Translating Guidelines Into Practice: Interpreting the 2016 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway on the Role of Non-Statin Therapies for LDL-Cholesterol Lowering in the Management of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Laura H; Phan, Yvonne L; Spinler, Sarah A

    2017-10-01

    In 2016, the American College of Cardiology released a decision pathway, based on expert consensus, to guide use of non-statin agents in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. The purpose of this article is to assist practitioners, health systems and managed care entities with interpreting this consensus statement in order to simplify implementation of the recommendations into patient care. Major themes from the consensus statement are briefly summarized and explained. Drug therapy recommendations are condensed into a single algorithm, while tables correlate each recommended regimen with the appropriate patient population from both a patient-level and systems-level perspective. Finally, a patient case with evidence-based decision support is explored. These tools allow practitioners to make appropriate patient-specific decisions about the use of non-statin pharmacotherapy and enable health systems and managed care entities to more readily identify guideline-appropriate use of these agents upon review of patient profiles or prescribing patterns. This article provides resources for healthcare providers that facilitate uptake of these recommendations into clinical practice.

  12. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and low-density lipoprotein heterogeneity as a risk factor of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with triglyceride metabolic disorder: a pilot cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Kiyoshi; Tani, Shigemasa; Atsumi, Wataru; Yagi, Tsukasa; Kawauchi, Kenji; Matsumoto, Naoya; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2017-11-01

    We hypothesized that an increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) might reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size in conjunction with triglyceride (TG) metabolism disorder, resulting in an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). This study was carried out as a hospital-based cross-sectional study in 537 consecutive outpatients (mean age: 64 years; men: 71%) with one or more risk factors for ASCVD from April 2014 to October 2014 at the Cardiovascular Center of Nihon University Surugadai Hospital. The estimated LDL-particle size was measured as relative LDL migration using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the LipoPhor system.The plasma PAI-1 level, including the tissue PA/PAI-1 complex and the active and latent forms of PAI-1, was determined using a latex photometric immunoassay method. A multivariate regression analysis after adjustments for ASCVD risk factors showed that an elevated PAI-1 level was an independent predictor of smaller-sized LDL-particle in both the overall patients population (β=0.209, PLDL-C) level lower than 100 mg/dl (β=0.276, PLDL-C levels yielded similar findings. Furthermore, in the 310 patients followed up for at least 6 months, a multiple-logistic regression analysis after adjustments for ASCVD risk factors identified the percent changes of the plasma PAI-1 level in the third tertile compared with those in the first tertile as being independently predictive of decreased LDL-particle size [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.11 (1.12/3.40), P=0.02]. The plasma PAI-1 levels may be determined by the degree of obesity and TG metabolic disorders. These factors were also shown to be correlated with a decreased LDL-particle size, increasing the risk of ASCVD, even in nondiabetic patients with well-controlled serum LDL-C levels.

  13. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Periodontal disease and risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Takako; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2009-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is an important component of coronary heart disease (CHD), which is the leading cause of death worldwide, including in Japan. Because atherosclerotic processes are typified by chronic inflammatory responses, which are similar to those elicited by chronic infection, the role of infection in promoting or accelerating atherosclerosis has received considerable focus. Increasing evidence supports the notion that periodontitis is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis through dysfunction of endothelial cells induced by either periodontopathic bacteria or their products, or inflammatory mediators derived from infected periodontal tissue. Here we review whether periodontitis represents a risk factor for CHD or atherosclerosis, particularly in a Japanese population.

  15. [Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, lipemic disorders, hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus in the population of a metropolitan area of southeastern Brazil. III--Hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, I S; Marucci, M de F; Velásquez-Meléndez, G; Coelho, L T; Cervato, A M

    1997-10-01

    The prevalencies of hypertension are analysed by sex and age group, in social groupings established in accord with social criteria. With a view better to understanding the social dimension of the disease, prevalencies were characterised by type of occupation. The sample consisted of 1,041 people and corresponds to the sum of the samples representing the "study areas" established by the use of socio-economic and geographical criteria. Four social strata were defined in obedience to a socioeconomic gradient. Hypertension was defined by the Joint National Committee (JNC), 140/90 mmHg, and of the World Health Organization (WHO), 160/95 mmHg, standard references. According to the JNC and WHO standard references the prevalencies of hypertension, age adjusted, were of approximately the following: stratum (I + II) 60 and 37%; stratum III 50 and 39%; stratum IV 55 e 46%. Among women the prevalencies were 40 and 38% (stratum I + II); 56 and 47% (stratum III) and 55 and 46% (stratum IV). For the men belonging to the economically active population, classified by occupation, it was showed that the freelance professionals, consisting of businessmen of small firms, small traders and liberal professionals, presented a prevalence of about 60 and 37%; the skilled workers, employed in factories of 35 and 14%; the daily freelance workers, unskilled laborers and unemployed, of 59 and 40%. The women were divided by occupation as belonging or not to the economically active population (EAP) and presented the following prevalencies: 39 and 47%, respectively, according to the JNC standard, and 27 and 45%, respectively, according to the WHO standard. Thus it may be seen that these results run counter to the hypothesis that women integrated into the labour market are more exposed to the risk factors for non-transmissible diseases. Thus it may be concluded that the categories most affected by the present economic were those most affected by hypertension. On the other hand the possibility of

  16. The BioImage Study: novel approaches to risk assessment in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease--study design and objectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muntendam, Pieter; McCall, Carol; Sanz, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk characteris......Image Study will help identify those patients with subclinical atherosclerosis who are at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events and enable a more personalized management of care.......The identification of asymptomatic individuals at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events to ensure optimal preventive treatment remains a challenging goal. In the BioImage Study, novel approaches are tested in a typical health-plan population. Based on certain demographic and risk...... characteristics on file with Humana Inc, a total of 7,687 men 55 to 80 years of age and women 60 to 80 years of age without evidence of atherothrombotic disease but presumed to be at risk for near-term atherothrombotic events were enrolled between January 2008 and June 2009. Those who met the prespecified...

  17. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most ...

  18. Changes in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors With Immediate Versus Deferred Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Among HIV-Positive Participants in the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Sharma, Shweta; Achhra, Amit C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: HIV infection and certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) medications increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, mediated, in part, through traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied cardiovascular disease risk factor changes in the STAR...

  19. 7-Dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), But Not Cholesterol, Causes Suppression of Canonical TGF-β Signaling and Is Likely Involved in the Development of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease (ASCVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Liu, I-Hua; Chen, Chun-Lin; Chang, Jia-Ming; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2017-06-01

    For several decades, cholesterol has been thought to cause ASCVD. Limiting dietary cholesterol intake has been recommended to reduce the risk of the disease. However, several recent epidemiological studies do not support a relationship between dietary cholesterol and/or blood cholesterol and ASCVD. Consequently, the role of cholesterol in atherogenesis is now uncertain. Much evidence indicates that TGF-β, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, protects against ASCVD and that suppression of canonical TGF-β signaling (Smad2-dependent) is involved in atherogenesis. We had hypothesized that cholesterol causes ASCVD by suppressing canonical TGF-β signaling in vascular endothelium. To test this hypothesis, we determine the effects of cholesterol, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC; the biosynthetic precursor of cholesterol), and other sterols on canonical TGF-β signaling. We use Mv1Lu cells (a model cell system for studying TGF-β activity) stably expressing the Smad2-dependent luciferase reporter gene. We demonstrate that 7-DHC (but not cholesterol or other sterols) effectively suppresses the TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity. We also demonstrate that 7-DHC suppresses TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity by promoting lipid raft/caveolae formation and subsequently recruiting cell-surface TGF-β receptors from non-lipid raft microdomains to lipid rafts/caveolae where TGF-β receptors become inactive in transducing canonical signaling and undergo rapid degradation upon TGF-β binding. We determine this by cell-surface 125 I-TGF-β-cross-linking and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. We further demonstrate that methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating agent, reverses 7-DHC-induced suppression of TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity by extrusion of 7-DHC from resident lipid rafts/caveolae. These results suggest that 7-DHC, but not cholesterol, promotes lipid raft/caveolae formation, leading to suppression of canonical TGF-β signaling and atherogenesis. J

  20. Caveolin-1 influences vascular protease activity and is a potential stabilizing factor in human atherosclerotic disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Rodriguez-Feo

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is a regulatory protein of the arterial wall, but its role in human atherosclerosis remains unknown. We have studied the relationships between Cav-1 abundance, atherosclerotic plaque characteristics and clinical manisfestations of atherosclerotic disease.We determined Cav-1 expression by western blotting in atherosclerotic plaques harvested from 378 subjects that underwent carotid endarterectomy. Cav-1 levels were significantly lower in carotid plaques than non-atherosclerotic vascular specimens. Low Cav-1 expression was associated with features of plaque instability such as large lipid core, thrombus formation, macrophage infiltration, high IL-6, IL-8 levels and elevated MMP-9 activity. Clinically, a down-regulation of Cav-1 was observed in plaques obtained from men, patients with a history of myocardial infarction and restenotic lesions. Cav-1 levels above the median were associated with absence of new vascular events within 30 days after surgery [0% vs. 4%] and a trend towards lower incidence of new cardiovascular events during longer follow-up. Consistent with these clinical data, Cav-1 null mice revealed elevated intimal hyperplasia response following arterial injury that was significantly attenuated after MMP inhibition. Recombinant peptides mimicking Cav-1 scaffolding domain (Cavtratin reduced gelatinase activity in cultured porcine arteries and impaired MMP-9 activity and COX-2 in LPS-challenged macrophages. Administration of Cavtratin strongly impaired flow-induced expansive remodeling in mice. This is the first study that identifies Cav-1 as a novel potential stabilizing factor in human atherosclerosis. Our findings support the hypothesis that local down-regulation of Cav-1 in atherosclerotic lesions contributes to plaque formation and/or instability accelerating the occurrence of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the large number of patients studied, we believe that Cav-1 may be considered as a novel target

  1. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  2. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... help understand the role of genetic factors in cardiovascular disease . However, the testing is sometimes used in ...

  3. Cardiovascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus: has the time for action come?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuven, Sander I.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Hayden, Michael R.; d'Cruz, David; Hughes, Graham R.; Stroes, Erik S.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The recognition that inflammation is a hallmark of atherosclerotic disease has led to a series of studies reporting accelerated atherogenesis in chronic inflammatory diseases. Indeed, systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease

  4. Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellova Amir Masrizal

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is performed by genetic, environmental, and complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Fatness levels in obese children are indicative of increased risk for elevated blood pressure, cholesterol, and lipoprotein ratios children and adolescents. Serum cholesterol and blood pressure are related to raise atherosclerotic lesion. Certain cardiovascular disease risk factors in obese children are related to the earliest stages of atherosclerosis disease. Obese children have the high risk factors of certain cardiovascular disease. Genetic factors affecting metabolic rate can be successfully managed by the introduction of environmental factors such as decrease caloric intake and increase physical activity. The treatment of obesity and of atherosclerotic patients should include dietary restriction (protein sparing modified fast and hypocaloric balanced diet, nutrition education, increased physical activity, behavior modification, and familial support. Success fully management of obesity can improve the quality of life and reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality associated with obesity.

  5. Cardiovascular risk prediction in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedeño Mora, Santiago; Goicoechea, Marian; Torres, Esther; Verdalles, Úrsula; Pérez de José, Ana; Verde, Eduardo; García de Vinuesa, Soledad; Luño, José

    Scores underestimate the prediction of cardiovascular risk (CVR) as they are not validated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Two of the most commonly used scores are the Framingham Risk Score (FRS-CVD) and the ASCVD (AHA/ACC 2013). The aim of this study is to evaluate the predictive ability of experiencing a cardiovascular event (CVE) via these 2scores in the CKD population. Prospective, observational study of 400 prevalent patients with CKD (stages 4 and 5 according the KDOQI; not on dialysis). Cardiovascular risk was calculated according to the 2scores and the predictive capacity of cardiovascular events (atherosclerotic events: myocardial infarction, ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, peripheral vascular disease; and non-atherosclerotic events: heart failure) was analysed. Forty-nine atherosclerotic cardiovascular events occurred in 40.3±6.6 months of follow-up. Most of the patients were classified as high CVR by both scores (59% by the FRS-CVD and 75% by the ASCVD). All cardiovascular events occurred in the high CVR patients and both scores (FRS-CVD log-rank 12.2, Prenal function, albuminuria and previous cardiovascular events. The cardiovascular risk scores (FRS-CVD and ASCVD [AHA/ACC 2013]) can estimate the probability of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in patients with CKD regardless of renal function, albuminuria and previous cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Ceruloplasmin and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P. L.; Mazumder, B.; Ehrenwald, E.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Transition metal ion-mediated oxidation is a commonly used model system for studies of the chemical, structural, and functional modifications of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The physiological relevance of studies using free metal ions is unclear and has led to an exploration of free metal ion-independent mechanisms of oxidation. We and others have investigated the role of human ceruloplasmin (Cp) in oxidative processes because it the principal copper-containing protein in serum. There is an abundance of epidemiological data that suggests that serum Cp may be an important risk factor predicting myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. Biochemical studies have shown that Cp is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro. The pro-oxidant activity of Cp requires an intact structure, and a single copper atom at the surface of the protein, near His(426), is required for LDL oxidation. Under conditions where inhibitory protein (such as albumin) is present, LDL oxidation by Cp is optimal in the presence of superoxide, which reduces the surface copper atom of Cp. Cultured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells also oxidize LDL in the presence of Cp. Superoxide release by these cells is a critical factor regulating the rate of oxidation. Cultured monocytic cells, when activated by zymosan, can oxidize LDL, but these cells are unique in their secretion of Cp. Inhibitor studies using Cp-specific antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides show that Cp is a major contributor to LDL oxidation by these cells. The role of Cp in lipoprotein oxidation and atherosclerotic lesion progression in vivo has not been directly assessed and is an important area for future studies.

  7. Obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, E

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease.

  8. Atherosclerotic renovascular disease and renal impairment : Can we predict the effect of intervention?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mui, Kwok-Wai; Woittiez, Arend-Jan; Navis, Gerjan

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) is associated with hypertension, ischemic nephropathy, and high cardiovascular risk. We review the data on revascularization of the renal artery by percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) and pharmacological therapy. In patients with severe

  9. Cardiovascular diseases in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Lisheng

    2007-01-01

    .... World Health Organization statistics on the death rate for total cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke in men and women aged 35-74 years revealed discrepancies between rural...

  10. Relationship between education and atherosclerotic disease risk factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, M; Vlajinac, H; Radak, D; Marinkovic, J; Maksimovic, J; Jorga, J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether different levels of education are associated with different atherosclerotic disease risk factors. The cross-sectional study, involving 388 consecutive patients with verified peripheral arterial disease, was performed in Belgrade. Formal education level was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Anthropometric parameters and data on cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in participants with different levels of education. In the analysis, univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used. Multivariate analysis showed that low education was significantly positively related to alcohol consumption (Odds Ratio - OR, 4.67; 95% confidence interval - CI, 1.80-12.12), increased triglycerides (OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.13-6.61), and physical activity during work (OR, 43.10; 95% CI 14.37-129.28), and negatively related to former smoking (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.03-0.46) and sports and leisure - time physical activity (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.04-0.41 and OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.11-0.57). Medium education was significantly positively related to increased triglycerides (OR, 1.74; 95% CI 1.01-2.98) and increased LDL-cholesterol (OR 2.37; 95% CI, 1.35-4.18), and to physical activity during work (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.34-3.67), and negatively related to age (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98) and leisure - time physical activity (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.30-0.74). It can be concluded that if there are differences in the risk of the occurrence of peripheral arterial disease by education status, they could be only partly explained by differences in the observed atherosclerotic disease risk factors.

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance parameters of atherosclerotic plaque burden improve discrimination of prior major adverse cardiovascular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansilal Sameer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims Patients with prior major cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events (MACE are more likely to have future recurrent events independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine if patients with traditional risk factors and prior MACE had increased cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR plaque burden measures compared to patients with risk factors but no prior events. Methods and Results Black blood carotid and thoracic aorta images were obtained from 195 patients using a rapid extended coverage turbo spin echo sequence. CMR measures of plaque burden were obtained by tracing lumen and outer vessel wall contours. Patients with prior MACE had significantly higher MR plaque burden (wall thickness, wall area and normalized wall index in carotids and thoracic aorta compared to those without prior MACE (Wall thickness carotids: 1.03 ± 0.03 vs. 0.93± 0.03, p = 0.001; SD wall thickness carotids: 0.137 ± 0.0008 vs. 0.102 ± 0.0004, p Conclusion A greater plaque burden and plaque eccentricity is prevalent among patients with prior MACE.

  12. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...... of acute pancreatitis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Although randomised trials showing cardiovascular benefit of triglyceride reduction are scarce, new triglyceride-lowering drugs are being developed, and large-scale trials have been initiated that will hopefully provide conclusive evidence...

  13. Lifestyle in Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.O. Younge (John)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Globally, the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still increasing. However, in recent decades, better treatment modalities have led to less cardiovascular related deaths. After years of research, we now generally accept that lifestyle factors are the most

  14. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors, including high blood pressure. Lack of physical activity Physical inactivity is another modifiable major risk factor for insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Exercising and losing weight can prevent or delay ...

  15. Lipoprotein (a) as a cause of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Langsted, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiologic and genetic evidence using the Mendelian randomization approach in large-scale studies now strongly supports that elevated lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease, that is, for myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic stenosis, and aortic valve...

  16. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelboom, John W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R.; Hart, Robert G.; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M.; Anand, Sonia S.; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S.; Branch, Kelley R. H.; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander N.; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L.; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J.; Verhamme, Peter B.; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M.; Lewis, Basil S.; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P. Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P.; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim; Aboyans, V.; Ha, J.; Keltai, K.; Lamy, A.; Liu, L.; Moayyedi, P.; Sharma, M.; Stoerk, S.; Varigos, J.; Bhagirath, V.; Bogaty, P.; Botto, F.; Catanese, L.; Donato Magno, J.; Fabbri, G.; Gabizon, I.; Gosselin, G.; Halon, D.; Heldmann, M.; Lamelas, P.; Lauw, M.; Leong, Y.; Liang, D.; Lutay, Y.; Maly, M.; Mikulik, R.; Nayar, S.; Ng, K.; Perera, K.; Pirvu, O.; Ronner, E.; Sato, S.; Smyth, A.; Sokolova, E.; Wiendl, M.; Winkelmann, B.; Yang, X.; Yufereva, Y.; Cairns, J.; Sleight, P.; deMets, D.; Momomura, S. I.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Ramsay, T.; Goto, S.; Rouleau, J. L.; Schumi, J.; Thabane, L.; Casanova, A.; Bangdiwala, S.; Deng, E.; Dyal, L.; Khatun, R.; Marsden, T.; Pogue, J.; Tang, C.; Wong, G.; Yuan, F.; Aman, S.; Ariz, A.; Ashton, H.; Belanger, J.; Belanger, M.; Brettell, K.; Chandra, J.; Choppick, C.; Cisternino, D.; Cuncins-Hearn, A.; Di Marino, M.; Diao, L.; Dwomoh, S.; Dykstra, A.; Galatsis, E.; Gasic, T.; Gutierrez, J.; Hamilton, L.; Irwin, L.; Lapensee, C.; Li, A.; Lu, X.; MacRae, L.; Malik, S.; Malvestiti, A.; Mastrangelo, J.; Maystrenko, A.; O'Donnell, L.; Reeh, K.; Szymkow, P.; Thomas, S.; Thrasher, D.; Tyrwhitt, J.; White, L.; Bastone, R.; Berkowitz, S.; Dias, A.; Ho, K.; Keller, L.; Lanius, V.; Lister, K.; Merten, C.; Muehlhofer, E.; Schmidt, K.; Tasto, C.; Tsihlias, E.; Woroniecka-Osio, A.; Orlandini, A.; Niemann, G.; Pascual, A.; Toscanelli, S.; Cabezón, M.; Debaveye, B.; Meeusen, K.; Luys, C.; Broos, K.; Vandenberghe, K.; Luyten, A.; Oliveira, G. B. F.; Vila Nova, D. C.; Konishi, M. Y. N.; Lonn, A.; Turbide, G.; Cayer, M.; Rovito, C.; Standen, D.; Li, J.; Lopez Pico, M.; Dusek, R.; Buzalka, V.; Larsen, J.; Paucar, M. J.; Saarinen, M.; Simon, T.; Bezault, M.; Le Lay, M.; Epstein, L.; Fajardo-Moser, M.; Röser, C.; Putz-Todd, G.; Scheidemantel, F.; Poehler, D.; Renner, J.; Hargitai, A.; Doherty, A. O.; Duffy, N.; Roarty, C.; Nolan, A.; Power, A.; Yuval, R.; Ben Ari, M.; Greenblatt, S.; Marmor, Y.; Lucci, D.; Ceseri, M.; Baldini, E.; Cipressa, L.; Miccoli, M.; Goto, M.; Yamasowa, H.; Kajiwara, M.; Takase, D.; Ikeguchi, K.; Matsumoto, M.; Ishii, M.; Asai, J.; Nozaki, D.; Akatsuka, T.; Yoshida, T.; Shahadan, S.; Md Nasir, N.; Schut, Astrid; Vinck, Leonie; van Leeuwen, Marjelle; Sanchez, J.; Aquino, M. R.; Mararac, T.; Benedyk, K.; Iordache, A.; Ciobanu, A.; Rimbas, R.; Dragoi Galrinho, R.; Magda, S.; Mihaila, S.; Mincu, R.; Suran, B.; Cotoban, A.; Matei, L.; Kursakov, A.; Rusnak, P.; Zakharova, A.; Demidova, E.; Commerford, A.; Lee, S.; Ju, I.; Gunolf, M.; Lorimer, A.; Parkhomenko, L.; Johnson, J.; Anderson, J.; Norby-Slycord., C.; Sala, J.; Sicer, M.; Rasmussen, M.; Luciani, C.; Cartasegna, L.; Beltrano, C.; Medek, G.; Vico, M.; Lanchiotti, P.; Martella, C.; Hominal, M.; Castoldi, M.; Casali, W.; Raimondi, S.; Hasbani, E.; Prado, A.; Paterlini, G.; Waisman, F.; Leonard, M.; Caccavo, A.; Alarcon, V.; Zaidman, C.; Guerlloy, F.; Vogel, D.; Imposti, H.; Dominguez, A.; Hrabar, A.; Fernandez, A.; Schygiel, P.; Sokn, F.; Cuneo, C.; Gutierrez Carrillo, N.; Martinez, G.; Luquez, H.; Costantino, M.; Ruiz, M.; Beccetti, N.; Mackinnon, I.; Cluigt, N.; Ahuad Guerrero, R.; Fanuele, M.; Campisi, V.; Costabel, J.; Romanelli, M.; Bartolacci, I.; Echeverria, M.; Pedrotti, M.; Montaña, O.; Camino, A.; Crespo, C.; Barbieri, M.; Lopez Santi, R.; Tonin, H.; Heffes, R.; Gomez Vilamajo, O.; Vanesio, F.; Allegrini, E.; Garcia Duran, R.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Duran, L.; Schiavi, L.; Mana, M.; Bordonava, A.; Rodriguez, M.; Gutierrez, M.; Garrido, M.; Rodriguez, C.; Ingaramo, A.; Costamagna, O.; Almagro, S.; Gerbaudo, C.; Pelagagge, M.; Bustamante Labarta, M.; Novaretto, L.; Maldini, A.; Lopez, L.; Albisu Di Gennero, J.; Ibanez Saggia, L.; Garcia Vilkas, A.; Alvarez, M.; Stoermann, W.; Vita, N.; Vottero, E.; Macin, S.; Cocco, M.; Onocko, M.; Dran, R.; Gimenez, C.; Cardona, M.; Guzman, L.; Guzman, P.; Martinez, D.; Sarjanovich, R.; Huerta, C.; Scaro, G.; Cuadrado, J.; Rodriguez, G.; Nani, S.; Guardiani, F.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Ceconi, G.; Chacon, C.; Casado, M.; Fernandez Moutin, M.; Maffei, L.; Sassone, S.; Yantorno, M.; Grinfeld, D.; Vensentini, N.; Rolandi, F.; Fallabrino, L.; Majul, C.; Paez, O.; Visser, M.; Luciardi, H.; Mansilla, V.; Gonzalez Colaso, P.; Ferre Pacora, F.; Jure, H.; Parody, M.; Espeche, E.; Whelan, A.; Boyle, A.; Collins, N.; Roberts-Thomson, P.; Rogers, J.; Caroll, P.; Colquhoun, D.; Williams, L.; Shaw, J.; Blombery, P.; Amerena, J.; Lee, C.; Hii, C.; Royse, A.; Royse, C.; Singh, B.; Selvanayagam, J.; Jansen, S.; Thompson, P.; Lo, W.; Hammett, C.; Poulter, R.; Graves, S.; Narasimhan, S.; van den Heuvel, P.; Wollaert, B.; Sinnaeve, P.; Fourneau, I.; Meuris, B.; Vanassche, T.; Ector, B.; Janssens, L.; Debonnaire, P.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; van de Borne, P.; Wautrecht, J.; Motte, S.; Leroy, J.; Schroë, H.; Vrolix, M.; Ferdinande, B.; Vranckx, P.; Benit, E.; Elegeert, I.; Lerut, P.; Wallaert, P.; Hoffer, E.; Borgoens, P.; Dujardin, K.; Brasil, C. 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Humaloja, K.; Lindberg, L.; Tuomilehto, H.; Tuominen, M.-L.; Kantola, I.; Juliard, J.; Feldman, L.; Ducrocq, G.; Boulogne, C.; Petitalot, V.; Leclercq, F.; Roubille, F.; Agullo, A.; Ferrari, E.; Chiche, O.; Moceri, P.; Boccara, F.; Charbonnier, M.; Azeddine, B.; Ederhy, S.; Soulat Dufour, L.; Cohen, A.; Etienney, A.; Messas, E.; Calvalido, A.; Galloula, A.; Zarka, S.; Courtois, M.-C.; Mismetti, P.; Accassat, S.; Buchmuller, A.; Moulin, N.; Bertoletti, L.; Seffert, B.; Sevestre, M.; Samy Modeliar Remond, S.; Dupas, S.; Mardyla, J.; Le Gloan, S.; Cayla, G.; Cornillet, L.; Schmutz, L.; Motreff, P.; Souteyrand, G.; Amonchot, A.; Barber-Charmoux, N.; Combaret, N.; Malcles, G.; Brenner, S.; Christa, M.; Duengen, H.; Krackhardt, F.; Bobenko, A.; Hashemi, D.; Stellbrink, C.; Stellbrink, E.; Köster, C.; Guerocak, O.; Bourhaial, H.; Oumbe Tiam, S.; Kemala, E.; Froemke, J.; Kadel, C.; Moellinger, H.; Friedrich, K.; Rafoud, K.; Braun-Dullaeus, R.; Herold, J.; Ganzer, M.; Jeserich, M.; Kimmel, S.; 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M.; Mahon, N.; Khan, I.; Hassan, S.; Curtin, R.; McFadden, E.; MacNeill, B.; Kyvelou, S.; Canavan, M.; Veerasingam, D.; Dinneen, S.; Halabi, M.; Rosenfeld, I.; Levinas, T.; Goldberg, A.; Khateeb, A.; Zimlichman, R.; Ben-Aharon, J.; Beniashvili, A.; Betsalel, A.; Zeltser, D.; Rogowski, O.; Mardi, T.; Rozenbaum, Z.; Turgeman, Y.; Or, T.; Rabkin, Y.; Klainman, E.; Halabi, S.; Halon, D. A.; Katz, A.; Plaev, T.; Drogenikov, T.; Atar, S.; Kilimnik, M.; Wishniak, A.; Merei, M.; Zvi, Y.; Nikolsky, E.; Zukermann, R.; Petcherski, S.; Bosi, S.; Gaitani, S.; Naldi, M.; Barbieri, A.; Faggiano, P.; Guidetti, F.; Adamo, M.; D’Aloia, A.; Magatelli, M.; Robba, D.; Mos, L.; Vriz, O.; Sinagra, G.; Maras, P.; Doimo, S.; Cosmi, F.; D'Orazio, S.; Oltrona Visconti, L.; Leonardi, S.; Vullo, E.; Sbaffi, A.; Azzara, G.; Mauri, S.; Gianni, U.; de Matteis, C.; Campidonico, U.; Di Pasquale, G.; Di Niro, M.; Riva, L.; Filippini, E.; Di Biase, M.; Ieva, R.; Martone, A.; Mandorla, S.; Regni, O.; Capponi, E. A.; Martinelli, S.; Bernardinangeli, M.; Proietti, G.; Piccinni, G. C.; Gualtieri, M. R.; Gulizia, M. M.; Francese, G. M.; Portale, A.; Galvani, M.; Ottani, F.; Capatano, O. G.; Conficoni, E.; Longhi, S.; Bachetti, C.; Venturi, F.; Capati, E.; Morocutti, G.; Bisceglia, T.; Fresco, C.; Baldin, M. G.; Gamba, C.; Olivieri, C.; Perna, G. P.; Battistoni, I.; Marini, M.; Cirrincione, V.; Ingrilli, F.; Kanno, T.; Ishii, Y.; Kohmura, C.; Igawa, T.; Izawa, K.; Daida, H.; Miyauchi, K.; Shimada, K.; Ohmura, H.; Ito, S.; Okazaki, S.; Konishi, H.; Miyazaki, T.; Hiki, M.; Kurata, T.; Suzuki, H.; Morimoto, R.; Yokoyama, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Okai, I.; Isoda, K.; Fujimoto, S.; Dohi, T.; Shimada, A.; Ozaki, Y.; Watanabe, E.; Kawai, H.; Naruse, H.; Takada, K.; Okuda, K.; Okumura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Ohtsuki, M.; Ohta, M.; Sarai, M.; Koshikawa, M.; Kawai, M.; Miyagi, M.; Motoyama, S.; Matsui, S.; Ichikawa, T.; Kato, Y.; Nagahara, Y.; Muramatsu, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Harada, M.; Yamada, A.; Yoshiki, Y.; Motoike, Y.; Nomura, Y.; Miyajima, K.; Takatsu, H.; Nishimura, H.; Nagasaka, R.; Kawada, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Seki, K.; Inoue, A.; Higashiue, S.; Kojima, S.; Kuroyanagi, S.; Furuya, O.; Komooka, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Wakabayashi, N.; Domae, H.; Ata, T.; Hashidomi, H.; Kawahara, R.; Hosokawa, S.; Hiasa, Y.; Otani, R.; Kishi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yuba, K.; Miyajima, H.; Tobetto, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Ogura, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Takamura, T.; Enkou, K.; Ochi, Y.; Yamada, D.; Kuramochi, T.; Misumi, K.; Iiduka, D.; Hirose, M.; Tone, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ebihara, T.; Makino, M.; Yokota, M.; Nitta, M.; Udo, A.; Shimizu, S.; Fujii, K.; Iwakura, K.; Okamura, A.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, H.; Hirao, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, N.; Yamasaki, T.; Oka, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Tanaka, T.; Nakamaru, R.; Okada, M.; Takayasu, K.; Sumiyoshi, A.; Inoue, H.; Kitagaki, R.; Ninomiya, Y.; Mizutomi, K.; Koizumi, I.; Funada, A.; Tagawa, S.; Kamide, S.; Saku, K.; Ideishi, M.; Ogawa, M.; Uehara, Y.; Iwata, A.; Nishikawa, H.; Ike, A.; Sugihara, M.; Imaizumi, S.; Fujimi, K.; Kawamura, A.; Sako, H.; Morito, N.; Morii, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Yahiro, E.; Matsunaga, A.; Matsumoto, N.; Noda, K.; Shiga, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kimura, K.; Ebina, T.; Hibi, K.; Iwahashi, N.; Maejima, N.; Konishi, M.; Matsushita, K.; Minamimoto, Y.; Kawashima, C.; Nakahashi, H.; Kimura, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Matsuzawa, Y.; Kirigaya, J.; Sato, R.; Kikuchi, S.; Ogino, Y.; Kirigaya, H.; Kashiwase, K.; Hirata, A.; Takeda, Y.; Amiya, R.; Higuchi, Y.; Sakaguchi, T.; Nakano, T.; Matsusaki, N.; Suzuki, S.; Hayashi, T.; Nakatani, S.; Koide, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Hamanaka, Y.; Makino, N.; Sotomi, Y.; Abe, M.; Fujieda, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Teratani, Y.; Abe, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Higashino, H.; Okuda, H.; Yamazato, M.; Noda, T.; Arai, M.; Ono, K.; Hirose, T.; Iwama, M.; Warita, S.; Goto, Y.; Abe, S.; Kojima, T.; Yoshizane, T.; Tanihata, S.; Fujii, T.; Yagasaki, H.; Miwa, H.; Ishiguro, M.; Kato, T.; Watanabe, R.; Horio, S.; Mita, T.; Hirayama, A.; Watanabe, I.; Hiro, T.; Nakai, T.; Takayama, T.; Yoda, S.; Yajima, Y.; Okubo, K.; Okumura, Y.; Kato, M.; Fukamachi, D.; Aizawa, Y.; Sonoda, K.; Iida, K.; Sasaki, N.; Iso, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kougo, T.; Haruta, H.; Kurokawa, S.; Mano, H.; Nagashima, K.; Onaka, H.; Doi, H.; Hirano, N.; Okamoto, F.; Mori, K.; Ri, G.; Zushi, R.; Otsuka, K.; Inoko, M.; Haruna, T.; Nakane, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Izumi, T.; Honjo, S.; Ikeda, H.; Wada, Y.; Funasako, M.; Hayashi, H.; Hamasaki, A.; Sasaki, K.; Seko, Y.; Nakasone, K.; Hanyu, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwasaki, K.; Ayano, S.; Hirokami, M.; Omoto, Y.; Sasaki, H.; Sato, H.; Yuda, S.; Okubo, M.; Matsuo, H.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kawase, Y.; Miyake, T.; Kondo, H.; Hattori, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Okamoto, S.; Hirata, T.; Kawamura, I.; Ota, H.; Omori, H.; Tanigaki, T.; Kamiya, H.; Sobue, Y.; Komoda, T.; Akatsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Isegawa, K.; Takanezawa, M.; Kataoka, C.; Imamaki, M.; Shibata, Y.; Yasuda, K.; Shimano, M.; Ozaki, R.; Morishita, Y.; Okabe, K.; Kondo, K.; Miura, A.; Manita, M.; Tabata, K.; Asahi, T.; Mashidori, T.; Higa, N.; Nakata, M.; Himi, T.; Matsudo, Y.; Sekine, T.; Hou, K.; Tonoike, N.; Hama, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Ge, B.; Takahara, M.; Ishimura, M.; Shikada, T.; Ueno, H.; Amemiya, H.; Hisamatsu, Y.; Sada, K.; Sato, T.; Harada, K.; Nakamura, T.; Ako, J.; Tojo, T.; Shimohama, T.; Kishihara, J.; Ishii, S.; Fukaya, H.; Meguro, K.; Nishino, Y.; Inoue, M.; Matsui, Y.; Omura, Y.; Kawakami, H.; Matsuoka, H.; Oshita, A.; Seike, F.; Kondo, N.; Miyoshi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Uchiya, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Koretsune, Y.; Abe, H.; Shinouchi, K.; Nishida, H.; Yasumura, K.; Date, M.; Ueda, Y.; Iida, Y.; Idemoto, A.; Toriyama, C.; Yokoi, K.; Mishima, T.; Yamada, T.; Fukunami, M.; Morita, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Kikuchi, A.; Tamaki, S.; Seo, M.; Shirakawa, Y.; Ikeda, I.; Fukuhara, E.; Kawai, T.; Kayama, K.; Kawahira, M.; Tanabe, K.; Nakamura, J.; Shimomura, H.; Kudo, T.; Morisaki, S.; Ogura, Y.; Chazono, N.; Onoue, Y.; Matsumuro, Y.; Shirakawa, T.; Nishi, M.; Kinoshita, N.; Nakamura, R.; Miyai, N.; Ohta, K.; Sawanishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Hada, T.; Nakajima, S.; Taniguchi, N.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Hashimoto, S.; Machida, M.; Hirabayashi, K.; Morimoto, S.; Higashino, Y.; Otsuji, S.; Takiuchi, S.; Yabuki, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Shishikura, D.; Ibuki, M.; Ishibuchi, K.; Nagayama, S.; Ishii, R.; Tamaru, H.; Yamamoto, W.; Utsu, N.; Miyakoshi, K.; Nakashima, D.; Tsukuda, K.; Ueda, K.; Nakano, A.; Fukuda, T.; Ikeda, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Toshima, S.; Tateno, R.; Ishikubo, T.; Suguta, M.; Nakamura, S.; Funatsu, A.; Mizobuchi, M.; Tanaka, M.; Nagai, T.; Hirano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Doi, T.; Shirasaka, A.; Takeda, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Ohya, H.; Hosokawa, A.; Nishina, N.; Koki, B.; Ando, K.; Hiramori, S.; Soga, Y.; Tomoi, Y.; Tohoku, S.; Shirai, S.; Hyodo, M.; Isotani, A.; Domei, T.; Kuramitsu, S.; Morinaga, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hiromasa, T.; Nagae, A.; Yamaji, Y.; Nakao, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Taguchi, E.; Tsurugi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Suzuyama, H.; Koyama, J.; Nagano, M.; Okamatsu, H.; Kodama, K.; Nakamura, M.; Horibata, Y.; Sone, M.; Tsunemori, M.; Bando, M.; Nakayama, T.; Tanigaito, Y.; Nomoto, M.; Sawamura, T.; Unoki, T.; Lim, C. W.; Zainal Rashid, R.; Najme Khir, R.; Ibrahim, K. S.; Wan Azman, W. A.; Sridhar, G. S.; Watson, T.; Abu Kassim, Z.; Mahmood Zuhdi, A. S.; Abdul Hafidz, M. I.; Abu Hassan, M. R.; Wan Rahimi Shah, W. F.; Karthikesan, D.; Mohd Suan, M. A.; Md Ali, S. M.; Kasim, S.; Mohd Arshad, M. K.; Ismail, J. R.; Ibrahim, Z. O.; Chua, N. Y. L.; Abdul Rahim, A. A.; Rusani, B. I.; Yap, L. B.; Zamrin, D. M.; Amir, M. A.; Ismail, N. I.; Mohammad Razi, A. A.; Prins, F.; Bendermacher, P.; Burg, M.; Lok, D.; van der Sluis, A.; Martens, F.; Badings, E.; Milhous, J.; van Rossum, P.; Viergever, E.; van Hessen, M.; Willems, F.; Tjon Joe Gin, R.; Swart, H.; Oomen, A.; Kromhout, S.; Lauwerijssen, I.; Daalmans, M.; Breedveld, R.; de Vries, K.; Feenema Aardema, M.; Hofma, S.; van der Borgh, R.; van Nes, E.; Göbel, E.; Oei, F.; Dorman, H.; Bos, R.; Zoet-Nugteren, S.; Emans, M.; Kragten, H.; Lenderink, T.; Feld, R.; Herrman, J.; van Bergen, P.; Gosselink, M.; Elvan, A.; Hoekstra, E.; The, S.; de Vries, R.; Zegers, E.; Oude Ophuis, T.; Remmen, J.; Bech, J.; Kooistra, J.; den Hartog, F.; Oosterhof, T.; Bartels, G.; Posma, J.; Nierop, P.; Liem, A.; van der Zwaan, C.; Asselman, M.; van Eck, J.; Gevers, R.; van Gorselen, E.; van Hal, J.; Terpstra, W.; Groenemeijer, B.; Jerzewski, A.; Hoogslag, P.; Geertman, J.; de Groot, M.; Dijkstra, B.; Loyola, A.; Sulit, D.; Mercado, M. J.; Rey, N.; Evangelista, L.; Abola, M.; Padua, L.; Morales, D.; Palomares, E.; Abat, M.; Santos, R.; Rogelio, G.; Chua, P.; Baello, R.; del Pilar, J.; Alianza, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alcaraz, L.; Ebo, G.; Guido-Saliot, I.; Tirador, L.; Estoce, E.; Ygpuara, M.; Cruz, J.; Anonuevo, J.; Pitargue, A.; Janion, M.; Drewniak, Z.; Guzik, B.; Nowak, M.; Nosal, M.; Niewiara, Ł; Gajos, G.; Bury, K.; Czubek, U.; Misztal, M.; Grzybczak, R.; Zalewski, J.; Kruszelnicka-Kwiatkowska, O.; Żabówka, M.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Grzybowski, A.; Szałkowski, P.; Broncel, M.; Gorzelak, P.; Możdżan, M.; Olszewska Banaszczyk, M.; Szuba, A.; Tabin, M.; Chachaj, A.; Czarnecka, D.; Terlecki, M.; Klocek, M.; Maga, P.; Coman, I.; Tarlea, M.; Ghionea, M.; Gavrila, C.; Dimulescu, D.; Popescu, A.; Stoicescu, C.; Vintila, V.; Florescu, M.; Baghilovici Cretu, D.; Suran, M.; Mihalcea, D.; Lungeanu Juravle, L.; Cinteza, M.; Calin, I.; Bicescu, G.; Vasile Toma, N.; Udroiu, C.; Gherghinescu, C.; Darabont, R.; Patrascu, N.; Constantinescu, C.; Popescu, I.; Sinescu, C.; Andrei, C.; Axente, L.; Arsenescu, C.; Statescu, C.; Ardeleanu, I.; Anghel, L.; Benedek, I.; Benedek, T.; Kinga, P.; Banga, D. K.; Bobescu, E.; Doka, B.; Dobreanu, D.; Sirbu, V.; Rudzik, R.; Kantor, K.; Sus, I.; Gaita, D.; Maximov, D.; Brie, D.; Mosteoru, S.; Olariu, I.; Iancu, A.; Marc, M.; Hagiu, R.; Manole, V.; Molnar, A.; Dregoesc, I.; Iliesiu, A.; Armean, P.; Parvu, I.; Deleanu, A.; Lighezan, D.; Buzas, R.; Petrescu, L.; Nicola, R.; Dan, R.; Crisan, S.; Trasca, L.; Teodorescu, I.; Zara, O.; Tiron, T.; Tesloianu, D.; Spiridon, M.; Vintila, M.; Baluta, M.; Chioncel, O.; Stoica, E.; Kulcsar, I.; Antohi, L.; Strazhesko, I.; Tkacheva, O.; Sharashkina, N.; Pykhtina, V.; Vasyuk, Y.; Shkolnik, E.; Khadzegova, A.; Sadulaeva, I.; Ivanova, S.; Nesterova, E.; Nesvetov, V.; Shupenina, E.; Shcherbak, M.; Sizova, Z.; Beloborodova, A.; Pozdnyakov, Y.; Tarasov, A.; Shvedov, I.; Zabashta, S.; Ryzhikova, I.; Barbarash, O.; Pecherina, T.; Vatutin, M.; Inozemceva, A.; Kazachek, Y.; Mineeva, E.; Kupriyanova, T.; Voevoda, M.; Gafarov, V.; Gromova, E.; Panov, D.; Voevoda, E.; Kovalkova, N.; Ragino, Y.; Poponina, T.; Poponina, Y.; Garganeeva, N.; Repin, A.; Vershinina, E.; Borodina, E.; Kalashnikova, T.; Safyanova, O.; Osipova, I.; Antropova, O.; Pyrikova, N.; Polyakova, I.; Efremushkina, A.; Guryanova, N.; Kiseleva, E.; Lomteva, E.; Shtyrova, T.; Novikova, N.; Parfenov, D.; Volovchenko, A.; Averkov, O.; Pavlikova, E.; Vaulina, L.; Pletnikova, I.; Mishchenko, L.; Saranin, S.; Tsupko, I.; Kuznetsova, N.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dankovtseva, E.; Vlazneva, Y.; Tolokonnikova, N.; Zhurina, M.; Zubova, E.; Aseycheva, O.; Sigalovich, E.; Vertkin, A.; Rodiukova, I.; Komissarov, S.; Sokolova, R.; Ausheva, A.; Salbieva, A.; Yusubova, A.; Isakova, S.; Hranai, M.; Obona, P.; Cisar, P.; Semetko, J.; Vanova, P.; Ferencikova, Z.; Vykoukalova, T.; Gaspar, L.; Caprnda, M.; Bendzala, M.; Pella, D.; Fedacko, J.; Hatalova, K.; Drozdakova, E.; Peter, O.; Ntsekhe, M.; de Andrade, M.; Seedat, S.; Gani, M.; van Zyl, L.; Naude, M.; Cronje, T.; van Zyl, F.; Engelbrecht, J.; Jansen, J.; Roos, J.; Makotoko, E.; Pretorius, C.; Mirna, S.; Nell, H.; Pretorius, M.; Basson, M.; Njovane, X.; Mohamed, Z.; Pillay, T.; Dawood, S.; Horak, A.; Lloyd, E.; Hitzeroth, J.; Mabin, T.; Abelson, M.; Klug, E.; Gebka, M.; Hellig, F.; Alison, M.; Bae, J.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.; Joo, S.; Park, C.; Kim, Y.; Jarnert, C.; Rydén, L.; Mooe, T.; Binsell-Gerdin, E.; Dellborg, M.; Torstensson, I.; Albertsson, P.; Hiller, M.; Perers, E.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J. H.; Al-Khalili, F.; Almroth, H.; Andersson, T.; Eriksson Östman, M.; Pantev, E.; Utter, F.; Tengmark, B. O.; Olsson, Å; Liu, B.; Rasmanis, G.; Wahlgren, C. M.; Thott, O.; Moccetti, T.; Rossi, M. G.; Crljenica, C.; Dovgan, N.; Skarzhevskyi, O.; Kozhukhov, S.; Tseluyko, V.; Mishchuk, N.; Kuznetsov, I.; Semenikhin, S.; Matviichuk, N.; Matuzok, O.; Yakovleva, L.; Volkov, V.; Zaprovalna, O.; Serik, S.; Riabukha, V.; Koval, O.; Kaplan, P.; Ivanov, A.; Romanenko, S.; Skoromna, A.; Kononenko, L.; Saprychova, L.; Lazareva, S.; Prokhorov, O.; Vdovychenko, V.; Bychkov, M.; Demydova, A.; Kapustynska, O.; Bazylevych, A.; Dutka, R.; Vlasyuk, Z.; Shabat, M.; Rudenko, L.; Beregova, O.; Fedtchouk, L.; Gusak, I.; Vizir, V.; Sadomov, A.; Shkolovoy, V.; Nasonenko, O.; Demidenko, O.; Karpenko, O.; Ponomarenko, K.; Oryshych, G.; Nevolina, I.; Mitskevych, L.; Bezuglova, S.; Kizim, S.; Todoriuk, L.; Brodi, N.; Karpenko, L.; Malynovsky, Y.; Fedotov, S.; Malynovska, O.; Goydenko, O.; Miroshnykov, S.; Rabota, I.; Koval, V.; Ohirko, O.; Khaba, U.; Storozhuk, B.; Danylchuk, I.; Danylchuk, A.; Gutsuliak, R.; Cotton, J.; Luckraz, H.; Wrigley, B.; Venkataraman, A.; Maher, A.; Moriarty, A.; McEneaney, D.; Connolly, D.; Davis, R.; Banerjee, P.; Davey, P.; Elmahi, E.; Senior, R.; Ahmed, A.; Birdi, I.; Gedela, S.; Singh, A.; Calvert, J.; Butler, M.; Donnelly, P.; Jasinka, A.; Orr, C.; Trevelyan, J.; Routledge, H.; Carter, J.; Oxenham, H.; Peace, A.; McNeill, A.; Austin, D.; Jackson, M.; Kukreja, N.; Kotwinski, P.; Hilton, T.; Bilizarian, S.; Srivastava, S.; Walsh, R.; Fields, R.; Portnay, E.; Gogia, H.; Deits, R.; Salacata, A.; Hunter, J.; Bacharach, J.; Shammas, N.; Suresh, D.; Gurbel, P.; Banerjee, S.; Grena, P.; Bedwell, N.; Sloan, S.; Lupovitch, S.; Soni, A.; Gibson, K.; Pepper, D.; Sangrigoli, R.; Mehta, R.; Patel, J.; I-Hsuan Tsai, P.; Gillespie, E.; Harrison, A.; Dempsey, S.; Phillips, R.; Hamroff, G.; Hametz, C.; Black, R.; Lader, E.; Kostis, J.; Bittner, V.; Mcguinn, W.; Cheng, R.; Pal, J.; Malhotra, V.; Michaelson, S.; Vacante, M.; Mccormick, M.; Arimie, R.; Dukkipati, R.; Camp, A.; Dagher, G.; Kosh y, N.; Culp, J.; Thew, S.; Ferraro, A.; Costello, F.; Heiman, M.; Chilton, R.; Moran, M.; Adler, F.; Balingit, P.; Comerota, A.; Seiwert, A.; French, W.; Vardi, G.; Singh, T.; Serota, H.; Qayyum, U.; Das, S.; Harrison, R.; Vora, A.; Bakeen, F.; Omer, S.; Chandra, L.; Casaccia, G.; Tinto, J.; Sighel, C.; Giozzi, E.; Morell, Y.; Bianchini, M.; Yossen, M.; Hoyos, M.; Venturini, C.; Merkusa, C.; Carrique, A.; Carrique, P.; Fracaro, V.; Torres, M.; Crunger, P.; Espinosa, M.; Passarello, A.; Zaidman, M.; Ledesma, M.; Troncoso, C.; Aviles, A.; Rodera Vigil, S.; Vogel, M.; Takla, M.; Funosas, C.; Ferreiro, M.; Bruno, T.; Buzzetti, C.; Lozano, J.; Alvarez Dámelio, A.; Bocanera, M.; Vicente, D.; Cenci, A.; Deluca, C.; Santana, R.; Ahuad Calvelo, A.; Alvarez D'Amelio, A.; Ahuad Calvelo, J.; Herrero, S.; Robertson, M.; Tapia, D.; Escalante, M.; Cañas, M.; Cendali, G.; Esposito, L.; Muñiz, M.; Montaña, J.; Di Vruno, M.; Strevezza, M.; Lopez Santi, M.; Massei, N.; Garate, V.; Perlo, D.; Campora, F.; Jakubowski, I.; Gonzalez Moisello, M.; Actis, M.; Schiavi, S.; Aguirre, M.; Ceirano, C.; Zillo, M.; Yunis, M.; Berdini, A.; Gerbaudo, R.; Berdini, J.; Palma, F.; Pinero, S.; Virulio, S.; Vitale, A.; Sosa Flores, G.; Ibanez Saggia, C.; Ibanez Saggia, D.; Roses, A.; Martinelli, C.; Vargas, L.; Galarza Salazan, M.; Dran, P.; Tinnirello, V.; Pelayes, S.; Bordoni, P.; Navarro, A.; Barilati, P.; Serra, R.; Nigro, A.; Cleiman, S.; Bianchi, M.; Vallejo, M.; Ingratta, M.; Tonelli, L.; Levantini, M.; Bonifacio, M.; Hansen, V.; Chaieb, A.; Majul, S.; Medina, F.; Gallinotti, P.; Madariaga, T.; Andrea, G.; Blumberg, C.; Volpe, M.; Gandur, H.; Benincasa, V.; Barreto, M.; Jure, D.; Tulloch, G.; Greenwell, D.; Forrest, N.; Nyman, E.; Mcintosh, C.; O'May, V.; Grabek, T.; Conway, B.; O’Donoghue, M.; Brady, L.; Duroux, M.; Ratcliffe, M.; Shone, S.; Connelly, A.; Ferreira-Jardim, A.; Vandernet, R.; Downes, R.; Davids, F.; Teal, L.; Knight, S.; Soraghan, D.; Spence, C.; Smith, K.; Tivendale, L.; Williams, Z.; O'Connor, M.; Walker, I.; Ferguson, L.; Holiday, J.; Griffin, R.; Palethorpe, L.; Hindom, L.; Lilwall, L.; Wadham, S.; Narasimhan, K.; van Extergem, P.; Joris, I.; Oreglia, M.; Jacobs, C.; Leus, W.; Robesyn, V.; Vanheule, K.; van den Bossche, K.; Albertijn, S.; Vissers, C.; Badts, G.; Vangenechten, K.; Derycker, K.; Dejaegher, K.; de Grande, T.; de Clippel, M.; Gayet, F.; Jorion, M.; Jourdan, A.; Tartaglia, K.; Zwinnen, W.; Roijakkers, I.; van Genechten, G.; Schoonis, A.; Bollen, J.; Janssen, A.; de Coninck, M.; Ruell, S.; Grimonprez, A.; Bouckaert, N.; van Eeckhoutte, H.; Malmendier, D.; Massoz, M.; Jacquet, S.; Vanhalst, E.; Casier, T.; Barroso, S. L.; Tamashiro, N.; Correa, C. P.; Sehnem, E. A. B.; Precoma, C. B.; Pinheiro, L.; Ruschel, K. B.; dos Reis, A. L.; Santos, M. S.; de Oliveira, L. O. S. P.; de Carvalho, L. M. G.; dos Santos, M. E. S.; Reis, L. L. F.; da Cunha, G. T.; França, F. F.; Bessa, S. K.; Vicente, C.; Ormundo, C.; Trama, L.; Pires, N. F.; Esteves, D.; Sila, O. L.; Góes, N. C.; Amorin, R. C.; Faria, M. O.; Bucalon, E. C.; Marin, L. P.; Herek, L.; Araujo, V. L.; Silva, A. F.; Lima, F.; Gomes, C. G.; Pagnan, L. G.; Novelli, C. M.; Carvalho, J. K. C.; Teodoro, A. R.; Zimmermann, E. M. B.; Beiersdorf, J. R.; Machado, B. G.; Pedroso, F. B. V.; de Vargas, T.; Peres, C. S.; dos Santos, T. F.; de Souza, S. F.; Luiz, R. O.; Ferreira, P.; Souza, D. F.; Cunha, S. M. C.; de Resende, I. M.; Furtado, C. C. F.; Soprane, A. A.; Brum, A. B.; Zorzo, J. A. T.; dos Santos, J. C.; Queiroz, L. B.; Barros, F. E.; Vianna, C. O.; Zanateli, A.; Vieira, A. P. Z.; Melo, G.; Zambonin, G. E. C.; Paiva, P.; Viana, R. M. M.; Yagihara, M. M.; Takiuti, M. M.; Miyamoto, P. B.; da Silva, M. F.; Borin, L. A.; Chiazzini, S. M. L.; Fleck, N.; Batista, R. F.; Cardoso, D. T.; MCamasmie, P.; Assompção, R. P.; Marques, L. L.; Leung, S.; Lewis, C.; Tytus, A.; Clarus, S.; Juranics, S.; Pandey, M.; Frenette, L.; Magi, A.; Nowacki, B.; Otis, J.; Fox, B.; Corke, R.; Miller, B.; Rizzo, A.; Trombetta, L.; Power, P.; Richert, L.; Haligowski, R.; Macrae, C.; Kooistra, L.; Urso, C.; Fox, S.; Felbel, S.; Stafford, C.; Stata, C.; Barnabe, B.; Mehta, K.; Faul, J.; Gohel, J.; Bhakta, S.; Harwood, A.; McPherson, C.; Marucci, J.; Manasterski, L.; Veenhuyzen, J.; Ramadan, D.; Madden, B.; Jetha, A.; Pajevic, M.; Dube, C.; Rolfe, B.; O’Blenis, G.; Roy, L.; Dihel, C.; Butler, J.; Simmavong, K.; Bartol, C.; Bozek, B.; Hart, B.; Shier, M.; Coughlin, M.; Lamantia, C.; Lamantia, D.; Vilag, C.; Fecteau, J.; Dionne, J.; Péloquin, G.; Hogg, N.; Welsh, S.; Weerasingam, S.; Lantz, M.; Lounsbury, N.; Martin, E.; Mitchell, L.; Morgen, G.; Nelson, S.; Pelzer, E.; Sorensen, S.; Leblanc, A.; Bourlaud, A. S.; Prémont, A.; Léger, P.; Larivière, M. M.; Tremblay, H.; Bergeron, A.; Dumont, J.; Keilani, S.; Landry, P.; Deneufbourg, I.; Breton, C.; Bilodeau, N.; Côté, M.; Dumont, F.; Dufort, L.; Marcoux, D.; David, M.; Otis, R.; Parks, J.; Cepidoza, C.; Janz, W.; Weighell, W.; Yaworski, S.; Boyd, K.; Lambert, J.; Shea-Landry, G.; Reid, K.; Thiessen, S.; Nemtean, D.; Futers, S.; Drouin, K.; Masson, C.; Arseneault, M. C.; Lachance, N.; Bergeron, C.; Boudreault, C.; Perkins, L.; Barnett, A.; Fortin, J.; Duclos, R.; Vallières, C.; Bouchard-Pilote, C.; Ouimet, F.; Roberge, B.; Couture, M. L.; Deshaies, D.; Bastien, A.; Chartrand, M. J.; Gagné, N. L.; Desbiens, K.; Alarie, P.; Cassan, J.; Ducharme, Y.; Roy D Tapps, I.; Bolduc, H.; Laliberté, J.; Hickey, L.; Spero, M.; Bernstein, M.; Clement, J.; Pawluch, A.; Ricci-Bonzey, M.; Richer, J.; Vaillancourt, J.; Ward, B.; Mostafai Rad, P.; Oleski, L.; Karkhanis, R.; Hartleib, V.; Poirier, R.; Hidalgo, J.; Hernandez, C.; Obreque, C.; Quilapi, D.; Villa, F.; Iturriaga, C.; Ferrada, M.; Navarrete, S.; Becerra, E.; Vargas, C.; Roque, C.; Alarcon, J.; Diaz, D.; Sepulveda, M.; Villan, C.; Garcia, N.; Lara, C.; Lezana, B.; Basso, N.; Torres, G.; Pasmino, C.; Gonzalez, S.; Medina, D.; Rodriguez, T.; Guo, T.; Chen, S.; Han, W.; Shi, D.; Zhang, Q.; Li, W.; Cui, L.; Huang, Z.; Gong, X.; Liu, D.; Tan, S.; Caicedo, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Mejia, I.; Escalante Ruiz, J.; Camera Ochoa, C.; Conrrado Ortega, Y.; Accini Diaz, A.; Rodriguez, B.; Lopez-Lopez, J.; Di Stefano, K.; Florez, L.; Manco, T.; Rodriguez, D.; Urina, A.; de La Hoz, L.; Almendrales, L.; Bello, O.; Urrea Valencia, H.; Correa Rivera, P.; Perdomo, I.; Alzate, J.; Rivera, E.; Jimenez, N. N.; DMoreno, N.; Guzman, A.; Betancourt, S.; Mendoza Marin, H.; Leyva, M.; Ortiz, M.; Marin, E.; Angie Lorena, A.; Alvarez, Y.; Cervantes Hurtado, A.; Accini Mendoza, A.; Trujillo Accini, M.; Eguis, B.; del Portillo, C.; Ortega, M.; Delgado, P.; Arciniegas, J.; Rodriguez, L.; Melo Sanchez, S.; Chavera, I.; Pastrana Mendoza, M.; Negrette Quintero, A.; Zidek, M.; Hajkova, D.; Rozskowska, P.; Opavska, I.; Souckova, E.; Matuskova, E.; Kratochvilova, T.; Pavelec, P.; Zelenkova, V.; Dolezalova, Z.; Márquez, M.; Moreira, D.; Zuleta, M.; Santana, G.; Coello, A.; Andrade, G.; Salazar, J.; Rivadeneira, J.; Vaerma, J.; Lappalainen, S.; Silvennoinen, S.; Haaraoja, A.; Valimaki, S.; Roine, E.; Abergel, H.; Msakni, W.; Fuentes, A.; Briday, G.; David, A.; Soltani, S.; Decorps, A.; Chettouh, M.; Douillet, M.; Zamiti-Smondel, A.; Cuccu, L.; Salhi, N.; Helene, M.; Martin, S.; Merah, A.; Daher, P.; Laurie, S.; Roussel, L.; Leperchois, C.; Delelo, E.; Thalamy, A.; Chazot, E.; Tahirovic, E.; Watson, S.; Brettschneider, B.; Maas, M.; Euler, K.; Rahn, G.; Beissner, S.; Anuschek, V.; Tu, E.; Buerger, M.; Schemann, J.; Klinger, C.; Kurzidim, T.; Sahbani, S.; Laszig, S.; Beilfuss, M.; Foerster, A.; Eichinger, G.; Rupprecht, M.; Kuehnert, J.; Wendler-Huelse, I.; Buelow-Johansen, B.; Baierlein, A.; Iselt, M.; Sievert, B.; Frommhold, R.; Wolf, T.; Hahn, M.; Schoen, B.; Acimic, C.; Ludwig, M.; Funkat, A.; Wagner, I.; Schink, M.; Calvo-Sanchez, D.; Felfoldine Feil, J.; Patakine Sumegi, T.; Miko-Pauer, R.; Courcy, M.; Kelly, C.; Farrell, D.; Kirrane, C.; Hall, M.; Gilroy, E.; Kelsey, M.; Andrew, G.; Joyce, M.; Conway, S.; Duane, L.; Omer, T.; Zuker, S.; Platner, N.; Saranga, H.; Kaufman, E.; Livshitz, L.; Genin, I.; Klainman, M.; Uziel Iunger, K.; Abitbul, A.; Fishman, B.; Greenshtein, I.; Tubul, O.; Lasri, E.; Zvi, R.; Yablonski, A.; Helmer Levin, L.; Lunetto, M. L.; Savoldi, D.; Fiorini, M.; Ramani, F.; Mariottoni, B.; Rizzotti, D.; Di Matteo, C.; Musio, S.; Pieroni Minciaroli, S.; Serani, S.; Aloisi, A.; Attanasio, C.; Tricoli, M.; Giordano, V.; Andrioli, V.; Biundo, V.; Tullio, L.; Schiff, D.; Trovarelli, P.; Chiodi, R.; Sampaolesi, S.; Cina, M. T.; Abatello, M.; de Tora, M.; Pietrucci, F.; Pezzetta, S.; Chiminelli, E.; Dall’Asta, A.; Bennati, M.; Elia, A.; Bizzoco, M.; Iaquaniello, A.; Spigarelli, R.; Cremonesi, C.; Gagliardi, M.; Torricelli, L.; Ijichi, N.; Shiraiwa, K.; Murakami, M.; Takeshita, K.; Sato, M.; Shiratori, A.; Kinjo, K.; Tomita, K.; Mizuno, M.; Kurihara, F.; Tachibana, M.; Nitta, Y.; Unno, K.; Hiramatsu, H.; Sano, A.; Nanatsumura, M.; Tanikawa, I.; Uesugi, K.; Banno, S.; Miyata, T.; Kujuji, A.; Kawai, K.; Maegawa, A.; Koseki, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Aoki, S.; Maesawa, M.; Suzuki, A.; Itose, Y.; Konishi, K.; Fujieda, K.; Nakade, S.; Minami, M.; Yoneda, J.; Akiyama, R.; Sakai, S.; Nakatani, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Funama, M.; Kaneko, E.; Morii, S.; Onishi, M.; Sone, A.; Sagawa, N.; Iwai, F.; Kawahara, A.; Hasimoto, C.; Ueki, M.; Kamiji, M.; Ando, M.; Yokoo, M.; Okada, Y.; Yamada, H.; Matsushige, N.; Nagato, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Oka, I.; Kitou, S.; Tachiuchi, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Yoneda, S.; Iwasa, K.; Matsuda, J.; Oda, A.; Tokudome, S.; Kaneyuki, Y.; Higaki, M.; Yoneda, H.; Kajita, C.; Suwa, K.; Sato, E.; Nagata, T.; Kubo, Y.; Umesu, A.; Ohashi, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, I.; Nobehara, T.; Yamano, R.; Yumiba, A.; Hamada, M.; Nishihata, T.; Ohashi, Y.; Morita, M.; Endo, M.; Matsugi, M.; Tateishi, H.; Nakamori, R.; Yamashita, Y.; Okabe, M.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, T.; Shigeyama, Y.; Ichiyanagi, M.; Sugimori, K.; Ohmura, C.; Igarashi, M.; Aotsuka, S.; Komoda, N.; Watanabe, M.; Enomoto, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawaguchi, A.; Kasahara, A.; Koide, A.; Sakatani, T.; Kurihara, T.; Yokota, S.; Futagi, R.; Amemiya, Y.; Ono, E.; Maeda, A.; Kadono, K.; Ishiguchi, Y.; Kikuchi, R.; Kuramatsu, M.; Nakamura, E.; Chiba, S.; Higa, A.; Kitahashi, M.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, T.; Oba, M.; Tsubouchi, M.; Toshima, M.; Morishita, M.; Miyano, A.; Kondo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Shibata, R.; Tosaki, Y.; Ito, Y.; Saoda, M.; Yamasaki, E.; Kadosaki, S.; Motooka, S.; Akiyoshi, H.; Morio, S.; Nemoto, H.; Yoshizawa, S.; Okabe, N.; Semba, K.; Yoshida, A.; Lee, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Iwashita, Y.; Takeda, A.; Maezato, M.; Kawahira, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Okamoto, N.; Nishimura, M.; Matsuura, K.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukai, K.; Osakabe, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Koike, M.; Shibuya, S.; Shiramata, M.; Ono, Y.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Tadokoro, T.; Morishita, N.; Matsuo, Y.; Yumoto, I.; Sakazaki, S.; Atarashi, A.; Nabata, Y.; Okuda, N.; Fujita, A.; Matsuo, A.; Ishizawa, Y.; Shibata, H.; Ootsuka, M.; Taimatsu, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Sumi, Y.; Yamamoto, F.; Araki, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kuroda, S.; Sakata, R.; Okada, N.; Sawada, Y.; Miyata, M.; Asayama, H.; Koga, N.; Miki, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Hashimoto, A.; Fukuike, C.; Kubo, A.; Yamasaki, M.; Mori, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Takenaka, S.; Mashima, M.; Katsuta, H.; Matsumura, T.; Yanagida, S.; Watanabe, N.; Kodama, S.; Kusano, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Kamada, R.; Suzuki, K.; Itami, K.; Hasebe, Y.; Fujita, N.; Kubota, S.; Usuki, A.; Okamoto, M.; Uno, S.; Chikuma, A.; Kishikawa, H.; Yano K Nakano, C.; Otaguro, M.; Kayashima, Y.; Shinoda, M.; Jaafar, S. M.; Baharuddin, S.; Gembor, J.; Ahmad, H.; Syed Mansor, S. M.; Abdullah, W. M.; Shafie, Z.; Muhamad Yunus, S.; Alwi, S. M.; Hussin, N.; Basri, N. A.; Ling Ling, L.; Naem, N. S.; Rutten, R.; Rademaker, H.; van Buijsen, M.; Scholten, M.; Stuij, S.; van Zeijst, M.; van Houwelingen, K.; Engelen, W.; Kramer, H.; Maassen, E.; Verhoeven, P.; Awater, J.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, C.; Meijlis, P.; Blom, L.; Bos, M.; van der Wal, M.; van Laerhoven, G.; Jacobs, T.; Tan-Urgert, B.; van de Gaag, J.; den Boer, P.; Verlek, E.; Lardinois, R.; Coenjaerds, C.; Hendrick, R.; Schoep, J.; Froma, E.; van Nes, C.; Beuving, D.; Krikken, J.; Drent, I.; Geerlings, F.; Buvelot, S.; Wissenburg, A.; Dijkshoorn, A.; van Setten van der Meer, L.; Singerling, M.; van Wijk, D.; Bor, A.; Aukema-Wouda, Z.; Hendriks-van Woerden, M.; Kort, I.; Danse, I.; van der Knaap, M.; de Jong, C.; Temminck, M.; Schaefer, T.; van der Ven, N.; Drost, I.; Mulder, R.; de Vos, A.; de Hoop, M.; Post, G.; Wielandt, D.; Edorot, N.; de Castro, K.; Flotildes, M.; Mulingtapang, T.; Vasquez, S.; Facundo, S.; Peralta, M.; Jose, M.; Bandiez, J.; Sulit, P.; Joaquin, F.; Arbis, M. G.; Silva, C.; Delgado, D.; de Leon, R.; Maglasang, P.; Sian, A.; Alagban, C.; Alcorano, J.; Marcelo, M. J.; Dela Pena, C.; Hyra, I.; Malkiewicz, B.; Mosakowska, K.; Cana, I.; Dobrin, I.; Lautaru, A.; Manescu, G.; Samoila, N.; Lacatus, M.; Apostoie, A.; Prunoiu, M.; Tilinca, M.; Budeanu, A.; Nedelcu, C.; Dumitrache, N.; Boeru, L.; Zhuravleva, E.; Gundova, M.; Hoffmannova, J.; Svitkova, M.; Pekarova, T.; Ujacka, K.; Zsoriova, T.; Kubincova, K.; Jankovicova, Z.; Talliard, C.; Tyumbu, N.; Mngoma, N.; Kannemeyer, M.; Mostert, J.; Page, A.; Krahenbuhl, C.; Tredoux, C.; Hendricks, L.; Oliver, S.; Le Grange, M.; Naidoo, V.; Bae, Y.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Yu, N.; An, S.; Kim, E.; Yang, K.; Woo, J.; Kim, S.; Rasck, J.; Smetana, S.; Ajax, K.; Bylander, L.; Lindberg, A.; Dellborg, H.; Hultsberg-Olsson, G.; Harsmar, K.; Knutsson, A.; Håkansson, L.; Kåveryd-Holmström, M.; Lundmark, L. M.; Norrfors, B.; Löf, P.; Skoglund, K.; Torgersruud, M.; Johansson, K.; Mattsson, A.; Quist, M.; Haglund, P.; Lundell, L.; Gunvasdotter, S.; Rangman, B.; Liu, R.; Shi, J.; Förstedt, G.; Nylund, L.; Welin-Berger, B.; Nilsson, O.; Garcia-Värlid, A.; Forlenza, R.; Kaminska, K.; Nagorna, T.; Cottam, V.; Harper, R.; Gilchrist, M.; Musanhu, R.; Mackin, A.; Turner, A.; Willetts, S.; Cadd, A.; Evans, J.; Young, G.; Sevillano, A.; Brodie, K.; Eccles, A.; Kelly, S.; Doughty, A.; Gray, J.; Gibson, M.; Finlayson, M.; Domingo, D.; Brazee, L.; Renaud, K.; Doman, A.; Meyer, R.; Beatty, J.; Morgan, T.; Rodas, E.; Campbell, D.; Mcquarrie, M.; Battistelli, E.; Eisenbraun, P.; Farley, R.; Park, H.; Dwyer, J.; Adams, K.; Schneider, W.; Barbour, C.; Whyne, E.; Budzinski, S.; Craig, M.; Gilley Elmore, J.; Scott, D.; Bellini, S.; Pepper, M.; Gunderson, K.; Stipek, I.; Schwarz, L.; Watkins, K.; Moore, V.; Palao, A.; Keane-Richmond, P.; Franklin, L.; Ward, L.; Kostedt, G.; Bailey, S.; Hollenweger, L.; Solomon, A.; Johnson, D.; Gloer, K.; Meyer, M.; Boleyn, M.; Nieters, D.; Humphrey, K.; Bohn, A.; Mueller, G.; Mckenzie, H.; Edwards, T.; Velky, J.; Cole, C.; Diederick, M.; Burg, S.; Coulson, T.; Karunaratne, K.; Gunasekera, R.; Cook, S.; Fisher, S.; Garrison, K.; Passey, L.; Kuykendall, K.; Luck, K.; Ramia, L.; Joan, H.; Reynoso, F.; Farley, M.; Shuman, S.; Santana-Fernandes, E.; Ventimiglia, A.; Steele, V.; Gers, L.; Brown, P.; Wilson, J.; Freebersyser, J.; Reno, M.; Buettner, N.; McGovern, M.; Hubbard, T.; Elmore, H.; Payne, D.; Mccann, M.; Decker, S.; Sharp, A.; Forgey, E.; Broussard, E.; Juett, U.; Siddiqui, A.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg

  17. Periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease : A Bermuda Triangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis contributes to the understanding of the complex relationship between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus (DM), and periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). It was observed that a substantial number of suspected new DM patients could be

  18. Vascular progenitor cells in renal and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerweel, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of endothelial integrity plays a central role in the protection against the development and progression of renal and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Damaged or lost endothelial cells may be replaced through proliferation of local endothelium and by circulating bone marrow

  19. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambo, Amos; Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease [CVD] is a leading cause of mortality accounting for a global incidence of over 31%. Atherosclerosis is the primary pathophysiology underpinning most types of CVD. Historically, modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors were suggested to precipitate CVD. Recently, epidemiological studies have identified emerging risk factors including hypotestosteronaemia, which have been associated with CVD. Previously considered in the realms of reproductive biology, testosterone is now believed to play a critical role in the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The actions of testosterone as they relate to the cardiac vasculature and its implication in cardiovascular pathology is reviewed. PMID:27014372

  20. Gender and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Ruijter, Hester M.; Pasterkamp, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    More women than men die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) each year in every major developed country and most emerging economies. Nonetheless, CVD has often been considered as men’s disease due to the higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) of men at younger age. This has led to the

  1. Prevalence of Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Masters Endurance Athletes With a Low Atherosclerotic Risk Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghani, Ahmed; Maestrini, Viviana; Rosmini, Stefania; Cox, Andrew T; Dhutia, Harshil; Bastiaenan, Rachel; David, Sarojini; Yeo, Tee Joo; Narain, Rajay; Malhotra, Aneil; Papadakis, Michael; Wilson, Mathew G; Tome, Maite; AlFakih, Khaled; Moon, James C; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-07-11

    Studies in middle-age and older (masters) athletes with atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease report higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores compared with sedentary individuals. Few studies have assessed the prevalence of coronary artery disease in masters athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile. We assessed 152 masters athletes 54.4±8.5 years of age (70% male) and 92 controls of similar age, sex, and low Framingham 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores with an echocardiogram, exercise stress test, computerized tomographic coronary angiogram, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and a 24-hour Holter. Athletes had participated in endurance exercise for an average of 31±12.6 years. The majority (77%) were runners, with a median of 13 marathon runs per athlete. Most athletes (60%) and controls (63%) had a normal CAC score. Male athletes had a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques of any luminal irregularity (44.3% versus 22.2%; P=0.009) compared with sedentary males, and only male athletes showed a CAC ≥300 Agatston units (11.3%) and a luminal stenosis ≥50% (7.5%). Male athletes demonstrated predominantly calcific plaques (72.7%), whereas sedentary males showed predominantly mixed morphology plaques (61.5%). The number of years of training was the only independent variable associated with increased risk of CAC >70th percentile for age or luminal stenosis ≥50% in male athletes (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15; P=0.016); 15 (14%) male athletes but none of the controls revealed late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Of these athletes, 7 had a pattern consistent with previous myocardial infarction, including 3(42%) with a luminal stenosis ≥50% in the corresponding artery. Most lifelong masters endurance athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile have normal CAC scores. Male athletes are more likely to have a CAC

  2. Atherosclerotic plaque volume and composition in symptomatic carotid arteries assessed with multidetector CT angiography; relationship with severity of stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozie, S.; Weert, T.T. de; Monye, C. de; Homburg, P.J.; Tanghe, H.L.J.; Lugt, A. van der [Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dippel, D.W.J. [Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Neurology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and the composition of atherosclerotic plaque in symptomatic carotid arteries and to investigate the relationship between these plaque features and the severity of stenosis and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. One hundred patients with cerebrovascular symptoms underwent CT angiography. We measured plaque volume (PV) and the relative contribution of plaque components (calcifications, fibrous tissue, and lipid) in the symptomatic artery. The contribution of different components was measured as the number of voxels within defined ranges of HU values (calcification >130 HU, fibrous tissue 60-130 HU, lipid core <60 HU). Fifty-seven patients had atherosclerotic plaque in the symptomatic carotid artery. The severity of stenosis and PV were moderately correlated. Age and smoking were independently related to PV. Patients with hypercholesterolemia had significantly less lipid and more calcium in their plaques than patients without hypercholesterolemia. Other cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to PV or plaque composition. Luminal stenosis of the carotid artery partly reflects the amount of atherosclerotic carotid disease. Plaque volume and plaque composition are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. (orig.)

  3. The role of Visfatin in atherosclerotic peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoulias, Matthaios G; Skoura, Lemonia; Pitoulias, Apostolos G; Chatzidimitriou, Dimitris; Margariti, Apostolia; Arsenakis, Minas; Pitoulias, Georgios A

    2017-03-01

    Visfatin is an adipokine molecule acting as an essential coenzyme in multiple cellular redox reactions. The increased serum levels of Visfatin have been correlated with metabolic syndrome and endothelial homeostasis. In this study we investigate the possible relationship of Visfatin serum levels with the severity and location of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Study protocol included 45 consecutive PAOD and 20 Control patients with age >55years old. Definition of PAOD was based in Rutherord's classification (RC). End-stage PAOD patients (RC-V & -VI) were excluded from study. Data were collected prospectively and included age, gender, atherosclerotic risk factors and the body mass index (BMI). In PAOD patients recorded the PAOD's clinical stage and the presence of carotid stenosis >50%. PAOD patients divided in two subgroups, those with mild (RC-I & -II) and moderate disease (RC-III & -IV). In all serum samples Visfatin was measured, blindly, twice by anosoenzymatic technique. Statistical analysis was performed by non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test, Pearson's chi-square, One Way Anova and Kruskall-Wallis tests, as appropriate. The mean Visfatin value in PAOD and Control groups were 38.5±16.0 and 13.9±3.8ng/ml respectively (p0.05). Univariate analysis showed that severity of PAOD (mild vs severe), presence of carotid stenosis >50% and multilevel disease significantly affected outcomes (p=0.018, p=0.010 and p=0.006 respectively). In multivariate regression analysis severity of PAOD was the solely factor with strong correlation with high visfatin values (p=0.001). High Visfatin levels seem to be strongly correlated with the presence and severity of PAOD. Further and in depth investigation is needed to define the possible role of Visfatin in atherosclerosis and it's value as a potential prognostic biomarker of PAOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Evolving Paradigm in the Management of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali K. Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is a major cause of ischemic stroke worldwide and represents a significant health problem. The pathogenesis and natural history of ICAD are poorly understood, and rigorous treatment paradigms do not exist as they do for extracranial atherosclerosis. Currently, the best treatment for ICAD remains aspirin therapy, but many patients who are placed on aspirin continue to experience recurrent strokes. As microsurgical and endovascular techniques continue to evolve, the role of extracranial to intracranial bypass operations and stenting are increasingly being reconsidered. We performed a PubMed review of the English literature with a particular focus on treatment options for ICAD and present evidence-based data for the role of surgery and stenting in ICAD against medical therapy alone.

  5. [Cancer and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, Carlos; Valdivielso, Pedro; González-Alegre, María Teresa; García-Iglesias, María Francisca; Estirado, Eva; Mostaza, José M

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of cancer have a shorter survival in the long term partly due to the increase in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Some chemotherapy drugs, thoracic and cranial radiotherapy and above all the transplantation of hematopoietic cells are associated with an increase in the incidence of cardiovascular events compared with general population. Some of these treatments favor the development of a metabolic syndrome that could be the intermediary between these treatments and the development of CVD. It is recommended for cancer survivors to promote healthy lifestyles and the strict control of cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villella, Massimo; Villella, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a physiologic stressor that has multiple beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. Currently exercise training is a class I intervention as part of a multifactorial long-term process that includes: clinical assistance, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, identification of specific objective for each cardiovascular risk factor, formulation of an individual treatment plan with multiple intervention aimed at reduction of the risk, educational programs, planning of long term follow-up. This paper reviews the evidences of benefit of exercise in the most common heart diseases and describes the role of exercise training in the cardiac rehabilitation programs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Sex matters to the arteries : studies into the (epi)genetic background and clinical outcome of atherosclerotic disease in women and men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haitjema, S

    2017-01-01

    The higher incidence of atherosclerotic disease at a younger age in men has directed most cardiovascular research since the early 1980s towards men. Yet, if studied, sex-differences are found in etiology, diagnostics, therapy and prognosis of CVD. It has been suggested that sex hormone status

  8. Telomeres and Telomerase in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Kai Yeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are tandem repeat DNA sequences present at the ends of each eukaryotic chromosome to stabilize the genome structure integrity. Telomere lengths progressively shorten with each cell division. Inflammation and oxidative stress, which are implicated as major mechanisms underlying cardiovascular diseases, increase the rate of telomere shortening and lead to cellular senescence. In clinical studies, cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and hypertension have been associated with short leukocyte telomere length. In addition, low telomerase activity and short leukocyte telomere length have been observed in atherosclerotic plaque and associated with plaque instability, thus stroke or acute myocardial infarction. The aging myocardium with telomere shortening and accumulation of senescent cells limits the tissue regenerative capacity, contributing to systolic or diastolic heart failure. In addition, patients with ion-channel defects might have genetic imbalance caused by oxidative stress-related accelerated telomere shortening, which may subsequently cause sudden cardiac death. Telomere length can serve as a marker for the biological status of previous cell divisions and DNA damage with inflammation and oxidative stress. It can be integrated into current risk prediction and stratification models for cardiovascular diseases and can be used in precise personalized treatments. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of telomeres and telomerase in the aging process and their association with cardiovascular diseases. In addition, we discuss therapeutic interventions targeting the telomere system in cardiovascular disease treatments.

  9. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Steven M; Rumsfeld, John S

    2015-10-01

    There is a wealth of evidence linking depression to increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and worse outcomes among patients with known CVD. In addition, there are safe and effective treatments for depression. Despite this, depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in patients at risk for or living with CVD. In this review, we first summarize the evidence linking depression to increased risk of CVD and worse patient outcomes. We then review the mechanisms by which depression may contribute to cardiovascular risk and poor cardiovascular outcomes. We then summarize prior studies of depression treatment on cardiovascular outcomes. Finally, we offer guidance in the identification and management of depression among CVD populations. Given that 1 in 4 CVD patients has concurrent depression, application of these best-practices will assist providers in achieving optimal outcomes for their CVD patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Management of cardiovascular diseases during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Iung, Bernard; Pieper, Petronella G

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in women of childbearing age is rising. The successes in medical and surgical treatment of congenital heart disease have led to an increasing number of women at childbearing age presenting with problems of treated congenital heart disease. Furthermore, in developing countries and in immigrants from these countries, rheumatic valvular heart disease still plays a significant role in young women. Increasing age of pregnant women and increasing prevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors have led to an increase in women with coronary artery disease at pregnancy. Successful management of pregnancy in women with CVDs requires early diagnosis, a thorough risk stratification, and appropriate management by a multidisciplinary team of obstetricians, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, and primary care physicians. The following review is based on the recent European guidelines on the management of CVDs during pregnancy, which aim at providing concise and simple recommendations for these challenging problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mashhad stroke and heart atherosclerotic disorder (MASHAD) study: design, baseline characteristics and 10-year cardiovascular risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Moohebati, Mohsen; Esmaily, Habibollah; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Parizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Heidari-Bakavoli, Ali Reza; Safarian, Mohammad; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Nematy, Mohsen; Saber, Hamidreza; Mohammadi, Maryam; Andalibi, Mohammad Sobhan Sheikh; Ferns, Gordon A; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-07-01

    The Mashhad stroke and heart atherosclerotic disorder (MASHAD) study is a 10-year cohort study that aims to evaluate the impact of various genetic, environmental, nutritional and psychosocial risk factors on the incidence of cardiovascular events among an urban population in eastern Iran. The MASHAD study comprises a cohort of 9704 individuals aged 35-65 years using a stratified cluster random sampling design. This cohort will be followed up until 2020, with follow-up examinations being undertaken every 3 years. Ten-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk estimation was determined using NCEP ATP III criteria. Overall, 88.4 % of women and 79.2 % of men (P 20 % were observed to be 86.6, 11 and 2.5 %, respectively. Predicted risk of CVD > 10 % using the Framingham algorithm was considerably higher in men compared to women. Overall, 9.5 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 8.9-10.1 %] of our subjects had prevalent CAD. The prevalence of CVD risk factors within our population is high compared to Western countries, indicating the necessity for interventional risk modifications.

  12. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  13. cardiovascular disease intervention programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in smoking during a community-based cardiovascular disease intervention programme. The Coronary Risk Factor Study. H. J. STEENKAMP, P. L. JOOSTE, P. C. J. JORDAAN,. A. S. P. SWANEPOEL, J. E. ROSSOUW. Summary. A prospective anti-smoking clinical trial was conducted as part of a coronary risk factor ...

  14. Tea and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Apranta; Vita, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for a protective effect of tea consumption against cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the available epidemiological data providing evidence for and against such an effect. We also review observational and intervention studies that investigated an effect of tea and tea extracts on cardiovascular risk factors, including blood pressure, serum lipids, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Finally, we review potential mechanisms of benefit, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-proliferative effects, as well as favorable effects on endothelial function. Overall, the observational data suggest a benefit, but results are mixed and likely confounded by lifestyle and background dietary factors. The weight of evidence indicates favorable effects on risk factors and a number of plausible mechanisms have been elucidated in experimental and translational human studies. Despite the growing body evidence, it remains uncertain whether tea consumption should be recommended to the general population or to patients as a strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:21477653

  15. CARDIOVASCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Involving systemic autoimmune diseases, they primarily affect the joints, muscles and connective tissues. Cardiovascular impairment is often common in these disease manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to life-situations in danger. Otherwise impaired cardiovascular reason may be the first presentation. This may require aggressive therapy immunosuppressed, therefore the diagnosis is very important for a good choice of therapy. This article discusses the cardiovascular manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases, mainly rheumatic diseases, focusing on diagnosis and manangement cardiovascular implications.

  16. Peripheral ARtery Atherosclerotic DIsease and SlEep disordered breathing (PARADISE) trial - protocol for an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Filip M; Gałązka, Zbigniew; Płatek, Anna E; Górko, Dariusz; Ostrowski, Tomasz; Adamkiewicz, Karolina; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ryś, Anna; Semczuk-Kaczmarek, Karolina; Celejewski, Krzysztof; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is in fact a group of disease entities with different symptoms and course but a common underlying cause, i.e. atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is known to be aggravated by several cardiovascular risk factors, including obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Following paper is a protocol for the Peripheral ARtery Atherosclerotic DIsease and SlEep disordered breathing (PARADISE) trial, which aims to describe the prevalence of OSA in PAD patients scheduled for revascularisation, and to determine the effect of OSA on the procedure outcomes. The PARADISE study is an observational cohort trial. It plans to include 200 consecutive patients hospitalised for revascularisation due to PAD. In every patient an overnight sleep study will be performed to diagnose sleep disorders. Accord¬ing to the results of the test, patients will be divided into two groups: group A - patients with OSA, and group B - patients without OSA (control group). All patients will also be screened for classical and non-classical cardiovascular risk factors. In some of the patients, during surgery, a fragment of atherosclerotic plaque will be collected for further testing. Patients will be followed for one year for adverse events and end-points. Primary end-point of the study will be the failure of revascularisa¬tion defined as recurrence or new onset of the symptoms of ischaemia from the treated region, a need for re-operation or procedure revision, or recurrence of ischaemia signs on the imaging tests. The data obtained will help determine the incidence of OSA in the population of patients with PAD. The au¬thors expect to show that, as with other cardiovascular diseases associated with atherosclerosis, also in patients with PAD the incidence of undiagnosed OSA is high and its presence is associated with elevated cholesterol, inflammatory markers, and higher prevalence of arterial hypertension and poor control of other cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, due to

  17. Cardiovascular risk prediction in chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cedeño Mora

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: The cardiovascular risk scores (FRS-CVD and ASCVD [AHA/ACC 2013] can estimate the probability of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in patients with CKD regardless of renal function, albuminuria and previous cardiovascular events.

  18. Atherosclerotic Heart Disease: Prevalence and Risk Factors in Hospitalized Men with Hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, Margaret V.; Moore, Charity G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Atherosclerotic heart disease (ASHD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Few studies have determined prevalence and predictors of ASHD in hemophilia (HA), a population whose survival is improving with safer blood products and effective treatments for AIDS and hepatitis C. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and factors associated with ASHD in hemophilia A patients in Pennsylvania. Methods The prevalence of ASHD (myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease), cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, co-morbidities, and in-hospital mortality were assessed on statewide ASHD discharge data, 2001–2006, from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4). Results The prevalence of hemophilia ASHD admissions fluctuated between 6.5% and 10.5% for 2001 to 2006, p=0.62. Compared to HA without ASHD, HA with ASHD were older and more likely to be hypertensive, hyperlipidemic, and diabetic, all pHemophilia patients with ASHD have similar cardiovascular risk factors, admitting diagnoses, severity of illness, and in-hospital mortality as the general population. These findings suggest cardiovascular prevention measures should be promoted in hemophilia. PMID:21371197

  19. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Hypericum perforatum on selected traditional and novel biochemical factors of cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic rabbits: A comparison between the extract and lovastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Asgary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Evidence suggests that diets with high contents of cholesterol will increase serum lipoproteins and apolipoproteins, thereby increase risk of atherosclerosis. According to literature, some plants show hypolipidemic, hypocholestrolemic, and antiatherosclerotic activities. Aims: In this study, antiatherosclerotic effect of Hypericum perforatum hydroalcoholic extract on hypercholesterolemic rabbits was compared with that of lovastatin. Materials and Methods: Twenty five mature male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups of five and were fed for 60 days as follows: Standard diet (GroupI, standard diet and hydroalcoholic extract of Hypericum perforatum (150 mg/kg daily(GroupII, standard diet, hydroalcoholic extract of Hypericum perforatum (150 mg/ kg daily and cholesterol (1% of food content (Group III, standard diet and cholesterol (1% of food content(GroupIV, and finally standard diet, lovastatin (10 mg/kg, and cholesterol (1% of foodcontent (GroupV. Results: Hypericum perforatum extract significantly decreased the levels of apolipoprotein B(apoB, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A (apoB/apoA, triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidized LDL, malondialdehyde, and C-reactive protein (CRP as well as atherosclerosis index, and increased high density lipoprotein and apoA in rabbits of Group III compared to the rabbits of Group IV. The effect of Hypericum perforatum extract in decreasing the level of some biochemical factors like apoB, apoB/apoA, and CRP was meaningfully more than that of lovastatin. Histopathological findings confirmed that hydroalcoholic extract of Hypericum perforatum restricted the atherosclerotic lesions. Conclusions: This study indicates that hydroalcoholic extract of Hypericum perforatum possesses hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects and could be beneficial in the management of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  20. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    -macroglobulin (r=0.78, P < 0.01). These results indicate that in patients with peripheral arterial disease plasma viscosity increases with the progression of the atherosclerotic process and is correlated with the clinical stages of the disease.

  1. Childhood obesity and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bridger, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Many of these children have risk factors for later disease, including cardiovascular disease. For optimal cardiovascular health, health care professionals must be able to identify children and youth at risk and provide appropriate support as needed. The present article reviews the current medical literature on obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the paediatric population, the long-term cardiovascular consequences of childhood ...

  2. Nonfasting hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Langsted, A; Freiberg, J J

    2009-01-01

    , total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 all associate with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. These new data open the possibility that nonfasting rather than fasting lipid profiles can be used for cardiovascular risk prediction. If implemented, this would...... of cardiovascular disease and early death....

  3. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  4. Guidelines for Management of Hyperlipidemia: Implications for Treatment of Patients with Stroke Secondary to Atherosclerotic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandapat, Sudeepta; Robinson, Jennifer G

    2016-03-01

    After careful review of randomized cardiovascular outcomes trial data, the 2013 ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline focused on using the appropriate intensity of statin therapy to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk and moved away from recommending specific low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment targets. In patients who have had a stroke or other clinical ASCVD event, a high-intensity statin should be initiated up to age 75 years unless there are safety concerns, including a history of hemorrhagic stroke. A moderate-intensity statin is recommended if there are safety concerns or age is greater than 75 years. Atorvastatin 40-80 mg and rosuvastatin 20-40 mg are considered high-intensity statins. These new guidelines avoid unnecessary usage of non-statins to achieve specific LDL-C values, thus avoiding potential adverse effects or use of an inadequate statin intensity in patients who are "at goal." When non-statins are considered for additional LDL-C lowering, ezetimibe is the only non-statin clearly shown to further reduce ASCVD risk when added to background statin therapy.

  5. Three Decades of Atherosclerotic Reno-vascular Disease Management - Changing Outcomes in an Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vassallo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Optimized medical therapy has improved cardiovascular outcomes in the general population. To investigate whether changes in the management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD have had an impact on clinical outcomes. Methods: Recruitment into this single-center prospective cohort study started in 1986. Data was analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups based on relationship of diagnosis year to landmark randomized controlled trials (RCT; group 1 - pre-large RCT data (1986-2000; group 2 - post-early RCT (2001-2004; group 3 - ASTRAL study recruitment era (2004-2009; group 4 - post-ASTRAL (2009-2014. Results: In total, 872 patients were followed for a median 54.9 months (IQR 20.2-96.2. Over successive time-periods, there was an increase in baseline utilization of renin angiotensin blockade (RAB (group 4: 69% vs. group 1: 31%, pConclusions: Although fewer patients are being investigated for ARVD in our center, these have more cardiovascular comorbidities. Nonetheless, optimized medical therapy may have contributed towards improved proteinuria, renal function and clinical outcomes in patients diagnosed with ARVD.

  6. Lipoprotein(a in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein(a (Lp(a is an LDL-like molecule consisting of an apolipoprotein B-100 (apo(B-100 particle attached by a disulphide bridge to apo(a. Many observations have pointed out that Lp(a levels may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Lp(a inhibits the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF and contributes to the growth of arterial atherosclerotic lesions by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the migration of smooth muscle cells to endothelial cells. Moreover Lp(a inhibits plasminogen binding to the surfaces of endothelial cells and decreases the activity of fibrin-dependent tissue-type plasminogen activator. Lp(a may act as a proinflammatory mediator that augments the lesion formation in atherosclerotic plaques. Elevated serum Lp(a is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Furthermore, Lp(a levels should be a marker of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, saphenous vein bypass graft atherosclerosis, and accelerated coronary atherosclerosis of cardiac transplantation. Finally, the possibility that Lp(a may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke has been assessed in several studies. Recent findings suggest that Lp(a-lowering therapy might be beneficial in patients with high Lp(a levels. A future therapeutic approach could include apheresis in high-risk patients in order to reduce major coronary events.

  7. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Chaddha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine.

  8. Moderate overweight is beneficial and severe obesity detrimental for patients with documented atherosclerotic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Aziza; Charlot, Mette Gitz; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H; Køber, Lars; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Ravkilde, Jan; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Thuesen, Leif

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is paradoxically associated with enhanced survival in patients with established cardiovascular disease. We explored this paradox further by examining the influence of obesity on survival in patients with verified atherosclerotic heart disease. This retrospective registry based cohort study included all patients from the Western Denmark Heart Registry with coronary atherosclerosis confirmed by coronary angiography from January 2000 to December 2010. Patients were divided into eight groups according to body mass index (BMI) based on WHO BMI classification. Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark. The study included 37 573 patients (70.7% men) with a mean age of (66.3 ± 11.1) years. During the 11 years of follow-up, 5866 (15.6%) patients died. Multivariable analysis confirmed that the risk of death was the lowest among the preobese patients (27.5 ≤ BMIObese classes I and II did not differ from the reference group (23 ≤ BMIheart disease patients have improved survival compared with normal weight patients. Underweight and severely obese patients have increased mortality. Our results lean more towards an overweight paradox than an obesity paradox.

  9. Obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachur, Sergey; Lavie, Carl J; de Schutter, Alban; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is increasingly more common in postindustrial societies, and the burden of childhood obesity is increasing. The major effects of obesity on cardiovascular (CV) health are mediated through the risk of metabolic syndrome (insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension), such that an absence of these risk factors in obese individuals may not be associated with increased mortality risk. In individuals already diagnosed with chronic CV disease (CVD), the overweight and class I obese have significant associations with improved survival. However, this effect is attenuated by increases in cardiorespiratory fitness. The negative effects of obesity on CV health manifest as accelerated progression of atherosclerosis, higher rates of ventricular remodeling and a higher risk of associated diseases, including stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. The most effective therapies at reversing CVD risk factors associated with obesity have been dietary changes with exercise, especially through structured exercise programs, such as cardiac rehabilitation.

  10. Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Diseases: Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Seung Hwan; Nicholls, Stephen J; Sakuma, Ichiro; Zhao, Dong; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2016-01-01

    Residual cardiovascular risk and failure of high density lipoprotein cholesterol raising treatment have refocused interest on targeting hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and remnant cholesterol have demonstrated to be important risk factors for cardiovascular disease; this has been demonstrated in experimental, genetic, and epidemiological studies. Fibrates can reduce cardiovascular event rates with or without statins. High dose omega-3 fatty acids co...

  11. Educational inequality in cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Educational inequality in diseases in the circulatory system (here termed cardiovascular disease) is well documented but may be confounded by early life factors. The aim of this observational study was to examine whether the associations between education and all cardiovascular diseases...... educational status was associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and stroke. All associations attenuated in the within-sibship analyses, in particular in the analyses on ischaemic heart disease before age 45 years. For instance, in the cohort analyses, the hazard rate...... factors shared by siblings explained the associations between education and the cardiovascular disease outcomes but to varying degrees. This should be taken into account when planning interventions aimed at reducing educational inequalities in the development of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart...

  12. Precision Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since President Obama announced the Precision Medicine Initiative in the United States, more and more attention has been paid to precision medicine. However, clinicians have already used it to treat conditions such as cancer. Many cardiovascular diseases have a familial presentation, and genetic variants are associated with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, which are the basis for providing precise care to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Large-scale cohorts and multiomics are critical components of precision medicine. Here we summarize the application of precision medicine to cardiovascular diseases based on cohort and omic studies, and hope to elicit discussion about future health care.

  13. Resveratrol and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bonnefont-Rousselot

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs has stimulated research for substances that could improve cardiovascular health. Among them, resveratrol (RES, a polyphenolic compound notably present in grapes and red wine, has been involved in the “French paradox”. RES is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and for its ability to upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS. RES was able to scavenge •OH/O2•− and peroxyl radicals, which can limit the lipid peroxidation processes. Moreover, in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC under glucose-induced oxidative stress, RES restored the activity of dimethylargininedimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH, an enzyme that degrades an endogenous inhibitor of eNOS named asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA. Thus, RES could improve •NO availability and decrease the endothelial dysfunction observed in diabetes. Preclinical studies have made it possible to identify molecular targets (SIRT-1, AMPK, Nrf2, NFκB…; however, there are limited human clinical trials, and difficulties in the interpretation of results arise from the use of high-dose RES supplements in research studies, whereas low RES concentrations are present in red wine. The discussions on potential beneficial effects of RES in CVDs (atherosclerosis, hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure should compare the results of preclinical studies with those of clinical trials.

  14. Chlamydia pneumoniae in the atherosclerotic plaques of coronary artery disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Izadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An association between Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to study this potential relationship in 105 Iranian patients. Coronary artery specimens from 105 Iranian patients undergoing CABG were analyzed by PCR method for C. pneumoniae. Serological evaluation for C. pneumoniae IgG and IgM was performed using ELISA. 53 specimens from mamillary artery were also investigated. C. pneumoniae PCR test result was positive for 23 (21.9% of patients with coronary artery atherosclerosis, but none of the specimens from the mamillary artery was positive for C. pneumoniae when it was evaluated by the PCR (P<0.001. Coronary artery disease patients with and without a history of unstable angina or myocardial infarction were comparable in C. pneumoniae PCR test positive rates (P=0.618. Relevance of IgG and IgM positivity were also studied by correlating it to the study parameters, but no difference was found. CRP was significantly higher in the IgM positive group (P<0.001. A significant proportion of coronary atherosclerotic plaques are infected with C. pneumoniae while no infection was found in the normal mamillary artery specimens. No association was found between acute coronary syndromes and serological and PCR positivity. Further prospective randomized controlled studies with large patient population are needed to confirm our findings.

  15. YKL-40 - an emerging biomarker in cardiovascular disease and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathcke Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several inflammatory cytokines are involved in vascular inflammation resulting in endothelial dysfunction which is the earliest event in the atherosclerotic process leading to manifest cardiovascular disease. YKL-40 is an inflammatory glycoprotein involved in endothelial dysfunction by promoting chemotaxis, cell attachment and migration, reorganization and tissue remodelling as a response to endothelial damage. YKL-40 protein expression is seen in macrophages and smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques with the highest expression seen in macrophages in the early lesion of atherosclerosis. Several studies demonstrate, that elevated serum YKL-levels are independently associated with the presence and extent of coronary artery disease and even higher YKL-40 levels are documented in patients with myocardial infarction. Moreover, elevated serum YKL-40 levels have also been found to be associated with all-cause as well as cardiovascular mortality. Finally, YKL-40 levels are elevated both in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, known to be at high risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases, when compared to non-diabetic persons. A positive association between elevated circulating YKL-40 levels and increasing levels of albuminuria have been described in patients with type 1 diabetes indicating a role of YKL-40 in the progressing vascular damage resulting in microvascular disease. This review describes the present knowledge about YKL-40 and discusses its relation to endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes and look ahead on future perspectives of YKL-40 research.

  16. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, A.; Sortso, C.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2016-01-01

    We present an investigation of the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes in Denmark 2000 through 2011. The Diabetes Impact Study 2013 is based on all registrants in the Danish National Diabetes Register as of July 3rd 2013 (n=497,232). Record linkage with the Danish...... of diabetes has been rather constant at higher level in males (around 16-18%) than in females (around 12-14%) during 2000-2011 (incl.). In contrast, the incidence rate of CVD after having diabetes diagnosis has declined from about 4.5 to less than 3 during the same period, with higher declining level...... for males than for females. Efforts to detect diabetes at an earlier stage have not resulted in a reduced occurrence of CVD at the diagnosis of diabetes in Denmark. However, the risk of developing CVD after the diagnosis of diabetes has been declining, possibly reflecting benefits of intensified treatment...

  17. Risk of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Scheel-Thomsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Type 2 diabetes (DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of antidiabetic drugs on the composite endpoint (CE) of ischemic heart disease, heart failure or stroke in DM patients. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study. Cases were DM patients who...... subsequently suffered from CE; controls were DM patients with no history of CE after DM diagnosis. Using the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, we included DM patients with information on date of DM diagnosis, date of CE, and comorbidities. From the Central Region of Jutland, Denmark, medication use......% CI: 16.88-24.12), neuropathy (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 1.05-1.85) and peripheral artery disease (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69) increased the risk of CE. Biguanides (OR=0.62 95% CI; 0.54-0.71) and liraglutide (OR=0.48 95% CI; 0.38-0.62) significantly decreased the risk of CE as did statin treatment (OR=0.63, 95...

  18. CARDIOVASCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Alina-Costina LUCA; Constantin IORDACHE; Mariana PĂGUȚE

    2016-01-01

    Involving systemic autoimmune diseases, they primarily affect the joints, muscles and connective tissues. Cardiovascular impairment is often common in these disease manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to life-situations in danger. Otherwise impaired cardiovascular reason may be the first presentation. This may require aggressive therapy immunosuppressed, therefore the diagnosis is very important for a good choice of therapy. This article discusses the cardiovascular manifestations of sys...

  19. Cysteinyl leukotriene signaling aggravates myocardial hypoxia in experimental atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nobili, Elena; Salvado, M Dolores; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard

    2012-01-01

    Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT) are powerful spasmogenic and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases, in particular asthma. Here, we investigated whether cys-LT signaling, in the context of atherosclerotic heart disease, compromises the myocardial microcirculation and ...

  20. Atherosclerotic disease in axial spondyloarthritis: increased frequency of carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Corrales, Alfonso; Blanco, Ricardo; Fuentevilla, Patricia; Portilla, Virginia; Expósito, Rosa; Mata, Cristina; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    To establish whether subclinical atherosclerosis is increased in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA). A set of 149 consecutive patients with no history of cardiovascular disease that fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society classification criteria for ax-SpA was studied by carotid ultrasonography. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaques were assessed. A series of 181 community-based controls with no cardiovascular disease were studied for comparison. To establish whether ax-SpA might have a direct effect on the risk of carotid plaques or an indirect effect via its putative influence on hypertension, dyslipidaemia or obesity, we obtained adjusted odds ratios (OR) for each clinical factor by the development of adjusted models. cIMT was increased in patients (0.621±0.123 mm) when compared to controls (0.607±0.117 mm) but the difference was not significant (p=0.30). Nevertheless, carotid plaques were more commonly observed in patients with ax-SpA than in controls (41.6% vs. 26.4%; p=0.003). Patients with plaques had longer duration of the disease than those without plaques (20.5±11.2 years vs. 12.0±8.6 years; p<0.001). Plaques were more frequent in patients with hip involvement (crude odds ratio 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-9.75; p=0.05), syndesmophytes (crude OR 4.94, 95% CI 2.14-11.4; p<0.001), in patients with higher functional limitation and mobility index measured by BASFI (crude OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.33; p=0.03) and BASMI (crude OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.19-1.77; p<0.001), and in those with psoriasis (crude OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.31-11.84; p=0.02. However, except for psoriasis that continued being a strong risk factor for plaques after adjustment, the relationship between other clinical features of ax-SpA and carotid plaques disappeared in the adjusted models. Our results confirm the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with ax-SpA.

  1. Novel approaches to treating cardiovascular disease: lessons from Tangier disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, J F

    2001-03-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. Although cholesterol is a major CVD risk factor, therapeutic interventions to lower plasma cholesterol levels have had limited success in reducing coronary events. Thus, novel approaches are needed to reduce or eliminate CVD. A potential therapeutic target is a newly discovered ATP binding cassette transporter called ABCA1, a cell membrane protein that is the gateway for secretion of excess cholesterol from macrophages into the high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolic pathway. Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease, a severe HDL deficiency syndrome characterised by accumulation of cholesterol in tissue macrophages and prevalent atherosclerosis. Studies of Tangier disease heterozygotes revealed that the relative activity of ABCA1 determines plasma HDL levels and susceptibility to CVD. Drugs that induce ABCA1 in mice increase clearance of cholesterol from tissues and inhibit intestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol. Thus, ABCA1-stimulating drugs have the potential to both mobilise cholesterol from atherosclerotic lesions and eliminate cholesterol from the body. By reducing plaque formation and rupture independently of the atherogenic factors involved, these drugs would be powerful agents for treating CVD.

  2. Structural Remodeling of Sympathetic Innervation in Atherosclerotic Blood Vessels: Role of Atherosclerotic Disease Progression and Chronic Social Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noller, Crystal M; Mendez, Armando J; Szeto, Angela; Boulina, Marcia; Llabre, Maria M; Zaias, Julia; Schneiderman, Neil; McCabe, Philip M

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) can undergo dramatic structural plasticity in response to behavioral factors and/or the presence of disease, leading to SNS hyperinnervation of peripheral tissues. The SNS has been proposed as an important mediator between stressful behavior and the progression of atherosclerosis in the vasculature. The present study examined whether structural remodeling of the SNS occurs in the vasculature in a genetically hyperlipidemic animal model of atherosclerosis, the Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit (WHHL; relative to normolipidemic New Zealand white rabbits [NZW]), and whether SNS plasticity is driven by the progression of disease and/or by stressful social behavior. WHHL and NZW rabbits were assigned to an unstable or stable social environment for 4 months. Aortic atherosclerosis was assessed and SNS aortic innervation quantified using immunofluorescent microscopy. Numerous SNS varicosities were observed throughout the aorta in WHHLs and NZWs, extending into the vascular media and intima, an innervation pattern not previously reported. WHHLs exhibited significantly greater innervation than NZWs (F(1,41) = 55.3, p Social environment did not influence innervation in NZWs (aortic arch: p = .078, thoracic aorta: p = .34) or WHHLs (arch: p = .97, thoracic: p = .61). The findings suggest that hyperinnervation is driven largely by the progression of disease rather than social environment. SNS innervation patterns observed in atherosclerotic human and mouse aortas were consistent with the rabbit, suggesting that SNS hyperinnervation of the diseased vessel wall is a general feature across mammalian species.

  3. Uric acid increases erythrocyte aggregation: Implications for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloop, Gregory D; Bialczak, Jessica K; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, J A

    2016-10-05

    Uric acid may be a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the data conflict and the mechanism by which it may cause cardiovascular disease is uncertain. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that uric acid, an anion at physiologic pH, can cause erythrocyte aggregation, which itself is associated with cardiovascular disease. Normal erythrocytes and erythrocytes with a positive direct antiglobulin test for surface IgG were incubated for 15 minutes in 14.8 mg/dL uric acid. Erythrocytes without added uric acid were used as controls. Erythrocytes were then examined microscopically for aggregation. Aggregates of up to 30 erythrocytes were noted when normal erythrocytes were incubated in uric acid. Larger aggregates were noted when erythrocytes with surface IgG were incubated in uric acid. Aggregation was negligible in controls. These data show that uric acid causes erythrocyte aggregation. The most likely mechanism is decreased erythrocyte zeta potential. Erythrocyte aggregates will increase blood viscosity at low shear rates and increase the risk of atherothrombosis. In this manner, hyperuricemia and decreased zeta potential may be risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  4. Cardiovascular diseases in China1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisheng Liu

    2007-01-01

    .... World Health Organization statistics on the death rate for total cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke in men and women aged 35-74 years revealed discrepancies between rural...

  5. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderon, Larkin; Whooley, Mary A

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one out of every five patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) suffers from major depressive disorder (MDD). Both MDD and depressive symptoms are risk factors for CVD incidence, severity and outcomes. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between MDD and CVD, particularly focusing on health behaviors. Investigators have also made considerable strides in the diagnosis and treatment of depression among patients with CVD. At the same time, many research questions remain. In what settings is depression screening most effective for patients with CVD? What is the optimal screening frequency? Which therapies are safe and effective? How can we better integrate the care of mental health conditions with that of CVD? How do we motivate depressed patients to change health behaviors? What technological tools can we use to improve care for depression? Gaining a more thorough understanding of the links between MDD and heart disease, and how best to diagnose and treat depression among these patients, has the potential to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality from CVD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Relative risk for cardiovascular atherosclerotic events after smoking cessation: 6–9 years excess risk in individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastelein John JP

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking history is often di- or trichotomized into for example "never, ever or current smoking". However, smoking must be treated as a time-dependent covariate when lifetime data is available. In particular, individuals do not smoke at birth, there is usually a wide variation with respect to smoking history, and smoking cessation must also be considered. Methods Therefore we analyzed smoking as a time-dependent risk factor for cardiovascular atherosclerotic events in a cohort of 2400 individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia who were followed from birth until 2004. Excess risk after smoking-cessation was modelled in a Cox regression model with linear and exponential decaying trends. The model with the highest likelihood value was used to estimate the decay of the excess risk of smoking. Results Atherosclerotic events were observed in 779 patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 1569 individuals had a smoking history. In the model with the highest likelihood value the risk reduction of smoking after cessation follows a linear pattern with time and it appears to take 6 to 9 years before the excess risk is reduced to zero. The risk of atherosclerotic events due to smoking was estimated as 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.5; 2.9. Conclusion It was concluded that excess risk due to smoking declined linearly after cessation in at least six to nine years.

  7. Earlobe crease in women: evaluation of reproductive factors, alcohol use, and Quetelet index and relation to atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, N L

    1995-10-01

    The diagonal earlobe crease (ELC) has been found to be associated with atherosclerotic heart disease. Although atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is less prevalent among women than among men, no studies have been reported for women on the possible relationship of reproductive factors, contraceptive and menopausal estrogen use, and alcohol use on the expression of the ELC. The presence of ELC was determined in 625 white women who were seen as part of a breast research project. Information was obtained on age, height, weight, age at menarche, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy, use of oral contraceptives or menopausal estrogens, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Statistical methods used included estimation of the age-adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals, and multiple logistic regression. No association was found between the ELC and reproductive factors and smoking. Only age, Quetelet index, and alcohol use were associated with the ELC. The ELC was negatively associated with alcohol use, and was more marked in women under 59 years of age. The positive association of ELC with the Quetelet index progressively became more marked with advancing age, especially after 60 years of age. The negative association found between the ELC and alcohol use is of interest because of the reported protective effect of moderate alcohol consumption on risk of coronary heart disease. No significant association was found between the ELC and reproductive risk factors. Based on events occurring during the embryonic development of the earlobes, a new hypothesis is proposed for the formation and peculiar diagonal localization of the ELC in adult earlobes in association with atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  8. Depressive symptom clusters are differentially associated with atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, B A A; Marijnissen, R M; Holewijn, S; Franke, B; Purandare, N; de Graaf, J; den Heijer, M; Buitelaar, J K; Voshaar, R C Oude

    2011-07-01

    Depression increases the risk of subsequent vascular events in both cardiac and non-cardiac patients. Atherosclerosis, the underlying process leading to vascular events, has been associated with depression. This association, however, may be confounded by the somatic-affective symptoms being a consequence of cardiovascular disease. While taking into account the differentiation between somatic-affective and cognitive-affective symptoms of depression, we examined the association between depression and atherosclerosis in a community-based sample. In 1261 participants of the Nijmegen Biomedical Study (NBS), aged 50-70 years and free of stroke and dementia, we measured the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid artery as a measure of atherosclerosis and we assessed depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Principal components analysis (PCA) of the BDI items yielded two factors, representing a cognitive-affective and a somatic-affective symptom cluster. While correcting for confounders, we used separate multiple regression analyses to test the BDI sum score and both depression symptom clusters. We found a significant correlation between the BDI sum score and the IMT. Cognitive-affective, but not somatic-affective, symptoms were also associated with the IMT. When we stratified for coronary artery disease (CAD), the somatic-affective symptom cluster correlated significantly with depression in both patients with and patients without CAD. The association between depressive symptoms and atherosclerosis is explained by the somatic-affective symptom cluster of depression. Subclinical vascular disease thus may inflate depressive symptom scores and may explain why treatment of depression in cardiac patients hardly affects vascular outcome.

  9. Inflammation – a common pathogenic factor of arterial atherosclerotic and venous thromboembolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Kaja Ježovnik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is among the basic mechanisms of arterial atherosclerotc diseases and is most likely also involved in the onset of venous thromboembolic disease. Various risk factors for atherosclerosis cause damage to the vascular wall and trigger inflammatory changes, which may lead to the development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, people with advanced atherosclerosis, and particularly those with unstable atherosclerotic plaques as a result of intense inflammatory changes, are found to have elevated levels of inflammatory markers in the blood. The most frequent findings include elevated levels of highly specific C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, which is a non-specific systemic indicator of inflammation, and certain interleukins (interleukin–6, interleukin–8 that are considered to be more specific markers of vascular wall inflammation. Therefore, studies are underway to improve the prognostic value for cardiovascular events by the determination of inflammatory markers in the blood. However, due to the unspecifcity of individual inflammatory markers, different methods of their determination and close relation between marker levels and the established risk factors, these have failed to contribute significantly to the evaluation of the role of inflammation in the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Currently, the determination of hs-CRP as one of the most prominent risk factors is recommended only in persons at high risk for cardiovascular events, in those that do not have classical risk factors and are at risk due to other causes, such as e.g. familial predisposition.Recently, it has also been found that inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis. In the case of a damaged venous wall inflammation occurs as a response to injury, while in idiopathic venous thrombosis without the presence of risk factors the vascular wall inflammation is probably a primary event that is followed by coagulation activation. Namely

  10. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  11. Circulating chemokines accurately identify individuals with clinically significant atherosclerotic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardigo, Diego; Assimes, Themistocles L; Fortmann, Stephen P; Go, Alan S; Hlatky, Mark; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Iribarren, Carlos; Tsao, Philip S; Tabibiazar, Raymond; Quertermous, Thomas

    2007-11-14

    Serum inflammatory markers correlate with outcome and response to therapy in subjects with cardiovascular disease. However, current individual markers lack specificity for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesize that a multimarker proteomic approach measuring serum levels of vascular derived inflammatory biomarkers could reveal a "signature of disease" that can serve as a highly accurate method to assess for the presence of coronary atherosclerosis. We simultaneously measured serum levels of seven chemokines [CXCL10 (IP-10), CCL11 (eotaxin), CCL3 (MIP1 alpha), CCL2 (MCP1), CCL8 (MCP2), CCL7 (MCP3), and CCL13 (MCP4)] in 48 subjects with clinically significant CAD ("cases") and 44 controls from the ADVANCE Study. We applied three classification algorithms to identify the combination of variables that would best predict case-control status and assessed the diagnostic performance of these models with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The serum levels of six chemokines were significantly higher in cases compared with controls (P algorithms entered three chemokines in their final model, and only logistic regression selected clinical variables. Logistic regression produced the highest ROC of the three algorithms (AUC = 0.95; SE = 0.03), which was markedly better than the AUC for the logistic regression model of traditional risk factors of CAD without (AUC = 0.67; SE = 0.06) or with CRP (AUC = 0.68; SE = 0.06). A combination of serum levels of multiple chemokines identifies subjects with clinically significant atherosclerotic heart disease with a very high degree of accuracy. These results need to be replicated in larger cross-sectional studies and their prognostic value explored.

  12. Drug treatment of obesity in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charakida, Marietta; Finer, Nicholas

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem worldwide and is associated with a number of co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, and cardiovascular disease. A number of different pathophysiologic mechanisms including increased inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance have been associated with initiation and progression of atherosclerotic disease in obese individuals. Lifestyle modifications have provided modest results in weight reduction and the focus of interest has now shifted towards drug development to treat severely obese individuals with a body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m(2) or those with a BMI >27 kg/m(2) who have additional co-morbidities. Different regimens focusing on dietary absorption or acting centrally to control hunger and food intake have been developed. However, their weight loss effect is, in most cases, modest and this effect is lost once the medication is discontinued. In addition, long-term use of these drugs is limited by significant side effects and lack of long-term safety and efficacy data. Orlistat is the only US FDA-approved medication for long-term use. A number of new medications are currently under investigation in phase III trials with promising preliminary results. This review comments on available anti-obesity pharmacologic regimens, their weight-loss benefit, and their impact on cardiovascular risk factors.

  13. Molecular analysis of oral bacteria in dental biofilm and atherosclerotic plaques of patients with vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Clarissa Pessoa; Oliveira, Francisco Artur Forte; Silva, Paulo Goberlânio de Barros; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Mota, Mário Rogério Lima; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodriguez; Seabra, Aline Damasceno; Lobo Filho, José Glauco; Lima, Danilo Lopes Ferreira; Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon Evelin; Sousa, Fabrício Bitu

    2014-07-01

    Oral bacteria have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques at a variable frequency; however, the connection between oral health and vascular and oral bacterial profiles of patients with vascular disease is not clearly established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral bacterial DNA in the mouth and atherosclerotic plaques, in addition to assessing the patients' caries and periodontal disease history. Thirty samples of supragingival and subgingival plaque, saliva and atherosclerotic plaques of 13 patients with carotid stenosis or aortic aneurysm were evaluated, through real-time polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of Streptococcus mutans (SM), Prevotella intermedia (PI), Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) and Treponema denticola (TD). All patients were submitted to oral examination using the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth) and PSR (Periodontal Screening and Recording) indexes. Histopathological analysis of the atherosclerotic plaques was performed. Most of the patients were edentulous (76.9%). SM, PI, PG and TD were detected in 100.0%, 92.0%, 15.3% and 30.7% of the oral samples, respectively. SM was the most prevalent targeted bacteria in atherosclerotic plaques, detected in 100% of the samples, followed by PI (7.1%). The vascular samples were negative for PG and TD. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the presence of PG and TD in the oral cavity and vascular samples. SM was found at a high frequency in oral and vascular samples, even in edentulous patients, and its presence in atherosclerotic plaques suggests the possible involvement of this bacterium in the disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovás, José M; Smith, Caren E

    2010-09-01

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only explain a small part of the variability in CVD risk, which is a major obstacle for its prevention and treatment. A more thorough understanding of the factors that contribute to CVD is, therefore, needed to develop more efficacious and cost-effective therapy. Application of the 'omics' technologies will hopefully make these advances a reality. Epigenomics has emerged as one of the most promising areas that will address some of the gaps in our current knowledge of the interaction between nature and nurture in the development of CVD. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA alterations, which collectively enable the cell to respond quickly to environmental changes. A number of CVD risk factors, such as nutrition, smoking, pollution, stress, and the circadian rhythm, have been associated with modification of epigenetic marks. Further examination of these mechanisms may lead to earlier prevention and novel therapy for CVD.

  15. Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Francisco B; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2016-05-27

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide over the past few decades. In 2013, the prevalence of obesity exceeded the 50% of the adult population in some countries from Oceania, North Africa, and Middle East. Lower but still alarmingly high prevalence was observed in North America (≈30%) and in Western Europe (≈20%). These figures are of serious concern because of the strong link between obesity and disease. In the present review, we summarize the current evidence on the relationship of obesity with cardiovascular disease (CVD), discussing how both the degree and the duration of obesity affect CVD. Although in the general population, obesity and, especially, severe obesity are consistently and strongly related with higher risk of CVD incidence and mortality, the one-size-fits-all approach should not be used with obesity. There are relevant factors largely affecting the CVD prognosis of obese individuals. In this context, we thoroughly discuss important concepts such as the fat-but-fit paradigm, the metabolically healthy but obese (MHO) phenotype and the obesity paradox in patients with CVD. About the MHO phenotype and its CVD prognosis, available data have provided mixed findings, what could be partially because of the adjustment or not for key confounders such as cardiorespiratory fitness, and to the lack of consensus on the MHO definition. In the present review, we propose a scientifically based harmonized definition of MHO, which will hopefully contribute to more comparable data in the future and a better understanding on the MHO subgroup and its CVD prognosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases; Molekulare kardiovaskulaere MRT-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botnar, R.M. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Imaging Sciences; St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ebersberger, H. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Noerenberg, D. [Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Radiology; and others

    2015-02-15

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  17. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Liang [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Bu-Lang [Department of Medical Research Shijiazhuang First Hospital, Hebei Medical University (China); Li, Tian-Xiao, E-mail: litianxiaod@163.com [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Li, Zhao-Shuo [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  18. Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammatory State in Uremia and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Panichi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the general population; traditional risk factors seem inadequate to explain completely the remarkable prevalence of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity observed in the uremic population. A role for chronic inflammation has been well established in the development of atherosclerotic disease, and, on the basis of these observations, atherosclerosis might be considered an inflammatory disease. Inflammation has been implicated in the etiology of coronary artery disease in the general population, and traditional inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6 have been shown to predict cardiovascular events in both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals as well as those in the uremic population. Later on, new nontraditional markers were related to the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in general and in uremic population. As a consequence of the expanding research base and availability of assays, the number of inflammatory marker tests ordered by clinicians for cardiovascular disease (CVD risk prediction has grown rapidly and several commercial assays have become available. So, up to now we can consider that several new nontraditional markers as CD40-CD40 ligand system and pentraxin-3 seem to be significant features of cardiovascular disease in general and in ESRD population.

  19. Approach to Cardiovascular Disease in Primary Care Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aparci

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Significance of primary health services was understood by the time and a distinct care began to be directed at in our country. Increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease and death urged the health systems to provide early diagnosis, appropriate treatment and regular control of those patients. Thus primary health care physicians deserve currently greater importance. The purpose of this review is to mention shortly about the widely used diagnosis method and techniques and also treatment modalities and goals of atherosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and sudden cardiac death in the direction of recent guidelines. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(5.000: 380-388

  20. Approach to Cardiovascular Disease in Primary Care Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aparci

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Significance of primary health services was understood by the time and a distinct care began to be directed at in our country. Increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease and death urged the health systems to provide early diagnosis, appropriate treatment and regular control of those patients. Thus primary health care physicians deserve currently greater importance. The purpose of this review is to mention shortly about the widely used diagnosis method and techniques and also treatment modalities and goals of atherosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and sudden cardiac death in the direction of recent guidelines. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(5: 380-388

  1. Sleep and inflammation: psychoneuroimmunology in the context of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivala, Sarosh J

    2011-10-01

    Poor sleep is prospectively linked to all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Inflammatory processes may be an important biological mechanism linking poor sleep to cardiovascular disease. Such processes involve active participation of signaling molecules called cytokines in development of atherosclerotic plaques. I review evidence from experimental sleep deprivation and clinical observational studies suggesting a bidirectional relationship between sleep and inflammatory cytokines. Findings from sleep deprivation studies indicate that sleep loss is associated with increases in these cytokines. Similarly, studies in clinical populations with sleep problems, such as primary insomnia patients and those diagnosed with major depression, also show elevations in these same cytokines. Bidirectional communication between the brain and the immune system is carried out through a complex network of autonomic nerves, endocrine hormones, and cytokines. Disturbed sleep appears to perturb the functioning of this network and therefore contribute to elevations in inflammatory mediators linked to cardiovascular disease.

  2. Clinical Molecular Imaging of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 Expression in Atherosclerotic Plaque using (68)Ga-Pentixafor PET: Correlation with Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Calcified Plaque Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiberg, Desiree; Thackeray, James T; Daum, Guenter; Sohns, Jan M; Kropf, Saskia; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Ross, Tobias L; Bengel, Frank M; Derlin, Thorsten

    2017-08-03

    The CXC-motif chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) represents a promising target for molecular imaging of different CXCR4+ cell types in cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis and arterial wall injury. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, pattern, and clinical correlates of arterial wall accumulation of (68)Ga-Pentixafor, a specific CXCR4 ligand for positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Data of fifty-one patients who underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) for non-cardiovascular indications were retrospectively analyzed. Tracer accumulation in the vessel wall of major arteries was analyzed qualitatively and semiquantitatively by blood-pool-corrected target-to-background ratios (TBRs). Tracer uptake was compared with calcified plaque burden and cardiovascular risk factors. Results: Focal arterial uptake of (68)Ga-Pentixafor was seen at 1411 sites in 51 (100%) of patients. (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake was significantly associated with calcified plaque burden (P<0.0001) and cardiovascular risk factors including age (P<0.0001), arterial hypertension (P<0.0001), hypercholesterolemia (P = 0.0005), history of smoking (P = 0.01), and prior cardiovascular events (P = 0.0004). Both the prevalence (P<0.0001) and signal intensity (P = 0.009) of (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake increased as the number of risk factors increased. Conclusion:(68)Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT is suitable for non-invasive, highly specific PET imaging of CXCR4 expression in the atherosclerotic arterial wall. Arterial wall (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake is significantly associated with surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, and is linked to the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. (68)Ga-Pentixafor signal is higher in patients with a high-risk profile, and may hold promise for identification of vulnerable plaque. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. [Cardiovascular disease and professional activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberale, D; Pecora, A; Ardù, M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases occurrence in the industrial countries is very high and represents one of the major cause of invalidity and mortality. Studies show the close connection between cardiovascular diseases and other risk factors. In Italy heart diseases prevention is one of the main goals of the National Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Coronary disease increased by 40% among shift-workers and those workers exposed to vibrations and microclimate; extra-auditory effects of noise have also proved to be relevant. Reintegration into labour market and work eligibility certificate can be a problem for patients with coronary diseases, after pathological events. A record of the cardiovascular system could be useful for a readmission to work, in particular after acute episodes. The PreSAL service on the basis of the 2009 data provided by qualified doctors did not show professional diseases but the undervalue may be due to the limited use of specific complementary tests.

  4. Pharmacoeconomics of cardiovascular disease prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanovic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, some of the methodological challenges in simulating and synthesizing pharmacoeconomic evidence in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention were assessed and potential solutions to those challenges were proposed. This includes a set of recommendations for enhancing the robustness of

  5. Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Diseases: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hwan; Nicholls, Stephen J; Sakuma, Ichiro; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Residual cardiovascular risk and failure of high density lipoprotein cholesterol raising treatment have refocused interest on targeting hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and remnant cholesterol have demonstrated to be important risk factors for cardiovascular disease; this has been demonstrated in experimental, genetic, and epidemiological studies. Fibrates can reduce cardiovascular event rates with or without statins. High dose omega-3 fatty acids continue to be evaluated and new specialized targeting treatment modulating triglyceride pathways, such as inhibition of apolipoprotein C-III and angiopoietin-like proteins, are being tested with regard to their effects on lipid profiles and cardiovascular outcomes. In this review, we will discuss the role of hypertriglyceridemia, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and remnant cholesterol on cardiovascular disease, and the potential implications for treatment stargeting hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:27014342

  6. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive performance in middle-aged and elderly men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.; Grobbee, D. E.; Aleman, A.; Bots, M.; van der Schouw, Y. T.

    Background: Decline of cognitive function with age may be due, in part, to atherosclerotic changes. The aim of the present study was to determine the relative contribution of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to cognitive functioning in middle-aged and elderly men. Methods: In a cross-sectional study,

  7. Fish cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Johanna; Weber, E Scott; Marty, Gary D; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Fish patients with cardiovascular disorders present a challenge in terms of diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic options. Veterinarians can approach these cases in fish using methods similar to those employed for other companion animals. Clinicians who evaluate and treat fish in private, aquarium, zoologic, or aquaculture settings need to rely on sound clinical judgment after thorough historical and physical evaluation. Pharmacokinetic data and treatments specific to cardiovascular disease in fish are limited; thus, drug types and dosages used in fish are largely empiric. Fish cardiovascular anatomy, physiology, diagnostic evaluation, monitoring, common diseases, cardiac pathologic conditions, formulary options, and comprehensive references are presented with the goal of providing fish veterinarians with clinically relevant tools.

  8. 2017 Focused Update of the 2016 ACC Expert Consensus Decision Pathway on the Role of Non-Statin Therapies for LDL-Cholesterol Lowering in the Management of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Task Force on Expert Consensus Decision Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Morris, Pamela B; Ballantyne, Christie M; Birtcher, Kim K; Daly, David D; DePalma, Sondra M; Minissian, Margo B; Orringer, Carl E; Smith, Sidney C

    2017-10-03

    In 2016, the American College of Cardiology published the first expert consensus decision pathway (ECDP) on the role of non-statin therapies for low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol lowering in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Since the publication of that document, additional evidence and perspectives have emerged from randomized clinical trials and other sources, particularly considering the longer-term efficacy and safety of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors in secondary prevention of ASCVD. Most notably, the FOURIER (Further Cardiovascular Outcomes Research with PCSK9 Inhibition in Subjects with Elevated Risk) trial and SPIRE-1 and -2 (Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of Vascular Events), assessing evolocumab and bococizumab, respectively, have published final results of cardiovascular outcomes trials in patients with clinical ASCVD and in a smaller number of high-risk primary prevention patients. In addition, further evidence on the types of patients most likely to benefit from the use of ezetimibe in addition to statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome has been published. Based on results from these important analyses, the ECDP writing committee judged that it would be desirable to provide a focused update to help guide clinicians more clearly on decision making regarding the use of ezetimibe and PCSK9 inhibitors in patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities. In the following summary table, changes from the 2016 ECDP to the 2017 ECDP Focused Update are highlighted, and a brief rationale is provided. The content of the full document has been changed accordingly, with more extensive and detailed guidance regarding decision making provided both in the text and in the updated algorithms. Revised recommendations are provided for patients with clinical ASCVD with or without comorbidities on statin therapy for secondary prevention. The ECDP writing committee judged

  9. Environmental Factors and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk Tekbas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical observations have led to the hypothesis that the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is influenced not only by genetic, lifestyle and major risk factors, but also by environmental factors. Environmental factors are considered key determinants of cardiovascular diseases. Although lifestyle choices such as smoking, diet, and exercise are viewed as major environmental influences, the contribution of pollutants and environmental chemicals is less clear. Accumulating evidence suggests that exposure to physically and chemical pollutants could elevate the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Many epidemiological studies report that exposure to physically, biologically and socio-cultural environmental factors are associated with an increase in cardiovascular mortality. Relationships between environmental factors and coronary arter disease, arhythmias, and cardiomyopathies have been reported. Exposures to arsenic, lead, cadmium, pollutant gases, solvents, and pesticides have also been linked to increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, I review that relationships between exposure to physically, chemical, biologically and socio-cultural environmental factors and cardiovascular diseases. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(5.000: 435-444

  10. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacogenomics and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    Variability in drug responsiveness is a sine qua non of modern therapeutics, and the contribution of genomic variation is increasingly recognized. Investigating the genomic basis for variable responses to cardiovascular therapies has been a model for pharmacogenomics in general and has established...... resulted in changes to the product labels but also have led to development of initial clinical guidelines that consider how to facilitate incorporating genetic information to the bedside. This review summarizes the state of knowledge in cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and considers how variants described...

  12. Freqüência de doença cardiovascular aterosclerótica e de seus fatores de risco em pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico Frequency of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and its risk factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Weiss Telles

    2007-06-01

    cardiovasculares deve ser objeto de novos estudos.INTRODUCTION: the pathogenesis of coronary disease in systemic lupus erythematosus patients is not completely understood. Risk factors associated with lupus or its treatment may be associated with traditional risk factors for coronary disease. Such risk factors are more common in patients with lupus. OBJECTIVE: to determine the frequency of cardiovascular disease and traditional risk factors in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at Rheumatology Division of Hospital das Clínicas of Minas Gerais Federal University. METHODS: 172 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were evaluated. Cardiovascular events, traditional risk factors and clinical-laboratorial findings were investigated in this cross-sectional research. RESULTS: the mean age (SD of the patients was 38.5 years (11.2 years. 95.9% were female and 64.5% were non white. Cardiovascular disease was identified in 8 patients (4.7%, with 11 different diagnoses. Three patients had coronary insufficiency, three had stroke and five had peripheral arterial disease. Systemic arterial hypertension was the most frequent risk factor (48.8%, followed by dyslipidemia in 70 patients (40.7% and hypertriglyceridemia in 51 patients (29.7%. LDL-c > 100 mg/dl was found in 77 patients (44.8%. Among 165 female patients, 67 (40.6% had menopause, 43.3% of them with early menopause. CONCLUSION: the present study describes the frequency of risk factors for coronary artery disease in a Brazilian sample of lupus patients. The impact of recognition and management of those risk factors in prevention of cardiovascular events should be object of others studies.

  13. Anxiety Disorders and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Christopher M; Daunis, Daniel J; Lokko, Hermioni N; Campbell, Kirsti A; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety and its associated disorders are common in patients with cardiovascular disease and may significantly influence cardiac health. Anxiety disorders are associated with the onset and progression of cardiac disease, and in many instances have been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including mortality. Both physiologic (autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, changes in platelet aggregation) and health behavior mechanisms may help to explain the relationships between anxiety disorders and cardiovascular disease. Given the associations between anxiety disorders and poor cardiac health, the timely and accurate identification and treatment of these conditions is of the utmost importance. Fortunately, pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions for the management of anxiety disorders are generally safe and effective. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions to treat anxiety disorders ultimately impact both psychiatric and cardiovascular health.

  14. Psychosocial perspectives in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S; von Känel, Roland; Tully, Phillip J

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation to living with cardiovascular disease may differ from patient to patient and is influenced not only by disease severity and limitations incurred by the disease but also by socioeconomic factors (e.g. health literacy), the patients' psychological make-up and susceptibility to distress. Co......-morbid depression and/or anxiety is prevalent in 20% of patients with cardiovascular disease, which may be either transient or chronic. Distress, such as depression, reduces adherence, serves as a barrier to behaviour change and the adoption of a healthy lifestyle, and increases the risk that patients drop out...

  15. Weight loss therapy for clinical management of patients with some atherosclerotic diseases: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Oshakbayev, Kuat; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar; Otarbayev, Nurzhan; Togizbayeva, Gulnar; Tabynbayev, Nariman; Gazaliyeva, Meruyert; Idrisov, Alisher; Oshakbayev, Pernekul

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and burden of atherosclerotic (AS) diseases are increasing during the last twenty years. Some studies show a close relationship between overweight and AS, but influence on AS diseases of different weight loss methods are still studying. The purpose of the research was to study the effectiveness of a weight loss program in AS patients in randomized controlled trial, and to develop a conception of evolution of AS. Methods A randomized controlled prospective clinical tr...

  16. ABCA1 as a New Therapeutic Target for Treating Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, John F.

    2002-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in western societies. Although cholesterol is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor, therapeutic interventions to lower plasma cholesterol levels have had limited success in reducing coronary events, underscoring the need for other treatment strategies. A promising therapeutic target is an ATP binding cassette transporter called ABCA1, a cell membrane protein that is the gatekeeper for secretion of excess cholesterol from macrophages into the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolic pathway. Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease, a severe HDL-deficiency syndrome characterized by accumulation of cholesterol in tissue macrophages and prevalent atherosclerosis. Thus, ABCA1-activating drugs have the potential to mobilize cholesterol from macrophages of atherosclerotic lesions, making them powerful agents for preventing and reversing cardiovascular disease. (c) 2002 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiovascular changes in atherosclerotic ApoE-deficient mice exposed to Co60 (γ radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Kumarathasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is evidence for a role of ionizing radiation in cardiovascular diseases. The goal of this work was to identify changes in oxidative and nitrative stress pathways and the status of the endothelinergic system during progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice after single and repeated exposure to ionizing radiation. METHODS AND RESULTS: B6.129P2-ApoE tmlUnc mice on a low-fat diet were acutely exposed (whole body to Co60 (γ (single dose 0, 0.5, and 2 Gy at a dose rate of 36.32 cGy/min, or repeatedly (cumulative dose 0 and 2 Gy at a dose-rate of 0.1 cGy/min for 5 d/wk, over a period of 4 weeks. Biological endpoints were investigated after 3-6 months of recovery post-radiation. The nitrative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine and the vasoregulator peptides endothelin-1 and endothelin-3 in plasma were increased (p<0.05 in a dose-dependent manner 3-6 months after acute or chronic exposure to radiation. The oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane was not affected by radiation, while plasma 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decreased (p<0.05 after treatment. At 2Gy radiation dose, serum cholesterol was increased (p = 0.008 relative to controls. Percent lesion area increased (p = 0.005 with age of animal, but not with radiation treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our observations are consistent with persistent nitrative stress and activation of the endothelinergic system in ApoE-/- mice after low-level ionizing radiation exposures. These mechanisms are known factors in the progression of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Lifetime Risks of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jarett D.; Dyer, Alan; Cai, Xuan; Garside, Daniel B.; Ning, Hongyan; Thomas, Avis; Greenland, Philip; Van Horn, Linda; Tracy, Russell P.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease have not been reported across the age spectrum in black adults and white adults. METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis at the individual level using data from 18 cohort studies involving a total of 257,384 black men and women and white men and women whose risk factors for cardiovascular disease were measured at the ages of 45, 55, 65, and 75 years. Blood pressure, cholesterol level, smoking status, and diabetes status were used to stratify participants according to risk factors into five mutually exclusive categories. The remaining lifetime risks of cardiovascular events were estimated for participants in each category at each age, with death free of cardiovascular disease treated as a competing event. RESULTS We observed marked differences in the lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease across risk-factor strata. Among participants who were 55 years of age, those with an optimal risk-factor profile (total cholesterol level, risks of death from cardiovascular disease through the age of 80 years than participants with two or more major risk factors (4.7% vs. 29.6% among men, 6.4% vs. 20.5% among women). Those with an optimal risk-factor profile also had lower lifetime risks of fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction (3.6% vs. 37.5% among men, risk-factor strata were observed among blacks and whites and across diverse birth cohorts. CONCLUSIONS Differences in risk-factor burden translate into marked differences in the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, and these differences are consistent across race and birth cohorts. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.) PMID:22276822

  19. Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. V. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD in Brazil. Their mean age was 47 ± 39 years. The main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were arterial hypertension (89.4%, dyslipidemia (78.3%, low high-density lipoprotein levels (84.2% and low physical activity (64.1%. Family history of coronary insufficiency and high low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.005 and P = 0.029, respectively. Sedentary life style, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperglycemia also showed a significant association with the underlying vascular disease (P = 0.017, P = 0.039, P = 0.037 and P = 0.030, respectively. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and black race were factors significantly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P = 0.01, P = 0.0013 and P = 0.024, respectively. Our study shows that the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in patients with ESRD were left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic disease, valvular disease and coronary artery disease. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were the common risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on HD in a single center in Brazil.

  20. Imaging Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara C. Croca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is a multisystem, autoimmune disease known to be one of the strongest risk factors for atherosclerosis. Patients with SLE have an excess cardiovascular risk compared with the general population, leading to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although the precise explanation for this is yet to be established, it seems to be associated with the presence of an accelerated atherosclerotic process, arising from the combination of traditional and lupus-specific risk factors. Moreover, cardiovascular-disease associated mortality in patients with SLE has not improved over time. One of the main reasons for this is the poor performance of standard risk stratification tools on assessing the cardiovascular risk of patients with SLE. Therefore, establishing alternative ways to identify patients at increased risk efficiently is essential. With recent developments in several imaging techniques, the ultimate goal of cardiovascular assessment will shift from assessing symptomatic patients to diagnosing early cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients which will hopefully help us to prevent its progression. This review will focus on the current status of the imaging tools available to assess cardiac and vascular function in patients with SLE.

  1. Nanomedical Theranostics in Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Read, Joanna C.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are needed to mitigate this public health issue. Advances in nanotechnology have generated innovative strategies for diagnosis and therapy in a variety of diseases,

  2. Cohort study of predictive value of urinary albumin excretion for atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Yokoyama, H; Mathiesen, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether slightly elevated urinary albumin excretion precedes development of atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes independently of conventional atherogenic risk factors and of diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cohort study with 11 year follow......, smoking habits, and serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor. END POINT: atherosclerotic vascular disease assessed by death certificates, mailed questionnaires, and hospital records. RESULTS: Thirty patients developed...... atherosclerotic vascular disease during follow up of 2457 person year. Elevated urinary albumin excretion was significantly predictive of atherosclerotic vascular disease (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.18) per 5 mg increase in 24 hour urinary albumin excretion, P = 0.002). Predictive effect...

  3. Stages of change for fruit and vegetable intake among patients with atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Simone; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo A

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the stages of change in fruit and vegetable intake among patients with atherosclerotic disease, identifying demographic, socioeconomic, and health predictive factors for each stage of change. It is a cross-sectional study of 290 consecutive patients with atherosclerotic disease submitted to endovascular procedures in two referral hospitals. The staging algorithm included intentional and behavioral criteria, and patients were categorized into "pre-action" (pre-contemplation, contemplation, and preparation), or "action" (action, non-reflective action, and maintenance). Most of the patients were in action for the fruits intake (67.9%) and pre-action for the vegetables intake (69.1%). The logistic regression analysis for the stages of action change for fruits intake has identified as predictive factors, the higher level of education and consultation with a cardiologist. For the stages of action change for vegetable intake, absence of abdominal obesity, previous cardiac surgery, and consultation with dietitian have shown significant association. This study has shown differences in the distribution of stages of change for the fruits and vegetable intake among the patients with atherosclerotic disease. The different predictive factors for the stage of changes for fruits and vegetables suggest that approaches of nutritional orientation of the individuals must be distinct for each eating behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, Jean-Michel

    2009-05-01

    Fatty acids have been classified into "good" or "bad" groups according to their degree of unsaturation or whether they are "animal fat" or "vegetable fat". Today, it appears that the effects of fatty acids are complex and vary greatly according to the dose and the nature of the molecule. Monounsaturated fatty acids are still considered as having a "neutral" status, but any benefits may be related to the chemical environment of the source food or the associated overall food pattern. Controversy surrounds omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, because even though they lower LDL cholesterol levels, excessive intakes do not appear to be correlated with cardiovascular benefit. The omega-3 fatty acids are known to exert cardiovascular protective effects. Dairy fat and its cardiovascular impact are being evaluated. This review examines the existing literature on the relationships between the different fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... of some types of cardiovascular disease compared to Danish-born. Family-reunified migrants on the other hand had lower rates of CVD. All migrants had better survival than Danish-born indicating that migrants may not always be disadvantaged in health....

  6. Association of Thrombomodulin Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Atherosclerotic Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Jin, Jun; Tan, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have proved that the dysfunction of thrombomodulin (TM) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases. In order to reveal their inherent relationship, we conducted a meta-analysis to uncover the association between two polymorphisms -33G/A and Ala455Val (c.1418C>T) in the TM gene and atherosclerotic diseases. We carried out a systematic search in PubMed, Science Direct, BIOSIS Previews, SpringerLink, the Cochrane library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chinese Biomedical Database, the Wei Pu database, and the Wanfang Database. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed to show the association. We included 22 eligible studies which involved 5472 patients and 7786 controls. There were statistically significant associations between -33G/A polymorphisms in TM and the MI group under the Allele and Recessive models in Asians (G vs. A: OR = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.56-0.78, P < 0.00001; GG vs. GA+AA: OR = 0.66, 95%CI = 0.56-0.78, P < 0.00001). However, these findings of the overall and subgroups showed that Ala455Val polymorphisms did not have any relationship with atherosclerotic diseases. After Bonferroni correction, the above associations remained statistically significant. This meta-analysis provides robust evidence of association between the -33G/A polymorphism in the TM gene and the risk of myocardial infarction in Asians. The A allele may increase the incidence of MI in Asians. However, the Ala455Val variant was not associated with atherosclerotic risk. Further studies with adequate sample size are needed to verify our findings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  7. The Cardiovascular Risk Profile of Atherosclerotic Gastrointestinal Ischemia Is Different from Other Vascular Beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Renzo P.; ter Steege, Rinze W. F.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; Huisman, Ad B.; Kolkman, Jeroen J.

    BACKGROUND: The distribution of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic gastrointestinal ischemia due to atherosclerosis of the splanchnic vessels (chronic splanchnic syndrome) is not well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the cardiovascular risk factor pattern in patients

  8. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R. Grübler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency, as well as cardiovascular diseases (CVD and related risk factors are highly prevalent worldwide and frequently co-occur. Vitamin D has long been known to be an essential part of bone metabolism, although recent evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a key role in the pathophysiology of other diseases, including CVD, as well. In this review, we aim to summarize the most recent data on the involvement of vitamin D deficiency in the development of major cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, we outline the most recent observational, as well as interventional data on the influence of vitamin D on CVD. Since it is still an unresolved issue whether vitamin D deficiency is causally involved in the pathogenesis of CVD, data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs designed to assess the impact of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes are awaited with anticipation. At present, we can only conclude that vitamin D deficiency is an independent cardiovascular risk factor, but whether vitamin D supplementation can significantly improve cardiovascular outcomes is still largely unknown.

  9. Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in Japanese patients 60 years or older with atherosclerotic risk factors: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yasuo; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Teramoto, Tamio; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Oikawa, Shinichi; Sugawara, Masahiro; Ando, Katsuyuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Yokoyama, Kenji; Ishizuka, Naoki

    2014-12-17

    Prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases is an important public health priority in Japan due to an aging population. To determine whether daily, low-dose aspirin reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events in older Japanese patients with multiple atherosclerotic risk factors. The Japanese Primary Prevention Project (JPPP) was a multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel-group trial. Patients (N = 14,464) were aged 60 to 85 years, presenting with hypertension, dyslipidemia, or diabetes mellitus recruited by primary care physicians at 1007 clinics in Japan between March 2005 and June 2007, and were followed up for up to 6.5 years, with last follow-up in May 2012. A multidisciplinary expert panel (blinded to treatment assignments) adjudicated study outcomes. Patients were randomized 1:1 to enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg/d or no aspirin in addition to ongoing medications. Composite primary outcome was death from cardiovascular causes (myocardial infarction, stroke, and other cardiovascular causes), nonfatal stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic, including undefined cerebrovascular events), and nonfatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included individual end points. The study was terminated early by the data monitoring committee after a median follow-up of 5.02 years (interquartile range, 4.55-5.33) based on likely futility. In both the aspirin and no aspirin groups, 56 fatal events occurred. Patients with an occurrence of nonfatal stroke totaled 114 in the aspirin group and 108 in the no aspirin group; of nonfatal myocardial infarction, 20 in the aspirin group and 38 in the no aspirin group; of undefined cerebrovascular events, 3 in the aspirin group and 5 in the no aspirin group. The 5-year cumulative primary outcome event rate was not significantly different between the groups (2.77% [95% CI, 2.40%-3.20%] for aspirin vs 2.96% [95% CI, 2.58%-3.40%] for no aspirin; hazard ratio [HR], 0.94 [95% CI, 0.77-1.15]; P = .54). Aspirin

  10. Laser therapy in cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindge, David

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. It is broadly defined to include anything which adversely affects the heart or blood vessels. One-third of Americans have one or more forms of it. By one estimate, average human life expectancy would increase by seven years if it were eliminated. The mainstream medical model seeks mostly to "manage" cardiovascular disease with pharmaceuticals or to surgically bypass or reopen blocked vessels via angioplasty. These methods have proven highly useful and saved countless lives. Yet drug therapy may be costly and ongoing, and it carries the risk of side effects while often doing little or nothing to improve underlying health concerns. Similarly, angioplasty or surgery are invasive methods which entail risk. Laser therapy1 regenerates tissue, stimulates biological function, reduces inflammation and alleviates pain. Its efficacy and safety have been increasingly well documented in cardiovascular disease of many kinds. In this article we will explore the effects of laser therapy in angina, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, stroke and other conditions. The clinical application of various methods of laser therapy, including laserpuncture and transcutaneous, supravascular and intravenous irradiation of blood will be discussed. Implementing laser therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease offers the possibility of increasing the health and wellbeing of patients while reducing the costs and enhancing safety of medical care.

  11. Effects of direct renin inhibition on atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Brian K; Trujillo, Alex; Seifert, Charles F; Simoni, Jan S; Doctolero, Susan; Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate whether the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, has a more favorable effect compared to amlodipine on atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease and diabetes currently receiving standard secondary prevention therapy. A total of 38 patients were randomly assigned initially to either aliskiren (150 mg daily) or amlodipine (5 mg daily) for 2 weeks after which the dose of either medication was increased to its maximum daily dose for 4 additional weeks. Baseline and 6-week blood samples were analyzed for changes from baseline and between treatment groups for vascular and intracellular cell adhesion molecule, C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, 8-isoprostane, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Thirty-one patients completed the study. More of the dropouts occurred in patients receiving aliskiren. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both treatment arms with no differences between the groups being noted. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, nitric oxide, and C-reactive protein concentrations increased in both groups from baseline but changes from baseline or between groups were not significant. Vascular and intracellular cell adhesion molecule, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and isoprostane concentrations decreased in each treatment arm from baseline, but these changes were not significant and no differences were noted between the groups. Treatment with either aliskiren or amlodipine did not significantly alter surrogate biomarkers of atherosclerosis in patients with both diabetes and established cardiovascular disease already receiving appropriate secondary cardiovascular prevention therapy. The study is limited in its size and duration to see an effect.

  12. Triglycerides as a risk factor in extracranial atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrence, C F; Rao, G R

    1983-07-01

    A retrospective study was carried out on a group of 138 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy for extracranial vascular disease. Risk factors of cerebrovascular disease and routine laboratory evaluations were assessed. Of the laboratory evaluations of blood lipids, only mean triglycerides were found to be significantly different from laboratory normals. Stroke as a clinical event has been suggested not to be correlated with blood lipids in a number of large studies, but the present investigation supports the notion that extracranial vascular disease may be associated with blood lipid concentrations. Previous studies of stroke and lipids have not separated out the anatomical site responsible for the cerebral infarction, and thus probably have underestimated the effect of lipids as a risk factor in cervical extracranial atherosclerosis and brain infarction.

  13. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ian R.A. Mackenzie, MD FRCPC. Department of Pathology, Vancouver General Hospital, British Columbia, Canada. Pagana, K. ... Disease: Updates and Considerations. Medscape from Geriatrics and Aging [On-line information]. Available online at http://www. ...

  14. The programming of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, K L

    2015-10-01

    In spite of improving life expectancy over the course of the previous century, the health of the U.S. population is now worsening. Recent increasing rates of type 2 diabetes, obesity and uncontrolled high blood pressure predict a growing incidence of cardiovascular disease and shortened average lifespan. The daily >$1billion current price tag for cardiovascular disease in the United States is expected to double within the next decade or two. Other countries are seeing similar trends. Current popular explanations for these trends are inadequate. Rather, increasingly poor diets in young people and in women during pregnancy are a likely cause of declining health in the U.S. population through a process known as programming. The fetal cardiovascular system is sensitive to poor maternal nutritional conditions during the periconceptional period, in the womb and in early postnatal life. Developmental plasticity accommodates changes in organ systems that lead to endothelial dysfunction, small coronary arteries, stiffer vascular tree, fewer nephrons, fewer cardiomyocytes, coagulopathies and atherogenic blood lipid profiles in fetuses born at the extremes of birthweight. Of equal importance are epigenetic modifications to genes driving important growth regulatory processes. Changes in microRNA, DNA methylation patterns and histone structure have all been implicated in the cardiovascular disease vulnerabilities that cross-generations. Recent experiments offer hope that detrimental epigenetic changes can be prevented or reversed. The large number of studies that provide the foundational concepts for the developmental origins of disease can be traced to the brilliant discoveries of David J.P. Barker.

  15. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienreich, K.; Tomaschitz, A.; Verheyen, N.; Pieber, T.R.; Gaksch, M.; Grubler, M.; Pilz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency, as well as cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and related risk factors are highly prevalent worldwide and frequently co-occur. Vitamin D has long been known to be an essential part of bone metabolism, although recent evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a key role in the

  16. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of

  17. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Cristina Garcia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency has been observed worldwide at all stages of life. It has been characterized as a public health problem, since low concentrations of this vitamin have been linked to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. Several studies have suggested that vitamin D is involved in cardiovascular diseases and have provided evidence that it has a role in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. It may be involved in regulation of gene expression through the presence of vitamin D receptors in various cells, regulation of blood pressure (through renin-angiotensin system, and modulation of cell growth and proliferation including vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Identifying correct mechanisms and relationships between vitamin D and such diseases could be important in relation to patient care and healthcare policies.

  18. Contraception and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Hesselink, JolienW.; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veldtman, Gruschen R.; Johnson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an

  19. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Systemic Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of aortic arch calcification, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, with rotator cuff tendinosis and tears given the hypothesis that decreased tendon vascularity is a contributing factor in the etiology of tendon degeneration. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients ages 50 to 90 years who had a shoulder MRI and a chest radiograph performed within 6 months of each other. Chest radiographs and shoulder MRIs from 120 patients were reviewed by two sets of observers blinded to the others' conclusions. Rotator cuff disease was classified as tendinosis, partial thickness tear, and full thickness tear. The presence or absence of aortic arch calcification was graded and compared with the MRI appearance of the rotator cuff. The tendon tear grading was positively correlated with patient age. However, the tendon tear grading on MRI was not significantly correlated with the aorta calcification scores on chest radiographs. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between aorta calcification severity and tendon tear grading. In conclusion, rotator cuff tears did not significantly correlate with aortic calcification severity. This suggests that tendon ischemia may not be associated with the degree of macrovascular disease.

  20. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids: role in metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Philipp A; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Berneis, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    The inverse association of cardiovascular risk with intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was suspected early in populations that are known to have a high consumption of fish and fish oil. Subsequent cohort studies confirmed such associations in other populations. Further evidence of possible beneficial effects on metabolism and cardiovascular health was provided by many studies that were able to show specific mechanisms that may underlie these observations. These include improvement of the function of tissues involved in the alterations occurring during the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, as adipose tissue, the liver and skeletal muscle. Direct action on the cardiovascular system was not only shown regarding vascular function and the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, but also by providing antiarrhythmic effects on the heart. Data on these effects come from in vitro as well as in vivo studies that were conducted in animal models of disease, in healthy humans and in humans suffering from cardiovascular disease. To define prophylactic as well as treatment options in primary and secondary prevention, large clinical trial assessed the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on end points as cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, so far these trials provided ambiguous data that do allow recommendations regarding the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in higher dosages and beyond the dietary advice of regular fish intake only in few clinical situations, such as severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  2. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in stable cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. METHODS: In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive...... rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after...... a mean follow-up of 23 months. RESULTS: The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; P

  3. Genetic Markers of Cardiovascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV disease is the most common cause of premature mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. It is the result of an accelerated atherosclerotic process. Both RA and atherosclerosis are complex polygenic diseases. Besides traditional CV risk factors and chronic inflammation, a number of studies have confirmed the role of genetic factors in the development of the atherogenesis observed in RA. In this regard, besides a strong association between the HLA-DRB1*04 shared epitope alleles and both endothelial dysfunction, an early step in the atherosclerotic process, and clinically evident CV disease, other polymorphisms belonging to genes implicated in inflammatory and metabolic pathways, located inside and outside the HLA region, such as the 308 variant (G>A, rs1800629 of the TNFA locus, the rs1801131 polymorphism (A>C; position + 1298 of the MTHFR locus, or a deletion of 32 base pairs on the CCR5 gene, seem to be associated with the risk of CV disease in patients with RA. Despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic basis of CV disease in RA, further studies are required to better establish the genetic influence in the increased risk of CV events observed in patients with RA.

  4. Association of ideal cardiovascular health and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Jeremy M; Petrone, Andrew B; Carr, J Jeffrey; Pankow, James S; Hunt, Steven C; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K; Ellison, R Curtis; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-03-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) established recommendations based on 7 ideal health behaviors and factors with the goal of improving cardiovascular health (CVH) and reducing both morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease by 20% by 2020. Few studies have investigated their association with subclinical coronary heart disease. We sought to examine whether the 7 AHA CVH metrics were associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1,731 predominantly white men and women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study without prevalent coronary heart disease. Diet was assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac computed tomography. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of 100+ and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Mean age was 56.8 years, and 41% were male. The median number of ideal CVH metrics was 3, and no participant met all 7. There was a strong inverse relationship between number of ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC of 100+ were 1.0 (reference), 0.37 (0.29-0.45), 0.35 (0.26-0.44), and 0.27 (0.20-0.36) among subjects with 0 to 1, 2, 3, and 4+ ideal CVH metrics, respectively (P = .0001), adjusting for sex, age, field center, alcohol, income, education, and energy consumption. These data demonstrate a strong and graded inverse relationship between AHA ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R; Hart, Robert G; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M; Anand, Sonia S; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S; Branch, Kelley R H; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K; Fox, Keith A A; Parkhomenko, Alexander N; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J; Verhamme, Peter B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M; Lewis, Basil S; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-10-05

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after a mean follow-up of 23 months. The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; Paspirin group (288 patients [3.1%] vs. 170 patients [1.9%]; hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.05; Paspirin group as compared with 378 (4.1%) in the aspirin-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.96; P=0.01; threshold P value for significance, 0.0025). The primary outcome did not occur in significantly fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group than in the aspirin-alone group, but major bleeding events occurred in more patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group. Among patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease, those assigned to rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin had better cardiovascular outcomes and more major bleeding events than those assigned to aspirin alone. Rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) alone did not result in better cardiovascular outcomes than aspirin alone and resulted in more major bleeding events. (Funded by Bayer; COMPASS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776424 .).

  6. Pregnancy disorders and cardiovascular disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, KY

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in women in the Netherlands. Early identification of women at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and subsequent detection and treatment of risk factors contributes to the reduction of cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. A

  7. Understanding of emotions and cardiovascular related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Vlachakis, Chrisanthy

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the relation between understanding of emotions and cardiovascular related diseases, namely coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Coronary heart disease is a type of cardiovascular disease that usually coexists with other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and obesity. The uniqueness of this study lies in the fact that examined the relationship between the cardiovascular related diseases named above and the understanding of emotions ...

  8. Genetic testing in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; MacRae, Calum A

    2014-05-01

    The review is designed to outline the major developments in genetic testing in the cardiovascular arena in the past year or so. This is an exciting time in genetic testing as whole exome and whole genome approaches finally reach the clinic. These new approaches offer insight into disease causation in families in which this might previously have been inaccessible, and also bring a wide range of interpretative challenges. Among the most significant recent findings has been the extent of physiologic rare coding variation in the human genome. New disease genes have been identified through whole exome studies in neonatal arrhythmia, congenital heart disease and coronary artery disease that were simply inaccessible with other techniques. This has not only shed light on the challenges of genetic testing at this scale, but has also sharply defined the limits of prior gene-panel focused testing. As novel therapies targeting specific genetic subsets of disease become available, genetic testing will become a part of routine clinical care. The pace of change in sequencing technologies has begun to transform clinical medicine, and cardiovascular disease is no exception. The complexity of such studies emphasizes the importance of real-time communication between the genetics laboratory and genetically informed clinicians. New efforts in data and knowledge management will be central to the continued advancement of genetic testing.

  9. Cardiovascular involvement in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Lewis, Suzanne K; Biviano, Angelo B; Iyer, Vivek; Garan, Hasan; Green, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune response to ingestion of gluten protein, which is found in wheat, rye, and barley grains, and results in both small intestinal manifestations, including villous atrophy, as well as systemic manifestations. The main treatment for the disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which typically results in the restoration of the small intestinal villi, and restoration of other affected organ systems, to their normal functioning. In an increasing number of recently published studies, there has been great interest in the occurrence of alterations in the cardiovascular system in untreated CD. Herein, published studies in which CD and cardiovascular terms appear in the title of the study were reviewed. The publications were categorized into one of several types: (1) articles (including cohort and case-control studies); (2) reviews and meta-analyses; (3) case studies (one to three patient reports); (4) letters; (5) editorials; and (6) abstracts (used when no full-length work had been published). The studies were subdivided as either heart or vascular studies, and were further characterized by the particular condition that was evident in conjunction with CD. Publication information was determined using the Google Scholar search tool. For each publication, its type and year of publication were tabulated. Salient information from each article was then compiled. It was determined that there has been a sharp increase in the number of CD - cardiovascular studies since 2000. Most of the publications are either of the type “article” or “case study”. The largest number of documents published concerned CD in conjunction with cardiomyopathy (33 studies), and there have also been substantial numbers of studies published on CD and thrombosis (27), cardiovascular risk (17), atherosclerosis (13), stroke (12), arterial function (11), and ischemic heart disease (11). Based on the published research, it can be concluded that many types of cardiovascular

  10. [New AHA and ACC guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk : Statement of the D•A•CH Society for Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases, the Austrian Atherosclerosis Society and the Working Group on Lipids and Atherosclerosis (AGLA) of the Swiss Society for Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, G; Beil, F U; Dieplinger, H; von Eckardstein, A; Föger, B; Gouni-Berthold, I; Koenig, W; Kostner, G M; Landmesser, U; Laufs, U; Leistikow, F; März, W; Merkel, M; Müller-Wieland, D; Noll, G; Parhofer, K G; Paulweber, B; Riesen, W; Schaefer, J R; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E; Steinmetz, A; Toplak, H; Wanner, C; Windler, E

    2014-05-01

    Guidelines for the reduction of cholesterol to prevent atherosclerotic vascular events were recently released by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. The authors claim to refer entirely to evidence from randomized controlled trials, thereby confining their guidelines to statins as the primary therapeutic option. The guidelines derived from these trials do not specify treatment goals, but refer to the percentage of cholesterol reduction by statin medication with low, moderate, and high intensity. However, these targets are just as little tested in randomized trials as are the cholesterol goals derived from clinical experience. The same applies to the guidelines of the four patient groups which are defined by vascular risk. No major statin trial has included patients on the basis of their global risk; thus the allocation criteria are also arbitrarily chosen. These would actually lead to a significant increase in the number of patients to be treated with high or maximum dosages of statins. Also, adhering to dosage regulations instead of cholesterol goals contradicts the principles of individualized patient care. The option of the new risk score to calculate lifetime risk up to the age of 80 years in addition to the 10-year risk can be appreciated. Unfortunately it is not considered in the therapeutic recommendations provided, despite evidence from population and genetic studies showing that even a moderate lifetime reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or non-HDL cholesterol has a much stronger effect than an aggressive treatment at an advanced age. In respect to secondary prevention, the new American guidelines broadly match the European guidelines. Thus, the involved societies from Germany, Austria and Switzerland recommend continuing according to established standards, such as the EAS/ESC guidelines.

  11. Apolipoprotein E and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Moreno Valladares

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E is a polymorphic glycoprotein who interacts with the lipoprotein receptors (LRP-Receptor Related Protein and the receptors for low density lipoproteins of (LDL receptors. When lipoproteins bring up the receptors begins lipids captation and degradation which allows cholesterol utilization, taking place an intracellular auto regulation. The three isoforms of greater importance: Apo E2, E3 and E4 are product of three alleles e2, e3, e4 of one only gene. This factor is related with the amount of lipoproteins that contains ApoE for E/B receptors. A low concentration of lipoproteins with ApoE can increase the activity of LDL receptors and consequently downward the circulating LDL. In the other hand particles with Apo E3 or Apo E4, can cause a downward regulation of LDL and in this way produces a LDL plasma elevation. Many studies in human populations have concluded that this polymorphism of apoE and the plasma variation of lipoproteins are associated with cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular disease is the result of different interaction between factors which are genetic factor specially ApoE polymorphism e4 allelic of ApoE can explain, in some degree, the greater frequency of cardiovascular disease in those who carries it.

  12. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Krone, Wilhelm; Berthold, Heiner K

    2009-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently vitamin D deficiency has been identified as a potential risk factor for many diseases not traditionally associated with vitamin D, such as cancer and CVD. This review discusses the evidence suggesting an association between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and CVD and the possible mechanisms mediating it. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with CVD risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis such as intima-media thickness and coronary calcification as well as with cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke as well as congestive heart failure. It could be suggested that vitamin D deficiency contributes to the development of CVD through its association with risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension. However, direct effects of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system may also be involved. Vitamin D receptors are expressed in a variety of tissues, including cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells and vitamin D has been shown to affect inflammation and cell proliferation and differentiation. While much evidence supports a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of vitamin D, prospective, placebo-controlled randomized as well as mechanistic studies are needed to confirm this association. Since vitamin D deficiency is easy to screen for and treat, the confirmation of such an association could have important implications for both, patient care and health policy.

  13. Bone marrow transplantation in mice as a tool for studying the role of hematopoietic cells in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; de Haan, Gerald; Hofker, Marten H.

    2010-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have been established as major players in cardiovascular disease, with an important role in the etiology of atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, hematopoietic cells, and in particular the cells of monocyte and macrophage lineages, have recently been unmasked as one of the main

  14. Low Serum Levels of Vitamin D are Associated with Progression of Subclinical Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Prospective, Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Fontán, Miguel; Borràs Sans, Mercè; Bajo Rubio, Maria Auxiliadora; Rodriguez-Carmona, Ana; Betriu, Angels; Valdivielso, José Maria; Fernández, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis and the main predictors of progression of this condition in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) have been insufficiently investigated. Following a prospective, multicenter, observational design, we studied 237 patients who were treated with PD for ≥3 months, without any clinical background of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Our objectives were the following: (1) to investigate the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis, as compared to a control group of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and (2) to disclose PD technique-related predictors of progression of disease during a 24-month follow-up period. We used vascular ultrasound for characterization of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. A total of 123 patients (51.9%) vs. 79 controls (33.5%) presented ≥1 carotid plaque, and 114 patients (48.3%) vs. 72 controls (30.5%) ≥1 femoral plaque, at baseline evaluation (p identified age, carotid intima-media thickness, presence of ≥1 carotid plaque, and serum levels of 25OH vitamin D and C-reactive protein (CRP) at baseline as independent correlates of progression of atherosclerotic disease. On the contrary, PD technique-related variables did not show any association with this outcome. Atherosclerotic vascular disease is frequent among asymptomatic patients undergoing PD. Older age, pre-existent disease (assessed by vascular ultrasound), and serum levels of 25OH vitamin D and CRP are independent markers of the progression of this condition. These findings may contribute to improve identification of subpopulations with a high risk of CV events, deserving intensified measures of prevention. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Cheese and cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the effect of dairy products on cardiovascular risk is a topic with much debate and conflicting results. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the existing literature regarding the effect of cheese intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies included...... reporting the intake of cheese and risk of CVD or risk factors of CVD represent four human intervention studies, nine prospective studies, one prospective case-cohort study, one prospective nested case-control study, five case-control studies, five cross-sectional studies and three correlation studies....... The possible mechanisms that may be of importance include calcium, protein, fermentation and the fatty acid composition of cheese. Results from four prospective studies reported no association between cheese intake and CVD risk, whereas one reported an increased risk, two reported a decreased risk and one...

  16. High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticle Imaging in Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Leeper, MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Nanoparticles promise to advance the field of cardiovascular theranostics. However, their sustained and targeted delivery remains an important obstacle. The body synthesizes some “natural” nanoparticles, including high-density lipoprotein (HDL, which may home to the atherosclerotic plaque and promote cholesterol efflux. In a recent article published in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, investigators generated modified, radiolabeled HDL nanoparticles and confirmed they accumulated in atherosclerotic lesions from several different species. These approaches hold promise for the noninvasive diagnosis of vulnerable plaque and in the stratification of patients in whom HDL-mimetic therapy may have a clinical benefit. Key Words: atherosclerosis, HDL, imaging, nanoparticles, macrophages/monocytes

  17. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal K Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by various oxygen containing free radicals and reactive species (collectively called "Reactive Oxygen Species" or ROS has long been attributed to cardiovascular diseases. In human body, major oxidizing species are super oxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxy nitrite etc. ROS are produced from distinct cellular sources, enzymatic and non-enzymatic; have specific physicochemical properties and often have specific cellular targets. Although early studies in nineteen sixties and seventies highlighted the deleterious effects of these species, later it was established that they also act as physiological modulators of cellular functions and diseases occur only when ROS production is deregulated. One of the major sources of cellular ROS is Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (Noxes that are expressed in almost all cell types. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generated from them under various conditions act as signal transducers. Due to their immense importance in cellular physiology, various Nox inhibitors are now being developed as therapeutics. Another free radical of importance in cardiovascular system is nitric oxide (a reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide synthase(s. It plays a critical role in cardiac function and its dysregulated generation along with superoxide leads to the formation of peroxynitrite a highly deleterious agent. Despite overwhelming evidences of association between increased level of ROS and cardiovascular diseases, antioxidant therapies using vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids have largely been unsuccessful till date. Also, there are major discrepancies between studies with laboratory animals and human trials. It thus appears that the biology of ROS is far complex than anticipated before. A comprehensive understanding of the redox biology of diseases is thus needed for developing targeted therapeutics.

  18. The Role of Perivascular Adipose Tissue in Non-atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Horimatsu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT surrounds most large blood vessels and plays an important role in vascular homeostasis. PVAT releases various chemokines and adipocytokines, functioning in an endocrine and paracrine manner to regulate vascular signaling and inflammation. Mounting evidence suggests that PVAT plays an important role in atherosclerosis and hypertension; however, the role of PVAT in non-atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including neointimal formation, aortic aneurysm, arterial stiffness and vasculitis, has received far less attention. Increasing evidence suggests that PVAT responds to mechanical endovascular injury and regulates the subsequent formation of neointima via factors that promote smooth muscle cell growth, adventitial inflammation and neovascularization. Circumstantial evidence also links PVAT to the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms and vasculitic syndromes, such as Takayasu's arteritis, where infiltration and migration of inflammatory cells from PVAT into the vascular wall may play a contributory role. Moreover, in obesity, PVAT has been implicated to promote stiffness of elastic arteries via the production of reactive oxygen species. This review will discuss the growing body of data and mechanisms linking PVAT to the pathogenesis of non-atherosclerotic vascular diseases in experimental animal models and in humans.

  19. Vitamin D, Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies have suggested a possible protective role of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system. The available evidence does not support either cardiovascular benefits or harms of vitamin D supplementation. This chapter provides an overview and discussion of the current knowledge of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  20. Health benefits of high-density lipoproteins in preventing cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrougui, Hicham; Momo, Claudia N; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2012-01-01

    Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) are strongly and inversely correlated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, it is becoming clear that a functional HDL is a more desirable target than simply increasing HDL-cholesterol levels. The best known antiatherogenic function of HDL particles relates to their ability to promote reverse cholesterol transport from peripheral cells. However, HDL also possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. This review focuses on the state of knowledge regarding assays of HDL heterogeneity and function and their relationship to cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2012 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evolocumab and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatine, Marc S; Giugliano, Robert P; Keech, Anthony C; Honarpour, Narimon; Wiviott, Stephen D; Murphy, Sabina A; Kuder, Julia F; Wang, Huei; Liu, Thomas; Wasserman, Scott M; Sever, Peter S; Pedersen, Terje R

    2017-05-04

    Evolocumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels by approximately 60%. Whether it prevents cardiovascular events is uncertain. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 27,564 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and LDL cholesterol levels of 70 mg per deciliter (1.8 mmol per liter) or higher who were receiving statin therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive evolocumab (either 140 mg every 2 weeks or 420 mg monthly) or matching placebo as subcutaneous injections. The primary efficacy end point was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. The key secondary efficacy end point was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The median duration of follow-up was 2.2 years. At 48 weeks, the least-squares mean percentage reduction in LDL cholesterol levels with evolocumab, as compared with placebo, was 59%, from a median baseline value of 92 mg per deciliter (2.4 mmol per liter) to 30 mg per deciliter (0.78 mmol per liter) (P<0.001). Relative to placebo, evolocumab treatment significantly reduced the risk of the primary end point (1344 patients [9.8%] vs. 1563 patients [11.3%]; hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 0.92; P<0.001) and the key secondary end point (816 [5.9%] vs. 1013 [7.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.73 to 0.88; P<0.001). The results were consistent across key subgroups, including the subgroup of patients in the lowest quartile for baseline LDL cholesterol levels (median, 74 mg per deciliter [1.9 mmol per liter]). There was no significant difference between the study groups with regard to adverse events (including new-onset diabetes and neurocognitive events), with the exception of injection-site reactions, which were more common with

  2. Prognosis of non-significant coronary atherosclerotic disease detected by coronary artery tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Siqueira, Bruna Pinto; Guimaraes, Carolina Camargos Braichi; Cruz, David Filipe Silva; Guimaraes, Leiziane Assuncao Alves; Lima, Maicom Marcio Perigolo, E-mail: marciovlbarros@gmail.com [Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana, Vespasiano, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira [Universidade de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz [Hospital Materdei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Introduction: Although studies have shown high diagnostic accuracy of coronary tomography (CT) in detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), data on the prognostic value of this method in patients with no significant coronary obstruction are limited. Objective: To evaluate the value of CT in predicting adverse events in patients with suspected CAD and no significant coronary obstruction. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 440 patients between January 2008 and July 2013 by MDCT, diagnosed with no significant obstruction or no atherosclerotic coronary obstruction with an average follow-up of 33 months. The outcomes evaluated were: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina associated with hospitalization or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: Of the 440 patients studied, 295 (67%) were men with mean age 55.9 ± 12.0 years. Non-significant obstruction was found in 152 (35%) of the patients and there were 49 (11%) outcomes. In the multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model, the predictors of clinical outcomes were non-significant obstruction on CT (hazard ratio 3.51; 95% CI 1.73 - 7.8; p <0.01), age and hypertension. Non-significant obstruction on CT was associated with adverse clinical outcomes and survival analysis showed a significant difference (log-rank 24.6; p <0.01) in predicting these outcomes. Conclusion: The detection of non-significant atherosclerotic obstruction by CT was associated with the presence of adverse events in patients with suspected CAD, which may prove useful in the risk stratification of these patients. (author)

  3. Association between pregnancy losses in women and risk of atherosclerotic disease in their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Behrens, Ida

    2016-01-01

    , respectively, as parents whose daughters had no miscarriages. For parents with ≥3 daughters, the HRs were 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.24), 1.29 (95% CI 1.13-1.48), and 1.33 (95% CI 1.12-1.57). Effect magnitudes did not differ for fathers and mothers. We observed similar patterns for IHD and CVI (parents...... regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for each outcome by history of pregnancy loss in daughters/sisters. Overall, parents whose daughters had 1, 2, and ≥3 miscarriages had 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.04], 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.11), and 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.19) times the rate of MI......) and the atherosclerotic endpoint (brothers). Parents whose daughters had stillbirths had 1.14 (95% CI 1.05-1.24) and 1.07 (95% CI 0.96-1.18) times the rates of MI and CVI, respectively, as parents whose daughters had no stillbirths. CONCLUSION: Certain pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic diseases in both heart and brain...

  4. Aspirin desensitization for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, Katharine M

    2015-08-01

    The use of aspirin in coronary artery disease and address the unmet need of aspirin therapy in patients with history of hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) or other nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin hypersensitivity is reported in 1.5% of patients with cardiovascular disease. However, many of those labeled as allergic to aspirin had experienced side-effects and could be safely treated with aspirin. Those with true hypersensitivity reactions were often not placed on appropriate antiplatelet therapy. A number of protocols of varying complexity exist in the literature for aspirin desensitization. The focus of this review is to identify the types of aspirin reactions that can occur and provide a rational approach to oral aspirin challenge and desensitization. In summary, with rare exceptions, patients with a history of 'aspirin/NSAID allergy' who need ASA for cardiovascular issues will be able to safely take aspirin either after a graded challenge or desensitization providing a central role of the allergist in the management of these patients.

  5. Environmental Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2017-07-07

    Many features of the environment have been found to exert an important influence on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, progression, and severity. Changes in the environment because of migration to different geographic locations, modifications in lifestyle choices, and shifts in social policies and cultural practices alter CVD risk, even in the absence of genetic changes. Nevertheless, the cumulative impact of the environment on CVD risk has been difficult to assess and the mechanisms by which some environment factors influence CVD remain obscure. Human environments are complex, and their natural, social, and personal domains are highly variable because of diversity in human ecosystems, evolutionary histories, social structures, and individual choices. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that ecological features such as the diurnal cycles of light and day, sunlight exposure, seasons, and geographic characteristics of the natural environment such as altitude, latitude, and greenspaces are important determinants of cardiovascular health and CVD risk. In highly developed societies, the influence of the natural environment is moderated by the physical characteristics of the social environments such as the built environment and pollution, as well as by socioeconomic status and social networks. These attributes of the social environment shape lifestyle choices that significantly modify CVD risk. An understanding of how different domains of the environment, individually and collectively, affect CVD risk could lead to a better appraisal of CVD and aid in the development of new preventive and therapeutic strategies to limit the increasingly high global burden of heart disease and stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Marijuana Use and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Christopher A; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is currently the most used illicit substance in the world. With the current trend of decriminalization and legalization of marijuana in the US, physicians in the US will encounter more patients using marijuana recreationally over a diverse range of ages and health states. Therefore, it is relevant to review marijuana's effects on human cardiovascular physiology and disease. Compared with placebo, marijuana cigarettes cause increases in heart rate, supine systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and forearm blood flow via increased sympathetic nervous system activity. These actions increase myocardial oxygen demand to a degree that they can decrease the time to exercise-induced angina in patients with a history of stable angina. In addition, marijuana has been associated with triggering myocardial infarctions (MIs) in young male patients. Smoking marijuana has been shown to increase the risk of MI onset by a factor of 4.8 for the 60 minutes after marijuana consumption, and to increase the annual risk of MI in the daily cannabis user from 1.5% to 3% per year. Human and animal models suggest that this effect may be due to coronary arterial vasospasm. However, longitudinal studies have indicated that marijuana use may not have a significant effect on long-term mortality. While further research is required to definitively determine the impact of marijuana on cardiovascular disease, it is reasonable to recommend against recreational marijuana use, especially in individuals with a history of coronary artery disorders.

  7. Monocyte and haematopoietic progenitor reprogramming as common mechanism underlying chronic inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, Renate M; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Riksen, Niels P; Netea, Mihai G; de Winther, Menno P J; Lutgens, Esther; Nordestgaard, Boerge; Neidhart, Michel; Stroes, Erik S G; Catapano, Alberico L; Bekkering, Siroon

    2017-10-24

    A large number of cardiovascular events are not prevented by current therapeutic regimens. In search for additional, innovative strategies, immune cells have been recognized as key players contributing to atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Particularly the role of innate immune cells is of major interest, following the recent paradigm shift that innate immunity, long considered to be incapable of learning, does exhibit immunological memory mediated via epigenetic reprogramming. Compelling evidence shows that atherosclerotic risk factors promote immune cell migration by pre-activation of circulating innate immune cells. Innate immune cell activation via metabolic and epigenetic reprogramming perpetuates a systemic low-grade inflammatory state in cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is also common in other chronic inflammatory disorders. This opens a new therapeutic area in which metabolic or epigenetic modulation of innate immune cells may result in decreased systemic chronic inflammation, alleviating CVD, and its co-morbidities. © The Author 2017. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Perivascular adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Young; Després, Jean-Pierre; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2013-10-01

    Adipose tissue, which has been considered mainly as a site of energy storage and mobilization, is found in many depots throughout the body. Adipose depots may have structural properties such as, for instance, the fat pads located in the hands and feet and the periorbital fat supporting the eyes. Adipose tissue also shows remarkable regional heterogeneity. For instance, substantial differences have been reported in the metabolic properties of visceral (intra-abdominal) vs. subcutaneous adipose depots. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) has active endocrine and paracrine functions with the secretion of various pro-inflammatory chemokines potentially contributing to the progression of atherosclerosis related with obesity. In addition, adipose depots surrounding the heart, such as epicardial (EAT) and perivascular adipose tissues (PAT) may also exert important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease beyond the contribution of VAT due to their close anatomic relationships with vascular structures and myocardium. The purpose of the present review is to outline the current understanding of the pathophysiological links between EAT, PAT and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Also, we discuss the current investigative methods for PAT quantification and discuss the potential impact of PAT on cardiovascular risk prediction. Finally, potential clinical implications of these notions are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Oriana Aragona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify, evaluate, and synthesize evidence on the predictive power of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in cardiovascular disease, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources. MEDLINE was searched using keywords related to “endothelial progenitor cells” and “endothelium” and, for the different categories, respectively, “smoking”; “blood pressure”; “diabetes mellitus” or “insulin resistance”; “dyslipidemia”; “aging” or “elderly”; “angina pectoris” or “myocardial infarction”; “stroke” or “cerebrovascular disease”; “homocysteine”; “C-reactive protein”; “vitamin D”. Study Selection. Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 927 database hits, 43 quantitative studies were included. Data Syntheses. EPC count has been suggested for cardiovascular risk estimation in the clinical practice, since it is currently accepted that EPCs can work as proangiogenic support cells, maintaining their importance as regenerative/reparative potential, and also as prognostic markers. Conclusions. EPCs showed an important role in identifying cardiovascular risk conditions, and to suggest their evaluation as predictor of outcomes appears to be reasonable in different defined clinical settings. Due to their capability of proliferation, circulation, and the development of functional progeny, great interest has been directed to therapeutic use of progenitor cells in atherosclerotic diseases. This trial is registered with registration number: Prospero CRD42015023717.

  10. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekatsu Yanai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, which causes the red coloring of tomatoes. Several reports have suggested lycopene plays a role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we systematically reviewed the interventional studies using tomatoes or tomato products to understandtheanti-atherosclerotic effects of the tomatoas a functional food. We found that a significantnumber of interventional studies reportedtheanti-atherosclerotic effects of tomatoes, includinganti-obesity effects, hypotensiveeffects, improvement of lipid/glucose metabolismand endothelial function, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effect, and anti-platelet effect; however, the anti-platelet effect was disagreed uponby some studies. Furthermore, we discoveredcooking methods significantlyaffect anti-atherosclerotic effects of tomatoes.

  11. Secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is extremely common in older adults and the potential benefits of secondary prevention are perhaps greater in this population than in younger patients. While there is good evidence that secondary prevention efforts are justified in patients up to 80 years of age, limited data are available on secondary prevention in octogenarians and there is no evidence to guide treatment in patients ≥90 years of age. Further, the value of secondary prevention may be confounded by prevalent comorbidities, polypharmacy, and limited life expectancy. It is therefore essential that all management decisions be made in relation to individual preferences and goals of care, with understanding by patients that benefits as well as risks may increase with age. Furthermore, research is needed to refine markers to better delineate which older adults are most likely to benefit from preventive therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Streptococcus mutans and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Nakano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen of dental caries, is known to be associated with bacteremia and infective endocarditis (IE. The bacterium has been classified into four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, based on the chemical composition of the serotype-specific rhamnose-glucose polymers. Serotype k, recently designated and initially found in blood isolates, features a drastic reduction of glucose side chains attached to the rhamnose backbone. Glucosyltransferases (GTFs, protein antigen (PA, and glucan-binding proteins (Gbps are major surface protein antigens of S. mutans, and in vitro analyses using isogenic mutants without those cell surface proteins showed that a PA-defective mutant had the least susceptibility to phagocytosis. Further, rat experiments demonstrated that infection with such defective mutants resulted in a longer duration of bacteremia, while S. mutans strains without GTFs were isolated from the extirpated heart valve of an IE patient. These results imply that some variation of cell surface components is correlated to the virulence of IE caused by S. mutans. In addition, S. mutans DNA has been frequently identified in cardiovascular specimens at a higher ratio than other periodontal bacteria, indicating its possible involvement in various types of cardiovascular diseases beside bacteremia and IE.

  13. Cardiovascular disease in Hajj pilgrims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shimemeri, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    The changing pattern of hospital admissions during Hajj, the Muslims yearly pilgrimage attracting millions of pilgrims from all around the globe, has gradually seen infectious causes of hospital admission replaced by cardiovascular diseases as a leading cause of both intensive care unit admission and death. While this trend is partly associated with the high quality of medical services and awareness programs targeted at reducing the spread of infections, at the same time it underscores an urgent need to establish a pragmatic system to manage the challenge of cardiovascular morbidities and mortality during Hajj. Search strategy and inclusion criteria A PubMed Central (PMC) literature search without date restrictions was performed for articles reporting on the medical experience during Hajj. There were 109 articles were returned using “Hajj” and “mortality” as search terms. After determining relevance to the current theme based on both direct and indirect reference to the pattern hospital admission during Hajj, 20 articles reporting on conducted studies were obtained. Data from these studies reporting on the pattern and outcome of hospitalization during Hajj were examined and helped in arriving at the conclusions presented in this review. PMID:23960680

  14. Cardiovascular disease in Hajj pilgrims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shimemeri, Abdullah

    2012-04-01

    The changing pattern of hospital admissions during Hajj, the Muslims yearly pilgrimage attracting millions of pilgrims from all around the globe, has gradually seen infectious causes of hospital admission replaced by cardiovascular diseases as a leading cause of both intensive care unit admission and death. While this trend is partly associated with the high quality of medical services and awareness programs targeted at reducing the spread of infections, at the same time it underscores an urgent need to establish a pragmatic system to manage the challenge of cardiovascular morbidities and mortality during Hajj. A PubMed Central (PMC) literature search without date restrictions was performed for articles reporting on the medical experience during Hajj. There were 109 articles were returned using "Hajj" and "mortality" as search terms. After determining relevance to the current theme based on both direct and indirect reference to the pattern hospital admission during Hajj, 20 articles reporting on conducted studies were obtained. Data from these studies reporting on the pattern and outcome of hospitalization during Hajj were examined and helped in arriving at the conclusions presented in this review.

  15. Association of peripheral arterial and cardiovascular diseases in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Santos, Raul D

    2014-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  16. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c. Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Objective: This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD, such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods: The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations, mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results: The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049. Conclusion: Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  17. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carolina [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miname, Marcio [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Makdisse, Marcia [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kalil, Roberto Filho [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Raul D., E-mail: rdsf@cardiol.br [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  18. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten

    2015-01-01

    a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2......) Presumed stabile atherosclerotic plaques obtained from autopsy from a control group of patients who all died from causes not related to cardiovascular disease. Our data provides evidence that suggest a wide range of microbial agents in atherosclerotic plaques, and an intriguing new observation that shows...... these microbiota displayed differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques as judged from the taxonomic profiles in these two groups of patients. Additionally, functional annotations reveal significant differences in basic metabolic and disease pathway signatures between these groups. CONCLUSIONS: We...

  19. Does exercise conditioning delay progression of myocardial ischemia in coronary atherosclerotic heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelicher, V F

    1977-01-01

    The data regarding the effect of physical of physical conditioning on the progression of myocardial is chemia, although suggestive of a favorable influence, are in no way definitive. Efforts to alter the physical activity habits of our population should not supersede efforts directed to alter the major risk factors. The emphasis in the prevention of coronary atherosclerotic heart disease for the general public should be on the well established cardinal risk factors, that is, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and cigarette smoking. The National Postinfarction Rehabilitation Study, when completed, may demonstrate how physical conditioning influences the progression of myocardial ischemia. However, "moderate activity is a part of a balanced satisfying living and is the safe and sane hygienic prescription of the thoughtful physician for his patients, the high risk and the healthy alike.

  20. Sex differences in lifetime risk and first manifestation of cardiovascular disease: prospective population based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leening, Maarten J G; Ferket, Bart S; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Kavousi, Maryam; Deckers, Jaap W; Nieboer, Daan; Heeringa, Jan; Portegies, Marileen L P; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; Hunink, M G Myriam; Franco, Oscar H; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2014-01-01

    analyses were restricted to hard atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease outcomes, but absolute risk differences between men and women were attenuated for both coronary heart disease and stroke. Conclusions At age 55, though men and women have similar lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease, there are considerable differences in the first manifestation. Men are more likely to develop coronary heart disease as a first event, while women are more likely to have cerebrovascular disease or heart failure as their first event, although these manifestations appear most often at older ages. PMID:25403476

  1. Dietary inflammatory index in relation to sub-clinical atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Nicola P; Lewis, Joshua R; Blekkenhorst, Lauren C; Shivappa, Nitin; Woodman, Richard J; Bondonno, Catherine P; Ward, Natalie C; Hébert, James R; Thompson, Peter L; Prince, Richard L; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2017-06-01

    Arterial wall thickening, stimulated by low-grade systemic inflammation, underlies many cardiovascular events. As diet is a significant moderator of systemic inflammation, the dietary inflammatory index (DIITM) has recently been devised to assess the overall inflammatory potential of an individual's diet. The primary objective of this study was to assess the association of the DII with common carotid artery-intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) and carotid plaques. To substantiate the clinical importance of these findings we assessed the relationship of DII score with atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD)-related mortality, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVA)-related mortality and ischaemic heart disease (IHD)-related mortality more. The study was conducted in Western Australian women aged over 70 years (n 1304). Dietary data derived from a validated FFQ (completed at baseline) were used to calculate a DII score for each individual. In multivariable-adjusted models, DII scores were associated with sub-clinical atherosclerosis: a 1 sd (2·13 units) higher DII score was associated with a 0·013-mm higher mean CCA-IMT (P=0·016) and a 0·016-mm higher maximum CCA-IMT (P=0·008), measured at 36 months. No relationship was seen between DII score and carotid plaque severity. There were 269 deaths during follow-up. High DII scores were positively associated with ASVD-related death (per sd, hazard ratio (HR): 1·36; 95 % CI 1·15, 1·60), CVA-related death (per sd, HR: 1·30; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·69) and IHD-related death (per sd, HR: 1·40; 95 % CI 1·13, 1·75). These results support the hypothesis that a pro-inflammatory diet increases systemic inflammation leading to development and progression of atherosclerosis and eventual ASVD-related death.

  2. Cardiovascular disease after cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleman, Berthe M P; Moser, Elizabeth C; Nuver, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in treatment and earlier diagnosis have both contributed to increased survival for many cancer patients. Unfortunately, many treatments carry a risk of late effects including cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), possibly leading to significant morbidity and mortality. In this paper we...... of Cancer (EORTC). Better knowledge is needed of the late effects of modern systemic treatments and of radiotherapy to critical structures of the heart, including the effect of both radiation dose and volume of the heart exposed. Research elucidating the extent to which treatments interact in causing CVD....... Better knowledge of these cardiac effects will contribute to both primary and secondary prevention of late complications where exposure to cardiotoxic treatment is unavoidable. Also surrogate markers would help to identify patients at increased risk of cardiotoxicity. Evidence-based screening guidelines...

  3. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Lucia; Nobili, Valerio; Anania, Caterina; Verdecchia, Paola; Chiesa, Claudio

    2011-07-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of liver histology severity and outcomes in the absence of chronic alcohol use. The mildest form is simple steatosis in which triglycerides accumulate within hepatocytes. A more advanced form of NAFLD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, includes inflammation and liver cell injury, progressive to cryptogenic cirrhosis. NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents. The recent rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity likely explains the NAFLD epidemic worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and most patients have evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, NAFLD shares many features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a highly atherogenic condition, and this has stimulated interest in the possible role of NAFLD in the development of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that NAFLD is associated with a significantly greater overall mortality than in the general population, as well as with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), independently of classical atherosclerotic risk factors. Yet, several studies including the pediatric population have reported independent associations between NAFLD and impaired flow-mediated vasodilatation and increased carotid artery intimal medial thickness-two reliable markers of subclinical atherosclerosis-after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Therefore, the rising prevalence of obesity-related MetS and NAFLD in childhood may lead to a parallel increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In children, the cardiovascular system remains plastic and damage-reversible if early and appropriate interventions are established effectively. Therapeutic goals for NAFLD should address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also CVD.

  4. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  5. Vitamin D, cardiovascular disease and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H.; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism......, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials...... (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease....

  6. Vitamin D, Cardiovascular Disease and Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    of vitamin D effects from a cardiovascular health perspective. It focuses on vitamin D in relation to cardiovascular disease, i.e. ischemic heart disease, and stroke; the traditional cardiovascular risk factors hypertension, abnormal blood lipids, obesity; and the emerging risk factors hyperparathyroidism......, microalbuminuria, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Meta-analyses of observational studies have largely found vitamin D levels to be inversely associated with cardiovascular risk and disease. However, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized, controlled trials...... (RCTs) have not been able to consistently replicate the observational findings. Several RCTs are ongoing, and the results from these are needed to clarify whether vitamin D deficiency is a causal and reversible factor to prevent cardiovascular disease....

  7. Preventive Effects of Catechins on Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qiang Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Catechins are polyphenolic phytochemicals with many important physiological activities that play a multifaceted health care function in the human body, especially in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, various experimental and clinical studies have revealed the role of catechins in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, and we review the preventive effects of catechins on cardiovascular disease from the following aspects: Regulating lipid metabolism, regulating blood lipid metabolism, vascular endothelial protection, and reducing blood pressure.

  8. Preventive Effects of Catechins on Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Ting; Han, Yu; Huang, Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Yun-Tian; Du, Yu; Jiang, Yong-Wen

    2016-12-21

    Catechins are polyphenolic phytochemicals with many important physiological activities that play a multifaceted health care function in the human body, especially in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, various experimental and clinical studies have revealed the role of catechins in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders, and we review the preventive effects of catechins on cardiovascular disease from the following aspects: Regulating lipid metabolism, regulating blood lipid metabolism, vascular endothelial protection, and reducing blood pressure.

  9. Plasma Homocysteine and Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

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    S. S. Moselhy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy has been associated with pathological and stressfull conditions and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between plasma homocysteine (hcy and lipid peroxidation in patient with CVD. This study was carried out on 40 patients with CVD as well as 15 healthy volunteers of comparable age and gender as control group. The patients were divided into 2 groups as follows: group I, included 20 patients with acute myocardial infarction and group II, included 20 patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease with no evidence of previous myocardial infarction . Plasma hcy, nitric oxide (NO and malondialdhyde (MDA [as index of lipid peroxidation] were measured in all groups. In addition serum total-cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides were evaluated. Results obtained showed that, there was a significant elevation in the levels of plasma hcy, NO and MDA in groups I and II as compared to control group. There was a strong positive correlation between plasma hcy and MDA (r = 0.59, p < 0.001. Also NO was positively correlated with both hcy (r = 0.49, p < 0.001 and MDA (r = 0.51, p < 0.001 . Serum total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerids were also significantly elevated while serum HDL was significantly decreased in groups I and II as compared to control group. It can be concluded that, hyperhomocysteinemia is a possible factor in free radical generation and therefore cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Depression: risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehl, L.K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Otte, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major depression is an independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. In patients with existing cardiovascular disease, major depression has a large impact on the quality of life and is associated with a poor course and prognosis. Potential mechanisms responsible for this

  11. Serum triglycerides and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boullart, I.; Graaf, J. de; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, especially elevated serum levels of cholesterol, is causally related to cardiovascular disease. The specific role of triglycerides has long been controversial. In this article we discuss the role of serum triglycerides in relation to the risk of cardiovascular disease. First, the

  12. Reducing the Global Burden of Cardiovascular Disease, Part 2: Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Darryl P; Joseph, Philip G; McKee, Martin; Anand, Sonia S; Teo, Koon K; Schwalm, Jon-David; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-09-01

    In this second part of a 2-part series on the global burden of cardiovascular disease, we review the proven, effective approaches to the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. We specifically review the management of acute cardiovascular diseases, including acute coronary syndromes and stroke; the care of cardiovascular disease in the ambulatory setting, including medical strategies for vascular disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure; surgical strategies for arterial revascularization, rheumatic and other valvular heart disease, and symptomatic bradyarrhythmia; and approaches to the prevention of cardiovascular disease, including lifestyle factors, blood pressure control, cholesterol-lowering, antithrombotic therapy, and fixed-dose combination therapy. We also discuss cardiovascular disease prevention in diabetes mellitus; digital health interventions; the importance of socioeconomic status and universal health coverage. We review building capacity for conduction cardiovascular intervention through strengthening healthcare systems, priority setting, and the role of cost effectiveness. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. The effect of revascularization in patients with anatomically significant atherosclerotic renovascular disease presenting with high-risk clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Diana; Ritchie, James; Green, Darren; Chrysochou, Constantina; Kalra, Philip A

    2017-03-23

    Patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) and high-risk clinical presentations have largely been excluded from randomized controlled trials comparing renal revascularization and optimal medical therapy. Here, we explore the effect of revascularization on death, progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and cardiovascular events (CVE) in a highly selected cohort of patients with ARVD. All patients with a radiological diagnosis of ARVD referred to our tertiary centre have been recruited into a single-centre cohort study between 1986 and 2014. Patients with ≥70% unilateral or bilateral ARVD together with one or more of the following putative high-risk presentations were designated 'high-risk': flash pulmonary oedema (FPE), severe hypertension, rapidly deteriorating renal function. The effect of revascularization on clinical outcomes in high-risk patients, patients with bilateral severe ARVD and those with Revascularization was associated with a reduced risk of progression to ESKD, CVE and all combined events in patients with rapidly deteriorating renal function [ESKD: hazard ratio (HR) 0.47 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.25-0.85), P = 0.01; CVE: HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.91), P = 0.02; Any: HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.29-0.90), P = 0.02]. High-risk patients with bilateral ≥70% RAS and those with revascularization when compared with controls. Our results indicate that revascularization may be of benefit in patients with anatomically significant RAS who present with rapidly deteriorating renal function, especially in the presence of severe bilateral ARVD or <1 g/day proteinuria.

  14. Algorithms for cardiovascular disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Seth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of coronary artery disease requires control of risk factors. It is not enough to take out guidelines, it is necessary to implement the guidelines. There are a number of studies which have shown that quite often guidelines are not followed.In this article, we have abstracted the essence of the guidelines into simple to follow algorithms so that they are easy to remember and also teach. For Cardiovascular risk reduction, general measures include stopping smoking, perform 150 minutes of moderate activity per week and take a low fat and low salt diet. For hypertension: All classes of drugs are suitable but generally (NICE 2011 Angiotensin receptor blockers or Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors for young (55 years, many with isolated systolic hypertension Calcium channel blockers, diuretics if needed , are prefered. Combinations are used if monotherapy does not work. For dyslipidemia: Statin benefit groups are defined and manifest coronary artery disease and Diabetics above 40 years should get high dose statins. Lipid levels are only tested to look for compliance or further intensification of regime. Diabetes: Metformin is the drug of choice, Sulfonylureas can be used in combination. Glyptins are also safe and can be used. Other drugs should be used with the help of the endocrinologist.

  15. Doenças cardiovasculares ateroscleróticas, dislipidemias, hipertensão, obesidade e diabetes melito em população da área metropolitana da região Sudeste do Brasil. III - Hipertensão Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, lipemic disorders, hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus in the population of a metropolitan area of Southeastern Brazil. III - Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignez Salas Martins

    1997-10-01

    with social criteria. With a view better to understanding the social dimension of the disease, prevalencies were characterised by type of occupation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 1,041 people and corresponds to the sum of the samples representing the "study areas" established by the use of socio-economic and geographical criteria. Four social strata were defined in obedience to a socioeconomic gradient. Hypertension was defined by the Joint National Committee (JNC, 140/90 mmHg, and of the World Health Organization (WHO, 160/95 mmHg, standard references. RESULTS: According to the JNC and WHO standard references the prevalencies of hypertension, age adjusted, were of approximately the following: stratum (I+II 60 and 37%; stratum III 50 and 39%; stratum IV 55 e 46%. Among women the prevalencies were 40 and 38% (stratum I+II; 56 and 47% (stratum III and 55 and 46% (stratum IV. For the men belonging to the economically active population, classified by occupation, it was showed that the freelance professionals, consisting of businessmen of small firms, small traders and liberal professionals, presented a prevalence of about 60 and 37%; the skilled workers, employed in factories of 35 and 14%; the daily freelance workers, unskilled laborers and unemployed, of 59 and 40%. The women were divided by occupation as belonging or not to the economically active population (EAP and presented the following prevalencies: 39 and 47%, respectively, according to the JNC standard, and 27 and 45%, respectively, according to the WHO standard. Thus it may be seen that these results run counter to the hypothesis that women integrated into the labour market are more exposed to the risk factors for non-transmissible diseases. CONCLUSION: Thus it may be concluded that the categories most affected by the present economic were those most affected by hypertension. On the other hand the possibility of there being and a intense social determination in the etiology of hypertension in

  16. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Vaccination Records Vaccine-Preventable Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination ... are hospitalized, and some even die. People with heart disease and those who have suffered stroke are at ...

  17. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac Arrest • Cardiac Rehab • Cardiomyopathy • Cardiovascular Conditions of ... Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and ...

  18. [Hyperuricemia, gout and cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karsten; Burkard, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, gout as well as arterial hypertension and metabolic syndrom are highly prevalent and clinicians are frequently confronted with both conditions in the same patient. Hyperuricemia and gout are associated with cardiovascular comorbidities and a high cardiovascular risk. Despite coherent pathophysiological concepts, it remains to be determined, if this association is independent and causal. In daily clinical practice, cardiovascular risk factors should be thoroughly identified and consequently treated in all patients with hyperuricemia and gout. If preventive treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia with urate-lowering agents may improve cardiovascular risk and outcomes remains to be determined and is recommended only in special situations like young patients with severe hyperuricemia.

  19. Review: Mechanical Characterization of Carotid Arteries and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, C.L. de; Fekkes, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Manniesing, R.; Hansen, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death and is in the majority of cases due to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Initially, thickening of the inner layer of the arterial wall occurs. Continuation of this process leads to plaque formation. The risk of a plaque to

  20. ACC/AHA Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Cholesterol Management: Implications of New Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Wong, PhD, FACC, FAHA, FNLA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2014 the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association issued four new guidelines for cardiovascular disease prevention that focused on cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle management, obesity management, and blood cholesterol management. The development of an atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk calculator formed the basis of the risk assessment guideline, and the lifestyle management guideline focused on recommending an evidence-based dietary pattern. The blood cholesterol management guideline specifically identified four groups of patients shown to benefit from moderate-intensity or high-intensity statin therapy from previous clinical trials and abandoned the use of specific low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol (LDL-C goal levels on the basis of the lack of clinical trial evidence. The recommendations for treatment with moderate-intensity or high-intensity statin therapy are based on rigorous evidence from randomized clinical trials. Guidance has since been provided for the use of nonstatin therapies, including cholesterol absorption inhibitor and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 monoclonal antibody therapy when adequate reduction of LDL-C levels is not achieved with maximally tolerated statin therapy. The recent development and application of these therapies have resulted in remarkable reductions in LDL-C levels that are well tolerated, and preliminary outcome data are promising in showing substantial atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease event reductions beyond statin therapy.

  1. Cardiovascular Disease, Mitochondria, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that mitochondria play an important role in the cardiovascular system and mutations of mitochondrial DNA affect coronary artery disease, resulting in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular disease, but it is not yet clear how TCM affects mitochondrial function. By reviewing the interactions between the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial DNA, and TCM, we show that cardiovascular disease is negatively affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA and that TCM can be used to treat cardiovascular disease by regulating the structure and function of mitochondria via increases in mitochondrial electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, modulation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, and decreases in mitochondrial ROS. However further research is still required to identify the mechanism by which TCM affects CVD and modifies mitochondrial DNA.

  2. Small Dense Low-Density Lipoprotein as Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Ivanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein (LDL plays a key role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. LDL consists of several subclasses of particles with different sizes and densities, including large buoyant (lb and intermediate and small dense (sd LDLs. It has been well documented that sdLDL has a greater atherogenic potential than that of other LDL subfractions and that sdLDL cholesterol (sdLDL-C proportion is a better marker for prediction of cardiovascular disease than that of total LDL-C. Circulating sdLDL readily undergoes multiple atherogenic modifications in blood plasma, such as desialylation, glycation, and oxidation, that further increase its atherogenicity. Modified sdLDL is a potent inductor of inflammatory processes associated with cardiovascular disease. Several laboratory methods have been developed for separation of LDL subclasses, and the results obtained by different methods can not be directly compared in most cases. Recently, the development of homogeneous assays facilitated the LDL subfraction analysis making possible large clinical studies evaluating the significance of sdLDL in the development of cardiovascular disease. Further studies are needed to establish guidelines for sdLDL evaluation and correction in clinical practice.

  3. Cardiovascular disease leads to a new algorithm for diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Valentina; Weiss, Matthew C; Weintraub, Howard; Goldberg, Ira J; Schwartzbard, Arthur

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have increased rates of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and heart failure (HF). This increase occurs despite optimal lipid-lowering therapies. We reviewed clinical trials of diabetes treatments and their effects on circulating plasma lipoproteins and CVD. Several earlier studies failed to demonstrate clear CVD benefit from diabetes therapies. In addition, triglyceride-reducing agents did not reduce overall CVD in large clinical trials although these trials were not conducted in cohorts selected as hypertriglyceridemic. Specific classes such as the thiazolidinediones increased HF. After Food and Drug Administration mandates for more rigorous safety data, recent studies have not only demonstrated CVD safety for many diabetes mellitus agents, but have also shown that certain newer medications such as empagliflozin, canagliflozin, liraglutide, and semaglutide reduce CVD. Moreover, pioglitazone use in insulin-resistant patients has resulted in decreased cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events, suggesting a protective vascular effect of this agent. Benefits from these newer classes of medications are unlikely to be because of improved lipoprotein profiles. These disparities in diabetes medication effects on CVD are likely attributable to each drug or drug class' cardiometabolic effects. Selecting medications based solely on their potential to lower hemoglobin A1C is an outdated therapeutic approach. We propose a new algorithm for treatment of patients with type II diabetes such that medication selection is based on the presence or risk of coronary artery disease and/or HF. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dietary sodium and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Andrew; O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-06-01

    Although an essential nutrient, higher sodium intake is associated with increasing blood pressure (BP), forming the basis for current population-wide sodium restriction guidelines. While short-term clinical trials have achieved low intake (6 months). Guidelines assume that low sodium intake will reduce BP and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD), compared to moderate intake. However, current observational evidence suggests a J-shaped association between sodium intake and CVD; the lowest risks observed with 3-5 g/day but higher risk with 5 g/day) and increased risk of CVD. Although lower intake may reduce BP, this may be offset by marked increases in neurohormones and other adverse effects which may paradoxically be adverse. Large randomised clinical trials with sufficient follow-up are required to provide robust data on the long-term effects of sodium reduction on CVD incidence. Until such trials are completed, current evidence suggests that moderate sodium intake for the general population (3-5 g/day) is likely the optimum range for CVD prevention.

  5. Association of Inter-Arm Systolic Blood Pressure Difference with Coronary Atherosclerotic Disease Burden Using Calcium Scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Ae Young; Cho, Kyoung Im; Garg, Scot; Kim, Yong Hoon; Shin, Eun Seok

    2017-09-01

    There are no sufficient data on the correlation between inter-arm blood pressure (BP) difference and coronary atherosclerosis found using coronary artery calcium score (CACS). We aimed to investigate if the increased difference in inter-arm BP is independently associated with severity of CACS. Patients who had ≥3 cardiovascular risk factors or an intermediate Framingham Risk Score (FRS; ≥10) were enrolled. Inter-arm BP difference was defined as the absolute difference in BP in both arms. Quantitative CACS was measured by using coronary computed tomography angiography with the scoring system. A total of 261 patients were included in this study. Age (r=0.256, parm systolic BP (SBP; r=0.172, p=0.005), mean of left arm SBP (r=0.190, p=0.002), inter-arm SBP difference (r=0.152, p=0.014), and the FRS (r=0.278, parm SBP difference (≥6 mm Hg) was significantly associated with CACS ≥300 [odds ratio (OR) 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-4.22; p=0.022]. In multivariable analysis, the inter-arm SBP difference ≥6 mm Hg was also significantly associated with CACS ≥300 after adjusting for clinical risk factors (OR 2.34, 95 % CI 1.06-5.19; p=0.036). An increased inter-arm SBP difference (≥6 mm Hg) is associated with coronary atherosclerotic disease burden using CACS, and provides additional information for predicting severe coronary calcification, compared to models based on traditional risk factors.

  6. [Risk factors for cardiovascular system damage in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrina, I M; Rudenko, T E; Savel'eva, S A; Shvetsov, M Iu; Vasil'eva, M P

    2013-01-01

    To study the prevalence of and risk factors (RF) associated with cardiovascular system damage in patients with predialysis diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). The investigation enrolled 317 patients with CKD of various etiologies. In Group 1 (165 patients with CKD: 54% of men, 46% of women; mean age 46 +/- 15 years), the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 37.2 ml/min; the serum creatinine level was 2.9 mg/dl. Group 2 included 152 (41%) patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (41% of men and 59% of women; mean age 57.3 +/- 7.1 years). The duration of DM averaged 10.4 +/- 7.1 years. All the patients underwent physical examination; the levels of glycated hemoglobin and adipose tissue hormones, urinary albumin excretion were additionally determined in the diabetic patients. Echocardiography was performed in 172 patients. The influence of populationwide and renal failure-associated RFs on the cardiovascular system was evaluated in CKD. Clinical and instrumental examinations of 165 patients with Stages II-IV nondiabetic CKD revealed atherosclerosis of the aorta and the vessels of the heart, brain, kidney, and lower extremities in 60 (37%), 35 (24%), 30 (18%), 23 (14%), and 8 (5%), respectively. As atherosclerotic vascular lesion progressed, the incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE) increased. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was diagnosed in 37.3% of the patients with nondiabetic CKD. Along with traditional cardiovascular RFs (age, smoking, gender, arterial hypertension), the renal dysfunction-related factors (anemia, diminished glomerular filtration rate, elevated creatitine levels, and abnormal phosphorus and calcium metabolism) are of importance. An association was found between LVH, atherosclerotic vascular lesion, and heart valve calcification. According to EchoCG data, 36% of the patients with type 2 DM were diagnosed as having LVH. The RFs of the latter were albuminuria, obesity, and abnormal carbohydrate and purine metabolisms. There

  7. Smokeless tobacco and prevalence of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Nasir; Beebe, Laura A; Thompson, David M; Skaggs, Valerie J

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined the possible increased risk of cardiovascular disease with smokeless tobacco. Existing studies have yielded inconsistent results and have been based on limited populations. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the use of smokeless tobacco increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and to identify higher risk groups. Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1999 to 2001 for the state of Oklahoma were analyzed. We analyzed 10332 complete records to assess association of any use of smokeless tobacco (over the respondent's life time) with cardiovascular disease. Similarly, the association between cardiovascular disease and individual socio-demographic covariates such as age, gender, smoking, and BMI was checked. As a secondary analysis we explored associations among three categories for smokeless tobacco users, current, former, and never users, with cardiovascular disease. Logistic regression models, which controlled for age, sex, race-ethnicity, obesity, and smoking, estimated the odds of having cardiovascular disease were 1.18 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.45) times higher among smokeless tobacco users. This odds ratio was more than two fold in the Non-White/Hispanic group (O.R. 2.31, 95% CI: 1.42, 3.73). Similarly the odds of cardiovascular disease were higher among female ST users than among females who were non-users of ST (O.R. 1.72 95% CI: 1.12, 2.65). A modest increase in the odds of cardiovascular disease was associated with smokeless tobacco. Two risk groups were identified, females and Non-Whites/Hispanics, whose odds of cardiovascular disease increased with the use of smokeless tobacco.

  8. Weight loss therapy for clinical management of patients with some atherosclerotic diseases: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshakbayev, Kuat; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar; Otarbayev, Nurzhan; Togizbayeva, Gulnar; Tabynbayev, Nariman; Gazaliyeva, Meruyert; Idrisov, Alisher; Oshakbayev, Pernekul

    2015-11-25

    The prevalence and burden of atherosclerotic (AS) diseases are increasing during the last twenty years. Some studies show a close relationship between overweight and AS, but influence on AS diseases of different weight loss methods are still studying. The purpose of the research was to study the effectiveness of a weight loss program in AS patients in randomized controlled trial, and to develop a conception of evolution of AS. A randomized controlled prospective clinical trial including 97 people, from them 71 patients with various AS manifestations. Patients were divided in 2 subgroups for non-drug weight loss program, and conventional drug therapy. The weight loss program included calorie restriction with 100-150 kcal/day, fat-free vegetables, salt diet, and optimum physical activity. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows version 17.0. The weight loss subgroup lost ranging between 7-20% from an initial weight (P = 0.016). Weight loss was achieved due to fatty mass reduction only (P = 0.005). Hemoglobin levels (P bone mineral density (P water (P = 0.006) and muscle masses (P = 0.0038) were increased in weight loss subgroup. Ejection fraction (P body fat. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01700075. State registration is # 0109RK000079, code is O.0475 at the National Center for Scientific and Technical Information of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  9. Bisphosphonates for cardiovascular risk reduction : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, Guido; Bartstra, Jonas W.; Weijmans, Maaike; de Jong, Pim A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672; Mali, Willem P.; Verhaar, Harald J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111379628; Visseren, Frank L J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166267678; Spiering, Wilko|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269114173

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Bisphosphonates might be effective in reducing cardiovascular events due to their ability to reduce calcification in arterial walls. We aimed to investigate the effects of treatment with bisphosphonates on the prevention of atherosclerotic processes and cardiovascular disease.

  10. Hypertension and dyslipidaemia in obesity and insulin resistance: pathophysiology, impact on atherosclerotic disease and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M John; Sposito, Andrei C

    2008-03-01

    Hypertension, a prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, frequently occurs in conjunction with metabolic disturbances and in particular with dyslipidaemia; such comorbidity presents in more than one-third of hypertensive patients. Moreover, hypertension and dyslipidaemia often manifest concomitantly in the clinical context of obesity and insulin resistance. In this setting, distinct metabolic anomalies may account for the development of both conditions, and may equally act to exacerbate their effects on vascular dysfunction. Significantly, hypertension and dyslipidaemia are linked mechanistically and may act in synergy at the arterial wall to enhance atherosclerosis. In this review, we identify potential mechanisms underlying the pathophysiological interaction between hypertension and dyslipidaemia at the cellular and molecular levels, and which may underlie elevated cardiovascular risk in obesity and insulin resistance. Finally, the clinical evidence supporting the beneficial effects of an integrated pharmacotherapeutic strategy to the reduction of cardiovascular risk in patients with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is critically discussed.

  11. Current evidence and future perspectives of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizos, Evangelos C; Elisaf, Moses S

    2013-04-15

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been traditionally used for the prevention of major cardiovascular events in patients with or without a history of cardiovascular disease. Their main mechanism of action is to lower triglyceride levels, but they also exert anti-arrythmic and anti-inflammatory properties, they reduce blood pressure levels and stabilize the atherosclerotic plaques. There is a vast amount of evidence derived from randomized studies that seems to question their benefit for the prevention of major cardiovascular events. Upcoming trials will help to better clarify their use in certain indications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ABO Blood Groups and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanrui Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ABO blood groups have been associated with various disease phenotypes, particularly cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of death in developed countries and their prevalence rate is rapidly growing in developing countries. There have been substantial historical associations between non-O blood group status and an increase in some cardiovascular disorders. Recent GWASs have identified ABO as a locus for thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and multiple cardiovascular risk biomarkers, refocusing attention on mechanisms and potential for clinical advances. As we highlight in this paper, more recent work is beginning to probe the molecular basis of the disease associations observed in these observational studies. Advances in our understanding of the physiologic importance of various endothelial and platelet-derived circulating glycoproteins are elucidating the mechanisms through which the ABO blood group may determine overall cardiovascular disease risk. The role of blood group antigens in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular disorders remains a fascinating subject with potential to lead to novel therapeutics and prognostics and to reduce the global burden of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Role of quercetin in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Deepak Kumar Rai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease constitutes a major public health concern in industrialized nations. Over recent decades, a large body of evidence has accumulated indicating that oxidative stress induced free radicals play a critical role in cellular processes implicated in atherosclerosis and many other heart diseases. However a diet high in antioxidants is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. The compound quercetin is a dietary antioxidant with a polyphenolic structure that is present in many foods, such as onion, apples, wine and tea. An increased intake of quercetin has been correlated with a decrease in the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Quercetin has been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological and pharmacological effects in animals and man besides its antioxidative and free radical scavenging actions. This paper reviews various steps of oxidative stress mediated atherogenesis and their signaling pathways and also emphasizes the role of quercetin in controlling oxidative stress and reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Preeclampsia : At risk for remote cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; Zeeman, Gerda G.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that women with preeclampsia are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. Population-based studies relate preeclampsia to an increased risk of later chronic hypertension (RR, 2.00 to 8.00) and cardiovascular morbidity/mortality (RR, 1.3 to

  15. TOBACCO USE AND THE CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0655711075

    smoking legislation on admission due to acute myocardial infarction. Research method/Methodology: PubMed and manual search strategies using the search words. 'tobacco and cardiovascular disease' were used to identify articles published on the contribution of smoking to cardiovascular events and the effects of ...

  16. Imaging of inflamed carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques with the use of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 scintigraphy in end-stage renal disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opalinska, Marta; Pach, Dorota; Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Glowa, Boguslaw; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Endocrinology, Cracow (Poland); Stompor, Tomasz [University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Department of Nephrology, Hypertensiology and Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Olsztyn (Poland); Mikolajczak, Renata; Garnuszek, Piotr; Maurin, Michal; Karczmarczyk, Urszula [National Centre for Nuclear Research Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, Otwock (Poland); Fedak, Danuta [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Clinical Biochemistry, Cracow (Poland); Krzanowski, Marcin; Sulowicz, Wladyslaw [Jagiellonian University Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Cracow (Poland); Rakowski, Tomasz [Jagiellonian University Medical School, 2nd Department of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology, Cracow (Poland)

    2012-04-15

    Identification of vulnerable plaques remains crucial for better cardiovascular risk assessment. At least 20% of inflammatory cells within unstable (vulnerable) plaques comprise T lymphocytes, which contain receptors for interleukin-2 (IL-2); those receptors can be identified by scintigraphy with radiolabelled IL-2.The aim of this study was to identify the ''inflamed'' (vulnerable) plaques by scintigraphy using IL-2 labelled with {sup 99m}Tc in the selected, high cardiovascular risk group of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 28 patients (18 men, 10 women, aged 55.2 {+-} 9.6 years, 17 on peritoneal dialysis, 11 on haemodialysis) underwent common carotid artery (CCA) scintigraphy with the use of {sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-IL-2. In all cases, ultrasound examination of the CCA was performed and levels of selected proinflammatory factors, atherogenic markers and calcium-phosphate balance parameters were measured. Finally, the target to non-target (T/nT) ratio of IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques with intima-media thickness (IMT), classic cardiovascular risk factors and concentrations of the measured factors were compared. Increased {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques in 38/41 (91%) cases was detected. The median T/nT ratio of focal {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in atherosclerotic plaques was 2.35 (range 1.23-3.63). The mean IMT value on the side of plaques assessed by scintigraphy was 0.79 {+-} 0.18 mm (median 0.8, range 0.5-1.275). Correlations between T/nT ratio and homocysteine (R = 0.22, p = 0.037), apolipoprotein B (apoB) (R = 0.31, p = 0.008), apoB to apoA-I ratio (R = 0.29, p = 0.012) and triglyceride concentration (R = 0.26, p = 0.021) were detected. A lower T/nT ratio in patients with better parameters of nutritional status (haemoglobin, albumin, adiponectin) in comparison with patients with worse nutritional parameters (3.20 {+-} 0.5 vs 2.16 {+-} 0.68, p = 0.025) was revealed as well

  17. Economic burden of cardiovascular diseases in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakić Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cardiovascular disease imposes a burden to society in terms of mortality, morbidity and economic losses. The aim of this study was to estimate the economic burden of cardiovascular disease in Serbia in 2009 from the perspective of the society. Methods. For the purpose of the study cardiovascular disease was defined by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, as the following diagnosis: hypertension, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathy, heart failure and cerebrovascular disease. The prevalence, top-down method was used to quantify the annual cardiovascular costs. Productivity losses were estimated using the human capital approach and the friction cost method. A discount rate of 5% was used to convert all future lifetime earnings into the present value. Results. The total direct costs of cardiovascular disease in 2009 were € 400 million. The results showed that more than half a million working days were lost due to incapacity resulting from cardiovascular diseases, yielding the € 113.9 million. The majority of total costs (€ 514.3 million were for: medication (29.94%, hospital days (28.97% and hospital inpatient care - surgical and diagnostic interventions (17.84%. The results were robust to a change in 20% of volume or the unit price of all direct and indirect cost and to discount rate 2% and 10%. Conclusions. The total cardiovascular disease costs in 2009 represented approximately 1.8% of the Serbian gross domestic product. The results of the study would be valuable to health policy makers to bridge the gap between invested resources and needs, in order to improve cardiovascular disease outcomes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175035

  18. Correlations of chemokine CXCL16 and TNF-α with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jieyong; Liu, Yanshao; Chen, Tao

    2018-01-01

    This study determined the correlations of CXC ligand 16 (CXCL16) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CAHD) and screened for new clinical markers for the prognosis and treatment of the disease. Eighty patients with coronary heart disease and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled into a CAHD or healthy control group, respectively. Computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography and Gensini integral were used to classify plaques and evaluate patients with coronary heart disease. The serum levels of CXCL16 and TNF-α of subjects in each group were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and the correlation between levels and clinical markers (such as blood pressure, glucose, lipid and heart rate) and the severity of disease were analyzed. Our results showed the serum levels of CXCL16 and TNF-α were significantly higher in the CAHD group than those in the CK group. The serum CXCL16 levels of the CAHD group patients with plaques were distinctly higher than those of the CADH group patients without plaques, but there were no significant difference in serum TNF-α levels between these two groups of patients. The level of CXCL16 had a significantly positive correlation with the severity of disease, but there was no significant correlation between TNF-α level and the severity of disease. Also, there was no significant correlation between the CXCL16 levels and blood pressure, blood glucose, heart rate, total cholesterol, triglyceride or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but there was a clear correlation with the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Finally no significant correlations were found between TNF-α levels and each of the clinical markers studied. Based on our findings, the levels of CXCL16 and TNF-α in the patients with coronary heart disease were abnormally increased and the level of CXCL16 correlated closely with the severity of disease. These markers seem to be reliable biological markers for

  19. Selective IgE deficiency and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eli; Mishal, Joseph; Vardy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Selective immunoglobulin E (IgE) deficiency (IgED) is defined as serum levels of IgE more than or equal to 2 kIU/L and is associated with immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. This study aimed to investigate a prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in population with IgED. Within the electronic patient record (EPR) database of Leumit Health Care Services (LHS) in Israel, data capture was performed using IBM Cognos 10.1.1 BI Report Studio software. The case samples were drawn from the full study population (n = 18,487), having any allergy-related symptoms and/or those requesting antiallergy medications and performed serum total IgE measurement during 2012 at LHS. All subjects aged more than or equal to 40 years old, with serum total IgE less than 2 kIU/L were included in case group. Control group was randomly sampled from the remained subjects, with a case-control ratio of 10 controls for each case (1:10). The comorbid cardiovascular diseases during less than or equal to 10 years before serum total IgE testing were identified and retrieved using specific International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes. There were 103 in case and 1030 subjects in control group. Compared with control group patients, the case group had significantly more arterial hypertension [34 (37.7%) versus 187 (18.2%), p < 0.001], ischemic heart disease (IHD) [26 (25.2%) versus 87 (8.4%), p < 0.001], carotid stenosis [5 (4.9%) versus 7 (0.7%), p = 0.003], cerebrovascular disease (CVD) [3 (2.9%) versus 5 (0.5%), p = 0.029], and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) [4 (3.9%) versus 9 (0.9%), p = 0.024]. IgED is associated with higher prevalence of arterial hypertension and ASCVD.

  20. [Air pollution and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Guy; Witberg, Guy; Danenberg, Haim

    2007-10-01

    Cardiovascular atherothrombosis is the most common cause of death globally, with several well-known risk factors. Air pollution is a byproduct of fuel combustion by motor vehicles, power plants and industrial factories. It is composed of gases, fluids and particulate matter (PM) of different sizes, which include basic carbon, organic carbonic molecules and metals such as vanadium, nickel, zinc and iron. These particles are subdivided by their median size, a major contributing factor for their capability to enter the human body through the respiratory system. Most of the epidemiological studies have shown correlation between acute and long-term exposure to air pollution elements and cardiovascular morbidity in general, and angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction specifically. Physiological studies have found different arrhythmias as the etiologic cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality following exposure to air pollution. A major finding was a decline in heart rate variability, a phenomenon known as endangering for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in patients after acute myocardial infarction. To date, several pathways have been proposed, including a hypercoagulable state following an inflammatory response, cardiac nervous autonomic disequilibrium, endothelial dysfunction with blood vessel contraction and direct toxic impact on cardiac muscle. Additional research is needed for clarifying the pathophysiological pathways by which air pollution affects the cardiovascular system. That might allow forthcoming with preventive measures and correct treatment, and hence a decrease in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another important target is dose-outcome correlation curves for safety threshold calculation as a basis for air pollution regulations.

  1. Platelet reactivity and cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoep, Jacob Daniël

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the Western world. Platelets play an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease, not only in the acute onset of thrombosis after atherosclerotic plaque rupture but also in the initiation and progression of

  2. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  3. Disease Human - MDC_CardiovascularMortality2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Polygon feature class based on Zip Code boundaries showing the rate of deaths due to major cardiovascular diseases per 1000 residents of Miami-Dade County in 2006.

  4. Saturated fat, carbohydrate, and cardiovascular disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W; Sun, Qi; Hu, Frank B; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    A focus of dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment has been a reduction in saturated fat intake, primarily as a means of lowering LDL-cholesterol concentrations...

  5. Translational Perspective on Epigenetics in Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; de Windt, Leon J.; Chambers, John C.

    2017-01-01

    A plethora of environmental and behavioral factors interact, resulting in changes in gene expression and providing a basis for the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity in gene expression responses among cells and individuals involves epigenetic mechanisms. Advancing

  6. Relationship between Inflammation and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Riddhi Patel; Henish Patel; Rachana Sarawade

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a part of complex biological response of vascular tissue to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells or irritants. Recent advance in basic science have established a fundamental role for inflammation immediating all stages of cardiovascular diseases from initiation, progression and complications. Inflammation is thread linking to cardiovascular diseases. Clinical studies have shown that this emerging biology of inflammation play important role in pathogenesis of acute ...

  7. Cardiovascular diseases in dental practice : Practical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Margaix Muñoz, María; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia

    2008-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the principal cause of death in the industrialized world. Its most serious expression, acute myocardial infarction, causes 7.2 million deaths each year worldwide, and it is estimated that 20% of all people will suffer heart failure in the course of their lifetime. The control of risk cardiovascular factors, including arterial hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus is the best way to prevent such diseases. The most frequent and serious cardiovascular emergenc...

  8. Cardiovascular risk and subclinical cardiovascular disease in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajuk Studen, Katica; Jensterle Sever, Mojca; Pfeifer, Marija

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its effects on reproductive health, it is now well recognized that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic disorder, characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity which leads to an excess lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PCOS patients are often obese, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and insulin resistant; they have obstructive sleep apnea and have been reported to have higher aldosterone levels in comparison to normal healthy controls. These are all components of an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Many studies exploring subclinical atherosclerosis using different methods (flow-mediated dilatation, intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, coronary artery calcification) as well as assessing circulating cardiovascular risk markers, point toward an increased cardiovascular risk and early atherogenesis in PCOS. The risk and early features of subclinical atherosclerosis can be reversed by non-medical (normalization of weight, healthy lifestyle) and medical (metformin, thiazolidinediones, spironolactone, and statins) interventions. However, the long-term risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as the clinical significance of different interventions still need to be properly addressed in a large prospective study. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Cysteinyl leukotriene signaling aggravates myocardial hypoxia in experimental atherosclerotic heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nobili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LT are powerful spasmogenic and immune modulating lipid mediators involved in inflammatory diseases, in particular asthma. Here, we investigated whether cys-LT signaling, in the context of atherosclerotic heart disease, compromises the myocardial microcirculation and its response to hypoxic stress. To this end, we examined Apoe(-/- mice fed a hypercholesterolemic diet and analysed the expression of key enzymes of the cys-LT pathway and their receptors (CysLT1/CysLT2 in normal and hypoxic myocardium as well as the potential contribution of cys-LT signaling to the acute myocardial response to hypoxia. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Myocardial biopsies from Apoe(-/- mice demonstrated signs of chronic inflammation with fibrosis, increased apoptosis and expression of IL-6, as compared to biopsies from C57BL/6J control mice. In addition, we found increased leukotriene C(4 synthase (LTC(4S and CysLT1 expression in the myocardium of Apoe(-/- mice. Acute bouts of hypoxia further induced LTC(4S expression, increased LTC(4S enzyme activity and CysLT1 expression, and were associated with increased extension of hypoxic areas within the myocardium. Inhibition of cys-LT signaling by treatment with montelukast, a selective CysLT1 receptor antagonist, during acute bouts of hypoxic stress reduced myocardial hypoxic areas in Apoe(-/- mice to levels equal to those observed under normoxic conditions. In human heart biopsies from 14 patients with chronic coronary artery disease mRNA expression levels of LTC(4S and CysLT1 were increased in chronic ischemic compared to non-ischemic myocardium, constituting a molecular basis for increased cys-LT signaling. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that CysLT1 antagonists may have protective effects on the hypoxic heart, and improve the oxygen supply to areas of myocardial ischemia, for instance during episodes of sleep apnea.

  10. The added value of longitudinal black-blood cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in the cross sectional identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippe Daniel S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid atherosclerotic ulceration is a significant source of stroke. This study evaluates the efficacy of adding longitudinal black-blood (BB cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR angiography to cross-sectional CMR images in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration. Methods Thirty-two subjects (30 males and two females with ages between 48 and 83 years scheduled for carotid endarterectomy were imaged on a 1.5T GE Signa scanner using multisequence [3D time-of-flight, T1, proton density, T2, contrast enhanced T1], cross-sectional CMR images and longitudinal BB CMR angiography (0.625 × 0.625 mm/pixel. Two rounds of review (round 1: cross-sectional CMR images alone and round 2: cross-sectional CMR images plus longitudinal BB CMR angiography were conducted for the presence and volume measurements of ulceration. Ulceration was defined as a distinct depression into the plaque containing blood flow signal on cross-sectional CMR and longitudinal BB CMR angiography. Results Of the 32 plaques examined by histology, 17 contained 21 ulcers. Using the longitudinal BB CMR angiography sequence in addition to the cross-sectional CMR images in round 2, the sensitivity improved to 80% for ulcers of at least 6 mm3 in volume by histology and 52.4% for all ulcers, compared to 30% and 23.8% in round 1, respectively. There was a slight decline in specificity from 88.2% to 82.3%, though both the positive and negative predictive values increased modestly from 71.4% to 78.6% and from 48.4% to 58.3%, respectively. Conclusion The addition of longitudinal BB CMR angiography to multisequence cross-sectional CMR images increases accuracy in the identification of carotid atherosclerotic ulceration.

  11. Cardiovascular Endocrinology : The impact of the growth hormone (GH) axis / insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system on the expression of an atherogenic lipid and pro-diabetic phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twickler, Theodorus Bartholomeus

    2003-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to premature atherosclerotic disease is the major cause of death in Western Societies. Key factors in the origin of premature atherosclerotic disease are lipid disturbances. Although classic lipid parameters predict cardiovascular disease in a huge amount, novel factors in

  12. Cardiovascular Disease and Thyroid Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones at the ce......Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones...... at the cellular level. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased left ventricular mass of the heart, which reverts after obtaining euthyroidism. Mortality and risk of major cardiovascular events are increased. Subclinical hypothyroidism is also associated with subtle changes in the heart, e.g. its...

  13. Effects of stress on the development and progression of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Steptoe, Andrew

    2017-12-07

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of disease burden globally, which underlies the continuing need to identify new complementary targets for prevention. Over the past 5-10 years, the pooling of multiple data sets into 'mega-studies' has accelerated progress in research on stress as a risk and prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease. Severe stressful experiences in childhood, such as physical abuse and household substance abuse, can damage health and increase the risk of multiple chronic conditions in adulthood. Compared with childhood stress and adulthood classic risk factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure, and high serum cholesterol levels, the harmful effects of stress in adulthood are generally less marked. However, adulthood stress has an important role as a disease trigger in individuals who already have a high atherosclerotic plaque burden, and as a determinant of prognosis and outcome in those with pre-existing cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. In real-life settings, mechanistic studies have corroborated earlier laboratory-based observations on stress-related pathophysiological changes that underlie triggering, such as lowered arrhythmic threshold and increased sympathetic activation with related increases in blood pressure, as well as pro-inflammatory and procoagulant responses. In some clinical guidelines, stress is already acknowledged as a target for prevention for people at high overall risk of cardiovascular disease or with established cardiovascular disease. However, few scalable, evidence-based interventions are currently available.

  14. Epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2001-01-01

    Within Europe large differences exist in mortality from coronary heart disease and stroke. These diseases show a clear West-East gradient with high rates in Eastern Europe. In spite the decreasing trend in age-adjusted cardiovascular disease mortality in Western European countries an increase in the

  15. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD among a sample in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Melvin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CASHD is increasing in India. Several modifiable risk factors contribute directly to this disease burden. Public knowledge of such risk factors among the urban Indian population is largely unknown. This investigation attempts to quantify knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD as sampled among an Indian population at a large metropolitan hospital. Methods A hospital-based, cross sectional study was conducted at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, a major tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. Participants (n = 217 recruited from patient waiting areas in the emergency room were provided with standardized questionnaires to assess their knowledge of modifiable risk factors of CASHD. The risk factors specifically included smoking, hypertension, elevated cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus and obesity. Identifying 3 or less risk factors was regarded as a poor knowledge level, whereas identifying 4 or more risk factors was regarded as a good knowledge level. A multiple logistic regression model was used to isolate independent demographic markers predictive of a participant's level of knowledge. Results 41% of the sample surveyed had a good level of knowledge. 68%, 72%, 73% and 57% of the population identified smoking, obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol correctly, respectively. 30% identified diabetes mellitus as a modifiable risk factor of CASHD. In multiple logistic regression analysis independent demographic predictors of a good knowledge level with a statistically significant (p Conclusion An Indian population in a hospital setting shows a lack of knowledge pertaining to modifiable risk factors of CASHD. By isolating demographic predictors of poor knowledge, such as current smokers and persons who do not exercise regularly, educational interventions can be effectively targeted and implemented as primary and secondary prevention strategies

  16. Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease. Diagnosis and prevalence in an hypertensive and/or uremic elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Michele

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerotic ischemic renal disease is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure leading to dialysis among the elderly; Its prevalence is inferred from autopsy or retrospective arteriographic studies. This study has been conducted on 269 subjects over 50 with hypertension and/or CRF, unrelated to other known causes of renal disease. Methods All 269 patients were studied either by color-flow duplex sonography (n = 238 or by renal scintigraphy (n = 224, and 199 of the 269 patients were evaluated using both of these techniques. 40 patients, found to have renal artery stenosis (RAS, were subjected to 3D-contrast enhancement Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA and/or Selective Angiography (SA. An additional 23 cases, negative both to scintigraphy and to ultrasound study, underwent renal angiography (MRA and/or SA. Results Color-duplex sonography, carried out in 238 patients, revealed 49 cases of RAS. MR or SA was carried out in 35 of these 49 patients, and confirmed the diagnosis in 33. Color-duplex sonography showed a PPV value of 94.3% and NPV of 87.0% while renal scintigraphy, carried out in 224 patients, had a PPV of 72.2% and a NPV of 29.4%. Patients with RAS showed a higher degree of renal insufficiency compared to non stenotic patients while there were no differences in proteinuria. RAS, based on color-duplex sonography studies, was present in 11% of patients in the age group 50–59, 18% in the 60–69 and 23% at age 70 and above. Conclusions A relatively large percentage of the elderly population with renal insufficiency and/or hypertension is affected by RAS and is at risk of developing end-stage renal failure. Color-duplex ultrasonography is a valid routine method of investigation of population at risk for renal artery stenosis.

  17. Anti-atherosclerotic effect of traditional fermented cheese whey in atherosclerotic rabbits and identification of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Xin-Hua; Ma, Chun-Yan; Manaer, Tabusi; Heizati, Mulalibieke; Wulazibieke, Baheti; Aierken, Latipa

    2016-08-24

    Traditional fermented cheese whey (TFCW), containing probiotics, has been used both as a dairy food with ethnic flavor and a medicine for cardiovascular disease, especially regulating blood lipid among Kazakh. We therefore investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of TFCW in atherosclerotic rabbits and identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts in TFCW. Atherosclerotic rabbits were induced by administration of atherosclerotic diet for 12 weeks and divided randomly into three groups and treated for 4 weeks with Simvastatin (20 mg/kg) or TFCW (25 mg/kg) and (50 mg/kg). In addition, a normal control group and an atherosclerotic group were used for comparison. All drugs were intragastrical administered once daily 10 mL/kg for 4 weeks. Body weight (BW), lipid profiles, C-reactive protein (CRP), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were tested and theromatous plaques and the number of foam cells and infiltrating fibroblast cells in the thoracic aorta endothelium was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin stainin. LAB and yeasts were isolated and purified by conventional techniques and identified using morphological and biochemical properties as well as gene sequences analysis. After 4 weeks of treatment, high and low dose TFCW decreased serum TC, TG, LDLC, CRP, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 (P < 0.05) compared to atherosclerotic group, and increased HDL-C (P < 0.05) compared to normal controls. Histological analysis showed TFCW reduced VCAM-1 expression and formation of atheromatous plaques on the aortic endothelium of atherosclerotic rabbits. Seven classes of LBA from two different genera including Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus kefianofaciens, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus Casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus kefiri and Lactococcus lactic as well as 2 classes of yeasts from two different genera including Saccharomyces unisporus and Issatchenkia orientalis were isolated and identified

  18. [Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network (RECAVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dorado, David; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Díez, Javier; Gabriel, Rafael; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R; Ortiz de Landázuri, Manuel; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Today, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of death and hospitalization in Spain, and accounts for an annual healthcare budget of more than 4000 million euros. Consequently, early diagnosis, effective prevention, and the optimum treatment of cardiovascular disease present a significant social and healthcare challenge for the country. In this context, combining all available resources to increase the efficacy and healthcare benefits of scientific research is a priority. This rationale prompted the establishment of the Spanish Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network, or RECAVA (Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Enfermedades Cardiovasculares), 5 years ago. Since its foundation, RECAVA's activities have focused on achieving four objectives: a) to facilitate contacts between basic, clinical and epidemiological researchers; b) to promote the shared use of advanced technological facilities; c) to apply research results to clinical practice, and d) to train a new generation of translational cardiovascular researchers in Spain. At present, RECAVA consists of 41 research groups and seven shared technological facilities. RECAVA's research strategy is based on a scientific design matrix centered on the most important cardiovascular processes. The level of RECAVA's research activity is reflected in the fact that 28 co-authored articles were published in international journals during the first six months of 2007, with each involving contributions from at least two groups in the network. Finally, RECAVA also participates in the work of the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research, or CNIC (Centro Nacional de Investigación Cardiovascular), and some established Biomedical Research Network Centers, or CIBER (Centros de Investigación Biomédica en RED), with the aim of consolidating the development of a dynamic multidisciplinary research framework that is capable of meeting the growing challenge that cardiovascular disease will present

  19. Racism and cardiovascular disease: implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer; McGibbon, Elizabeth; Waldron, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as a prominent influence on health outcomes across the lifespan. Racism is identified as a key SDH. In this article, the authors describe the concept of racism as an SDH, its impact in discriminatory actions and inactions, and the implications for cardiovascular nurses. Although research in Canada on the links among racism, stress, and cardiovascular disease is limited, there is growing evidence about the stress of racism and its long-term impact on cardiovascular health. The authors discuss how cardiovascular nursing could be enhanced through an understanding of racism-related stress, and race-based differences in cardiovascular care. The authors conclude with strategies for action to address this nursing concern.

  20. Sex differences of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with symptomatic carotid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cardiovascular diseases, especially heart disease and stroke are the cause of more than a half of the total number of deaths in Serbia. Objectives. The aim of the present study was to determine sex differences of atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with symptomatic carotid disease. Methods. The cross-sectional study, involving 657 consecutive patients with verified carotid atherosclerotic disease, was performed in Belgrade, Serbia. Sex differences of anthropometric parameters and atherosclerotic risk factors were analyzed by means of the univariate logistic regression. Results. In comparison with men, lower education and physical inactivity were significantly more frequent in women, and the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MetS, lower high-density cholesterol, abdominal obesity, body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m2, hypercholesterolemia and depression were also significantly higher in women. Smoking and high serum uric acid level were significantly more frequent in men than in women. Women had significantly higher number of MetS components per person, but there were no significant sex differences in the number of other risk factors. Out of all observed risk factors, including MetS components, physical inactivity and hypertension were most frequent in both sexes followed by ever smoking and low education in men and low education and dyslipidemia in women. Conclusion. There were significant sex differences in the distribution of some atherosclerotic risk factors, but not in their number per person. Only the number of MetS components was significantly higher in women. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41002

  1. Register-based studies of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Steen Z; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Madsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    -up. This review gives three examples within cardiovascular epidemiology to illustrate the use of the national administrative registers available to all researchers upon request. Research topics: The hospitalisation rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was expected to be increased and case-fatality rate......-based treatment increased significantly over time and adherence to treatment was high. Finally, use of specific nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs by healthy subjects was associated with a dose-dependent increase in cardiovascular risk. CONCLUSION: The nationwide registers have proven very useful in monitoring...... the hospitalisation rate and treatment of cardiovascular disease. The risk of unmeasured factors affecting the results calls for cautious interpretation of the results....

  2. The regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1) an important factor involved in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torac, E; Gaman, L; Atanasiu, V

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, one of the main causes of cardiovascular diseases, is a complex process that involves manifold factors. Besides the vascular lipids accumulation, inflammatory factors could be considered as a proatherogenic factor - RCAN1. RCAN1 is a regulator of calcineurin, both of them being calcium dependent proteins. Recent studies have shown that RCAN1 has an important role in heart valve development. In the same time researchers found that, the atherosclerotic plaques have an up-regulated RCAN1 gene expression. In the near future, it is desirable to elucidate the RCAN1 function and classify it as a possible biochemical marker to diagnose infancy atherosclerosis.

  3. Screen-detected gallstone disease and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Skaaby, Tea; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge about temporal associations for screen-detected gallstone disease and cardiovascular disease is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if screen-detected gallstones or cholecystectomy was associated with development of cardiovascular disease. A cohort study of three...... randomly selected groups from the general population of Copenhagen was performed. Participants (n = 5928) were examined 1982-1992 and underwent abdominal ultrasound examination to detect gallstone disease and were not informed of their gallstone status. Participants were followed up for occurrence...... of cardiovascular disease through nationwide registers until December 2014. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed including traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and apolipoprotein E genotype. Gallstone disease was identified in 10% (591/5928) of participants at baseline of whom 6.8% had...

  4. Perceptions of risk: understanding cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Webster; Emma Heeley

    2010-01-01

    Ruth Webster1, Emma Heeley21Cardiovascular Division, 2Neurological and Mental Health Division, The George Institute for International Health, Camperdown, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the leading cause of death and disability worldwide despite the availability of well-established and effective preventive options. Accurate perception of a patient’s risk by both the patient and the doctors is important as this is one of the components that determine hea...

  5. MACD - an imaging marker for cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; de Bruijne, Marleen; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Despite general acceptance that a healthy lifestyle and the treatment of risk factors can prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), CVD are the most common cause of death in Europe and the United States. It has been shown that abdominal aortic calcifications (AAC) correlate strongly...... imaging markers described. Finally we present that the MACD index predicts cardiovascular death with a hazard ratio of approximately four....

  6. Large animal models of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, H. G.; Rashdan, N. A.; Whitelaw, C.B.A.; Corcoran, B. M.; Summers, K M; MacRae, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    The human cardiovascular system is a complex arrangement of specialized structures with distinct functions. The molecular landscape, including the genome, transcriptome and proteome, is pivotal to the biological complexity of both normal and abnormal mammalian processes. Despite our advancing knowledge and understanding of cardiovascular disease (CVD) through the principal use of rodent models, this continues to be an increasing issue in today's world. For instance, as the ageing population i...

  7. Correlates of preclinical cardiovascular disease in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw A Andrew

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high frequency of premature death from cardiovascular disease in indigenous Australians is often attributed to the high prevalence of risk factors, especially type II diabetes mellitus (DM. We evaluated the relationship of ethnicity to atherosclerotic burden, as evidenced by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, independent of risk factor status. Methods We studied 227 subjects (147 men; 50 ± 13 y: 119 indigenous subjects with (IDM, n = 54, and without DM (InDM, n = 65, 108 Caucasian subjects with (CDM, n = 52, and without DM (CnDM, n = 56. IMT was measured according to standard methods and compared with clinical data and cardiovascular risk factors. Results In subjects both with and without DM, IMT was significantly greater in indigenous subjects. There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index (BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP, or diastolic blood pressure (DBP between any of the groups, and subjects with DM showed no difference in plasma HbA1c. Cardiovascular risk factors were significantly more prevalent in indigenous subjects. Nonetheless, ethnicity (β = -0.34; p Conclusion Ethnicity appears to be an independent correlate of preclinical cardiovascular disease, even after correction for the high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in indigenous Australians. Standard approaches to control currently known risk factors are vital to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, but in themselves may be insufficient to fully address the high prevalence in this population.

  8. High-Density Lipoprotein Processing and Premature Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Corina; Gillard, Baiba K.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Pownall, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    High plasma concentrations of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) are a well-accepted risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the statin class of hypolipidemic drugs has emerged as an effective means of lowering LDL-C and reducing CVD risk. In contrast, the role of plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in protection against atherosclerotic vascular disease is the subject of considerable controversy. Although the inverse correlation between plasma HDL-C and CVD is widely acknowledged, reduction of CVD risk by interventions that increase HDL-C have not been uniformly successful. Several studies of large populations have shown that the first step in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), the transfer of cholesterol from the subendothelial space of the arterial wall via the plasma compartment to the liver for disposal, is impaired in patients with CVD. Here we review HDL function, the mechanisms by which HDL supports RCT, and the role of RCT in preventing CVD. PMID:26634027

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular co-morbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Panuccio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is the fourth largest cause of death worldwide. However, most patients with COPD die from cardiovascular causes (CVD. COPD is an independent risk factor for CVD and a predictor of long-term mortality. There is a high prevalence of traditional risk factors in this patient group, including smoking, sedentary behaviour and low socio-economic class. COPD is now recognized to having both local lung and systemic effects. The mechanism of such systemic effects is not completely known, but it is supposed to be related to enhanced systemic inflammation and to oxidative stress, both implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic process. CONCLUSIONS COPD is frequently associated with congestive heart failure (CHF. It is also a confounding factor for the diagnosis of CHF. In fact, some studies demonstrate that about 20% of patients diagnosed with COPD had also or only CHF. Patients with CHF and associated COPD have less frequently β-blockers prescription than CHF patients without COPD. COPD is a heavy negative prognostic factor for CHF hospitalization and mortality. Pulmonary Embolism (PE in patients with COPD is generally underdiagnosed, and this last disease is a risk factor for a complicated course of PE, with increased mortality.

  10. History of diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND. Access to the anatomy, physiology and pathology of cardiovascular system organs has been made easy by the invention of various tools and techniques. One third of all deaths globally are due to heart diseases. Future predictions indicate that by the year 2020, heart diseases will be the ...

  11. Psychological interventions in cardiovascular disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maw Pin; Morgan, Karen

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate recent literature on psychological interventions in cardiovascular disease. Mindfulness-based stress reduction did not reduce blood pressure, and a self-management programme in heart failure patients (HART), showed no improvement in health-related quality of life. Web-based decision aids are as effective as individually tailored counseling at reducing cardiovascular risk. Among health attack survivors, the ProActive Heart study involving telephone delivered counseling reduced anxiety whereas integrated motivational interviewing cognitive behavioral therapy (Beating Heart Problems) reduced depression and anger with no physiological or behavioral benefits. Psychological conditions increase cardiovascular risk as well as complicate cardiovascular disease. Psychological interventions are, however, far less studied compared with pharmacological and device therapies for cardiovascular disease. Interventions can either be delivered in isolation or in combination with other interventions including education, exercise, and medications, whereas outcomes measured could include psychometrics, behavior, risk scores, cardiovascular endpoints, and mortality. Due to the large variety of possible interventions and outcomes, published studies have reported mixed results and it remains unclear which modes of delivery and which types of intervention are most appropriate.

  12. A MMP derived versican neo-epitope is elevated in plasma from patients with atherosclerotic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Genovese, Federica; Larsen, Lise Korsager

    2013-01-01

    ELISA for detection of the fragment in plasma. VCANM was measured in plasma of patients with different levels of heart diseases. Patients experiencing I) acute coronary syndrome, II) stable ischemic heart disease and III) demonstrating high levels of coronary calcium deposits had significantly higher...... plasma levels of VCANM compared to a control group of individuals with no detectable coronary calcium deposits. VCANM was also detected by immunohistochemistry in coronary artery sections of patients with different degrees of atherosclerosis. VCANM ability to separate patients with atherosclerotic...

  13. Ticagrelor for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease: insights from the PARTHENON clinical development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Peter; Himmelmann, Anders; Ditmarsch, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Ticagrelor (P2Y12 receptor antagonist) is presently indicated for preventing atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome and patients with a history of myocardial infarction. The PARTHENON clinical development program comprises five randomized, controlled, cardiovascular, indication-seeking outcome studies, aiming to evaluate ticagrelor across the spectrum of patients with atherothrombotic disease. Results of two large-scale trials support a benefit for ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndrome (PLATO; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00391872) and in patients with a history of myocardial infarction (PEGASUS-TIMI 54; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01225562). Ongoing trials will provide information on the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (SOCRATES; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01994720), peripheral artery disease (EUCLID; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01732822) and coronary artery disease in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (THEMIS: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01991795).

  14. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgün, Alev; Gürgün, Cemil

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide killing nearly 3 million people annually. Even the most optimistic estimates suggest that COPD mortality rates will increase by 50% over the next 15 years. Individuals with COPD are at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), lung cancer, osteoporosis and muscle wasting. Smoking is a well-described risk factor for both COPD and CVD, but CVD in patients with COPD is likely to be due to other factors in addition to smoking. Systemic inflammation may be an important common etiological cause between COPD and CVD, being well described in both diseases. This paper reviews the close relationship between COPD and cardiovascular diseases, principally atherosclerosis. The common pathogenetic mechanisms, relation between cardiovascular comorbidities and pulmonary function parameters, the treatment of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, the role medications in the treatment of both disorders, the effect of cardiovascular comorbidities on the prognosis of COPD and prediction of mortality is discussed. The anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled corticosteroids and statins, their effects on cardiovascular endpoints, all-cause mortality, and survival of COPD patients are reviewed as a new perspective to the treatment.

  15. Coffee intake, cardiovascular disease and allcause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coffee has been associated with modestly lower risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in meta-analyses; however, it is unclear whether these are causal associations. We tested first whether coffee intake is associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality...... observationally; second, whether genetic variations previously associated with caffeine intake are associated with coffee intake; and third, whether the genetic variations are associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Methods: First, we used multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazard...... regression models evaluated with restricted cubic splines to examine observational associations in 95 366 White Danes. Second, we estimated mean coffee intake according to five genetic variations near the AHR (rs4410790; rs6968865) and CYP1A1/2 genes (rs2470893; rs2472297; rs2472299). Third, we used sex...

  16. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  17. Microparticles as Potential Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Carolina Nunes, E-mail: carolufscar24@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Santo Amaro - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; Amaral, Jônatas Bussador do; Tegani, Daniela Melo; Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is a choice of great relevance because of its impact on health. Some biomarkers, such as microparticles derived from different cell populations, have been considered useful in the assessment of cardiovascular disease. Microparticles are released by the membrane structures of different cell types upon activation or apoptosis, and are present in the plasma of healthy individuals (in levels considered physiological) and in patients with different pathologies. Many studies have suggested an association between microparticles and different pathological conditions, mainly the relationship with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the effects of different lipid-lowering therapies have been described in regard to measurement of microparticles. The studies are still controversial regarding the levels of microparticles that can be considered pathological. In addition, the methodologies used still vary, suggesting the need for standardization of the different protocols applied, aiming at using microparticles as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  18. Social networks in cardiovascular disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Fadia T; Yan, Xia; Farshid, Maryam; Barakat, Samer; Jung, Miah; Low, Sara; Fedder, Donald

    2010-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Social networks have a positive association with obesity, smoking cessation and weight loss. This article summarizes studies evaluating the impact of social networks on the management of cardiovascular disease. The 35 studies included in the article describe the impact of social networks on a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease, depression and mortality. In addition, having a large-sized social network is also associated with better outcomes and improved health. The role of pharmacists is beginning to play an important role in the patient-centered medical home, which needs to be incorporated into social networks. The patient-centered medical home can serve as an adaptive source for social network evolvement.

  19. [Cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajchenberg, Bernardo Léo; Rassi, Nelson; Feitosa, Alina Coutinho R; Lerário, Antonio Carlos; Betti, Roberto Tadeu Barcelos

    2008-03-01

    The association between type 1 diabetes and coronary heart disease has become very clear since the late 1970. It has been demonstrated that there is an important increased risk in morbidity and mortality caused by coronary artery disease in young adults with type 1 diabetes compared with the non diabetic population. The underlying pathogeneses is still poorly understood. While the role of glycemic control in the development of microvascular disease complication is well established its role in CVD in patients with DM1 remains unclear with epidemiologic studies reporting conflicting data. Recent findings from the DCCT/EDIC showed that prior intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT was associated with less atherosclerosis, largely because of reduced level of HbA1c during the DCCT. The improvement of glycemic control itself appeared to be particularly effective in younger patients with shorter duration of the disease. Other analyses suggested the glycemia may have a stronger effect on CAD in patients without than in those with albuminúria. Other major determinants of coronary artery disease are the components of metabolic syndrome and the surrogate measure of insulin resistence: eGDR. It is proposed that patients with DM1 should have aggressive medical therapy, risk factor modification and careful monitoring not only of his blood sugar but also of the other processes involved in the atherosclerotic process, mostly the ones with family history of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C

    2012-02-01

    Obesity promotes a cascade of secondary pathologies including diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation, thrombosis, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, and OSA, which collectively heighten the risk for cardiovascular disease. Obesity may also be an independent moderator of cardiac risk apart from these comorbid conditions. Rates of obesity and cardiac disease continue to rise in a parallel and exponential manner. Because obesity is potentially one of the most modifiable mediators of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, effective treatment and prevention interventions should have a profound and favorable impact on public health.

  1. Obesity: the 'huge' problem in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, M Javed; Baweja, Paramdeep

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic in the United States. It is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and associated with reduced life expectancy. The adverse effects are related to direct impact of obesity on cardiovascular system and indirectly through its influence on risk factors. Excessive accumulation of adipose tissue in the myocardium leads to structural and functional alteration. In addition, numerous hormones secreted by adipose tissue create pro-inflammatory and prothrombotic state. This predisposes to coronary heart disease, heart failure, and sudden death. Even those with normal weight but excessive body fat are at risk. Weight reduction and exercise are the main therapeutic options.

  2. Roles of High Mobility Group Box 1 in Cardiovascular Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Chen; Ze-Yang Wang; Li-Yuan Chen; Hou-Yuan Hu

    2017-01-01

    Calcific disease of the cardiovascular system, including atherosclerotic calcification, medial calcification in diabetes and calcific aortic valve disease, is an important risk factor for many adverse cardiovascular events such as ischemic cardiac events and subsequent mortality. Although cardiovascular calcification has long been considered to be a passive degenerative occurrence, it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process that involves osteochondrogenic differentiation, ...

  3. Lipocalin (LCN 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Oberoi

    Full Text Available Lipocalin (LCN 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans.In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1 and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr-/- mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients as determined by coronary angiography.Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression.

  4. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  5. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol efflux capacity as a relevant predictor of atherosclerotic coronary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Nakajima, Takatomo; Mutoh, Makoto; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    We examined the clinical relevance of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux capacity from macrophage (cholesterol efflux capacity) as a predictor of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) in comparison with that of conventional coronary and lipid risk variables in Japanese daily practice. Fasting blood sampling, including 6 routinely measured dyslipidemia-related variables, was performed at the time of coronary angiography (CAG) or multi-slice coronary computed tomography (MSCT) between January 2011 and January 2013. CAD, defined as native coronary atherosclerosis stenosis >50% by CAG or MSCT, was identified in 182 patients (CAD group), but not in 72 patients (non-CAD group). Cholesterol efflux capacity, measured using a cell-based efflux system in (3)[H]-cholesterol-labeled J774 macrophages in apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma, was significantly impaired in the CAD group compared with the non-CAD group (0.86 ± 0.26 vs. 1.02 ± 0.38; p = 0.001). After adjusting 15 patient and dyslipidemia-related variables using a propensity score matching analysis produced 55 patients in each arm, cholesterol efflux capacity in the CAD group remained to be significant compared with the non-CAD group (0.83 ± 0.24 vs. 0.97 ± 0.36; p = 0.019). Stepwise logistic regression analysis using a backward method after the baseline adjustment showed that cholesterol efflux capacity (odds ratio [OR]: 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.056-0.91; p = 0.037) was the single predictor of CAD, while other variables including HDL-C (p = 0.088) and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I (p = 0.681) were removed owing to those insignificance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve after the baseline adjustment was 0.67 (95% CI: 0.51-0.73, p = 0.048 by Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistics). The present observational study conducted under daily clinical practice confirmed that cholesterol efflux capacity is a clinically relevant predictor of CAD among the

  6. Atherosclerotic and thrombotic genetic and environmental determinants in Egyptian coronary artery disease patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Manal S; Toraih, Eman A; Aly, Nagwa M; Fakhr-Eldeen, Abeer; Badran, Dahlia I; Hussein, Mohammad H

    2017-01-13

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Multiple genetic variants in combination with various environmental risk factors have been implicated. This study aimed to investigate the association of twelve thrombotic and atherosclerotic gene variants in combination with other environmental risk factors with CAD risk in a preliminary sample of Egyptian CAD patients. Twenty three consecutive CAD patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and 34 unrelated controls, have been enrolled in the study. Genotyping was based on polymerase chain reaction and reverse multiplex hybridization. Five genetic association models were tested. Data distribution and variance homogeneity have been checked by Shapiro-Wilk test and Levene test, respectively; then the appropriate comparison test was applied. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used for correlation analysis and logistic regression has been performed to adjust for significant risk factors. Clustering the study participants according to gene-gene and gene-environment interaction has been done by Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA). The univariate analysis indicated that the five variants; rs1800595 (FVR2; factor 5), rs1801133 (MTHFR; 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase), rs5918 (HPA-1; human platelet antigen 1), rs1799752 (ACE; angiotensin-converting enzyme), and rs7412 and rs429358 (ApoE; apolipoprotein E) were significantly associated with CAD susceptibility under different genetic models. Multivariate analysis revealed clustering of the study population into three patient groups (P) and one control group. FVR2 was the most variant associated with CAD patients, combined with the factor V Leiden (FVL) variant in P1 cluster and with both ACE and MTHFR 667C > T in P2. Whereas, P3 was mostly affected by both MTHFR 667C > T and FXIII (factor 13) V89L mutations. When combined with traditional risk factors, P1 was mostly affected by dyslipidemia, smoking

  7. Cohort study of predictive value of urinary albumin excretion for atherosclerotic vascular disease in patients with insulin dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert, T; Yokoyama, H; Mathiesen, E

    1996-01-01

    , smoking habits, and serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor. END POINT: atherosclerotic vascular disease assessed by death certificates, mailed questionnaires, and hospital records. RESULTS: Thirty patients developed...... was independent of age; sex; blood pressure; smoking; serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sialic acid, and von Willebrand factor; level of haemoglobin A(lc); insulin dose, duration of diabetes, and diabetic nephropathy (hazard ratio 1.04 (1.01 to 1.08) per 5 mg...

  8. Cardiovascular effects of Etanercept in patients with psoriatic arthritis: evidence from the cardiovascular risk in rheumatic diseases database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Iervolino, Salvatore; Zincarelli, Carmela; Lupoli, Roberta; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Pizzicato, Paolo; Di Minno, Alessandro; Pappone, Nicola; Peluso, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Many literature data support the possibility of an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients compared with the general population. This cannot be entirely explained by the presence of traditional vascular risk factors. It has been suggested that inflammation may act synergistically with traditional vascular risk factors, thus contributing to the atherosclerotic process and to the increased CV risk. In order to evaluate the CV effects of the control of systemic inflammation by Etanercept, in the present study we analyze data recorded in the Cardiovascular Risk in Rheumatic Diseases study group database to perform a further analysis on the effects of Etanercept on primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis and carotid subclinical atherosclerosis. Platelet reactivity is increased in patients with poorly controlled PsA. Among patients receiving Etanercept, those achieving minimal disease activity show a platelet reactivity comparable to healthy controls. Similarly, the anti-inflammatory effect of Etanercept is associated with a significant improvement of hemostatic and fibrinolytic parameters in PsA subjects, maximal changes being documented in patients achieving minimal disease activity. In addition, the treatment with Etanercept seems to be associated with a carotid intima-media thickness significantly lower as compared with matched patients receiving traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Our data can be suggestive of the reduction of the CV risk in patients with PsA treated with Etanercept.

  9. Platelets, aspirin, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, P C; Hughes, C; O'Brien, J R

    1998-10-01

    Aspirin was first synthesised 100 years ago and its preparation and marketing is generally reckoned to have been the foundation of the pharmaceutical industry. For most of the time since then it has been used for the relief of pain and fever. The modern phase of aspirin use commenced with the reporting in 1974 of a randomised controlled trial in the secondary prevention of death by low-dose aspirin given to patients who had suffered a myocardial infarct. Reports of other trials followed and an overview of the first six trials was presented to the inaugural meeting of the Society for Clinical Trials in Philadelphia in 1980. There have been two further major overviews and the most recent, based on 145 trials, established that low-dose aspirin reduces vascular events by around one third. It has been estimated that, used appropriately, aspirin could prevent 100,000 premature deaths each year worldwide, at a cost of about 250 Pounds ($400) per life saved, and about 80 Pounds ($130) per cardiovascular event prevented. The evidence indicates that it is seriously underused at present. The aspirin story continues and trials are in progress to test other possible uses of aspirin, in vascular dementia, colorectal cancer, and cataract.

  10. The ABCA1 gene R230C variant is associated with decreased risk of premature coronary artery disease: the genetics of atherosclerotic disease (GEA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Villarreal-Molina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ABCA1 genetic variation is known to play a role in HDL-C levels and various studies have also implicated ABCA1 variation in cardiovascular risk. The functional ABCA1/R230C variant is frequent in the Mexican population and has been consistently associated with low HDL-C concentrations. Although it has been associated with other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is not known whether it is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD. AIM: The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the ABCA1/R230C variant is associated with premature CAD in a case-control association study (GEA or Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease, and to explore whether BMI modulates the effect of the C230 allele on other metabolic traits using a population-based design. RESULTS: The C230 allele was significantly associated with both lower HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD as compared to controls (OR = 0.566; P(add = 1.499×10(-5. In addition, BMI modulated the effect of R230C on body fat distribution, as the correlation between BMI and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue (a metric of the propensity to store fat viscerally as compared to subcutaneously was negative in RR homozygous individuals, but positive in premenopausal women bearing the C230 allele, with a statistically significant interaction (P = 0.005. BMI-R230C interaction was also significant for triglyceride levels in women regardless of their menopausal status (P = 0.036. CONCLUSION: This is the first study assessing the effect of the R230C/ABCA1 variant in remature CAD. C230 was associated with both decreased HDL-C levels and a lower risk of premature CAD, and gender-specific BMI-R230C interactions were observed for different metabolic traits. These interactions may help explain inconsistencies in associations, and underscore the need to further analyze interactions of this functional and frequent variant with diet, exercise

  11. Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Yigit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases still ranks in first place among causes of death around the world. Environmental and genetic factors both play roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. One of the genetic changes that are claimed to contribute to the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases is the Glutathione S-Transferase (GST family that has been intensely examined recently. GST gene polymorphisms, which are among antioxidant system enzymes, have a relationship with each of the factors that are considered among the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, it can be said that the polymorphisms of GST genes are effective both in the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and directly in cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Statins May Prevent Atherosclerotic Disease in OSA Patients without Co-Morbidities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Benedetto, Michele De; Conte, Luana; De Nuccio, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive interruptions of breathing, causing Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH) that can be involved in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence showing a close relationship between OSA and atherosclerosis, even in patients who do not show co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, high levels of lowdensity lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), cigarette smoking and obesity, which can activate the endothelium. This endothelium activation due to CIH and specific to OSA seems to be dependent on a different pathway. The current first line therapy for OSA is the application of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), but it alone is not enough to reduce cardiometabolic risk in patients with OSA. In contrast, statins, via their pleiotropic property, might be able to change inflammation and early atherosclerosis, lipid profile and cardiovascular outcomes in OSA. The role of statins in OSA patients with or without any co-morbidities could potentially prevent coronary vascular risk and stroke and in the future, represent an additional treatment option along with CPAP therapy. Strengthening the prevention strategies against atherosclerosis in OSA should be one of the focal aims for healthcare programs of the future.

  13. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. DESIGN: Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. PARTICIPANTS: 261 991 individuals of European des...

  14. Total cardiovascular disease risk assessment: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2011-09-01

    The high risk strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) requires an assessment of an individual\\'s total CVD risk so that the most intensive risk factor management can be directed towards those at highest risk. Here we review developments in the assessment and estimation of total CVD risk.

  15. Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through Aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focused on the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors, through aerobic exercises. The central argument here is that through exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a reduction in body weight and ultimately less risk on the ...

  16. Cardiovascular diseases in dental practice. Practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaix Muñoz, María; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Poveda Roda, Rafael; Sarrión, Gracia

    2008-05-01

    Coronary heart disease is the principal cause of death in the industrialized world. Its most serious expression, acute myocardial infarction, causes 7.2 million deaths each year worldwide, and it is estimated that 20% of all people will suffer heart failure in the course of their lifetime. The control of risk cardiovascular factors, including arterial hypertension, obesity and diabetes mellitus is the best way to prevent such diseases. The most frequent and serious cardiovascular emergencies that can manifest during dental treatment are chest pain (as a symptom of underlying disease) and acute lung edema. Due to the high prevalence and seriousness of these problems, the dental surgeon must be aware of them and should be able to act quickly and effectively in the case of an acute cardiovascular event. In patients with a history of cardiovascular disease, attention must center on the control of pain, the reduction of stress, and the use or avoidance of a vasoconstrictor in dental anesthesia. In turn, caution is required in relation to the antiplatelet, anticoagulant and antihypertensive medication typically used by such patients.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Gouvea, Clecio Maria, E-mail: renatafelix@cardiol.br, E-mail: renata.felix@inc.saude.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carneiro, Michel Pontes [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Many articles have demonstrated the role of PET-CT in the evaluation of inflammatory and infectious diseases of the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on this topic to identify clinical situations in which there is evidence of the usefulness of PET-CT in diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation.

  18. Saturated fat, carbohydrates and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R. S.; de Graaf, D. J.; Luxwolda, M. F.; Muskiet, M. H. A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. J.; Muskiet, F. A. J.

    The dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) is associated with a modest increase in serum total cholesterol, but not with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Replacing dietary SAFA with carbohydrates (CHO), notably those with a high glycaemic index, is associated with an increase in CVD risk in

  19. The compensating income variation of cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, W.; Maassen van den Brink, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey to calculate the compensating income variation (CIV) of cardiovascular disease. It is found that the CIV decreases with age and is higher for men than for women. For women the estimated CIV is similar to those calculated by

  20. Lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.

    2013-01-01

     Background Evidence is accumulating that lifestyle factors influence the incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A healthy diet, being physically active, moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking are associated with a lower CVD risk. In addition to

  1. 459 Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a ... Key words: Cardiovascular disease, Risk factor, Aerobic Exercise. Introduction. There has always ... Oftentimes, problems appear to be more prevalent among the elderly. This may not be far.

  2. Short-term effect of severe exposure to methylmercury on atherosclerotic heart disease and hypertension mortality in Minamata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Sachiko; Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-15

    Recent studies suggest potential adverse effects of methylmercury exposure on myocardial infarction and hypertension, although the evidence is still limited. We thus evaluated this association using age-standardized mortality ratios (ASMRs) in Minamata, where severe methylmercury poisoning had occurred. We obtained mortality data from annual vital statistics and demographic statistics from census. We then compared mortality of atherosclerotic heart disease including degenerative heart disease and hypertension in Minamata-city with those in Kumamoto Prefecture, which includes Minamata city, as a control. We estimated ASMRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) during the period from 1953 to 1970. ASMRs of atherosclerotic heart disease were continuously decreased during the period from 1953 to 1967. In contrast, the ASMR of hypertension was significantly elevated during the period from 1963 to 1967 (SMR=1.38, CI; 1.06-1.80); but they decreased later. Although dilution is present in this ecological study, our study supports the notion that methylmercury exposure induces hypertension. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  4. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals...... lower odds of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.90 (0.84 to 0.96)). The protective association of the ADH1B rs1229984 A-allele variant remained the same across all categories of alcohol consumption (P=0.83 for heterogeneity). Although no association of rs1229984 was identified with the combined......OBJECTIVE: To use the rs1229984 variant in the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (ADH1B) as an instrument to investigate the causal role of alcohol in cardiovascular disease. DESIGN: Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of 56 epidemiological studies. PARTICIPANTS: 261 991 individuals of European...

  5. Mediterranean diets and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, T A

    2001-11-01

    Coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the Western world. Among these countries, however, there is a marked discrepancy in the prevalence of heart disease in spite of similar traditional risk factor profiles. This is undoubtedly due to differences in lifestyle, the most important of which are diet and exercise. Both epidemiologic data and clinical trials suggest that the beneficial impact of specific dietary and lifestyle changes on cardiac event rates could be greater than that achieved by any of the drug or revascularization trials to date.

  6. Genetic testing in cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; van Langen, Irene; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2010-01-01

    To review the current state and different aspects, including the yield, of genetic counseling and genetic testing in inherited heart disease. The number of counselees is growing rapidly all over the world, and the first studies about patients' perspectives and follow-up have been published. Progress

  7. Lipoprotein (a) as a cause of cardiovascular disease: insights from epidemiology, genetics, and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Langsted, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Human epidemiologic and genetic evidence using the Mendelian randomization approach in large-scale studies now strongly supports that elevated lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease, that is, for myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic stenosis, and aortic valve stenosis. The Mendelian randomization approach used to infer causality is generally not affected by confounding and reverse causation, the major problems of observational epidemiology. This approach is particularly valuable to study causality of Lp(a), as single genetic variants exist that explain 27-28% of all variation in plasma Lp(a). The most important genetic variant likely is the kringle IV type 2 (KIV-2) copy number variant, as the apo(a) product of this variant influences fibrinolysis and thereby thrombosis, as opposed to the Lp(a) particle per se. We speculate that the physiological role of KIV-2 in Lp(a) could be through wound healing during childbirth, infections, and injury, a role that, in addition, could lead to more blood clots promoting stenosis of arteries and the aortic valve, and myocardial infarction. Randomized placebo-controlled trials of Lp(a) reduction in individuals with very high concentrations to reduce cardiovascular disease are awaited. Recent genetic evidence documents elevated Lp(a) as a cause of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic stenosis, and aortic valve stenosis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. High-Sensitivity Troponin I in Stable Patients with Atherosclerotic Disease in the TRA 2°P - TIMI 50 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Alon; Bonaca, Marc P; Jarolim, Petr; Scirica, Benjamin M; White, Harvey D; Tendera, Michal; Dellborg, Mikael; Nicolau, Jose C; Morais, Joao; Fox, Keith A A; Bohula, Erin A; Murphy, Sabina A; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I, measured with a high-sensitivity assay (hs-TnI), is well-established for risk prediction in acute coronary syndromes. However, its prognostic role in stable atherosclerotic disease, particularly for future myocardial infarction (MI), is less well defined. We measured hs-TnI (Abbott ARCHITECT) in 15833 patients with prior MI, ischemic stroke, or peripheral arterial disease from the placebo-controlled Thrombin Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events (TRA 2°P)-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) 50 trial of the platelet inhibitor vorapaxar, excluding patients with recent MI (26 ng/L vs 26 ng/L vs 0.3% with hs-TnI <1.9 ng/L; P interaction = 0.82). In stable patients with established atherosclerosis, hs-TnI concentrations effectively stratified the risk of new or recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events, in particular CV death and MI. High-risk patients with prior MI identified by increased hs-TnI had a substantial absolute improvement in net clinical outcome with vorapaxar. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  9. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... disease (CKD). It is unclear how much of the association between kidney and vascular disease results from. • vascular disease causing kidney failure. • kidney failure causing vascular ... patients with CKD, with acute myocardial infarction accounting for 20% of ... failure and death. Valvular calcification may.

  10. Nutriceuticals in cardiovascular disease: psyllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchetti, Lavanya; Frishman, William H; Petrillo, Richard; Raju, Kolanuvada

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of dietary fiber in health maintenance and disease prevention. A deficiency of fiber in the Western diet may be contributing to the current epidemics of diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease (CAD), and colonic cancer. The awareness of fiber as a dietary supplement may have contributed to the reported 30% decline in death rate from CAD observed over the past 15 years. Psyllium is a soluble gel-forming fiber that has been shown to bind to the bile acids in the gut and prevent their normal reabsorption, similar to the bile acid sequestrant drugs. Psyllium is useful as an adjunct to dietary therapy (step 1 or step 2 American Heart Association [AHA] diet) in the treatment of patients with mild-to-moderate hypercholesterolemia. In combination with other cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as statins, psyllium provides an added benefit on cholesterol lowering, and is well tolerated and cost-effective.

  11. Dietary patterns and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C M; Lovegrove, J A; Griffin, B A

    2013-11-01

    Despite strong prospective epidemiology and mechanistic evidence for the benefits of certain micronutrients in preventing CVD, neutral and negative outcomes from secondary intervention trials have undermined the efficacy of supplemental nutrition in preventing CVD. In contrast, evidence for the positive impact of specific diets in CVD prevention, such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, has focused attention on the potential benefits of whole diets and specific dietary patterns. These patterns have been scored on the basis of current guidelines for the prevention of CVD, to provide a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between diet and disease. Using this approach, large prospective studies have reported reductions in CVD risk ranging from 10 to 60% in groups whose diets can be variously classified as ‘Healthy’, ‘Prudent’, Mediterranean’ or ‘DASH compliant’. Evaluation of the relationship between dietary score and risk biomarkers has also been informative with respect to underlying mechanisms. However, although this analysis may appear to validate whole-diet approaches to disease prevention, it must be remembered that the classification of dietary scores is based on current understanding of diet–disease relationships, which may be incomplete or erroneous. Of particular concern is the limited number of high-quality intervention studies of whole diets, which include disease endpoints as the primary outcome. The aims of this review are to highlight the limitations of dietary guidelines based on nutrient-specific data, and the persuasive evidence for the benefits of whole dietary patterns on CVD risk. It also makes a plea for more randomised controlled trials, which are designed to support food and whole dietary-based approaches for preventing CVD.

  12. Dietary fiber, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dana E

    2005-06-01

    The role of dietary fiber in the prevention of cardiovascular disease has received increasing attention as data have accumulated. Recent cohort studies have found a consistent protective effect of dietary fiber on cardiovascular disease outcomes, prompting many leading organizations to recommend increased fiber in the daily diet. However, the biologic mechanisms explaining how a fiber influences the cardiovascular system have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent research in large national sample in the USA has demonstrated an association between dietary fiber and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a clinical indicator of inflammation. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrating that high-fiber diets are beneficial, coupled with this newer evidence of a possible metabolic effect on inflammatory markers, suggest that inflammation may be an important mediator in the association between dietary fiber and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This paper reviews the evidence for the connections among inflammation, CRP, dietary fiber, and CVD, and recommends further clinical studies using fiber supplementation to isolate and prospectively confirm these important relationships.

  13. Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Disease: An Extreme Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Rodríguez, Mayerlin; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Cárdenas, Sebastián; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Moreno, Freddy; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Moreno, Sandra; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial and complex chronic inflammatory and infectious disease which has been linked to various systemic complications, including cardiovascular disease. This association has been difficult to prove because epidemiological studies are biased or classic risk factors that are difficult to control, cardiovascular disease also includes a variety of multifactorial diseases also making it even more difficult to determine the cause-effect. The studies reported in the liter...

  14. Assessment of the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disorders: a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionel, Anca; Lucaciu, Ondine; Bondor, Cosmina; Moga, Minodora; Ilea, Aranka; Feurdean, Claudia; Buhăţel, Dan; Hurubeanu, Lucia; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease, characterized by the loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone. There is an increasing evidence that periodontitis is associated with a number of chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between periodontitis and certain systemic diseases by identifying their risk factors in a population from North-West Romania. A questionnaire-based study was conducted on participants ≥45 years of age in 4 dentistry or family medicine practices from the Cluj and Bihor counties, Romania, over a time frame spanning two months. The interviewer-administered questionnaire included 42 items assessing risk factors for periodontal and cardiovascular disease, current diagnostic and medical treatment of the participants, their diet and oral hygiene habits. Of 108 participants included in the study, 63 (58.3%) declared a previous diagnosis of periodontitis. A significant difference was observed between the participants with declared diagnosis of periodontitis (PD+) and participants without declared diagnosis of periodontitis (PD-) for fresh fruit consumption (p=0.01) and increased sport activity (p=0.009). A significant difference between groups was observed in the case of smoking duration (p=0.047), participants with >10 years of smoking were more likely to declare a diagnosis of periodontitis. Also, PD+ participants were more likely to have a family history of periodontal disease (pperiodontitis as a predictive variable for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease with an OR of 4.85 (95% confidence interval 1.01-23.29, p=0.049). Our study found a statistically significant association between periodontal disease and a known family history of periodontal disorders and smoking duration. Daily intake of fresh fruit and increased sport activities were found to be protective factors against periodontal disease, while periodontitis was found as a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  15. Adipokines and cardiovascular disease: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekal, Ales; Vaclavik, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Adipokines are peptides that signal the functional status of adipose tissue to the brain and other target organs. In adipose tissue dysfunction, adipokine secretion is altered, and this can contribute to a spectrum of obesity-associated conditions including cardiovascular disease. Some adipokines have anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective effects (omentin, apelin, adiponectin). Others are pro-inflammatory with negative impact on cardiovascular function (leptin, visfatin, resistin, adipocyte fatty-acid-binding protein). In the first part, this article reviews the endocrine functions of adipose tissue in general, effects of the distribution and composition of fat tissue, and the roles of cortisol and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the development of the inflammatory state of addipose tissue. In the second part, the known cardiovascular effects of different adipokines and their clinical potential are discussed in detail.

  16. Cardiovascular Physiology and Disease in Youth-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The two articles in the area of cardiovascular physiology and disease in youth were chosen for commentary because of their exploration of new approaches to the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular derangements in young persons. The first, by Hinds et al., describes the potential clinical importance of detection of cardiovascular changes during exercise testing in adolescent athletes following concussions. This approach might prove useful in establishing safe return-to-play guidelines. The second, a review article by Van De Schoor et al, evaluates the frequency of myocardial scarring in athletes, some of adolescent age, which is a recognized risk factor for sudden cardiac death. These findings support other evidence indicating that sports participation per se might rarely increase the risk of such tragedies. Clearly more research is indicated by the information raised in both of these articles, but their importance to clinical medicine is obvious.

  17. Cosmic Transmission of Periodontal, Cardiovascular and Kidney Disease via Nanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Kolahi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nanobacteria (NB are mysterious particles that have spurred one of the biggest controversies in modern micro-biology. NB has been reported to be present in animal and human blood, tissue culture cell lines, wastewater and etc. NB appear to cause or contribute to common diseases of the mankind e.g. periodontitis, formation of kidney stone, heart calcifications, coronary artery calcification, atherosclerotic plaque. Recent data on the far-ultraviolet extinction of starlight in our galaxy and in external galaxies is interpreted in terms of the widespread occurrence of organic particles of optical refractive index 1.4 and radii less than or equal to 20 nm. Such particles are candidates for NB such as recently been found in abundance on the Earth. Unbelievably nanobacteria-like rods observed at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite and Martian rock.The hypothesis: It seems logic to hypothesize that aliens from inner space, nanobacteria, can bring us new disease such as periodontal, cardiovascular and kidney diseases via space travels or meteorites or interstellar dusts.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The main criticism with this idea is how NB can keep alive during transfer among seriously life threatening condition in interstellar space. NB are generally thought to be very difficult to deactivation, exceptionally resistant to heat, are not deactivated by physical or chemical treatments including autoclaving, UV treatment, and various biocides. Health care providers, health policy makers and space agencies e.g. NASA and European Space Agency should make a concentrated effort to prevent transmission of NB especially following space travels.

  18. Adipocytokines in relation to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Voorde, Johan; Pauwels, Bart; Boydens, Charlotte; Decaluwé, Kelly

    2013-11-01

    Adipose tissue can be considered as a huge gland producing paracrine and endocrine hormones, the adipo(cyto)kines. There is growing evidence that these adipo(cyto)kines may link obesity to cardiovascular diseases. The excessive adipocyte hypertrophy in obesity induces hypoxia in adipose tissue. This leads to adiposopathy, the process that converts "healthy" adipose tissue to "sick" adipose tissue. This is accompanied by a change in profile of adipo(cyto)kines released, with less production of the "healthy" adipo(cyto)kines such as adiponectin and omentin and more release of the "unhealthy" adipo(cyto)kines, ultimately leading to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present review provides a concise and general overview of the actual concepts of the role of adipo(cyto)kines in endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherosclerosis and heart diseases. The knowledge of these concepts may lead to new tools to improve health in the next generations. © 2013.

  19. Extracellular vesicles: new players in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaceb, Abderahim; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular vesicles, particles released by all cell types, represent a new way to convey information between cells such as proteins, second messengers, and genetic information to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. Recent data suggest that extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in both physiology and pathology, including coagulation, angiogenesis, cell survival, modulation of the immune response, and inflammation. Thus extracellular vesicles participate in the processes of cardiovascular diseases from atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction to heart failure. Consequently, extracellular vesicles can potentially be exploited for therapy, prognosis, and biomarkers for health and disease. This review focuses on the role of extracellular vesicles in the development of cardiovascular diseases, as well as the deleterious and beneficial effects that they may provide in vascular cells and myocardium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between alcohol and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Dale, Caroline E; Zuccolo, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    descent, including 20 259 coronary heart disease cases and 10 164 stroke events. Data were available on ADH1B rs1229984 variant, alcohol phenotypes, and cardiovascular biomarkers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratio for coronary heart disease and stroke associated with the ADH1B variant in all individuals...... lower odds of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.90 (0.84 to 0.96)). The protective association of the ADH1B rs1229984 A-allele variant remained the same across all categories of alcohol consumption (P=0.83 for heterogeneity). Although no association of rs1229984 was identified with the combined...... subtypes of stroke, carriers of the A-allele had lower odds of ischaemic stroke (odds ratio 0.83 (0.72 to 0.95)). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with a genetic variant associated with non-drinking and lower alcohol consumption had a more favourable cardiovascular profile and a reduced risk of coronary heart...

  1. Heme Oxygenases in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayer, Anita; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam; Stocker, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenases are composed of two isozymes, Hmox1 and Hmox2, that catalyze the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous iron, and biliverdin, the latter of which is subsequently converted to bilirubin. While initially considered to be waste products, CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown over the last 20 years to modulate key cellular processes, such as inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, as well as antioxidant defense. This shift in paradigm has led to the importance of heme oxygenases and their products in cell physiology now being well accepted. The identification of the two human cases thus far of heme oxygenase deficiency and the generation of mice deficient in Hmox1 or Hmox2 have reiterated a role for these enzymes in both normal cell function and disease pathogenesis, especially in the context of cardiovascular disease. This review covers the current knowledge on the function of both Hmox1 and Hmox2 at both a cellular and tissue level in the cardiovascular system. Initially, the roles of heme oxygenases in vascular health and the regulation of processes central to vascular diseases are outlined, followed by an evaluation of the role(s) of Hmox1 and Hmox2 in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, intimal hyperplasia, myocardial infarction, and angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of heme oxygenases and their products are examined in a cardiovascular disease context, with a focus on how the knowledge we have gained on these enzymes may be capitalized in future clinical studies. PMID:27604527

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk in women with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Fernanda Camboim; Perla, Alexandre da Silveira; Perry, Ingrid D Schweigert; Chaves, Márcia L Fagundes

    2013-09-06

    Studies suggest a higher prevalence of unfavourable cardiovascular risk factors amongst migraineurs, but results have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate traditional and newly recognized risk factors as well as other surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk in obese and normal weight women with migraine. Fifty-nine adult female probands participated in this case-control study. The sample was divided into normal weight and obese migraineurs and age- and body mass index-matched control groups. The following cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed: serum levels of lipids, fasting glucose, and insulin; insulin resistance; blood pressure; smoking (categorized as current, past or never); Framingham 10-year risk of general cardiovascular disease score; C-reactive protein; family history of cardiovascular disease; physical activity; sleep disturbances; depression; and bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The means of continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test for independent samples or the Mann-Whitney U-test (for 2 groups) and ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test (for 4 groups) depending on the distribution of data. All migraineurs were sedentary irrespective of nutritional status. Migraineurs had higher depression scores and shorter sleep duration, and obese migraineurs, in particular, had worse sleep quality scores. Insulin resistance and insulinaemia were associated with obesity, and obese migraineurs had lower HDL-c than normal weight controls and migraineurs. Also, the Framingham risk score was higher in obese migraineurs. These findings suggest that female migraineurs experience marked inactivity, depression, and some sleep disturbance, that higher insulin resistance and insulinaemia are related to obesity, and that obesity and migraine probably exert overlapping effects on HDL-c levels and Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk.

  3. Homocysteine, B-vitamins and cardiovascular disease : epidemiologic evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, P.

    1996-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease constitutes a major public health problem in the Netherlands and other Western countries. Elevated plasma homocysteine has attracted growing interest as a "new" risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine is

  4. Perceptions of risk: understanding cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Webster

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruth Webster1, Emma Heeley21Cardiovascular Division, 2Neurological and Mental Health Division, The George Institute for International Health, Camperdown, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD is still the leading cause of death and disability worldwide despite the availability of well-established and effective preventive options. Accurate perception of a patient’s risk by both the patient and the doctors is important as this is one of the components that determine health-related behavior. Doctors tend to not use cardiovascular (CV risk calculators and underestimate the absolute CV risk of their patients. Patients show optimistic bias when considering their own risk and consistently underestimate it. Poor patient health literacy and numeracy must be considered when thinking about this problem. Patients must possess a reasonably high level of understanding of numerical processes when doctors discuss risk, a level that is not possessed by large numbers of the population. In order to overcome this barrier, doctors need to utilize various tools including the appropriate use of visual aids to accurately communicate risk with their patients. Any intervention has been shown to be better than nothing in improving health understanding. The simple process of repeatedly conveying risk information to a patient has been shown to improve accuracy of risk perception. Doctors need to take responsibility for the accurate assessment and effective communication of CV risk in their patients in order to improve patient uptake of cardioprotective lifestyle choices and preventive medications.Keywords: risk perception, cardiovascular disease, cardioprotective lifestyle

  5. Association of Relationship between Periodontal Disease and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, N; Dhodapkar, S V; Kumar, R; Verma, T; Jajoo, A

    2017-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the relationship between periodontal and cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have shown some co-relation between the two conditions. We included 186 patients divided into four groups. First two Groups (A1 & A2) were the patients with cardiac disease (100 in numbers) whilst Groups (B1 & B2) (86 in numbers) were treated as controls (without cardiac disease). Following markers of periodontal disease were assessed - plaque index, calculus index, gingival and periodontal index. Markers of cardiovascular disease included were LDL, HDL, total cholesterol and CRP. Ramfjords periodontal index was used to assess the extent of periodontal disease. In the present study there was a significant increase in CRP levels in Group A1 (CVD + PD) compared to controls and overall the two cardiac groups showed a significant increase in CRP compared to controls. There was a non-significant change in lipid profile markers (LDL, HDL and total cholesterol). Periodontal Disease Index (PDI) was also increased in Group A1 compared to other groups except Group B1 and overall in cardiac groups compared to non-cardiac (PD) groups. In this study no correlation between periodontal and cardiovascular disease was found. This may be due intake of statins by few patients in Group A with a confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Cardiovascular disease: primary prevention, disease modulation and regenerative therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs are the contemporary frontiers in functional metabolic vascular medicine. This novel science perspective harnesses our inherent ability to modulate the interface between specialized gene receptors and bioavailable nutrients in what is labeled as the nutrient-gene interaction. By mimicking a natural process through the conveyance of highly absorbable receptor specific nutrients, it is feasible to accelerate cell repair and optimize mitochondrial function, thereby achieving cardiovascular cure. We performed a comprehensive review of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Review databases for articles relating to cardiovascular regenerative medicine, nutrigenomics and primary prevention, with the aim of harmonizing their roles within contemporary clinical practice. We searched in particular for large-scale randomized controlled trials on contemporary cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and their specific adverse effects on metabolic pathways which feature prominently in cardiovascular regenerative programs, such as nitric oxide and glucose metabolism. Scientific research on \\'cardiovascular-free\\' centenarians delineated that low sugar and low insulin are consistent findings. As we age, our insulin level increases. Those who can decelerate the rapidity of this process are prompting their cardiovascular rejuvenation. It is beginning to dawn on some clinicians that contemporary treatments are not only failing to impact on our most prevalent diseases, but they may be causing more damage than good. Primary prevention programs are crucial elements for a better outcome. Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs have enhanced clinical efficacy and quality of life and complement our conventional endovascular practice.

  7. Circulating microRNAs in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlicka-Płocka, Marta; Gurda, Dorota; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Smolarek, Iwona; Wyszko, Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) are currently one of the most common causes of death. Because heart related deaths occur on such an enormous scale this phenomenon is referred to as an epidemic. Chronic and acute injury of the heart could be an effect of cardiac remodeling, which is a result of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes, influenced by hemodynamic load or neurohormonal activation (Cohn et al., 2000). These small deviations in cardiac activity and morphology may lead to an enormous negative effect. Despite a significant progress, knowledge of standard risk factors for cardiovascular diseases has become less and less effective, which is why predicting and seeking an appropriate treatment is very challenging. As a result, there is a growing interest in finding new markers of the CD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), are short, non-coding RNAs responsible for regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Among them that have the greatest potential are microRNA molecules that circulate in the blood plasma or serum, that are related to direct activation of signaling pathways, implicated in the aging process and thus for the development of cardiovascular disease. This paper is a summary of the current state of knowledge on miRNAs, their biogenesis and potential role as biomarkers to diagnose heart disease.

  8. Risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Naira Lígia de Araújo; Lima, Luisa Helena de Oliveira; Carvalho, Elaine de Sousa; Vera, Paula Valentina de Sousa; Frota, Karoline de Macêdo Gonçalves; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Oliveira, Edina Araújo Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease in adolescents. Descriptive cross-sectional study, conducted from May to September 2012, in the public schools of the city of Picos (Piaui State, Brazil). The sample consisted of 320 adolescents 10-19 years. As to gender, 60% were female. With regard to blood pressure values, 15.3% of participants had altered blood pressure values (6.9% with hypertension) and, in relation to nutritional status, 15.6% were overweight and 5.3% obese. None of the variables showed statistically significant differences according to sex. Correlation were found between the variables: family history of hypertension with arm circumference and triceps skinfold; maternal education with triceps skinfold thickness and diastolic blood pressure; uptime with body mass index, arm circumference, waist-hip ratio and heart rate; birth weight with body mass index and arm circumference. A significant proportion of adolescent respondents had risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Nursing should lead the adoption of interventions that promote the improvement of healthy lifestyle in adolescence, thus avoiding not only cardiovascular disease, but also other chronic diseases that can develop.

  9. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Sunny; Miller, Avraham; Agarwal, Chirag; Zakin, Elina; Acholonu, Michael; Gidwani, Umesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Kulbak, Guy; Shani, Jacob; Chen, On

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstabl...

  10. Atherosclerotic burden in coronary and peripheral arteries in patients with first clinical manifestation of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjec, Igor

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the atherosclerotic burden in patients with the first symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 100 consecutive patients (new-onset severe angina or myocardial infarction) and 70 age and sex matched asymptomatic volunteers. Functional and morphologic atherosclerotic markers were sought in carotid, brachial and femoral arteries of all individuals by means of high-resolution ultrasonography, whereas coronary arteriography was performed in the CAD patients only. A total of 347 coronary lesions [230 (66%) obstructive] were discovered in the CAD patients as well as 105 peripheral plaques [26 (25%) obstructive]. The mean percentage diameter stenosis of the culprit coronary lesion was 83.8 ± 15.8%, the mean vessel score 1.7 (range 0-3), the mean stenosis score 19.8 (range 1.5-89.0), and the mean extent score 49.1% (range 10-65%). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as assessed by the brachial flow-mediated response (FMR), was reduced by 50% in the CAD patients (P peripheral arteries of the CAD patients (P arteries of the CAD patients by 43%, in brachial arteries by 20% and in femoral arteries by 57% (P peripheral arteries of our patients with the first clinical presentation of CAD.

  11. Cardiovascular Disease in Women: Clinical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mariana; Mulvagh, Sharon L.; Merz, C. Noel Bairey; Buring, Julie E.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be the leading cause of death among women in the United States, accounting for approximately one of every three female deaths. Sex-specific data focused on CVD has been increasing steadily, yet is not routinely collected nor translated into practice. This comprehensive review focuses on novel and unique aspects of cardiovascular health in women and sex-differences as they relate to clinical practice in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of CVD. This review also provides current approaches to the evaluation and treatment of acute coronary syndromes that are more prevalent in women, including: myocardial infarction associated with non-obstructive coronary arteries, spontaneous coronary artery dissection, and stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo Syndrome). Other CVD entities with higher prevalence or unique considerations in women, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, peripheral arterial disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms, are also briefly reviewed. Lastly, recommendations for cardiac rehabilitation are addressed. PMID:27081110

  12. Occupational factors, fatigue, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean

    2009-06-01

    Briefly identify the epidemiological evidence, propose pertinent mechanisms, and discuss physical therapy practice as well as research implications of a causal association between occupational factors and cardiovascular disease. There is evidence that occupational metabolic demands and work organizations characterized by reduced worker control are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It is biologically plausible that these two factors interact to create a preclinical, intermediate state of fatigue (burnout) that is a critical component in the causal path from occupational factors to CVD. Physical therapists are uniquely qualified to contribute to an understanding of these mechanisms and their resultant implications for work organization, rehabilitation, and health promotion. Statement of Recommendations: Physical therapists engaged in ergonomic job analysis should consider work related metabolic demands, worker control, and fatigue in their assessment of risk for injury and illness, in recommendations for return to work, and in the prescription of health promotion leisure time physical activity.

  13. Selenium and coenzyme Q10 interrelationship in cardiovascular diseases--A clinician's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehagen, Urban; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A short review is given of the potential role of selenium deficiency and selenium intervention trials in atherosclerotic heart disease. Selenium is an essential constituent of several proteins, including the glutathione peroxidases and selenoprotein P. The selenium intake in Europe is generally in the lower margin of recommendations from authorities. Segments of populations in Europe may thus have a deficient intake that may be presented by a deficient anti-oxidative capacity in various illnesses, in particular atherosclerotic disease, and this may influence the prognosis of the disease. Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are two conditions where increased oxidative stress has been convincingly demonstrated. Some of the intervention studies of anti-oxidative substances that have focused on selenium are discussed in this review. The interrelationship between selenium and coenzyme Q10, another anti-oxidant, is presented, pointing to a theoretical advantage in using both substances in an intervention if there are deficiencies within the population. Clinical results from an intervention study using both selenium and coenzyme Q10 in an elderly population are discussed, where reduction in cardiovascular mortality, a better cardiac function according to echocardiography, and finally a lower concentration of the biomarker NT-proBNP as a sign of lower myocardial wall tension could be seen in those on active treatment, compared to placebo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Experience of Laser Angioplasty for the Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Okada

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, lasers are being utilized in cardiovascular surgery. Since the 1980's we have investigated angioplasty using an Argon laser for patients with obstructive arterial diseases. This technique aims to open the obstructive arterial lumen. Based on the excellent results of experimental studies, the technique has been clinically applied. Laser angioplasty was carried out in 84 patients with stenotic or obstructive lesions occluding more than 75% of peripheral and coronary arteries angiographically. They consisted of 74 cases with intermittent claudication and 10 cases with angina pectoris. Laser angioplasty for the peripheral arterial disease was performed under local anesthesia in the inguinal region under angioscopic guidance. On the other hand, laser coronary angioplasty was simultaneously undertaken at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting for a patient with multiple coronary stenoses. The initial success rate by laser angioplasty for the peripheral artery was 91% in the stenotic lesions and 71% in the obstructive lesions. The cumulative patency rate was 94% in the stenotic lesions and 83% in the occlusive lesions. A follow-up study of 66 months was carried out for patients with clinical success, excluding the cases where an angiogram showed occlusion within 1 week after laser angioplasty. Consequently, excellent long-term results could be clinically obtained. Based on the satisfactory results in the peripheral artery, coronary laser angioplasty was employed in 10 patients with angina pectoris. There were no complications by laser. Thus, the feasibility of laser application was apparently confirmed and laser angioplasty might be recommended for patients with atherosclerotic changes, especially for small arteries.

  15. Gut Microbiota in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W H Wilson; Kitai, Takeshi; Hazen, Stanley L

    2017-03-31

    Significant interest in recent years has focused on gut microbiota-host interaction because accumulating evidence has revealed that intestinal microbiota play an important role in human health and disease, including cardiovascular diseases. Changes in the composition of gut microbiota associated with disease, referred to as dysbiosis, have been linked to pathologies such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition to alterations in gut microbiota composition, the metabolic potential of gut microbiota has been identified as a contributing factor in the development of diseases. Recent studies revealed that gut microbiota can elicit a variety of effects on the host. Indeed, the gut microbiome functions like an endocrine organ, generating bioactive metabolites, that can impact host physiology. Microbiota interact with the host through many pathways, including the trimethylamine/trimethylamine N -oxide pathway, short-chain fatty acids pathway, and primary and secondary bile acids pathways. In addition to these metabolism-dependent pathways, metabolism-independent processes are suggested to also potentially contribute to cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. For example, heart failure-associated splanchnic circulation congestion, bowel wall edema, and impaired intestinal barrier function are thought to result in bacterial translocation, the presence of bacterial products in the systemic circulation and heightened inflammatory state. These are thought to also contribute to further progression of heart failure and atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current review is to highlight the complex interplay between microbiota, their metabolites, and the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We will also discuss the roles of gut microbiota in normal physiology and the potential of modulating intestinal microbial inhabitants as novel therapeutic targets. © 2017 American Heart

  16. Therapy of obese patient with Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jindal, Ankur; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Brietzke, Stephen; Sowers, James R

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions and is a significant public health concern. Obesity is associated with increased diabetes, cardiovascular and kidney disease, and associated morbidity and mortality. Despite the increasing public health problem of obesity, there is a dearth of effective treatment options. Following the FDA mandated withdrawal of sibutramine, the treatment options for obesity were limited to orlistat as the only pharmacological treatment option for long term management ...

  17. Fatty Acids, Cardiovascular Diseases, and Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qianyi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause for mortality and morbidity around the world. Meanwhile, diabetes mellitus (DM) has become an emerging epidemic, causing 1.5 million deaths in 2012, with 80% occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Substantial evidence has linked both lifestyle and metabolic risk factors to increased risk of CVD and death, with suboptimal diet being the single leading modifiable cause of poor health (Lim. SS, et al, Lancet 2012). Of 20 top individual...

  18. [Hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baszczuk, Aleksandra; Kopczyński, Zygmunt

    2014-01-02

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an endogenous, non-structural protein, a sulfur-containing amino acid emerging on the pathway of methionine and cysteine, actively involved in numerous biochemical reactions. Total concentration of homocysteine in plasma of healthy humans is low and its level is between 5.0 and 15.0 mmol/l, assessed with the use of HPLC, or 5.0-12.0 mmol/l, using immunoassay methods. Higher concentration of this amino acid in blood is called hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia is significantly correlated with cardiovascular disease and its complications: heart attacks and strokes. It is believed that hyperhomocysteinemia damages endothelial cells, reduces the flexibility of vessels, and adversely affects the process of hemostasis. In addition, hyperhomocysteinemia enhances the adverse effects of risk factors such as hypertension, smoking, and impaired glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, as well as promoting the development of inflammation. The concentration of homocysteine can be effectively lowered by supplementation with folic acid and vitamins B12 and B6. However, intervention studies conducted in the past decade did not confirm the clinical benefit of vitamin therapy lowering the level of homocysteine in blood of patients with cardiovascular disease. Moreover, there is not clear evidence from genetic studies that the presence of the gene for MTFHR polymorphism 677C>T, which is one of the most common causes of hyperhomocysteinemia, is also associated with the development of cardiovascular disease. These results led the researchers to discuss the role of homocysteine in the development and treatment of cardiovascular disease as well as the need for further research on this issue.

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Baszczuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is an endogenous, non-structural protein, a sulfur-containing amino acid emerging on the pathway of methionine and cysteine, actively involved in numerous biochemical reactions. Total concentration of homocysteine in plasma of healthy humans is low and its level is between 5.0 and 15.0 mmol/l, assessed with the use of HPLC, or 5.0–12.0 mmol/l, using immunoassay methods. Higher concentration of this amino acid in blood is called hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia is significantly correlated with cardiovascular disease and its complications: heart attacks and strokes. It is believed that hyperhomocysteinemia damages endothelial cells, reduces the flexibility of vessels, and adversely affects the process of hemostasis. In addition, hyperhomocysteinemia enhances the adverse effects of risk factors such as hypertension, smoking, and impaired glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, as well as promoting the development of inflammation. The concentration of homocysteine can be effectively lowered by supplementation with folic acid and vitamins B12 and B6. However, intervention studies conducted in the past decade did not confirm the clinical benefit of vitamin therapy lowering the level of homocysteine in blood of patients with cardiovascular disease. Moreover, there is not clear evidence from genetic studies that the presence of the gene for MTFHR polymorphism 677C>T, which is one of the most common causes of hyperhomocysteinemia, is also associated with the development of cardiovascular disease. These results led the researchers to discuss the role of homocysteine in the development and treatment of cardiovascular disease as well as the need for further research on this issue.

  20. Platelet-Derived Microvesicles in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T. K. Zaldivia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles (MVs circulating in the blood are small vesicles (100–1,000 nm in diameter derived from membrane blebs of cells such as activated platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes. A growing body of evidence now supports the concept that platelet-derived microvesicles (PMVs, the most abundant MVs in the circulation, are important regulators of hemostasis, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Compared with healthy individuals, a large increase of circulating PMVs has been observed, particularly in patients with cardiovascular diseases. As observed in MVs from other parent cells, PMVs exert their biological effects in multiple ways, such as triggering various intercellular signaling cascades and by participating in transcellular communication by the transfer of their “cargo” of cytoplasmic components and surface receptors to other cell types. This review describes our current understanding of the potential role of PMVs in mediating hemostasis, inflammation, and angiogenesis and their consequences on the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, and venous thrombosis. Furthermore, new developments of the therapeutic potential of PMVs for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases will be discussed.

  1. Phytochemicals from plants to combat cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthi, H R; ShriShriMal, N; Das, D K

    2012-01-01

    For many decades, the use of synthetic chemicals as drugs has been effective in the treatment of most diseases. Moreover, from ancient to modern history, many traditional plant based medicines are playing an important role in health care. Phytochemicals are natural bioactive compounds found in vegetables, fruits, medicinal plants, aromatic plants, leaves, flowers and roots which act as a defense system to combat against diseases. The phytochemicals from natural products cover a diverse range of chemical entities such as polyphenols, flavonoids, steroidal saponins, organosulphur compounds and vitamins. A number of bioactive compounds generally obtained from terrestrial plants such as isoflavones, diosgenin, resveratrol, quercetin, catechin, sulforaphane, tocotrienols and carotenoids are proven to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and aid in cardioprotection which is the leading cause of death globally. The cardioprotective effects of the various phytochemicals are perhaps due to their antioxidative, antihypercholesteroemic, antiangiogenic, anti-ischemic, inhibition of platelet aggregation and anti inflammatory activities that reduce the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The multi-faceted role of the phytochemicals is mediated by its structure-function relationship and can be considered as leads for cardiovascular drug design in future. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on selected phytochemicals as prophylactic and therapeutic agents in cardioprotection.

  2. Sleep duration, cardiovascular disease, and proinflammatory biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandner MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Grandner,1,2 Megan R Sands-Lincoln,3 Victoria M Pak,2,4 Sheila N Garland1,5 1Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 2Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 3Center for Evidence Based Medicine, Elsevier Inc, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 5Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA Abstract: Habitual sleep duration has been associated with cardiometabolic disease, via several mechanistic pathways, but few have been thoroughly explored. One hypothesis is that short and/or long sleep duration is associated with a proinflammatory state, which could increase risk for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. This hypothesis has been largely explored in the context of experimental sleep deprivation studies which have attempted to demonstrate changes in proinflammatory markers following acute sleep loss in the laboratory. Despite the controlled environment available in these studies, samples tend to lack generalization to the population at large and acute sleep deprivation may not be a perfect analog for short sleep. To address these limitations, population based studies have explored associations between proinflammatory markers and habitual sleep duration. This review summarizes what is known from experimental and cross-sectional studies about the association between sleep duration, cardiovascular disease, and proinflammatory biomarkers. First, the association between sleep duration with both morbidity and mortality, with a focus on cardiovascular disease, is reviewed. Then, a brief review of the potential role of proinflammatory markers in cardiovascular disease is presented. The majority of this review details specific findings related to specific

  3. Sugar restriction: the evidence for a drug-free intervention to reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, S; Tayler, R; Sikaris, K

    2012-10-01

    Uncertainty exists about what dietary component is most likely to cause coronary heart disease. Over the last thirty years, attention has focused on saturated fat and salt as guilty parties. More recently, evidence suggests that excess sugar intake is more likely than either traditional factor to lead to atherosclerotic disease. Some researchers have also speculated that sugar is addictive, in a similar manner to caffeine and established drugs of abuse. Here we review the epidemiological, biochemical and psychological evidence that implicates excess sugar intake as an important cause of ill-health. We found relatively consistent evidence of association between markers of sugar intake and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or the disease itself. This evidence contrasted with rather weaker evidence which linked either saturated fat or salt with cardiovascular disease endpoints. We also found some evidence of a sugar addiction syndrome. We suggest that advice to restrict sugar intake should be a routine part of clinical care, particularly when patients are being counselled about cardiovascular risk. © 2012 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Roles of the WHHL Rabbit in Translational Research on Hypercholesterolemia and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Kobayashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conquering cardiovascular diseases is one of the most important problems in human health. To overcome cardiovascular diseases, animal models have played important roles. Although the prevalence of genetically modified animals, particularly mice and rats, has contributed greatly to biomedical research, not all human diseases can be investigated in this way. In the study of cardiovascular diseases, mice and rats are inappropriate because of marked differences in lipoprotein metabolism, pathophysiological findings of atherosclerosis, and cardiac function. On the other hand, since lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits closely resemble those in humans, several useful animal models for these diseases have been developed in rabbits. One of the most famous of these is the Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL rabbit, which develops hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis spontaneously due to genetic and functional deficiencies of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptor. The WHHL rabbit has been improved to develop myocardial infarction, and the new strain was designated the myocardial infarction-prone WHHL (WHHLMI rabbit. This review summarizes the importance of selecting animal species for translational research in biomedical science, the development of WHHL and WHHLMI rabbits, their application to the development of hypocholesterolemic and/or antiatherosclerotic drugs, and future prospects regarding WHHL and WHHLMI rabbits.

  5. Lipid disorders in patients with renal failure: Role in cardiovascular events and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Visconti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of lipid disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD is usually characterized by high triglycerides and reduced high dense lipoprotein (HDL, associated with normal or slightly reduced low dense lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol. This dyslipidemia is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Keys for the cardiovascular risk reduction in these patients are lowering the number and modifying the composition of the cholesterol-carrying atherogenic lipoprotein particles. Statins have an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality in non-hemodialyzed CKD patients. The benefits in terms of progression of renal failure are contradictory. Patient education regarding dietary regimen should be part of the CKD clinical management.

  6. [New populations at increased cardiovascular risk: Cardiovascular disease in dermatological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Gijón, Elena; Meseguer-Yebra, Carmen; Palacio-Aller, Lucía; Godoy-Rocati, Diego Vicente; Lahoz-Rallo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The increased cardiovascular risk in some dermatological diseases has been demonstrated in recent decades. Diseases such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus are currently included in the guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Other diseases such as androgenic alopecia, polycystic ovary syndrome, hidradenitis suppurativa or lichen planus have numerous studies that point to an increased risk, however, they have not been included in these guidelines. In this article we review the evidence supporting this association, in order to alert the clinician to the need for greater control in cardiovascular risk factors in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Texture based segmentation method to detect atherosclerotic plaque from optical tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ammu; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has been widely employed in assessing cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is one of the major cause cardio vascular diseases. However visual detection of atherosclerotic plaque from OCT images is often limited and further complicated by high frame rates. We developed a texture based segmentation method to automatically detect plaque and non plaque regions from OCT images. To verify our results we compared them to photographs of the vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque that we used to generate the OCT images. Our results show a close match with photographs of vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque. Our texture based segmentation method for plaque detection could be potentially used in clinical cardiovascular OCT imaging for plaque detection.

  8. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross......-sectional cohort of nonselected consecutive outpatients with RA (The Questionnaires in Standard Monitoring of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Program, or QUEST-RA) who were receiving regular clinical care. METHODS: The study involved a clinical assessment by a rheumatologist and a self-report questionnaire...

  9. Carbon dioxide balneotherapy and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagourelias, Efstathios D.; Zorou, Paraskevi G.; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis; Athyros, Vasilis G.; Karagiannis, Asterios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.

    2011-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) balneotherapy is a kind of remedy with a wide spectrum of applications which have been used since the Middle Ages. However, its potential use as an adjuvant therapeutic option in patients with cardiovascular disease is not yet fully clarified. We performed a thorough review of MEDLINE Database, EMBASE, ISI WEB of Knowledge, COCHRANE database and sites funded by balneotherapy centers across Europe in order to recognize relevant studies and aggregate evidence supporting the use of CO2 baths in various cardiovascular diseases. The three main effects of CO2 hydrotherapy during whole body or partial immersion, including decline in core temperature, an increase in cutaneous blood flow, and an elevation of the score on thermal sensation, are analyzed on a pathophysiology basis. Additionally, the indications and contra-indications of the method are presented in an evidence-based way, while the need for new methodologically sufficient studies examining the use of CO2 baths in other cardiovascular substrates is discussed.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Prabhakaran; Tak, Tahir

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep-disordered breathing condition, which is increasingly being recognized as having wide-ranging pathophysiological effects on multiple organ systems. Although multiple factors affect the incidence and severity of OSA, male sex and obesity seem to play an influential role. The apnea-ventilation cycle, characterized by abnormalities in gas exchange, exaggerated respiratory effort and frequent arousals, has been shown to have deleterious effects on circulatory hemodynamics, the autonomic milieu, hormonal balance, inflammatory and coagulation cascades, endothelial function, and the redox state, with potential cardiovascular significance. Consequently, OSA is being increasingly implicated in a multitude of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, coronary artery disease, pulmonary hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. The strength of association for individual CVD is varied, and outcomes of clinical studies are conflicting. In addition, obesity, which is closely linked to both OSA and CVD, makes it harder to ascertain the independent role of OSA on CVD. Although available evidence is inconclusive, there is an increasing recognition of the direct role for OSA in CVD. Similarly, although several studies have demonstrated the cardiovascular benefits of OSA treatment, further studies are needed to confirm this.

  11. Heavy Metal Poisoning and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Alissa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is an increasing world health problem. Traditional risk factors fail to account for all deaths from CVD. It is mainly the environmental, dietary and lifestyle behavioral factors that are the control keys in the progress of this disease. The potential association between chronic heavy metal exposure, like arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and CVD has been less well defined. The mechanism through which heavy metals act to increase cardiovascular risk factors may act still remains unknown, although impaired antioxidants metabolism and oxidative stress may play a role. However, the exact mechanism of CVD induced by heavy metals deserves further investigation either through animal experiments or through molecular and cellular studies. Furthermore, large-scale prospective studies with follow up on general populations using appropriate biomarkers and cardiovascular endpoints might be recommended to identify the factors that predispose to heavy metals toxicity in CVD. In this review, we will give a brief summary of heavy metals homeostasis, followed by a description of the available evidence for their link with CVD and the proposed mechanisms of action by which their toxic effects might be explained. Finally, suspected interactions between genetic, nutritional and environmental factors are discussed.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, NRF2 Signalling and Cardiovascular Diseases in a Nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzini, Chiara; Cominacini, Luciano; Garbin, Ulisse; Fratta Pasini, Anna Maria

    2017-08-01

    This short review is intended primarily to summarize the understanding of the interrelated roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammation in cardiovascular diseases. Insults interfering with ER function lead to the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER. An excess of proteins folding in the ER is known as ER stress. This condition initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR). When the UPR fails to control the level of unfolded and misfolded proteins, ER-initiated apoptotic signalling is induced. Moreover, the role of the protective nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant-related element (ARE) and the activation of the pro-inflammatory nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) are analysed. Authors summarize evidence that oxidative stress, inflammation and ER stress are closely entwined phenomena. They are involved in the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular diseases. Current literature data are presented, focusing on three topics of related pathologies: atherosclerotic plaque, coronary artery disease and diabetes. This review will provide a basic platform for study and application to several other conditions in which oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammation are key features. Future studies in this area may identify the most promising molecules to be investigated as common targets for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Effects of alcohol and polyphenols from beer on atherosclerotic biomarkers in high cardiovascular risk men: a randomized feeding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva-Blanch, G; Magraner, E; Condines, X; Valderas-Martínez, P; Roth, I; Arranz, S; Casas, R; Navarro, M; Hervas, A; Sisó, A; Martínez-Huélamo, M; Vallverdú-Queralt, A; Quifer-Rada, P; Lamuela-Raventos, R M; Estruch, R

    2015-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption exerts a cardioprotective effect, but no studies have evaluated the alcohol-independent cardiovascular effects of the non-alcoholic components of beer. We aimed to evaluate the effects of ethanol and the phenolic compounds of beer on classical and novel cardiovascular risk factors. Thirty-three high risk male volunteers were included in a randomized, crossover feeding trial. After a washout period, all subjects received beer (30 g alcohol/d, 660 mL), the equivalent amount of polyphenols as non-alcoholic beer (990 mL), and gin (30 g alcohol/d, 100 mL) for 4 weeks. All outcomes were evaluated before and after each intervention period. Moderate alcohol consumption increased serum HDL-cholesterol (∼5%), ApoA-I (∼6%), ApoA-II (∼7%) and adiponectin (∼7%), and decreased serum fibrinogen (∼8%), and interleukin (IL)-5 (∼14%) concentrations, whereas the non-alcoholic fraction of beer (mainly polyphenols) increased the receptor antagonist of IL-1 (∼24%), and decreased lymphocyte expression of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (∼11%), lymphocyte and monocyte expression of Sialil-Lewis X (∼16%) and monocyte expression of CCR2 (∼31%), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-β (∼14%) and IL-15 (∼22%) plasma concentrations. No changes were observed in glucose metabolism parameters or in body weight and adiposity parameters. The phenolic content of beer reduces leukocyte adhesion molecules and inflammatory biomarkers, whereas alcohol mainly improves the lipid profile and reduces some plasma inflammatory biomarkers related to atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION, CORONARY HEART DISEASE, AND ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION OF LOWER EXTREMITY ARTERIES IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Karlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic lesion of lower extremity arteries frequently complicates the long-term course of hypertension and it is generally associated with coronary heart disease. Our study has attempted to evaluate the impact of combination antihypertensive therapy involving amlodipine, bisoprolol, and lisinopril on quality of life in this category of patients.

  15. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  16. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and its role in diabetes mellitus related cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Prioletta, Annamaria; Zuo, Pengou; Folli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Hyperglycemia is an important factor in cardiovascular damage, working through different mechanisms such as activation of protein kinase C, polyol and hexosamine pathways, advanced glycation end products production. All of these pathways, in association to hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress, promote reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation that, in turn, promote cellular damage and contribute to the diabetic complications development and progression. ROS can directly damage lipids, proteins or DNA and modulate intracellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases and redox sensitive transcription factors causing changes in protein expression and, therefore, irreversible oxidative modifications. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress induces endothelial dysfunction that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of micro- and macro-vascular diseases. It may also increase pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant factors expression, induce apoptosis and impair nitric oxide release. Oxidative stress induces several phenotypic alterations also in vascular smooth-muscle cell (VSMC). ROS is one of the factors that can promote both VSMC proliferation/migration in atherosclerotic lesions and VSMC apoptosis, which is potentially involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability and rupture. Currently, there are contrasting clinical evidences on the benefits of antioxidant therapies in the prevention/treatment of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Appropriate glycemic control, in which both hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic episodes are reduced, in association to the treatment of dyslipidemia, hypertension, kidney dysfunction and obesity, conditions which are also associated to ROS overproduction, can counteract oxidative stress and, therefore, both microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

  17. Endothelial activation, endothelial dysfunction and premature atherosclerosis in systemic autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M

    Atherosclerosis may be considered an inflammatory disease characterised by the development of atherosclerotic plaques and ischaemic cardiovascular events. Increased prevalence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to (premature) atherosclerosis has been observed in patients with autoimmune

  18. The relationships between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: focus on pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Jason C; Castellano, Jose M; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    There is a looming global epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Of all the end-organ effects caused by diabetes, the cardiovascular system is particularly susceptible to the biologic perturbations caused by this disease, and many patients may die from diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the pathobiology of the diabetic vasculature and heart. Clinical studies have illuminated the optimal way to treat patients with cardiovascular manifestations of this disease. This article reviews these aspects of diabetes and the cardiovascular system, broadly classified into diabetic vascular disease, diabetic cardiomyopathy, and the clinical management of the diabetic cardiovascular disease patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Yvonne Y; Pfeifer, Andreas; Ebersberger, Hans U

    2016-01-01

    In the Western world and developing countries, the number one causes of mortality and morbidity result from cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases represent a wide range of pathologies, including myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease, which...... impact on society, there are still limitations in the early diagnosis and the prevention of the disease. Current imaging methods mainly focus on morphological changes that occur at an advanced disease stage, e.g., degree of stenosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and specifically molecular...... cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are capable to reveal pathophysiological changes already occurring during early atherosclerotic plaque formation. This allows for the assessment of cardiovascular disease on a level, which goes beyond morphological or anatomical criteria. In this review, we...

  20. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the following definition apply: Cardiovascular screening blood test means: (1) A lipid panel consisting of a...

  1. Role and analysis of monocyte subsets in cardiovascular disease. Joint consensus document of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Working Groups "Atherosclerosis & Vascular Biology" and "Thrombosis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Shantsila, Eduard; Hristov, Michael; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Guzik, Tomasz; Heine, Gunnar H; Hoefer, Imo E; Monaco, Claudia; Peter, Karlheinz; Rainger, Ed; Siegbahn, Agneta; Steffens, Sabine; Wojta, Johann; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-09-27

    Monocytes as cells of the innate immunity are prominently involved in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. The heterogeneity of blood monocytes has widely been acknowledged by accumulating experimental and clinical data suggesting a differential, subset-specific contribution of the corresponding subpopulations to the pathology of cardiovascular and other diseases. This document re-evaluates current nomenclature and summarises key findings on monocyte subset biology to propose a consensus statement about phenotype, separation and quantification of the individual subsets.

  2. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Pignone, Michael; Williams, Craig D.

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin is effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of vascular disease, as so-called secondary prevention. In general populations with no history of previous myocardial infarction or stroke, aspirin also seems useful for primary prevention of cardiovascular events, although the absolute benefits are smaller than those seen in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of cardiovascular events...

  3. [Cardiovascular disease prevention and life style modifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudet, M; Daugareil, C; Ferrieres, J

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are mainly caused by atherosclerosis, the development of which is highly dependent on our Western lifestyle. Slowing this pathology depends on the reduction of risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, smoking, lack of physical activity, excess weight and diabetes. Drug treatment exists and is very effective, but too often they treat the immediate abnormality such as diabetes, high blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia and not the underlying causes: poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and excess weight. These have a negative impact on endothelial function, oxidative stress, and can trigger inflammation, arrythmias and thrombosis. Cardiovascular prevention must therefore target sedentary lifestyle, excess weight, and favor low-calorie, low-salt food and Mediterranean diet. The way this diet works begins to be understood and goes beyond simple cardiovascular prevention. Therapeutic education holds a growing and complementary role in the Public Health system which should call upon the strengths of all healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  4. Triglycerides and Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins in the Causal Pathway of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoff, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that elevated triglyceride levels are a biomarker of cardiovascular (CV) risk. Consistent with these findings, recent genetic evidence from mutational analyses, genome-wide association studies, and Mendelian randomization studies provide robust evidence that triglycerides and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are in the causal pathway for atherosclerotic CV disease, indicating that they may play a pathogenic role, much like low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although statins are the cornerstone of dyslipidemia management, high triglyceride levels may persist in some patients despite statin therapy. Several triglyceride-lowering agents are available, including fibrates, niacin, and omega-3 fatty acids, of which prescription omega-3 fatty acids have the best tolerability and safety profile. In clinical studies, omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce triglyceride levels, but products containing both eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid may increase LDL-C levels. Icosapent ethyl, a high-purity eicosapentaenoic acid-only product, does not raise LDL-C levels and also reduces triglyceride, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein levels. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids are currently being evaluated in large CV outcome studies in statin-treated patients; these studies should help to elucidate the causative role of triglycerides in atherosclerotic CV disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Aikawa, Elena

    2018-02-19

    Extracellular vesicles have emerged as one of the most important means through which cells interact with each other and the extracellular environment, but extracellular vesicle research remains challenging due to their small size, limited amount of material required for traditional molecular biology assays and inconsistency in the methods of their isolation. The advent of new technologies and standards in the field, however, have led to increased mechanistic insight into extracellular vesicle function. Herein, the latest studies on the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular physiology and disease are discussed. Extracellular vesicles help control cardiovascular homeostasis and remodelling by mediating communication between cells and directing alterations in the extracellular matrix to respond to changes in the environment. The message carried from the parent cell to extracellular space can be intended for both local (within the same tissue) and distal (downstream of blood flow) targets. Pathological cargo loaded within extracellular vesicles could further result in various diseases. On the contrary, new studies indicate that injection of extracellular vesicles obtained from cultured cells into diseased tissues can promote restoration of normal tissue function. Extracellular vesicles are an integral part of cell and tissue function, and harnessing the properties inherent to extracellular vesicles may provide a therapeutic strategy to promote tissue regeneration.

  6. Proteomic and genomic analysis of cardiovascular disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Eyk, Jennifer; Dunn, M. J

    2003-01-01

    ... to cardiovascular disease. By exploring the various strategies and technical aspects of both, using examples from cardiac or vascular biology, the limitations and the potential of these methods can be clearly seen. The book is divided into three sections: the first focuses on genomics, the second on proteomics, and the third provides an overview of the importance of these two scientific disciplines in drug and diagnostic discovery. The goal of this book is the transfer of their hard-earned lessons to the growing num...

  7. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, K. S.; Katan, M B

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are growing contributors to global disease burdens, with epidemics of CVD advancing across many regions of the world which are experiencing a rapid health transition. Diet and nutrition have been extensively investigated as risk factors for major cardiovascular diseases like coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke and are also linked to other cardiovascular risk factors like diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. The interpretation of evidence needs to involv...

  8. THE LEVEL OF GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS' KNOWLEDGE ON CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK FACTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaraković, Milana; Mihajlović, Bojan; Ćemerlić, Snežana; Ađić, Filip; Sladojević, Miroslava; Mihajlović, Boaoliub

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The atherosclerotic process in the aorta starts in childhood, while atheroclerotic changes of coronary heart vessels start in adolescence. The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge of the students attending all four grades of grammar school about the risk factors for cardiovascular disease, with special attention to the risk factors that can be influenced by modification of life-style. Data from the entrance and exit tests were collected from 197 students attending a grammar school in Novi Sad. Chi-square test and Student T-test or Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine the statistical difference between categorized variables and the continuous variables, respectively. The difference between the number of correct answers for all the students on the entrance test and exit test was statistically significant (pgrammar school and after the lectures, the student's knowledge level was increased by 82.3% (p<0.0005). Children and adolescents from Vojvodina and Serbia should be well informed about the cardiovascular disease risk factors and their prevention with special attention paid to the risk factors that can be influenced by changing lifestyle habits.

  9. Lp(a) (Lipoprotein(a)) Levels Predict Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Subjects With Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease on Intensive Lipid Therapy: An Analysis of the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) Carotid Magnetic Resonance Imaging Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Daniel S; Phan, Binh An P; Sun, Jie; Isquith, Daniel A; O'Brien, Kevin; Crouse, John R; Anderson, Todd; Huston, John; Marcovina, Santica M; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Xue-Qiao

    2018-01-04

    To assess whether Lp(a) (lipoprotein(a)) levels and other lipid levels were predictive of progression of atherosclerosis burden as assessed by carotid magnetic resonance imaging in subjects who have been treated with LDL-C (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol)-lowering therapy and participated in the AIM-HIGH trial (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes). AIM-HIGH was a randomized, double-blind study of subjects with established vascular disease, elevated triglycerides, and low HDL-C (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). One hundred fifty-two AIM-HIGH subjects underwent both baseline and 2-year follow-up carotid artery magnetic resonance imaging. Plaque burden was measured by the percent wall volume (%WV) of the carotid artery. Associations between annualized change in %WV with baseline and on-study (1 year) lipid variables were evaluated using multivariate linear regression. P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Average %WV at baseline was 41.6±6.8% and annualized change in %WV over 2 years ranged from -3.2% to 3.7% per year (mean: 0.2±1.1% per year; P=0.032). Increases in %WV were significantly associated with higher baseline Lp(a) (β=0.34 per 1-SD increase of Lp(a); 95% CI, 0.15-0.52; P<0.001) after adjusting for clinical risk factors and other lipid levels. On-study Lp(a) had a similar positive association with %WV progression (β=0.33; 95% CI, 0.15-0.52; P<0.001). Despite intensive lipid therapy, aimed at aggressively lowering LDL-C to <70 mg/dL, carotid atherosclerosis continued to progress as assessed by carotid magnetic resonance imaging and that elevated Lp(a) levels were independent predictors of increases in atherosclerosis burden. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Primary prevention of ischemic stroke: a guideline from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council: cosponsored by the Atherosclerotic Peripheral Vascular Disease Interdisciplinary Working Group; Cardiovascular Nursing Council; Clinical Cardiology Council; Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism Council; and the Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Larry B; Adams, Robert; Alberts, Mark J; Appel, Lawrence J; Brass, Lawrence M; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Culebras, Antonio; DeGraba, Thomas J; Gorelick, Philip B; Guyton, John R; Hart, Robert G; Howard, George; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Nixon, J V Ian; Sacco, Ralph L

    2006-06-20

    This guideline provides an overview of the evidence on various established and potential stroke risk factors and provides recommendations for the reduction of stroke risk. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of each writer's previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews (covering the time period since the last review published in 2001 up to January 2005), reference to previously published guidelines, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and when appropriate, formulate recommendations based on standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had numerous opportunities to comment in writing on the recommendations and approved the final version of this document. The guideline underwent extensive peer review before consideration and approval by the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. Schemes for assessing a person's risk of a first stroke were evaluated. Risk factors or risk markers for a first stroke were classified according to their potential for modification (nonmodifiable, modifiable, or potentially modifiable) and strength of evidence (well documented or less well documented). Nonmodifiable risk factors include age, sex, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, and genetic factors. Well-documented and modifiable risk factors include hypertension, exposure to cigarette smoke, diabetes, atrial fibrillation and certain other cardiac conditions, dyslipidemia, carotid artery stenosis, sickle cell disease, postmenopausal hormone therapy, poor diet, physical inactivity, and obesity and body fat distribution. Less well-documented or potentially modifiable risk factors include the metabolic syndrome, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, oral contraceptive use, sleep-disordered breathing, migraine

  11. Sortilin and the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Bourbon, Mafalda; Prata, Maria João; Alves, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    Plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are a key determinant of the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is why many studies have attempted to elucidate the pathways that regulate its metabolism. Novel latest-generation sequencing techniques have identified a strong association between the 1p13 locus and the risk of cardiovascular disease caused by changes in plasma LDL-C levels. As expected for a complex phenotype, the effects of variation in this locus are only moderate. Even so, knowledge of the association is of major importance, since it has unveiled a new metabolic pathway regulating plasma cholesterol levels. Crucial to this discovery was the work of three independent teams seeking to clarify the biological basis of this association, who succeeded in proving that SORT1, encoding sortilin, was the gene in the 1p13 locus involved in LDL metabolism. SORT1 was the first gene identified as determining plasma LDL levels to be mechanistically evaluated and, although the three teams used different, though appropriate, experimental methods, their results were in some ways contradictory. Here we review all the experiments that led to the identification of the new pathway connecting sortilin with plasma LDL levels and risk of myocardial infarction. The regulatory mechanism underlying this association remains unclear, but its discovery has paved the way for considering previously unsuspected therapeutic targets and approaches. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Lycopene Deficiency in Ageing and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petyaev, Ivan M.

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene is a hydrocarbon phytochemical belonging to the tetraterpene carotenoid family and is found in red fruit and vegetables. Eleven conjugated double bonds predetermine the antioxidant properties of lycopene and its ability to scavenge lipid peroxyl radicals, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide. Lycopene has a low bioavailability rate and appears in the blood circulation incorporated into chylomicrons and other apo-B containing lipoproteins. The recent body of evidence suggests that plasma concentration of lycopene is not only a function of intestinal absorption rate but also lycopene breakdown via enzymatic and oxidative pathways in blood and tissues. Oxidative stress and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide may represent a major cause of lycopene depletion in ageing, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been shown recently that low carotenoid levels, and especially decreased serum lycopene levels, are strongly predictive of all-cause mortality and poor outcomes of cardiovascular disease. However, there is a poor statistical association between dietary and serum lycopene levels which occurs due to limited bioavailability of lycopene from dietary sources. Hence, it is very unlikely that nutritional intervention alone could be instrumental in the correction of lycopene and carotenoid deficiency. Therefore, new nutraceutical formulations of carotenoids with enhanced bioavailability are urgently needed. PMID:26881023

  13. Antiinflammatory actions of inorganic nitrate stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambata, Rayomand S.; Ghosh, Suborno M.; Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Thevathasan, Tharssana; Filomena, Federica; Xiao, Qingzhong; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Reduced bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the enhanced leukocyte recruitment reflective of systemic inflammation thought to precede and underlie atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability. Recent evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrate (NO3−) through sequential chemical reduction in vivo provides a source of NO that exerts beneficial effects upon the cardiovascular system, including reductions in inflammatory responses. We tested whether the antiinflammatory effects of inorganic nitrate might prove useful in ameliorating atherosclerotic disease in Apolipoprotein (Apo)E knockout (KO) mice. We show that dietary nitrate treatment, although having no effect upon total plaque area, caused a reduction in macrophage accumulation and an elevation in smooth muscle accumulation within atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice, suggesting plaque stabilization. We also show that in nitrate-fed mice there is reduced systemic leukocyte rolling and adherence, circulating neutrophil numbers, neutrophil CD11b expression, and myeloperoxidase activity compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show in both the ApoE KO mice and using an acute model of inflammation that this effect upon neutrophils results in consequent reductions in inflammatory monocyte expression that is associated with elevations of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. In summary, we demonstrate that inorganic nitrate suppresses acute and chronic inflammation by targeting neutrophil recruitment and that this effect, at least in part, results in consequent reductions in the inflammatory status of atheromatous plaque, and suggest that this effect may have clinical utility in the prophylaxis of inflammatory atherosclerotic disease. PMID:28057862

  14. Anxiety and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Harrison, Nathan J; Cheung, Peter; Cosh, Suzanne

    2016-12-01

    Unrecognized anxiety is a difficult clinical presentation in cardiology. Anxiety leads to recurring emergency department visits and the need for numerous diagnostic evaluations to rule out cardiovascular disease (CVD). This review focuses broadly on anxiety and its subtypes in relation to the onset and progression of CVD while describing helpful guidelines to better identify and treat anxiety. Potential mechanisms of cardiopathogenesis are also described. An emerging literature demonstrates that anxiety disorders increase the risk for incident CVD but a causal relationship has not been demonstrated. Anxiety portends adverse prognosis in persons with established CVD that is independent from depression. The level of clinical priority received by depression should be extended to research and clinical intervention efforts in anxiety. Anxiety holds direct relevance for uncovering mechanisms of cardiopathogenesis, developing novel therapeutic strategies, and initiating clinical interventions in the population at risk of developing heart disease, or those already diagnosed with CVD.

  15. Pro-resolution therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Justin; Marinello, Michael; Fredman, Gabrielle

    2017-09-01

    Studies over the last couple of decades suggest that failed resolution of a chronic inflammatory response is an important driving force in the progression of atherosclerosis. Resolution of inflammation is mediated in part by lipid-derived specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) such as lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. The major functions of SPMs are to quell inflammation and repair tissue damage in a manner that does not compromise host defense. An imbalance between SPMs and pro-inflammatory mediators like leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ) are associated with several prevalent human diseases, including atherosclerosis. Because atherosclerosis is marked by persistent, unresolved inflammation and arterial tissue injury, SPMs have garnered immense interest as a potential treatment strategy. This mini review will highlight recent advances in the application of SPMs in atherosclerosis as well as the ability of SPMs to control several of the risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Effects of Vegetables on Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yi Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that vegetable consumption is inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, research has indicated that many vegetables like potatoes, soybeans, sesame, tomatoes, dioscorea, onions, celery, broccoli, lettuce and asparagus showed great potential in preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, and vitamins, essential elements, dietary fibers, botanic proteins and phytochemicals were bioactive components. The cardioprotective effects of vegetables might involve antioxidation; anti-inflammation; anti-platelet; regulating blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profile; attenuating myocardial damage; and modulating relevant enzyme activities, gene expression, and signaling pathways as well as some other biomarkers associated to cardiovascular diseases. In addition, several vegetables and their bioactive components have been proven to protect against cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials. In this review, we analyze and summarize the effects of vegetables on cardiovascular diseases based on epidemiological studies, experimental research, and clinical trials, which are significant to the application of vegetables in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Novel Biomarkers in Cardiovascular Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The investigation of novel circulating serum and plasma biomarkers in patients with cardiovascular disease has been accelerating at a remarkable pace. New markers or tests are often presented too early to the medical profession, potentially leading to overuse and, thus, extra burden and costs to patients, the healthcare industry, and the economy. The challenge for clinicians and medical researchers is how to optimally apply existing and new markers/tests. CONTENT: Biomarkers are biological parameters that can be objectively measured and quantified as indicators of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or responses to a therapeutic intervention. Typically thought of as disease process screening, diagnosing, or monitoring tools, biomarkers may also be used to determine disease susceptibility and eligibility for specific therapies. Cardiac biomarkers are protein components of cell structures that are released into circulation when myocardial injury occurs. They play a pivotal role in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment of patients with chest pain and suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS as well as those with acute exacerbations of heart failure. SUMMARY: Active investigation has brought forward an increasingly large number of novel candidate markers but few have withstood the test of time and become integrated into contemporary clinical care because of their readily apparent diagnostic, prognostic, and/or therapeutic utility. With regard to the more novel biomarkers, careful thought is needed with regard to the appropriate target populations for discovery and validation, as well as the criteria used to sort out the contenders from the pretenders. KEYWORDS: biomarker, cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, risk stratification, diagnosis, prognosis.

  18. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandvik, Per Olav; Lincoff, A. Michael; Gore, Joel M.; Gutterman, David D.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Akl, Elie A.; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline focuses on long-term administration of antithrombotic drugs designed for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, including two new antiplatelet therapies. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We present 23 recommendations for pertinent clinical questions. For primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, we suggest low-dose aspirin (75-100 mg/d) in patients aged > 50 years over no aspirin therapy (Grade 2B). For patients with established coronary artery disease, defined as patients 1-year post-acute coronary syndrome, with prior revascularization, coronary stenoses > 50% by coronary angiogram, and/or evidence for cardiac ischemia on diagnostic testing, we recommend long-term low-dose aspirin or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 1A). For patients with acute coronary syndromes who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent placement, we recommend for the first year dual antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin in combination with ticagrelor 90 mg bid, clopidogrel 75 mg/d, or prasugrel 10 mg/d over single antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B). For patients undergoing elective PCI with stent placement, we recommend aspirin (75-325 mg/d) and clopidogrel for a minimum duration of 1 month (bare-metal stents) or 3 to 6 months (drug-eluting stents) (Grade 1A). We suggest continuing low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel for 12 months for all stents (Grade 2C). Thereafter, we recommend single antiplatelet therapy over continuation of dual antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Recommendations continue to favor single antiplatelet therapy for patients with established coronary artery disease. For patients with acute coronary

  19. Anti-inflammatory Nanomedicine for Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Katsuki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease, in the development of which inflammation mediated by innate immune cells plays a critical role, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins are a widely used lipid-lowering drug that has lipid-independent vasculoprotective effects, such as improvement of endothelial dysfunction, antioxidant properties, and inhibitory effects on inflammation. Despite recent advances in lipid-lowering therapy, clinical trials of statins suggest that anti-inflammatory therapy beyond lipid-lowering therapy is indispensible to further reduce cardiovascular events. One possible therapeutic option to the residual risk is to directly intervene in the inflammatory process by utilizing a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS. Various nano-sized materials are currently developed as DDS, including micelles, liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and metallic nanoparticles. The application of nano-DDS to coronary artery disease is a feasible strategy since the inflammatory milieu enhances incorporation of nano-sized materials into mononuclear phagocytic system and permeability of target lesions, which confers nano-DDS on “passive-targeting” property. Recently, we have developed a polymeric nanoparticle-incorporating statin to maximize its anti-inflammatory property. This statin nanoparticle has been tested in various disease models, including plaque destabilization and rupture, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction, and its clinical application is in progress. In this review, we present current development of DDS and future perspective on the application of anti-inflammatory nanomedicine to treat life-threatening cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Urine Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Death in CKD: Results From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kathleen D.; Yang, Wei; Go, Alan S.; Anderson, Amanda H.; Feldman, Harold I.; Fischer, Michael J.; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Kusek, John W.; Master, Stephen R.; Miller, Edgar R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tao, Kaixiang; Weir, Matthew R.; Hsu, Chi-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is common and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Currently, markers of renal tubular injury are not used routinely to describe kidney health and little is known about risk of cardiovascular events and death associated with these biomarkers independent of glomerular filtration—based markers (such as serum creatinine or albuminuria). Study Design Cohort study, Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Setting & Participants 3386 participants with estimated glomerular filtration rate of 20-70 mL/min/1.73 m2 enrolled from June 2003 through August 2008. Predictor Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) concentration. Outcomes Adjudicated heart failure event, ischemic atherosclerotic event (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral artery disease) and death through March 2011. Measurements Urine NGAL concentration measured at baseline with a two-step assay using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay technology on an ARCHITECT i2000SR (Abbott Laboratories). Results There were 428 heart failure events (during 16383 person-years of follow-up), 361 ischemic atherosclerotic events (during 16584 person-years of follow-up) and 522 deaths (during 18214 person-years of follow-up). In Cox regression models adjusted for estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, demographics, traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiac medications, higher urine NGAL levels remained independently associated with ischemic atherosclerotic events (adjusted HR for the highest [>49.5 ng/ml] vs. lowest [≤6.9 ng/ml] quintile, 1.83 [95% CI, 1.20-2.81]; HR, per 0.1-unit increase in log urine NGAL, 1.012 [95% CI, 1.001-1.023]), but not heart failure events or deaths. Limitations Urine NGAL was measured only once. Conclusions Among patients with chronic kidney disease, urine levels of NGAL, a marker of renal tubular injury, were independently associated with future ischemic atherosclerotic

  1. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francone Marco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the epidemiology of constrictive pericarditis has been noted. Accurate decision making is crucial taking into account the significant morbidity and mortality caused by complicated pericardial diseases, and the potential benefit of therapeutic interventions. Imaging herein has an important role, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is definitely one of the most versatile modalities to study the pericardium. It fuses excellent anatomic detail and tissue characterization with accurate evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences of pericardial constraint on cardiac filling. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge how CMR can be used to study the most common pericardial diseases.

  2. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  3. Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease that affects 2-3% of the population and shares pathophysiologic mechanisms and risk factors with cardiovascular diseases. Studies have suggested psoriasis as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and Danish guidelines...... on cardiovascular risk factor modification in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have recently been published. We provide a short review of the current evidence and the Danish guidelines....

  4. Toward a causal model of cardiovascular responses to stress and the development of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Amy R; Gerin, William; Davidson, Karina W; Pickering, Thomas G; Brosschot, Jos F; Thayer, Julian F; Christenfeld, Nicholas; Linden, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Cardiovascular reactivity is hypothesized to mediate the relationship between stress and cardiovascular disease. We describe three considerations that are crucial for a causal model of cardiovascular responses to stress: the need for laboratory-life generalizability, the role of interactions between environmental exposures and individual response predispositions, and the importance of the duration of both stressor exposure and cardiovascular responding. We illustrate current understanding of stress-cardiovascular disease relationships with examples from the human and animal psychophysiology, epidemiology, and genetics literature. In a causal model of reactivity, the usefulness of laboratory assessment rests on the assumption that laboratory-based cardiovascular reactivity predicts responses in the natural environment. We find only limited generalizability and suggest that cardiovascular responses to stress can be better understood when examined in the natural environment. The interaction of individual response predispositions and stressor exposures contributes to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease; stress-disease relationships could therefore be better understood if predispositions and exposures were assessed simultaneously in interactive models. Cardiovascular responses to stress are likely to be most deleterious when responses are prolonged. Responses may vary in their magnitude, frequency, and duration; however, reactivity captures only response magnitude. The assessment of anticipatory and recovery measures, with response magnitude, may therefore lead to a more useful model of the stress-disease relationship. A causal model of cardiovascular responses to stress should generalize to the real world, assess interactions between individual predispositions and environmental exposures, and focus on sustained pathogenic exposures and responses.

  5. Disease: H01108 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available glycoprotein IV (CD36) deficiency may be related to the phenotypic expression of the metabolic syndrome and is frequent...ly associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. CD36 deficiency is relatively frequent

  6. Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Rachel H; Kuller, Lewis H; Moreland, Larry W

    2017-02-01

    Evidence suggests the greater than 1.5 increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is related to an accelerated burden of subclinical atherosclerosis that develops before the diagnosis of RA. Dyslipidemia in RA is better quantified by lipoproteins and apolipoproteins than cholesterol levels. Current risk factors likely underestimate CVD risk partly by underestimating prior risk factor levels. To reduce CVD risk in RA, control disease activity and aggressively treat CVD risk factors. Some of the two-fold higher risk of heart failure and total mortality in RA may be due to myocardial disease caused by inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pattern of cardiovascular disease admissions in the medical wards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akubudike Alikor

    ABSTRACT. Background: Cardiovascular disease as a leading contributor to global disease burden has shown an .... DomingnezLJ,GaliotoA,FerlisiA,Pineo A, Putignario E, Belvedera M Ageing, lifestyle modifications and cardiovascular disease in developing countries. J. Nutr Health Aging. 2006; 10. (2): 143 9. 11. Osuafor ...

  8. Cardiovascular disease in women : an epidemiological study of atherogenic factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractCardiovascular disease is generally considered to be a disorder of men. One reason for this is the low incidence of the disease in women at younger age. At older age. however. cardiovascular disease also becomes the most important cause of mortality in women: at age 40. 15% of the

  9. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddy, K.S.; Katan, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are growing contributors to global disease burdens, with epidemics of CVD advancing across many regions of the world which are experiencing a rapid health transition. Diet and nutrition have been extensively investigated as risk factors for major cardiovascular diseases

  10. Cardiovascular diseases in Patients with Bipolar disease: Pragmatic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Cátia; Jesus, Inês; Agius, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD), also known as manic-depressive illness, is a condition characterized by unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Bipolar disorder is known to be a chronic and disabling disease associated with higher incidence of obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemias, hypertension and tobacco use which all together are known risk factors for the development of Cardiovascular diseases. With this research we wish to collect evidence to show how Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) affect Patients with Bipolar disease, the burden it can have in patients lives, to understand how this problem has been assessed so far and present suggestions that may improve the health care of these patients. Our study is a literature based research. With our study we concluded that patients with BD are at higher risk of CVD and at an earlier age compared with the general population. Also, there is a lack of proper monitoring and consideration of the cardiovascular risk factors in patients with Bipolar disorder whether by primary care physicians or psychiatrists even though it plays a critical role in the general outcome of this patients and also leads to increase in mortality and morbidity rates.

  11. [A PhD completed. Periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease: a Bermuda triangle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeuw, W J

    2017-10-01

    The relationship among periodontitis, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is complex and can be thought of as a Bermuda triangle. A relationship has been demonstrated between periodontitis, a worsening in the condition of the vascular system and an increased total level of inflammatory markers. Patients with severe periodontitis also show raised levels of glycosylated haemoglobin. This means that severe periodontitis can be an early indication of diabetes mellitus. Periodontal treatment generally promotes improved blood sugar regulation in diabetes patients, an improved condition of the vascular system and a decrease in the total levels of inflammation. Factors such as genetics, lifestyle and the presence of other chronic co-morbidities contribute to the complexity of this relationship. For the treatment of severe periodontitis, interdisciplinary cooperation among dentists, general practitioners and internists is therefore recommended.

  12. Relationship between vascular endothelium and periodontal disease in atherosclerotic lesions: Review article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Aurélio Lumertz Saffi Mariana Vargas Furtado Carisi Anne Polanczyk Márlon Munhoz Montenegro Ingrid Webb Josephson Ribeiro Cassio Kampits Alex Nogueira Haas Cassiano Kuchenbecker R?sing Eneida Rejane Rabelo-Silva

    2015-01-01

    .... Recent studies suggest that periodontal infection and the ensuing increase in the levels of inflammatory markers may be associated with myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease...

  13. Subjective Versus Objective Estimated Cardiovascular Disease Risk and Adherence to Physical Activity in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nadia; Miller, Arlene; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis

    2017-07-18

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for African American (AA) women in the United States. Despite high prevalence of CVD risk factors, AA women perceive their CVD risk as low. Our objectives were to (1) identify relationships between subjective (self-reported perceived) CVD risk and objective CVD risk estimated by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD) risk estimator, (2) identify demographic and psychosocial factors associated with subjective perceived risk and discrepancy with objective estimated CVD risk, and (3) determine whether subjective perceived CVD risk was associated with physical activity (PA) adherence. This was a secondary data analysis of data collected from a 12-month lifestyle PA intervention conducted with 281 AA women. Subjective perceived CVD risk was measured by 1 question; objective estimated CVD risk was calculated using the ASCVD score. Women were categorized by congruence or discrepancy between subjective perceived and objective estimated CVD risk. Subjective perceived CVD risk and objective ASCVD risk scores were both low. Approximately 20% subjectively perceived their risk as lower than objective ASCVD scores. Atherosclerotic CVD risk discrepancy groups differed by depressed mood symptoms. Participants reported many perceived barriers to PA. Perceived CVD risk was not related to PA adherence. The significance of associated CVD risk factors may be underestimated by AA women, leading to discrepancy between subjective and objective risk estimates. Research is needed to clarify relationships among perceived risk, estimated risk using risk calculators such as ASCVD, and health behavior.

  14. Association of vitamin D deficiency with coronary artery disease in Mexican population: Genetics of atherosclerotic disease (GEA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bautista, Fabiola; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; Juárez-Rojas, Juan Gabriel; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the independent association between vitamin D deficiency (VDD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) in Mexican adult population. Matched case-control study. Data cardiovascular on risk factors, medication use, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking and vitamin D consumption were obtained. Biochemical variables, anthropometric and blood pressure were measured. 25(OH)D was quantified by chemiluminescence. We studied 250 patients with established CAD and 250 age-gender-body mass index (BMI) matched control subjects, with a mean age of 53 ± 6.1 years and BMI of 28 ± 3.5 kg/m(2). Deficiency of 25(OH)D was significantly higher in the control group (21.2 vs. 16%). Multiple logistic regression analysis did not show association between VDD and CAD (OR: 1.37 [0.08-23.2]). Multiple linear regression analysis also showed that statin use (b = 2.2; p = 0.004) and no alcohol use (b = -1.8; p = 0.03) significantly increased 25(OH)D levels. No independent association between VDD and the presence of coronary artery disease was found in Mexican adult population. The results suggest that treatment with statins and absence of alcohol consumption, might be the explanation for the higher concentrations of 25(OH)D observed in patients with CAD.

  15. Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease with a Mediterranean diet

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-González, M.A et al.; Martínez, J.A.; Basora, J.; Pintó, X.; Serra-Majem, L.; Lamuela-Raventos, R.M.; Lapetra, J.; Fiol, M.; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, V.; Gómez-Gracia, E.; Arós, F.; Corella, D.; Covas, M.-I.; Salas-Salvadó, J.; Ros, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational cohort studies and a secondary prevention trial have shown an inverse association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular risk. We conducted a randomized trial of this diet pattern for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events. METHODS: In a multicenter trial in Spain, we randomly assigned participants who were at high cardiovascular risk, but with no cardiovascular disease at enrollment, to one of three diets: a Mediterranean di...

  16. Sleep: Important Considerations for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Michael A.; Alfonso-Miller, Pamela; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Shetty, Safal; Shenoy, Sundeep; Combs, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Sleep plays many roles in maintenance of cardiovascular health. This review summarizes the literature across several areas of sleep and sleep disorders in relation to cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Current Findings Insufficient sleep duration is prevalent in the population and is associated with weight gain and obesity, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and mortality. Insomnia is also highly present and represents an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, especially when accompanied by short sleep duration. Sleep apnea is a well-characterized risk factor for cardiometabolic disease and cardiovascular mortality. Other issues are relevant as well. For example, sleep disorders in pediatric populations may convey cardiovascular risks. Also, sleep may play an important role in cardiovascular health disparities. Summary Sleep and sleep disorders are implicated in cardiometabolic disease risk. This review addresses these and other issues, concluding with recommendations for research and clinical practice. PMID:27467177

  17. The importance of selected spices in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kulczyński

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Literature data indicate that, due to these diseases, approximately 17.5 million people died in 2012. Types of cardiovascular disease include ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, congenital heart disease, rheumatic heart disease, cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia. Proper nutrition is an important factor in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. An interesting element of our diets is spices. For thousands of years, they have been used in the treatment of many diseases: bacterial infections, coughs, colds, and liver diseases. Many studies also demonstrate their antioxidant, chemopreventive, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. This paper focuses on discussing the importance of selected spices (garlic, cinnamon, ginger, coriander and turmeric in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. [Impact of CYP2C19 genotype and platelet function on clinical outcome in coronary atherosclerotic heart diseases patients received clopidogrel post percutaneous coronary intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Zhang, X X; Tian, L; Jiang, J J; Xu, L; Huang, Y L; Liu, H; Li, Y S

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To analyze association of CYP2C19 genotype and platelet function phenotype and their impact on clinical outcomes including bleeding events of coronary artery disease(CAD) patients received clopidogrel post percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI). Methods: Coronary atherosclerotic heart diseases patients underwent elective PCI and coronary stent implantation in Fuwai hospital were prospectively enrolled during May 2012 to April 2013. Patients were assigned into groups by genotype of CYP2C19 (extensive metabolizers, intermediate metabolizers, and poor metabolizers) and phenotype of platelet function (clopidogrel responders, semi-responders, and non-responders). The rates of major adverse cardiovascular events, combined cardiovascular events, and bleeding events were recorded during a at least 12 months follow-up period and compared among above defined groups. The association between genotype or phenotype and clinical outcome was assessed using multivariable Cox regression hazards model. Results: Three hundred and eighty patients received coronary stent implantation and met the inclusion criteria of the study, including 157(41.3%) clopidogrel extensive metabolizers, 176(46.3%) intermediate metabolizers, and 47(12.4%) poor metabolizers according to the genotype grouping; 98(25.8%) were responders to clopidogrel, 149(39.2%) were semi-responders, and 133 (35.0%) were non-responders according to the phenotype grouping. Three hundred and seventy-six patients accomplished follow-up. The highest combined cardiovascular events rate was observed in the poor metabolizers (34.0%(16/47)) as compared to the intermediate metabolizers (19.0%(33/174), P=0.026) and the extensive metabolizers (15.5%(24/155), P=0.005). The highest bleeding events rate was observed in the clopidogrel responders (33.7%(33/98)) as compared to the semi-responders (18.9%(28/149), P=0.008) and non-responders (17.7%(23/130), P=0.008). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, the adjusted risk of

  19. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A P; Aggarwal, K K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardioceuticals are nutritional supplements that contain all the essential nutrients including vitamins, minerals, omega-3-fatty acids and other antioxidants like a-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 in the right proportion that provide all round protection to the heart by reducing the most common risks associated with the cardiovascular disease including high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels and factors that contribute to coagulation of blood. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to significantly reduce the risk for sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmias and all-cause mortality in patients with known coronary heart disease. Omega-3 fatty acids are also used to treat hyperlipidemia and hypertension. There are no significant drug interactions with omega-3 fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends consumption of two servings of fish per week for persons with no history of coronary heart disease and at least one serving of fish daily for those with known coronary heart disease. Approximately 1 g/day of eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid is recommended for cardio protection. Higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids are required to reduce elevated triglyceride levels (2-4 g/day). Modest decreases in blood pressure occur with significantly higher dosages of omega-3 fatty acids.

  20. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  1. Perceptions of risk: understanding cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Ruth; Heeley, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the leading cause of death and disability worldwide despite the availability of well-established and effective preventive options. Accurate perception of a patient's risk by both the patient and the doctors is important as this is one of the components that determine health-related behavior. Doctors tend to not use cardiovascular (CV) risk calculators and underestimate the absolute CV risk of their patients. Patients show optimistic bias when considering their own risk and consistently underestimate it. Poor patient health literacy and numeracy must be considered when thinking about this problem. Patients must possess a reasonably high level of understanding of numerical processes when doctors discuss risk, a level that is not possessed by large numbers of the population. In order to overcome this barrier, doctors need to utilize various tools including the appropriate use of visual aids to accurately communicate risk with their patients. Any intervention has been shown to be better than nothing in improving health understanding. The simple process of repeatedly conveying risk information to a patient has been shown to improve accuracy of risk perception. Doctors need to take responsibility for the accurate assessment and effective communication of CV risk in their patients in order to improve patient uptake of cardioprotective lifestyle choices and preventive medications.

  2. Cardio-Vascular Disease and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mitchell-Fearon DrPh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the level of utilization of clinical preventive services by older adults in Jamaica and to identify independent factors associated with utilization. Method: A nationally representative, community-based survey of 2,943 older adults was undertaken. Utilization frequency for six preventive, cardiovascular or cancer-related services was calculated. Logistic regression models were used to determine the independent factors associated with each service. Results: A dichotomy in annual utilization rates exists with cardiovascular services having much higher uptake than those for cancer (83.1% for blood pressure, 76.7% blood glucose, 68.1% cholesterol, 35.1% prostate, 11.3% mammograms, and 9.6% papanicolaou smears. Age, source of routine care, and having a chronic disease were most frequently associated with uptake. Discussion: Education of providers and patients on the need for utilizing preventive services in older adults is important. Improved access to services in the public sector may also help increase uptake of services.

  3. Autoimmune Aspects of Neurodegenerative and Psychiatric Diseases : A Template for innovative Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Peter; Klein, Hans C.; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases (NPDs) are today's most important group of diseases, surpassing both atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cancer in morbidity incidence. Although NPDs have a dramatic impact on our society because of their high incidence, mortality, and severe

  4. Knowledge of cardiovascular disease in Turkish undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badir, Aysel; Tekkas, Kader; Topcu, Serpil

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. However, there is not enough data exploring student nurses' understanding, knowledge, and awareness of cardiovascular disease. To investigate knowledge of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors among undergraduate nursing students, with an emphasis on understanding of cardiovascular disease as the primary cause of mortality and morbidity, both in Turkey and worldwide. This cross-sectional survey assessed 1138 nursing students enrolled in nursing schools in Istanbul, Turkey. Data were collected using the Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Knowledge Level (CARRF-KL) scale and questions from the Individual Characteristics Form about students' gender, age, level of education, and family cardiovascular health history, as well as smoking and exercise habits. Respondents demonstrated a high level of knowledge about cardiovascular disease, with years of education (p students were not aware that cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of mortality and morbidity in Turkey and worldwide. The majority of the respondents' body mass index (87%) and waist circumference values (females: 90.3%, males: 94.7%) were in the normal range and most were non-smokers (83.7%). However, more than half of the students did not exercise regularly and had inadequate dietary habits. Although students were knowledgeable about cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors, there were significant gaps in their knowledge; these should be addressed through improved nursing curricula. While students were generally healthy, they could improve their practice of health-promoting behaviors. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  5. Which people should take aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Lozano,1 Maria-Esther Franco21Pharmacy Department, 2Haematology Department, Hospital Real de Nuestra Señora de Gracia, Zaragoza, SpainDear editorA single trial, ISIS-2,1 in 1988, demonstrated the utility of daily aspirin in the setting of acute myocardial infarction, reducing the risk of vascular death by 23%. In addition, aspirin has also proven effective in the setting of acute ischemic stroke.2 Thus, for a subset of the general population, aspirin may help to prevent heart attacks and strokes. In fact, at low doses, in the range of 75 to 100 mg per day, aspirin prevents the progression of existing cardiovascular disease (CVD, including coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease, and reduces the frequency of cardiovascular events in patients with history of CVD,3,4 referred to as secondary prevention.Although the benefits of aspirin for secondary prevention of CVD are well known, its use in primary prevention of CVD, defined as prevention of the first occurrence of CVD for all patients without clinical CVD, including those with diabetes mellitus and those without clinical evidence of atherosclerotic disease who are at higher CVD risk, is less clear and controversial results have been obtained. In fact, the results of several studies using aspirin for primary prevention of CVD have generally shown more modest reductions of major vascular events compared with secondary prevention (12% vs 23%.3,5

  6. Current smoking is associated with extracranial carotid atherosclerotic stenosis but not with intracranial large artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ruijun; Pan, Yuesong; Yan, Hongyi; Zhang, Runhua; Liu, Gaifen; Wang, Penglian; Wang, Yilong; Li, Hao; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-26

    Accumulating evidence has shown that cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear about the potential mechanisms through which cigarette smoking affects stroke risk. In the study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between cigarette smoking and the occurrence of extracranial (ECAS) and intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). We analyzed patients enrolled in the Chinese intracranial atherosclerosis (CICAS), which was a prospective, multicenter, hospital-based cohort study. Smoking status was classified into never, former and current smoking. For those patients with current smoking, data on time duration (year) and extent (the number of cigarette smoked per day) was recorded and pack year of smoking was calculated. ICAS was evaluated with 3-dimentional time-of-flight MRA and ECAS was evaluated with cervical ultrasonography or contrast-enhanced MRA. Multivariable Logistic regression was performed to identify the association between smoking status and the occurrence of ECAS and ICAS. A total of 2656 patients (92.7%) of acute ischemic stroke and 208 (7.3%) of transient ischemic attack were analyzed. The mean age was 61.9 ± 11.2 and 67.8% were male. There were 141 (4.9%) patients had only ECAS, 1074 (37.5%) had only ICAS, and 261 (9.1%) had both ECAS and ICAS. Current smoking was significantly associated with the occurrence of ECAS (adjusted OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.09-1.99, P smoking increment, the risk of ECAS increased by 1.1% (adjusted OR = 1.011; 95% CI = 1.003-1.019; P = 0.005); with one cigarette smoked per day increment, the risk of ECAS increased by 1.0% (adjusted OR = 1.010; 95% CI = 1.001-1.020; P = 0.03); and with one pack year of smoking increment, the risk of ECAS increased by 0.7% (adjusted OR = 1.007; 95% CI = 1.002-1.012; P smoking status and the occurrence of ICAS. A dose-response relationship was identified between cigarette smoking and the occurrence of ECAS, but not ICAS

  7. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10. PMID:24067391

  8. Nutritional recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-09-17

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  9. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Henkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD. This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  10. HIV infection, aging and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W

    2011-01-01

    In the developed world, HIV infection is now well managed with very effective and less toxic antiretroviral treatment. HIV-positive patients therefore are living longer, but are now faced by challenges associated with aging. Several non-AIDS associated morbidities are increased in this population......, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is suggested that CVD occurs earlier among HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative patients, and at a higher rate. Several factors have been proposed to contribute to this. First, the traditional CVD risk factors are highly prevalent in this population....... High rates of smoking, dyslipidaemia and a family history of CVD have been reported. This population is also aging, with estimates of more than 25% of HIV-positive patients in the developed world being over the age of 50. Antiretroviral treatment, both through its effect on lipids and through other...

  11. Network topology reveals key cardiovascular disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anida Sarajlić

    Full Text Available The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and "driver genes." We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies "key" genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs.

  12. Prevention of cardiovascular disease: highlights for the clinician of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nanette K

    2014-04-01

    Prevention of cardiovascular disease, undoubtedly an emphasis of clinical care in 2014, will provide both opportunities and challenges to patients and their healthcare providers. The recently-released ACC/AHA guidelines on assessment of cardiovascular risk, lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk, management of overweight and obesity, and treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk, have introduced new concepts and revised prior conventional strategies. New to risk assessment are the Pooled Cohort Equations, targeting the expanded concept of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and focusing not solely on mortality but as well on major nonfatal events. The lifestyle management focuses on diet and physical activity for lipid and blood pressure control. The cholesterol guideline identifies four high-risk groups with the greatest benefits from statin therapy: preexisting ASCVD, primary LDL-C elevations ≥ 190 mm/dl, those 45-75 years with diabetes and LDL-C 70-189 mm/dl without clinical ASCVD, and those 40-75 years without clinical ASCVD with an LDL-C 70-189 mg/dl with a 7.5% or greater 10-year ASCVD risk. Eliminated are arbitrary LDL-C treatment targets, with individual patient risk status guiding who should take statins and the appropriate intensity of statin drugs. Patient-physician discussions of individual benefits and risks are paramount. Management of high blood pressure remains controversial, with two different expert panels offering varying treatment targets; there is general agreement on a <140/90 mmHg goal, but substantial disagreement on blood pressure targets for older adults. Clinicians and their patients deserve a well-researched concensus document. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Impact of exercise training on redox signaling in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Juliane C; Gomes, Kátia M S; Ferreira, Julio C B

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species regulate a wide array of signaling pathways that governs cardiovascular physiology. However, oxidant stress resulting from disrupted redox signaling has an adverse impact on the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we address how redox signaling and oxidant stress affect the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, hypertension and heart failure. We also summarize the benefits of exercise training in tackling the hyperactivation of cellular oxidases and mitochondrial dysfunction seen in cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Short review of dental care for patients with cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškar Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The basic knowledge about cardiovascular diseases (CVD s, the symptoms and complications that can occur during dental interventions in patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases, and how to handle such patients during the dental intervention are essential to every dentist. Dental patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases that are not adequately treated have a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular event during the dental intervention. Results: The most common cardiovascular diseases that need special dental care are: arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, heart rhythm disorders and heart failure. Conclusion: Particular attention is needed when patients are treated with anticoagulant and /or antiplatelet therapy or when prevention of bacterial endocarditis is required.

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus: the influence of disease-related and classical risk factors on intima media thickness and prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques--a preliminary report. Beneficial effect of immunosuppressive treatment on carotid intima media thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Bartłomiej; Kruszewski, Robert; Juszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Raczkiewicz, Anna; Bachta, Artur; Kłos, Krzysztof; Duda, Krzysztof; Saracyn, Marek; Szymański, Konrad; Młozniak-Cieśla, Agnieszka; Grabowska-Jodkowska, Agnieszka; Olesińska, Marzena; Bogusławska-Walecka, Romana; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Płoski, Rafał; Tłustochowicz, Witold

    2015-04-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A meta-analysis showed increased carotid intima media thickness (IMT) in SLE. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different SLE characteristics and treatment regimens on IMT and atherosclerotic plaques. One hundred and three SLE patients and 95 age- and sex-matched control subjects were included in the study. MT was measured in the common carotid arteries bilaterally. Common carotid arteries, internal carotid arteries and superficial femoral arteries were also screened for the presence of plaques. The presence of plaques was correlated with age (P = 0.00002), male sex (P = 0.034), Framingham 10-year risk score (P body mass index (P = 0.026), Framingham 10-year risk score (P < 0.001), total cholesterol concentration (P = 0.002), LDL cholesterol concentration (P = 0.007), SLICC/ACR (P = 0.035), hypertension (P = 0.002), immunologic disorder (P = 0.00008) and discontinuous treatment with immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.043). We found a correlation between atherosclerosis and several classical cardiovascular risk factors and disease-related factors. A beneficial effect of continuous immunosuppressive treatment on IMT suggests that appropriate disease control with steroid-sparing agents may protect against atherosclerosis in SLE patients.

  16. Extra virgin olive oil and cardiovascular diseases: benefits for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocella, Cristina; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Fianchini, Luca; D'Amico, Alessandra; Novo, Marta; Castellani, Valentina; Stefanini, Lucia; Violi, Francesco; Carnevale, Roberto

    2017-11-14

    The cardioprotective properties of Mediterranean Diet were demonstrated for the first time from the Seven Country Study. In the last few decades, numerous epidemiological studies, as well as intervention trial, confirmed this observation, pointing out the close relationship between the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular diseases. In this context, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), the most representative component of this diet, seems to be relevant in lowering the incidence of cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke. From a chemical point of view, 98-99% of the total weight of EVOO is represented by fatty acids, especially monounsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid. Tocopherols, polyphenols and other minor constituents represent the remaining 1-2%. All these components may potentially contribute to "health maintenance" with their beneficial effects by EVOOO. Studies that examined the effect of EVOO supplementation in healthy subjects and in individuals at cardiovascular risk were included. The studies analyzed demonstrated the role of EVOO as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and vasodilatory nutrient that may contribute to lower the atherosclerotic burden. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Blood donation and cardiovascular disease. Addressing the healthy donor effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peffer, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the possible protective effect of frequent blood donation on cardiovascular disease was studied. Previous research has shown that high iron stores could have damaging effects on developing cardiovascular disease, and that blood donation lowers iron stores. Lowering iron stores

  18. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Keller, Tymen; Romualdi, Erica; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for those at high risk and those with established cardiovascular disease. To quantify the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel

  19. Cardiovascular disease in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzangs, Nicole; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; van Hout, Hein P. J.; de Jonge, Peter; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Background: Associations between depression, and possibly anxiety, with cardiovascular disease have been established in the general population and among heart patients. This study examined whether cardiovascular disease was more prevalent among a large cohort of depressed and/or anxious persons. In

  20. Diet-sensitive prognostic markers for cardiovascular and renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen, Ineke Jowanna

    2016-01-01

    Diet plays a relevant role in the development and progression of lifestyle-related diseases like hypertension and type 2 diabetes and the subsequent risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Riphagen used several diet-sensitive biomarkers to further explore the effects of diet on cardiovascular and

  1. Relationship between diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is increasing in most developing countries, especially in urban settings. Despite this increasing trend, there is limited data on the association between diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors in Tanzania. Objective: To assess the frequency of intake of various ...

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors and non-communicable diseases in Abia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is limited population based data on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and non-communicable diseases in Nigeria, and Abia state in particular. Aims: The purpose of this survey was to determine the burden of non-communicable diseases as well as associated cardiovascular risk factors in the ...

  3. Knowledge and awareness of risk factors for cardiovascular disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As these statistics indicate, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the world. In South Africa, through urbanisation and changes in lifestyle and dietary habits, the prevalence of risk factors and, by extension, the resulting morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in black people, are expected ...

  4. the metabolic syndrome among patients with cardiovascular disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of occurrence of the Metabolic Syndrome among patients presenting with cardiovascular disease at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Methods: This was a case-control study of 100 con-secutive cardiovascular disease patients and 100 age- and sex- matched controls who ...

  5. Towards microRNA-based therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The major risk factors currently associated with cardiovascular diseases will continuously increase these numbers, especially in developing countries, which will lead to a steep increase in mortality

  6. Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Michael V; Simon, Tabassome; Exeter, Holly J

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease.......This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease....

  7. Tobacco use and the cardiovascular disease epidemic in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the role of smoking on cardiovascular disease and effects of anti-smoking legislation on admission due to acute myocardial infarction. Research method/Methodology: PubMed and manual search strategies using the search words 'tobacco and cardiovascular disease' were ...

  8. The Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease in the Lagos State, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis, which examines the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (ICD 9: 390-459) in Lagos State of Nigeria, was based on records obtained from the register of deaths in four Local Government Areas of the State. The result shows that there is general increase in death rates due to cardiovascular diseases over the ...

  9. Data on the lipoprotein (a, coronary atherosclerotic burden and vulnerable plaque phenotype in angiographic obstructive coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Niccoli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein Lp(a represents an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD. However, its association with CAD burden and lipid rich plaques prone to rupture in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS still remains unknown. These data aim to investigate the association among serum Lipoprotein(a (Lpa levels, coronary atherosclerotic burden and features of culprit plaque in patients with ACS and obstructive CAD. For his reason, a total of 500 ACS patients were enrolled for the angiographic cohort and 51 ACS patients were enrolled for the optical coherence tomography (OCT cohort. Angiographic CAD severity was assessed by Sullivan score and by Bogaty score including stenosis score and extent index, whereas OCT plaque features were evaluated at the site of the minimal lumen area and along the culprit segment. In the angiographic cohort, Lp(a was a weak independent predictor of Sullivan score (p30 md/dl compared to patients with lower Lp(a levels (<30 md/dl exhibited a higher prevalence of lipidic plaque at the site of the culprit stenosis (P=0.02, a wider lipid arc (p=0.003 and a higher prevalence of thin-cap fibroatheroma (p=0.004

  10. Endemic Cardiovascular Diseases of the Poorest Billion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Gene F; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mocumbi, Ana O; Miranda, J Jaime; Ezzati, Majid; Jain, Yogesh; Robles, Gisela; Benjamin, Emelia J; Subramanian, S V; Bukhman, Gene

    2016-06-14

    The poorest billion people are distributed throughout the world, though most are concentrated in rural sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) data can be sparse in low- and middle-income countries beyond urban centers. Despite this urban bias, CVD registries from the poorest countries have long revealed a predominance of nonatherosclerotic stroke, hypertensive heart disease, nonischemic and Chagas cardiomyopathies, rheumatic heart disease, and congenital heart anomalies, among others. Ischemic heart disease has been relatively uncommon. Here, we summarize what is known about the epidemiology of CVDs among the world's poorest people and evaluate the relevance of global targets for CVD control in this population. We assessed both primary data sources, and the 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study modeled estimates in the world's 16 poorest countries where 62% of the population are among the poorest billion. We found that ischemic heart disease accounted for only 12% of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in the poorest countries, compared with 51% of DALYs in high-income countries. We found that as little as 53% of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly burden (1629/3049 DALYs per 100 000) was attributed to behavioral or metabolic risk factors in the poorest countries (eg, in Niger, 82% of the population among the poorest billion) compared with 85% of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly burden (4439/5199 DALYs) in high-income countries. Further, of the combined CVD and congenital heart anomaly burden, 34% was accrued in people under age 30 years in the poorest countries, while only 3% is accrued under age 30 years in high-income countries. We conclude although the current global targets for noncommunicable disease and CVD control will help diminish premature CVD death in the poorest populations, they are not sufficient. Specifically, the current framework (1) excludes deaths of

  11. [Nursing care in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enç, Nuray; Öz Alkan, Havva

    2017-09-01

    Aging is a process that has biological, physiological, psychological, sociological and chronological dimensions and can be defined from different directions. The incidence of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, heart failure, dysrhythmia and heart valve diseases is increasing with age. Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in people over 65 years of age. It also causes serious health problems and poses a significant burden on the health care system. Nurses have important responsibilities in the care of the elderly patients with cardiovascular system disease. Appropriate nursing care for elderly patient provides positive contributions to patient care outcomes.

  12. Disturbed tryptophan metabolism in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, H; Stelzer, I; Reininghaus, E Z; Weghuber, D; Postolache, T T; Fuchs, D

    2014-06-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), a major pathologic consequence of obesity, is the main etiological factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the most common cause of death in the western world. A systemic chronic low grade immune- mediated inflammation (scLGI) is substantially implicated in AS and its consequences. In particular, proinflammatory cytokines play a major role, with Th1-type cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) being a key mediator. Among various other molecular and cellular effects, IFN-γ activates the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in monocyte-derived macrophages, dendritic, and other cells, which, in turn, decreases serum levels of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP). Thus, people with CVD often have increased serum kynurenine to tryptophan ratios (KYN/TRP), a result of an increased TRP breakdown. Importantly, increased KYN/TRP is associated with a higher likelihood of fatal cardiovascular events. A scLGI with increased production of the proinflammatory adipokine leptin, in combination with IFN-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), represents another central link between obesity, AS, and CVD. Leptin has also been shown to contribute to Th1-type immunity shifting, with abdominal fat being thus a direct contributor to KYN/TRP ratio. However, TRP is not only an important source for protein production but also for the generation of one of the most important neurotransmitters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), by the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent TRP 5-hydroxylase. In prolonged states of scLGI, availability of free serum TRP is strongly diminished, affecting serotonin synthesis, particularly in the brain. Additionally, accumulation of neurotoxic KYN metabolites such as quinolinic acid produced by microglia, can contribute to the development of depression via NMDA glutamatergic stimulation. Depression had been reported to be associated with CVD endpoints, but it most likely represents only a secondary loop connecting excess adipose tissue, scLGI and

  13. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  14. Obesity and cardiovascular disease: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Després, Jean-Pierre; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2016-12-21

    Obesity is currently one of the greatest public health issues worldwide. However, despite its known deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and its association with numerous cardiovascular diseases (CVD), recent findings leading to the development of concepts such as metabolically healthy obesity, the obesity paradox, and protective subcutaneous fat depots have raised a lively debate on the disparate effects of obesity on health outcomes. Regarding the concept of metabolically healthy obesity, by presumably labelling a subset of obese people as metabolically healthy, physicians may not feel pressed to curb the current obesity epidemic and prevent the next generation of people from becoming obese. Another issue is that the most commonly used anthropometric index to define obesity, the body mass index, is at the core of the controversy because of its limitations including its inability to discriminate between fat mass and muscle mass. Many recent epidemiological and metabolic studies have used other indices such as waist-hip ratio, waist circumference, and imaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) measurements of visceral adiposity and of ectopic fat depots. In addition, emerging evidence supports the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness, skeletal muscle mass and strength in patients with obesity as useful variables to predict CVD risk beyond adiposity. In this review, we will discuss the complex and disparate effects of obesity on CVD, particularly focusing on whether, under given circumstances, it could be harmful, potentially harmless or neutral, or even possibly protective. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk: epidemiology, mechanisms, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Jafar, Tazeen H; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; Mann, Johannes F; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Wen, Chi Pang

    2013-07-27

    Since the first description of the association between chronic kidney disease and heart disease, many epidemiological studies have confirmed and extended this finding. As chronic kidney disease progresses, kidney-specific risk factors for cardiovascular events and disease come into play. As a result, the risk for cardiovascular disease is notably increased in individuals with chronic kidney disease. When adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, impaired kidney function and raised concentrations of albumin in urine increase the risk of cardiovascular disease by two to four times. Yet, cardiovascular disease is frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated in patients with chronic kidney disease. This group of patients should, therefore, be acknowledged as having high cardiovascular risk that needs particular medical attention at an individual level. This view should be incorporated in the development of guidelines and when defining research priorities. Here, we discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease, and discuss methods of prevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. YKL-40: a new biomarker in cardiovascular disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Henningsen, Kristoffer Mads Aaris; Harutyunyan, Marina Jurjevna

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in the form of coronary artery disease is the most common cause of death in western countries. Early treatment with stabilizing drugs and mechanical revascularization by percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary bypass surgery has reduced the mortality significantly....... But in spite of improved treatments, many patients are still plagued by a high frequency of angina symptoms, hospitalizations and a poor prognosis. There is a need for new independent or supplementary biomarkers that can help to predict cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events earlier and more...... precisely, and thus accompany existing biomarkers in both primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. One such potential new biomarker is the protein YKL-40. As an independent biomarker in both cardiovascular diseases and noncardiovascular diseases, current evidence suggests YKL-40 to be most useful...

  17. Exercise training for patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, J M; Gremeaux, V; Damak, S; Feki, A; Pérennou, D

    2007-07-01

    This review surveys effort training, a validated and recommended therapy, in patients with atheromatous cardiovascular disease. This true therapy reduces mortality by 25-35%, reduces clinical manifestations and complications (rhythm problems, thrombosis) and improves physical capacity, reintegration and quality of life. The effects are essentially linked to improved metabolic performance of muscles and reduced endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and neurohormonal abnormalities. Training also has an impact on the evolution of major risk factors, especially diabetes and arterial hypertension. The risks are limited as long as the contraindications are respected and the programmes supervised. The indications (stable angina, chronic heart failure, peripheral arterial disease) should be described more precisely by taking into account functional criteria: physical deconditioning, exclusion, compliance, mood swings, and seriousness of risk factors. The training programme should be tailor made and based on evaluation of the patient's adaptation to effort, in terms of frequency, intensity and duration of the exercises. Various types of exercise include overall or segmental physical training; concentric, eccentric, even isokinetic muscle contraction exercises; and proprioceptive rehabilitation. However, knowledge is lacking about the molecular mechanisms of the effects of training, the most effective intensity of effort, and strategies to develop physical activity in this ever-growing population for both primary and secondary prevention.

  18. Chemerin in renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-02-01

    The potential involvement of chemerin in cardiovascular and renal dysfunction has recently been acknowledged. There are indeed many links between this protein and inflammation, atherosclerosis, and multiple obesity- and diabetes-related parameters such as body mass index, insulin resistance, and blood levels of insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose. In addition, in the last few years, several repor